PLAY A GAME, GET A DATE: THE SOCIAL APPS TAKING CHINA BY STORM 

China's crowded social media space: Virtual Think Tank is a digital series focusing on the emerging
markets, covering their startups, the power of the middle classes on their economies and the macro environment. CNN) -- Go to any provincial city in China -- small hayseed towns where the population barely nudges three million people -- and you'd be forgiven for thinking the national youth pastimes, after smoking, are online gaming and flirting. "I like the personality tests and I like chatting with people, but I haven't been brave enough to meet anyone yet," says Nolan Lee from Guiyang in China's central Guizhou province. The 20-year-old student says she uses social media more than she cares to admit.
"I still use [microblogging website] Weibo for a lot of things but new things like Pengpeng come up all the time -- this one is pretty good actually. If I shake my mobile, it finds new people for me to meet and to compete with.

"I like the fact that it uses traditional Chinese games like truth or dare -- you can think up things that will be funny or embarrass the other person. It's fun." Launched in June, Pengpeng is a new mobile phone app that combines games and online chat. The Beijing-based start-up launched with $4.2 million in seed funding and since then has gone from strength to strength. Even outside China, it has proved sticky, recently hitting the number two position in Malaysia. For CNN writer Andy Tian, the brains behind Pengpeng, elbowing a space into China's crowded and ferociously competitive social networking space requires financial backing but, more than this, it demands a keen eye for how young subscribers are using the net.

"We have four million users which makes it one of the fastest growing mobile apps in China," Tian told CNN. "More than 90% of the users were born after 1990 so they're below the age of 24. "These people are the most active on social networks in China." Throwing a good party ---On China: The government and social med  ---Pengpeng uses location-based technology that allows users to meet strangers through playing games. As well as the usual Facebook-style feed and group chat, the app hosts quizzes, competitive games, horoscopes and the staple of teenagers everywhere on the net: personality tests."A lot of social networks out there enable you to meet someone and just start chatting [and] sharing pictures," said Tian. "That's great but the next generation should be able to interact in a much more fun way."
*
READ MORE...


ALSO: Chinese tech hopefuls challenge Silicon Valley heavyweights at TechCrunch

PHOTO: TechCrunch Beijing showcases some of China's most innovative start-ups. During the
two-day event, which ended on Tuesday, participants took part in a Silicon Valley-style pitch competition with products such as this smart watch designed for pregnant women to help them keep track of their baby's kicks. Beijing (CNN) -- San Francisco-based TechCrunch brought a taste of Silicon Valley to Beijing this week, with more than 100 startups showcasing their innovations to tech fans and investors at a two-day event in the Chinese capital. The conference attracted some of the most forward-thinking and dynamic Chinese technology wannabees, including ANTVR, a wearable gaming device company.

The startup attracted a long line of visitors eager to try out its very first product, ANTVR kit. Consisting of a headset and a controller, ANTVR claims the kit can provide a "fully immersive experience" by projecting a high-definition image onto users' retinas without distortion and provide an experience similar to an IMAX movie. During the demo, the player is thrown into a pitch-dark room and told to find the source of a sound, which leads to a pale ghost with blood trickling down her face. Qin Zheng, founder of ANTVR said the kit is compatible with all major gaming consoles and will hit both Chinese and overseas markets by the end of the year. The 27-year-old said ANTVR went through the same difficulties as many startups in China it was hard to find proper platforms to release products and raise funds. Crowdfunding --* READ MORE...

(ALSO) Likefunding: How to raise cash through Facebook likes 

Earning money from FB likes, (CNN) -- You've heard of crowdfunding -- raising funds through
donations on the internet -- well, get ready for "like" funding. An enterprising new startup in Hong Kong has devised a way of harnessing Facebook "likes" as a way of getting valuable donations to worthy causes and, at the same time, boosting the corporate social responsibility profile of the companies that provide the cash. Called Likefunding.me, the small team in Hong Kong's Science Park district -- the city's answer to Silicon Valley -- works to bring good stories and brands together.

