IN FRANCE: TWITTER USED FOR ePAYMENTS OF DEBTS IN BANK USING
S-Money   

OCT 17 --PHOTO: CEO of Paris-based bank’s e-payment unit S-Money Nicolas Chatillon, left, and CEO of BPCE, France’s second largest bank group, Jean-Yves Forel, left, attend a press conference in Paris, Tuesday. AP PARIS—Did someone spot you money for lunch two weeks ago? In France, Twitter users can now publicly repay debts, donate to charity or chip in for a gift with a new payment service backed by the country’s second-largest banking service. Group BPCE, which includes Banque Populaire and Caisses d’Epargne, announced the service — called S-money — on Tuesday. Users tweet a payment request to S-money, which then requires an authentication code before sending the amount — and a tweet to the destination confirming the payment for all the world to see.

“We think that this is quite interesting for the Twitter user to be able to communicate the financial transactions that he has made,” said Armand Dos Santos, chief technical officer for S-money. The service only works between people who have French bank cards and cell phone numbers, in a country that prizes discretion for personal spending. Transactions are limited to 250 euros when paying a Twitter user and 500 euros when sending money to charities or crowd-funding.
“It happens to everybody … you don’t have cash to pay a babysitter. If she has an S-money account, it will be easy to exchange with her and pay her with a simple tweet,” said Olivier Gonzalez, CEO ofTwitter France. Only, that is, if you and the babysitter want everyone to know the going rate. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: Twitter to partner with French bank on payment service  

One of France’s largest banks is teaming up with social network Twitter Inc. TWTR -0.14% this week to allow its customers to transfer money via tweets. The move by Groupe BPCE, France’s second-largest bank by customers, coincides with Twitter’s own push into the world of online payments as the social network seeks new sources of revenue beyond advertising. Twitter is racing other tech giants Apple AAPL 2.72% and Facebook FB 2.26% to get a foothold in new payment services for mobile phones or apps. They are collaborating and, in some cases, competing with banks and credit card issuers that have run the business for decades.

The bank said last month it was prepared to offer simple person-to-person money transfers via Twitter to French consumers, regardless of what bank they use, and without requiring the sender know the recipient’s banking details. “(S-Money) offers Twitter users in France a new way to send each other money, irrespective of their bank and without having to enter the beneficiary’s bank details, with a simple tweet,” Nicolas Chatillon, chief executive of S-Money, BPCE’s mobile payments unit, said in the statement. S-Money is a BPCE service which allows money transfers via text message and relies on the credit-card industry’s data security standards. BPCE and Twitter will hold a news conference in Paris on Tuesday to unveil the service. * READ MORE...

(ALSO) SAFE ONLINE SHOPPING: 10 TIPS TO AVOID GETTING BURNED

You need to buy some gifts. You need to buy them quickly. You can (a) brave the madness of holiday retail shopping at your local mall, rife with screaming children and airborne contagions, or (b) kick back at home and buy all your gifts online, accompanied by nothing more obnoxious than a warm cup of cocoa—or a cold glass of wine. We'll take the online shopping option. We're civilized adults at PCWorld, and we're not interested in rubbing shoulders with rabid mall zombies unless we have to. But the world of online shopping isn't all hot chocolate and chardonnay. Buying gifts via a Web browser certainly speeds up one's shopping regimen, but it also bears risks. 10 TIPS --- * READ MORE...

Facebook CEO Zuckerberg speaks Chinese; Beijing students cheer 

BEIJING — China may ban Facebook, but not its co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, and he entertained an audience of students with a 30-minute chat in his recently learned Mandarin Chinese at a prestigious Beijing university. Facebook is suing several law firms that represented Paul Ceglia, a man who claimed he owned half of the social network and was entitled to billions of dollars from the company and Zuckerberg. There was no explicit discussion of the ban or any Facebook effort to enter the China market during Wednesday’s question-and-answer session at Tsinghua University. But Facebook CEO Zuckerberg noted during his talk that the social media giant already helps some Chinese companies gain customers abroad. He cited computer maker Lenovo’s ads on Facebook in India.

