BRITAIN'S PRINCE HARRY VOICES HATRED FOR 'TWITTER'

Britain’s Prince Harry has spoken of his hatred for the micro-blogging website Twitter due to its role in the invasion of his privacy, newspapers reported Tuesday. Harry was speaking to students at an event promoting the upcoming inaugural Invictus Games, a Paralympics-style multi-sports event for wounded service personnel. The prince, fourth in line to the throne, is behind the creation of the Games, which will take place from September 10 to 14 in London, and was on hand to present certificates to the schoolchildren marking the completion of their social media training. The 29-year-old encouraged the youngsters to get involved with the Games across social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter — but confessed that he would not be joining them online. “I would love to tweet about things I care about, on a regular basis — if people wanted to hear about it, that would be good,” Harry said. “The issue for myself and my family, put quite simply, is that it’s very hard for me to tweet about the Invictus Games and tweet about something that means a lot to me, whereas I at the same time really quite hate Twitter (due to) the invasion of privacy. “I think you all know what I’m talking about.” The army captain’s remarks were interpreted as a reference to the way people post pictures and details of his movements whenever he goes out in public. Pictures of him frolicking naked with a blonde woman at a party in Las Vegas also did the rounds on Twitter.
Harry did reveal that he has had a taste of social networking in the past, saying: “I’m not on social media; I used to be.”
Newspapers reported that Harry had a Facebook page under the pseudonym Spike Wells, which suddenly disappeared after the Las Vegas furor. The Invictus Games will see wounded troops from 14 nations compete in a variety of events at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in east London, which hosted the 2012 London Games. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: Facebook users salute nude Prince Harry 

Whatever the royal family may think of his exploits in Las Vegas, many Britons can barely hide their support for Prince Harry, posting naked pictures of themselves online in tribute. A Facebook group entitled “Support Prince Harry with a naked salute!” — featuring people posing in various states of undress saluting the third-in-line to the throne — has won 13,000 members and is still growing. The group sprang up after Harry, 27, was photographed naked with a mystery woman during a game of “strip billiards” in a Las Vegas hotel suite. The images, first published on a US website last Wednesday, rapidly went viral and caused a furore in Britain. But supporters have posted a flood of images of themselves saluting while in various states of undress — often with strategically placed props including Union Jack flags, backpacks and teddy bears. The Sun newspaper published photographs on Tuesday of what it said were British soldiers serving in Afghanistan, posing naked and saluting Prince Harry. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Why This Shepherd Loves Twitter 

PHOTO: The author's sheep (@herdyshepherd1) "Tweeting is kind of an act of resistance and defiance, a way of shouting to the sometimes disinterested world that you’re stubborn, proud, and not giving in as everywhere else is turned into a clone of everywhere else." I'm not really an “early-adopter.” In fact, I'm the exact opposite. I'm a Luddite and a shepherd. Our shepherding work in the English Lake District is all about continuity and being part of a living cultural tradition that stretches back into the depths of time. Our work is often little changed from the way things were done when the Vikings first settled these valleys. Even our dialect is peppered with Norse words. Our world is one of mountains, meadows, dry-stone-walls, sheep, sheepdogs and managing the landscape much as our ancestors have done over many centuries.

I like old things, old ways of doing things, old stories, old places, and old people. I'm deeply conservative with a small 'c'. Ask any half decent economist and they'll tell you that most new ideas are a waste of time, most new ideas fail. Our way of life results in fairly conservative people suspicious of pointless chatter and new technologies for the sake of newness. I am, in short, about as unlikely to get excited by something like Twitter as anyone alive.  If you spend your life working with sheep in the fells (what you’d call mountains) you perhaps don't really need to be 'connected' and you probably don't have time for, or need to have, fancy techno gadgets in your pocket. Our world is one of mountains, meadows, dry-stone-walls, sheep, sheepdogs and managing the landscape much as our ancestors have done over many centuries (it’s being nominated for World Heritage status because of its unique landscape culture).