Where should you launch your start-up? 'Likes,' 'pokes' and more: Facebook at 10 --Co-founder Kelly Yim -- a former actuary with a major bank -- left her job to devise a system that would benefit charities, creative projects and social enterprise projects. "We want to rally supporters to share interesting stories on creative projects that carry a sponsor's logo. Through this sharing we can generate a measurable media exposure for corporate sponsors," Yim said, adding that sponsors get their corporate logo embedded with the story which appears whenever the project is 'liked' or shared.
"We know creative projects have the capacity to go viral -- just look at the potato salad project. We want to devise a system that allows people with these kind of projects to monetize their media exposure," she added.

With corporations donating a purse of a maximum of between $1,500 and $2,000, internet users can choose from a menu of projects to "like." Each "like" will typically give the project around $HK2 and each "like" will carry the backer's brand logo. "What we do is match-make creative projects with corporates," explained Yim. "We have a database of different projects currently from Hong Kong and then we have contact with the corporate sponsors. "After we match-make them based on their corporate social responsibility objectives, we provide a web link for the creative projects, which is for their supporters to share the story with a different Facebook circle." Using a simple embeddable button on the project, all supporters have to do is click the button to make a mini-donation. The business model for Likefunding is similar to crowdfunding models where the company takes 10% of the successful funds raised.* READ MORE...

ALSO Online money: What is Bitcoin and How Does it Work? 

A month ago Bitcoin was a little-known digital currency whose most high-profile customer was
Wikileaks, but now mainstream media reports, computer hijacks and an enormous gold rush has seen interest explode. Alistair Charlton explains what Bitcoin is and how it works. Who created Bitcoin? Bitcoin is an online, digital currency that was launched in January, 2009 by programmer Satoshi Nakamoto and can be exchanged through a peer-to-peer network without the need for a bank. Nakamoto - believed to be an alias - published a paper in 2008 explaining how Bitcoin works. Nakamoto described it as "a purely peer-to-peer version of electronic cash [that] would allow online payments to be sent directly from one party to another without going through a financial institution....a system for electronic transactions without relying on trust."

The Bitcoins system is now maintained by a volunteer open-source community coordinated by four core developers. One of these developers, Jeff Garzik, said in 2011 that "Satoshi's a bit of a mysterious figure. I and other core developers have occationally corresponded with him by email, but it's always a crapshoot as to whether he responds." Nakamoto described himself as a male in his late 30s or early 40s living in Japan, but this was met with skepticism due to his use of English and the Bitcoin software containing no Japanese. The programmer is quoted as saying: "Governments are good at cutting off the heads of a centrally controlled networks like Napster, but pure P2P networks like Gnutella and [software to access the Dark Web] Tor seem to be holding their own." Who issues Bitcoins? Being decentralised, Bitcoins are not issued from a central bank in the same way dollars, pounds and euro are printed. Instead, the digital currency is created by users of Bitcoin software, known as miners.

The program presents your computer with a complex mathematical equation which takes time to solve, although a more powerful computer will work out the answer more quickly, as will networks of computers working together where mined coins are split equally between them. That answer is a 64 digit number, and once it has been calculated the miner is rewarded with 25 Bitcoins, which are each currently worth around $150, as of 11 April. Mined Bitcoins can then be used to buy goods online, just like online banking or PayPal. As with any currency or valuable commodity, too many Bitcoins will result in their price falling, while too few will cause their value to increase, To try and keep the Bitcoin economy stable, the complexity of the equation miners must calculate is automatically adjusted, although on average a single batch of 25 Bitcoins is mined every 10 minutes through the combined effort of every miner. Unlike printed currencies, which can be added to as and when the economy requires it, there is a finite number of Bitcoins that can be mined, making it more like gold than cash. How many Bitcoins are in circulation? * READ MORE..


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Play a game, get a date: The social apps taking China by storm


Social media startups in China must look for ever more sophisticated niches to find space in a market dominated by a handful of large players

HONG KONG, OCTOBER 20, 2014 (CNN) By Peter Shadbolt, for CNN ORIGINALLY POSTED September 16, 2014 -- Updated - Virtual Think Tank is a digital series focusing on the emerging markets, covering their startups, the power of the middle classes on their economies and the macro environment.

China's crowded social media space:


Andy Tian

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Pengpeng uses location-based technology to allow users to meet strangers through playing games

Founder Andy Tian says Pengpeng has four million users and is one of the fastest growing apps in China

The Beijing-based startup launched with $ 4.2 million in seed funding earlier this year

Social media in China is seeing the rise of sites that allow users to post anonymously

(CNN) -- Go to any provincial city in China -- small hayseed towns where the population barely nudges three million people -- and you'd be forgiven for thinking the national youth pastimes, after smoking, are online gaming and flirting.