Zuckerberg married Chinese-American Priscilla Chan in 2012 and said he was learning Chinese. His pronunciation was far from fluent, but he maintained the conversation for a half hour and the students responded with warm cheers for his effort and laughter at his humor.THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Twitter to be used for payments in France


CEO of Paris-based bank’s e-payment unit S-Money Nicolas Chatillon, left, and CEO of BPCE, France's second largest bank group, Jean-Yves Forel, left, attend a press conference in Paris, Tuesday. AP

PARIS, FRANCE, OCTOBER 27, 2014 (ASSOCIATED PRESS) POSTED October 15th, 2014 - Did someone spot you money for lunch two weeks ago?

In France, Twitter users can now publicly repay debts, donate to charity or chip in for a gift with a new payment service backed by the country’s second-largest banking service.

Group BPCE, which includes Banque Populaire and Caisses d’Epargne, announced the service — called S-money — on Tuesday.

Users tweet a payment request to S-money, which then requires an authentication code before sending the amount — and a tweet to the destination confirming the payment for all the world to see.

“We think that this is quite interesting for the Twitter user to be able to communicate the financial transactions that he has made,” said Armand Dos Santos, chief technical officer for S-money.

The service only works between people who have French bank cards and cell phone numbers, in a country that prizes discretion for personal spending. Transactions are limited to 250 euros when paying a Twitter user and 500 euros when sending money to charities or crowd-funding.

“It happens to everybody … you don’t have cash to pay a babysitter. If she has an S-money account, it will be easy to exchange with her and pay her with a simple tweet,” said Olivier Gonzalez, CEO ofTwitter France.

Only, that is, if you and the babysitter want everyone to know the going rate.

FROM FORTUNE MAGAZINE ONLINE

Twitter to partner with French bank on payment service by Reuters @FortuneMagazine OCTOBER 13, 2014, 8:06 AM EDT E-mail Tweet Facebook Google Plus Linkedin

New service builds on last month’s roll-out of “Twitter Buy”

One of France’s largest banks is teaming up with social network Twitter Inc. TWTR -0.14% this week to allow its customers to transfer money via tweets.

The move by Groupe BPCE, France’s second-largest bank by customers, coincides with Twitter’s own push into the world of online payments as the social network seeks new sources of revenue beyond advertising.

Twitter is racing other tech giants Apple AAPL 2.72% and Facebook FB 2.26% to get a foothold in new payment services for mobile phones or apps. They are collaborating and, in some cases, competing with banks and credit card issuers that have run the business for decades.

The bank said last month it was prepared to offer simple person-to-person money transfers via Twitter to French consumers, regardless of what bank they use, and without
requiring the sender know the recipient’s banking details.

“(S-Money) offers Twitter users in France a new way to send each other money, irrespective of their bank and without having to enter the beneficiary’s bank details, with a simple tweet,” Nicolas Chatillon, chief executive of S-Money, BPCE’s mobile payments unit, said in the statement.

S-Money is a BPCE service which allows money transfers via text message and relies on the credit-card industry’s data security standards.

BPCE and Twitter will hold a news conference in Paris on Tuesday to unveil the service.

* Last month, Twitter started trials of its own new service, dubbed “Twitter Buy”, to allow consumers to find and buy products on its social network. The service embeds a “Twitter Buy” button inside tweets posted by more than two dozen stores, music artists and non-profits. Burberry, Home Depot, and musicians such as Pharrell and Megadeth are among the early vendors.

Twitter’s role to date has been to connect customers rather than processing payments or checking their identities.

“From the Twitter point of view, there is a limit to their appetite for getting involved in payments processing itself,” said Andrew Copeman, a payments analyst with financial services research firm AITE Group, who is based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

“At the moment, banks are probably viewing Twitter and other social media networks as marketing channels to reach a wider set of their customers and to extend the bank’s existing mobile banking initiatives,” he said.

Twitter’s success in developing additional services on its platform as Facebook has done will be key to its future profitability.

Rakuten Bank in Japan offers a similar “Transfer by Facebook” service that lets users of its mobile banking app send money to anyone in their Facebook friends list.

Investors have been worried about Twitter’s slowing user growth, sending the shares down about 17% this year, while rival Facebook’s have climbed 35%.

Thomas Husson, a marketing strategy analyst with Forrester Research, said Twitter was likely to multiply efforts to explore new ways to generate revenue with banks and credit card firms.

“Twitter wants to more explicitly demonstrate the overall value of its network as an advertising platform,” he said.