So I was a little behind the curve on getting an iPhone, and accepted it reluctantly as a free “upgrade” when my perfectly fine old mobile died after years of good service. I hated the cult of Apple: I was going to resist. But whatever I wanted to happen, I suddenly had a camera and Twitter app in my pocket whilst I worked. And though it took me a while to realize it, I had the tools to connect to thousands of people around the world. I could now defend the old in my own quirky and probably misguided way. * * * I first tweeted as an experiment in whether anyone might be interested (some friends told me it would be popular and I thought they were crazy). I’d just helped a ewe to lamb on a snowy morning and took a quick photo of the newborn lambs and posted it on Twitter.

By nightfall we had something like 200 followers. My wife heard the phone pinging, “What the freaking hell is going on with your phone?” Apparently people are interested, but it rather surprised us, and still amazes my neighbors. “Why do people follow you?” * READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Britain’s Prince Harry voices hatred of Twitter


PRINCE HARRY

LONDON, JULY 28, 2014 (INQUIRER) Agence France-Presse - Britain’s Prince Harry has spoken of his hatred for the micro-blogging website Twitter due to its role in the invasion of his privacy, newspapers reported Tuesday.

Harry was speaking to students at an event promoting the upcoming inaugural Invictus Games, a Paralympics-style multi-sports event for wounded service personnel.

The prince, fourth in line to the throne, is behind the creation of the Games, which will take place from September 10 to 14 in London, and was on hand to present certificates to the schoolchildren marking the completion of their social media training.

The 29-year-old encouraged the youngsters to get involved with the Games across social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter — but confessed that he would not be joining them online.

“I would love to tweet about things I care about, on a regular basis — if people wanted to hear about it, that would be good,” Harry said.

“The issue for myself and my family, put quite simply, is that it’s very hard for me to tweet about the Invictus Games and tweet about something that means a lot to me, whereas I at the same time really quite hate Twitter (due to) the invasion of privacy.

“I think you all know what I’m talking about.”

The army captain’s remarks were interpreted as a reference to the way people post pictures and details of his movements whenever he goes out in public.

Pictures of him frolicking naked with a blonde woman at a party in Las Vegas also did the rounds on Twitter.

Harry did reveal that he has had a taste of social networking in the past, saying: “I’m not on social media; I used to be.”
Newspapers reported that Harry had a Facebook page under the pseudonym Spike Wells, which suddenly disappeared after the Las Vegas furor.

The Invictus Games will see wounded troops from 14 nations compete in a variety of events at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in east London, which hosted the 2012 London Games.

Facebook users salute nude Prince Harry Agence France-Presse6:05 am | Wednesday, August 29th, 2012


Newly single and ready to mingle, Prince Harry hit up the pool at the Soho House in Miami Thursday while in town for a friend's bachelor party. Harry reportedly just broke up with Cressida Bonas after nearly two years together.

LONDON—Whatever the royal family may think of his exploits in Las Vegas, many Britons can barely hide their support for Prince Harry, posting naked pictures of themselves online in tribute.

A Facebook group entitled “Support Prince Harry with a naked salute!” — featuring people posing in various states of undress saluting the third-in-line to the throne — has won 13,000 members and is still growing.

The group sprang up after Harry, 27, was photographed naked with a mystery woman during a game of “strip billiards” in a Las Vegas hotel suite.

The images, first published on a US website last Wednesday, rapidly went viral and caused a furore in Britain.

But supporters have posted a flood of images of themselves saluting while in various states of undress — often with strategically placed props including Union Jack flags, backpacks and teddy bears.

The Sun newspaper published photographs on Tuesday of what it said were British soldiers serving in Afghanistan, posing naked and saluting Prince Harry.


This is a Saturday March 10, 2012 file photo of Britain’s Prince Harry, smiles after playing rugby at Flamengo’s beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Photographs of a naked Prince Harry in a Las Vegas hotel room have popped up online. A celebrity gossip site published two pictures of the 27-year-old royal cavorting with what they called a mystery woman in a VIP suite. Prince Harry’s office confirmed Wednesday Aug. 22. 2012 that the photos were of the prince but declined to make any further comment. AP/Felipe Dana

Harry, an army officer and a trained Apache helicopter pilot, served in Afghanistan for ten weeks himself but was pulled out in February 2008 after a media blackout broke down.