"I like the personality tests and I like chatting with people, but I haven't been brave enough to meet anyone yet," says Nolan Lee from Guiyang in China's central Guizhou province.

The 20-year-old student says she uses social media more than she cares to admit.

"I still use [microblogging website] Weibo for a lot of things but new things like Pengpeng come up all the time -- this one is pretty good actually. If I shake my mobile, it finds new people for me to meet and to compete with.

"I like the fact that it uses traditional Chinese games like truth or dare -- you can think up things that will be funny or embarrass the other person. It's fun."

Launched in June, Pengpeng is a new mobile phone app that combines games and online chat. The Beijing-based start-up launched with $4.2 million in seed funding and since then has gone from strength to strength. Even outside China, it has proved sticky, recently hitting the number two position in Malaysia.

For Andy Tian, the brains behind Pengpeng, elbowing a space into China's crowded and ferociously competitive social networking space requires financial backing but, more than this, it demands a keen eye for how young subscribers are using the net.

"We have four million users which makes it one of the fastest growing mobile apps in China," Tian told CNN. "More than 90% of the users were born after 1990 so they're below the age of 24.

"These people are the most active on social networks in China."

Throwing a good party

Pengpeng uses location-based technology that allows users to meet strangers through playing games. As well as the usual Facebook-style feed and group chat, the app hosts quizzes, competitive games, horoscopes and the staple of teenagers everywhere on the net: personality tests.

"A lot of social networks out there enable you to meet someone and just start chatting [and] sharing pictures," said Tian. "That's great but the next generation should be able to interact in a much more fun way."

* Tian likens Pengpeng to throwing a good party.

"We see mobile social apps as something like an amusement park -- you come and you're always playing with other people; you meet them in a 'no pressure' way," he says. "If you throw a party with good music, good drinks and good food, if you have a good theme -- maybe it's 1920s and everyone wears a Fedora hat -- then everyone has a good time.

"But if you throw a singles' party just to find the member of the opposite sex of your dreams, then it's not going to be very much fun.

We are creating all the amusements -- all the food and the drink --
and marrying it to a social platform. Andy Tian, Pengpeng

It might seem to be pretty obvious but no one has thought of it before."

Strong growth

While Facebook still dominates the social media landscape globally with 1.32 billion monthly active users (MAU), its Chinese rivals are starting to close the gap. Qzone, which runs the massively popular QQ instant messaging service, is second on the list with 645 million MAU.

Other Chinese sites such as Wechat, or Weixin as it is known in Chinese, have gained as many as 438 million MAU in a short few years, stealing a march in terms of numbers on sites like Twitter.

Twitter, Facebook and YouTube have been locked out of the Chinese market since 2009, leaving the field open to homegrown social media sites such as Sina Weibo and Tencent Weibo.

While some say the ban is motivated by a need to censor the web in China, most analysts believe that protectionism for its own domestic versions of YouTube - namely Tudou and Youku - has been behind the move.

Nevertheless, the progress of Chinese social media is keenly monitored in the West where companies such as Facebook and Google hope to one day re-enter the market.

"Pengpeng is just one of many of these new startups -- but these are up against very big companies. They're only getting a small slice of the pie," says analyst Xiaofeng Wang of Forrester.

Users may have nicknames, but behind those nicknames are real social connections, friends and colleagues.
Xiaofeng Wang, analyst

"The most popular social platform used to be Weibo -- which combines elements of Facebook and Twitter -- but mobile messaging apps are now the most popular apps like Wechat from Tencent."

But she says the growth of anonymous social networking platforms are now the latest development in China -- not unsurprising in the light of the strict controls the government places on online debates.

"Sites such as UMi and Mimi are gaining more and more users -- it won't become mainstream however," Wang says.

"When it's anonymous, users are more willing to share information. Users may have nicknames, but behind those nicknames are real social connections, friends and colleagues."

Fittingly, UMi literally translates as "no secrets" while Mimi means "secrets". As for Pengpeng, users are as anonymous or as open as they want to be.