FROM PCWORLD.COM

SAFE ONLINE SHOPPING: 10 TIPS TO AVOID GETTING BURNED  Mike Homnick Dec 10, 2012 3:30 AMe-mailprint

 

You need to buy some gifts. You need to buy them quickly. You can (a) brave the madness of holiday retail shopping at your local mall, rife with screaming children and airborne contagions, or (b) kick back at home and buy all your gifts online, accompanied by nothing more obnoxious than a warm cup of cocoa—or a cold glass of wine.

We'll take the online shopping option. We're civilized adults at PCWorld, and we're not interested in rubbing shoulders with rabid mall zombies unless we have to.

But the world of online shopping isn't all hot chocolate and chardonnay. Buying gifts via a Web browser certainly speeds up one's shopping regimen, but it also bears risks.

* Here are 10 easy ways to lock down your Web security this season, and still get all your shopping done in time.

1. Keep your browser updated

Start at the beginning. Whether you use Chrome, Firefox, or Internet Explorer, updating your browser will help to ensure that you’re getting the most up-to-date security protection.

Using Windows Update will take care of Internet Explorer. Firefox and Chrome should keep themselves current by automatically checking for updates.

To confirm whether you have the latest version of Firefox, click the Firefox tab in the top-left corner, find the help menu, and click About Firefox. In Chrome, click the settings button at the top-right corner of the window and click About Google Chrome; if you see a green checkmark, that means you have the latest version.

2. Install malware-protection software

Another thing to check before you binge-shop is your security software. The market has no shortage of utilities dedicated to protecting your computer from malicious attacks. G Data Internet Security, Norton Internet Security, and Bitdefender are all applications that have tested well at PCWorld.

You can even find plenty of free applications for protecting your computer from malware and Internet attacks that could result from an unfortunate online shopping session. The bottom line: Antimalware programs can't protect you from all attacks, and they certainly can't catch "social engineering" exploits. But in this day and age, it's silly not to use some sort of baseline protection.

3. Buy from reputable online stores and sellers

Look for this logo when checking a site's legitimacy. If you’ve never heard of the site you’re considering a purchase from, you have a number of ways to make sure it is legitimate.

Third-party organizations such as the Better Business Bureau Online and Truste give seals of approval to sites that meet their security and privacy standards.

Also, comparing products on sites like Bizrate can give you confidence that you're getting a fair price.

For example, searching for "iPad" on Bizrate provides a list of online retailers that sell the tablet, offering you an easy way to compare prices and read firsthand customer accounts of their experiences with specific retailers.

4. Look for the address-bar padlock symbol

A webpage should always be Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)-encrypted if you plan to use your credit card information to shop. SSL encryption ensures privacy by restricting the computers that can access the data being transferred, limiting access to you and the online retailer exclusively.

Most browsers indicate that the encryption is active with a padlock icon near the address bar, and the URL is preceded with https:// instead of http://, as shown below.


The padlock icon and 'https://' in Chrome.

5. Give out as little information as possible

Beware of nosy questions seeking personal information. For instance, a reputable online retailer will never need your Social Security number.

Generally it’s a good practice to give out the least amount of information the seller requires, so look over the required fields on forms and fill them out accordingly. Use the minimum number of fields that will allow your purchase to proceed.

6. Never give out your credit card number over email

It’s simple: Legitimate retailers will never ask for your credit card information or other sensitive personal details over email.

As mentioned above, the only time you should give out your credit card number and other personal info online is when you are on an SSL-encrypted webpage operated by a trusted retailer. (with the https://

7. Use online payment services such as PayPal

Services like PayPal, Bill Me Later, and PaySimple keep your credit-card information stored on a secure server, and then let you make purchases online without revealing your credit details to retailers.

PayPal also says that it monitors accounts for suspicious activity and covers most unauthorized transactions.

8. If shopping on a mobile device, stick to apps you know

Why power up the computer when you can shop easily from your smartphone?

Mobile shopping presents its own set of security issues, but a good rule of thumb is to use apps that came directly from retailers, and to make purchases inside those apps, if possible.

It's also wise to download apps only from sources you trust, such as the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Lastly, never make purchases over public, unsecured Wi-Fi. For example, connecting your phone to Starbucks' Wi-Fi and then shopping on Amazon could leave your personal information at risk.

9. Know your rights

In the United States, online purchases you make with a credit card are protected by the Fair Credit Billing Act, which limits your responsibility for fraudulent or erroneous charges to $50.