The Sun is the only British newspaper to have published the nude snaps of Harry, in defiance of orders from the royal family to respect the prince’s privacy and restrain from printing them.

The online show of support for Harry came as it was announced that he will be the patron of a charity race to the South Pole between three teams of wounded servicemen from around the world.

Harry, who last year joined a group of injured soldiers as they trekked to the North Pole, is supporting the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge 2013.

Troops from Britain, the US and the Commonwealth who suffered physical or cognitive injuries while serving will take part in the four-week expedition next year.

Royal officials said it was “far too early” to tell whether Harry would join the group for the gruelling trek.

FROM THE ATLANTIC.COM/TECHNOLOGY

Why This Shepherd Loves Twitter HERDY SHEPHERDNOV 22 2013, 10:43 AM ET

"Tweeting is kind of an act of resistance and defiance, a way of shouting to the sometimes disinterested world that you’re stubborn, proud, and not giving in as everywhere else is turned into a clone of everywhere else."


The author's sheep (@herdyshepherd1)

I'm not really an “early-adopter.” In fact, I'm the exact opposite. I'm a Luddite and a shepherd.

Our shepherding work in the English Lake District is all about continuity and being part of a living cultural tradition that stretches back into the depths of time. Our work is often little changed from the way things were done when the Vikings first settled these valleys. Even our dialect is peppered with Norse words.

Our world is one of mountains, meadows, dry-stone-walls, sheep, sheepdogs
and managing the landscape much as our ancestors have done over many centuries.

I like old things, old ways of doing things, old stories, old places, and old people. I'm deeply conservative with a small 'c'.

Ask any half decent economist and they'll tell you that most new ideas are a waste of time, most new ideas fail. Our way of life results in fairly conservative people suspicious of pointless chatter and new technologies for the sake of newness.

I am, in short, about as unlikely to get excited by something like Twitter as anyone alive.

If you spend your life working with sheep in the fells (what you’d call mountains) you perhaps don't really need to be 'connected' and you probably don't have time for, or need to have, fancy techno gadgets in your pocket. Our world is one of mountains, meadows, dry-stone-walls, sheep, sheepdogs and managing the landscape much as our ancestors have done over many centuries (it’s being nominated for World Heritage status because of its unique landscape culture).

So I was a little behind the curve on getting an iPhone, and accepted it reluctantly as a free “upgrade” when my perfectly fine old mobile died after years of good service. I hated the cult of Apple: I was going to resist.

But whatever I wanted to happen, I suddenly had a camera and Twitter app in my pocket whilst I worked. And though it took me a while to realize it, I had the tools to connect to thousands of people around the world.

I could now defend the old in my own quirky and probably misguided way.

* * *


I first tweeted as an experiment in whether anyone might be interested (some friends told me it would be popular and I thought they were crazy). I’d just helped a ewe to lamb on a snowy morning and took a quick photo of the newborn lambs and posted it on Twitter.

By nightfall we had something like 200 followers. My wife heard the phone pinging, “What the freaking hell is going on with your phone?” Apparently people are interested, but it rather surprised us, and still amazes my neighbors. “Why do people follow you?”

* I tweet anonymously because that's how I like it. My feed is not really about me: I’m just a narrator. It’s about the way my people farm an amazing landscape, the sheep, the land, the sheepdogs, and the characters in our valley. It’s not really in the spirit of my community to self promote... The individual is not that important here compared to the collective way of life. At the start of my tweeting I feared that my farming peers would disapprove of it, so its been amusing to discover that they worked out who I was very quickly, many follow me on Twitter, and funniest of all they ask me to post pictures of their sheep or to tell the wider world things ‘that need to be said.’