"So far, I haven't been bothered to meet anyone off any of the games," says Lee. "But who knows, one day I might put on some make up and a nice dress," she jokes.

Chinese tech hopefuls challenge Silicon Valley heavyweights at TechCrunch By Katie Hunt and Zhang Dayu, CNN August 13, 2014 -- Updated 0528 GMT (1328 HKT)


TechCrunch Beijing showcases some of China's most innovative start-ups. During the two-day event, which ended on Tuesday, participants took part in a Silicon Valley-style pitch competition with products such as this smart watch designed for pregnant women to help them keep track of their baby's kicks.

Beijing (CNN) -- San Francisco-based TechCrunch brought a taste of Silicon Valley to Beijing this week, with more than 100 startups showcasing their innovations to tech fans and investors at a two-day event in the Chinese capital.

The conference attracted some of the most forward-thinking and dynamic Chinese technology wannabees, including ANTVR, a wearable gaming device company.

The startup attracted a long line of visitors eager to try out its very first product, ANTVR kit.

Consisting of a headset and a controller, ANTVR claims the kit can provide a "fully immersive experience" by projecting a high-definition image onto users' retinas without distortion and provide an experience similar to an IMAX movie.

During the demo, the player is thrown into a pitch-dark room and told to find the source of a sound, which leads to a pale ghost with blood trickling down her face.

Qin Zheng, founder of ANTVR said the kit is compatible with all major gaming consoles and will hit both Chinese and overseas markets by the end of the year.

The 27-year-old said ANTVR went through the same difficulties as many startups in China it was hard to find proper platforms to release products and raise funds.

Crowdfunding

* READ MORE...Qin founded the company half a year ago, and to get started raised initial funding of $231,095 on U.S. crowdfunding site Kickstarter.

"Fund-raising is hard (here). I think this is why everybody rushes to crowdfunding sites," Qin said.

Lu Gang, head of Technode, TechCrunch's partner in China, said that Chinese startups face a unique set of challenges.

"I think Chinese startups (face) much tougher competition, like copies," said Lu. "We've found so many copycats."

By bringing TechCrunch to China, Lu hopes to bring the originality and creativity that Silicon Valley is known for and inspire Chinese companies to invent something that "really makes a difference."

"I think the TechCrunch brand obviously stands for original work for entrepreneurs, and for creating something out of nothing, which is ideal. I think this is what everybody's striving for," says Lu.

"We want to encourage people here to be truly innovative instead of copying."

Beijing intern Shen Lu contributed to this report

Likefunding: How to raise cash through Facebook likes
By Peter Shadbolt, for CNN October 9, 2014 -- Updated 1042 GMT (1842 HKT)


Likefunding.me is a new startup in Hong Kong that has devised a way of harnessing Facebook "likes" as a way of getting valuable donations to worthy causes.

Earning money from likes

(CNN) -- You've heard of crowdfunding -- raising funds through donations on the internet -- well, get ready for "like" funding.

An enterprising new startup in Hong Kong has devised a way of harnessing Facebook "likes" as a way of getting valuable donations to worthy causes and, at the same time, boosting the corporate social responsibility profile of the companies that provide the cash.

Called Likefunding.me, the small team in Hong Kong's Science Park district -- the city's answer to Silicon Valley -- works to bring good stories and brands together.

Where should you launch your start-up? 'Likes,' 'pokes' and more: Facebook at 10

Co-founder Kelly Yim -- a former actuary with a major bank -- left her job to devise a system that would benefit charities, creative projects and social enterprise projects.

"We want to rally supporters to share interesting stories on creative projects that carry a sponsor's logo. Through this sharing we can generate a measurable media exposure for corporate sponsors," Yim said, adding that sponsors get their corporate logo embedded with the story which appears whenever the project is 'liked' or shared.

"We know creative projects have the capacity to go viral -- just look at the potato salad project. We want to devise a system that allows people with these kind of projects to monetize their media exposure," she added.

With corporations donating a purse of a maximum of between $1,500 and $2,000, internet users can choose from a menu of projects to "like." Each "like" will typically give the project around $HK2 and each "like" will carry the backer's brand logo.

"What we do is match-make creative projects with corporates," explained Yim. "We have a database of different projects currently from Hong Kong and then we have contact with the corporate sponsors.