Consumers are required to write a physical letter within 60 days detailing any complaint to the retailer, with a return receipt acting as proof that the creditor received the letter.

The Federal Trade Commission provides an example letter, so all you need to do is fill in the blanks with your information.

19. Use common sense If a deal online seems too good to be true, it probably is.

If anything seems suspicious—for instance, if a retailer refuses to provide details on a product or avoids answering billing questions—the best practice is to avoid it and shop with a tried-and-true online retailer instead.

Additionally, you should never feel pressured to give out information.

If a retailer is requesting something from you that makes you uncomfortable, it's probably time to take your business elsewhere.

For more online shopping tips, check out these sites:

*Federal Trade Commission

*United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team

*StaySafeOnline.org

MORE TIPS

Using the internet to purchase goods or services saves considerable time and effort – and also presents you with the widest choice. There are, however, risks associated with online shopping and you need to take care with what you are buying, from whom, and how you pay for your purchases.

The Risks

Get started...
Choose reputable shopping sites.

Ensure the website is secure before entering payment details.

Fraud resulting from making payments over unsecured web pages.

Bogus online stores/shops – fake websites and email offers for goods and services that do not exist.

Buying fake goods intentionally or unintentionally - finding they are of inferior quality and also possibly funding more serious crimes in the process.

Receiving goods or services which do not match the advertiser’s description.

Being offered tailored prices based on information gathered by the retailer about your online shopping habits and websites visited.

Safe Shopping

Ensure that any online retailer unfamiliar to you is reputable by researching them. Establish a physical address and telephone contact details. Remember that the best way to find a reputable retailer is via recommendation from a trusted source.

Remember that paying by credit card offers greater protection than with other methods in terms of fraud, guarantees and non-delivery.

Double check all details of your purchase before confirming payment.

Do not reply to unsolicited emails from companies you don’t recognise.

Before entering payment card details on a website, ensure that the link is secure, in three ways:

1. There should be a padlock symbol in the browser window frame, which appears when you attempt to log in or register.

2. Be sure that the padlock is not on the page itself ... this will probably indicate a fraudulent site.

3. The web address should begin with ‘https://’. The ‘s’ stands for ‘secure’.

4. If using the latest version of your browser, the address bar or the name of the site owner will turn green.

5. Some websites will redirect you to a third-party payment service (such as WorldPay). Ensure that these sites are secure before you make your payment.

6. Safeguard and remember the password you have chosen for the extra verification services used on some websites, such as Verified by Visa.

7. When making a payment to an individual, never transfer the money directly into their bank account but use a secure payment site such as PayPal, where money is transferred between two electronic accounts.

8. Check sellers’ privacy policy and returns policy.

9. Always log out of sites into which you have logged in or registered details. Simply closing your browser is not enough to ensure privacy.

10. Keep receipts.

11. Check credit card and bank statements carefully after shopping to ensure that the correct amount has been debited, and also that no fraud has taken place as a result of the transaction.

12. Ensure you have effective and updated antivirus/antispyware software and firewall running before you go online.
Where possible, check that the price listed by the retailer on your browser is the same as that quoted on other people's browswers, to ensure you are not being monitored and overcharged.

More Information
If you think you have been a victim of fraud: Report it to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud reporting centre by calling 0300 123 20 40 or by visitng www.actionfraud.police.uk

FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Zuckerberg speaks Chinese; Beijing students cheer by AP October 23, 2014 (updated) Share this:


- In this Jan. 15, 2013 file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif.

BEIJING — China may ban Facebook, but not its co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, and he entertained an audience of students with a 30-minute chat in his recently learned Mandarin Chinese at a prestigious Beijing university.

Facebook is suing several law firms that represented Paul Ceglia, a man who claimed he owned half of the social network and was entitled to billions of dollars from the company and Zuckerberg.

There was no explicit discussion of the ban or any Facebook effort to enter the China market during Wednesday’s question-and-answer session at Tsinghua University.

But Facebook CEO Zuckerberg noted during his talk that the social media giant already helps some Chinese companies gain customers abroad. He cited computer maker Lenovo’s ads on Facebook in India.

Zuckerberg married Chinese-American Priscilla Chan in 2012 and said he was learning Chinese.

His pronunciation was far from fluent, but he maintained the conversation for a half hour and the students responded with warm cheers for his effort and laughter at his humor.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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