"After we match-make them based on their corporate social responsibility objectives, we provide a web link for the creative projects, which is for their supporters to share the story with a different Facebook circle."

Using a simple embeddable button on the project, all supporters have to do is click the button to make a mini-donation.

The business model for Likefunding is similar to crowdfunding models where the company takes 10% of the successful funds raised.

* It takes a lot of perseverance to get corporations to invest in this type of creative project -- it'll at least take a year to educate them

For a company that only filed its invention patent five months ago and had a beta-launch in August, it already has more than a few successes under its belt.

One in particular was a Hong Kong school principal who quit his job to start a charity organization to provide free tutorials to underprivileged children.

"In a matter of just six hours, he generated 5,000 'likes' and 8,000 shares," Yim said. "The result was quite impressive because the media exposure that project created was probably worth more than the exposure he got through Hong Kong's mainstream press."

Other projects include work with abandoned animals and medical projects in China.

"The ultimate objective is to make it like an advertising platform -- corporates can come to us, find the projects they want and at the same time their investment can be supporting interesting initiatives," she said.

Good stories, she says, have the capacity to go viral and can be worth more to corporations than the equivalent in advertising.

While there is a cap on the corporate donation so that a compelling and viral story does not sink its benefactor with Facebook "likes," Yim said that a donation of around $2,000 can make a big difference to a small charity.

As for Likefunding, the company is looking to break even after next year.

Is crowdfunding democratizing business? BitTorrent ready to monetize

Yim said that while many startups founder within a year, she has high hopes for the group she helped to set up. More than anything, she said, a startup needs money and it needs publicity when it starts out.

She believes the Likefunding model has the capacity to deliver both. Meanwhile, its most difficult task at the moment is educating a skeptical industry.

Digital media specialist Napoleon Biggs said the model was, as yet, largely untested.

"I'm really not sure if people are prepared to have sponsors ride their posts in exchange for funding a project. I guess if it's a cause that you believe in, why not," he said.

For Yim, however, the whole thrust of Likefunding is getting corporates to put their money where their Facebook "likes" are.

"It takes a lot of perseverance to get corporations to invest in this type of creative project -- it'll at least take a year to educate them," Yim said, adding that the group have now set their sites on China as its next frontier and is already investigating a tie-up with the mainland digital giant Sina Weibo.

FROM ibTIMES,COM/UK (INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TIMES)

What is Bitcoin and How Does it Work? By Alistair Charlton April 11, 2013 15:21 BST
 


ONLINE MONEY: Bitcoins are mined by computers solving complex mathematical equations.

A month ago Bitcoin was a little-known digital currency whose most high-profile customer was Wikileaks, but now mainstream media reports, computer hijacks and an enormous gold rush has seen interest explode. Alistair Charlton explains what Bitcoin is and how it works.

Who created Bitcoin?

Bitcoin is an online, digital currency that was launched in January, 2009 by programmer Satoshi Nakamoto and can be exchanged through a peer-to-peer network without the need for a bank. Nakamoto - believed to be an alias - published a paper in 2008 explaining how Bitcoin works.

Nakamoto described it as "a purely peer-to-peer version of electronic cash [that] would allow online payments to be sent directly from one party to another without going through a financial institution....a system for electronic transactions without relying on trust."

The Bitcoins system is now maintained by a volunteer open-source community coordinated by four core developers. One of these developers, Jeff Garzik, said in 2011 that "Satoshi's a bit of a mysterious figure. I and other core developers have occationally corresponded with him by email, but it's always a crapshoot as to whether he responds."

Nakamoto described himself as a male in his late 30s or early 40s living in Japan, but this was met with skepticism due to his use of English and the Bitcoin software containing no Japanese.

The programmer is quoted as saying: "Governments are good at cutting off the heads of a centrally controlled networks like Napster, but pure P2P networks like Gnutella and [software to access the Dark Web] Tor seem to be holding their own."

Who issues Bitcoins?

Being decentralised, Bitcoins are not issued from a central bank in the same way dollars, pounds and euro are printed. Instead, the digital currency is created by users of Bitcoin software, known as miners.

The program presents your computer with a complex mathematical equation which takes time to solve, although a more powerful computer will work out the answer more quickly, as will networks of computers working together where mined coins are split equally between them.

That answer is a 64 digit number, and once it has been calculated the miner is rewarded with 25 Bitcoins, which are each currently worth around $150, as of 11 April. Mined Bitcoins can then be used to buy goods online, just like online banking or PayPal.

As with any currency or valuable commodity, too many Bitcoins will result in their price falling, while too few will cause their value to increase, To try and keep the Bitcoin economy stable, the complexity of the equation miners must calculate is automatically adjusted, although on average a single batch of 25 Bitcoins is mined every 10 minutes through the combined effort of every miner.

Unlike printed currencies, which can be added to as and when the economy requires it, there is a finite number of Bitcoins that can be mined, making it more like gold than cash.

How many Bitcoins are in circulation?

* The maximum number of Bitcoins is 21 million with just over 11 million currently in circulation, and to combat any increases in the speed of mining, the number of coins extracted per equation solved is halved every four years. Coins per calculation will fall to 12.5 in 2016 and then to 6.25 in 2020.

At the current (but very unstable) value of around $150 per coin, the 11 million coins in circulation are worth more than $1.6bn.

In fact, the Bitcoin market is so unstable that figure increased by almost $100m in the time it took me to type that sentence, before falling by more an hour later.

Efforts to make the value of Bitcoins self-stabilising can only go so far, and in recent weeks the value has seen a rollercoaster of boom and bust caused by increased media attention, a Skype hack, cyber attacks and lag in trades taking place.

These issues are serious enough on their own, but add this to the fact that anyone can be a Bitcoin miner and trader - not just someone with an economics degree - and it's no surprise the market has been so unstable.

Where can I spend Bitcoins?

Once mined, Bitcoins can be spent as currency online through a huge and ever-increasing range of retailers, selling everything from computer components and pizzas, to custom clothing and cosmetics. Exchanges like Mt. Gox can be used to store Bitcoins and this is also where coins can be bought for dollars or other currencies.

THE DARK SIDE

But there is a darker side to Bitcoin use.

Because paying for goods with them is anonymous, users can shop on the Dark Web, a collection of websites that can only be accessed through a special computer program and includes sites like Silk Road, a marketplace for illegal drugs.


Silk Road

Silk Road, accessible through the Dark Web, accepts Bitcoins for drugs and other illegal goods.

Due to reduced faith in governments and banks, who can limit the amount of cash customers have access to (as we've seen recently in Cyprus) customers could turn to Bitcoin, which is seen as an online form of gold or silver, a safe haven away from the control of banks and government, but one plagued with instability from within.

Because Mt. Gox and other exchanges hold significant amounts of Bitcoins they are a target for computer hackers, who can launch cyber attacks on them, destabilising the value of Bitcoins to make a financial gain.

Are Bitcoins safe?

Just last week, a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on Mt. Gox caused its trading systems to run slow.

Those behind the DDoS attack would wait for the price to rise, sell their coins, execute an attack which would make the servers unstable and prompt traders to sell, thus lowering the value of Bitcoins, before buying again at the lower rate once the servers and price have stabilised.

Later in April, a computer virus was found spreading via Skype, hijacking computers and forcing them to mine for Bitcoins without the user realising.

Antivirus firm Kaspersky Labs said attackers sent messages to Skype users saying, in various languages, "this my favourite picture of you". The messages included a link that was being clicked more than 2,000 times per hour at its peak and doing so would start the covert mining, returning coins to the hackers.

Media attention and curiosity by readers lead to a huge boom and bust on 10 April, when the Bitcoin value reached a record of $266 per coin, double what it was a few days earlier and ten times its value just months ago.

Hours later, the gold rush became too much for Mt. Gox's servers to bear. The trading platform became slow and unstable, panic spread among traders who desperately tried to sell, driving the price down to just $105 before recovering to around $160 the following day.

On 11 April the price once again soared from $150 to $165 in less than an hour, pointing towards another bust, unless Mt. Gox and other exchanges can boost their servers to cope with demand.

A statement from the exchange, which handles 70 percent of all Bitcoin transactions, confirmed it is doing just that and is "working around the clock" to improve stability.

But if that happens, and trading speeds remain stable, how far will the value of Bitcoin go? How high could it have gone on 10 April, had the servers remained online and traders held their nerve?

No one really knows, but a glance at Twitter shows more spectators discussing Bitcoin each day, all waiting for the answer and an almighty crash.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi
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