Now we have close to 13,000 followers. We’ve been featured on many of the world’s leading news channels, had features written about us in many magazines, hosted film crews from around the world, and featured on several radio programmes. Weird for something that everyone here thinks is normal, and ‘Just what we do.’

Three things work for me about Twitter:

1) The 140 character limit forces a brevity that suits my way of life;

2) Sharing my world through photos is even quicker, and my world is, I’ve learnt, exotic, strange and beautiful to other people who are disconnected from the land;

3) It works on my smartphone so I can tweet whilst I work outdoors, without needing to stop work to do so. If I spend more than 20 seconds taking photos or tweeting then I’m not doing my real job properly. My tweeting is, and has to be, quick, dirty and real.

The combination of these three elements means that my world has become shareable in real time with other people. I'm no Robert Capa but the combination of a very good smart phone camera, an amazing landscape and working life, and Twitter letting me post pics in 2 or 3 clicks means that my world can be in your world within 10 seconds. And some of you appear to like my world.

When we tweet, we get immediate feedback, ranging from simple questions from folk trying to understand what we do, or where to buy our products, to other people like us around the world replying with their related news.

We also get artists and journalists and others wanting to use our pictures or wool. But often the response is simply other Tweeps pressing the ‘Favorite’ or ‘Retweet’ buttons and expressing their interest. A typical image of our work might be RT’d 50 times by people all around the world. Some images have been RT’d more than a thousand times and take on a life of their own. But does any of this matter?

On one level, the answer might be ‘not much’. Tweeting doesn’t affect the basic economics of what we do (it's a lousy way to make money), or how cold the rain or snow is, so some folk will never be interested. That’s fine. But tweeting surprised me, because it does sometimes give you heart to know so many other people respect and appreciate what we do. Sometimes it just makes you feel a little less lonely. It gives you a kind of courage to carry on.

Tweeting is kind of an act of resistance and defiance, a way of shouting to the sometimes disinterested world that you’re stubborn, proud, and not giving in as everywhere else is turned into a clone of everywhere else.

* * *


I’m not alone, there are some amazing people tweeting about their lives on Twitter. They are fascinating unique lives that were often invisible before the ability to self-publish on social media. I’d like to think that Twitter has given people that had disappeared from view — obscured and crowded out by the loud noise of modernity — the chance to raise their voice, tell their stories, share their lives, and to say "Hey, we didn’t go away, we are still here, and you might just be interested because what we do is important to everyone."

Twitter gives you an amplifier for your voice (albeit not necessarily an audience if you are tedious, and let's face it: lots of people are). It cuts out the middleman (I don't need you to interpret and translate my life and my work for other people – sorry journalists but I’m a shepherd not an idiot). It lets you find your niche (and that niche can be massive). It lets you sell things (we sell sheep, wool and visits to our farm on Twitter). And it lets you connect with weirdly interesting other people (widening your sphere of influence through collaborations with artists or writers).

And if you can grow an audience of followers then you create a kind of power and influence to defend the things you care about. I realized this recently when I watched a TV debate about our landscape recently, tweeted some harsh words about the debate, and had a slightly wounded response from one of the celebrity participants within ten minutes. (People don’t want to be criticized in front of 13,000 followers.)

Being able to share your life enables other people to see you for the first time, to see past clichés and stereotypes. And since the 1960s farming has had a rather poisonous image for some people. Now, for the first time, lots of folk following us on Twitter actually know a farmer. They know what we do each day and that we are essentially decent people doing our best sometimes against the economic and natural odds. They see that we have a love of what we do, and a deep respect for the landscape and wildlife around us.

When you’ve followed and understood, then you have a little bit of you invested in our working lives. So when the extreme snow came last winter and our sheep were buried in the drifts, we were picking up a thousand Twitter followers an hour at one point. There was an outpouring of support and good will through Twitter for farms like ours. It helped.

Most new ideas may fail, and most new ideas might be rubbish... but sometimes a new idea, a new technology, empowers you to defend the old against the new, and some old things are worth defending.

HERDY SHEPHERD
Herdy Shepherd is the pen name of a sheep farmer based in England's Lake District.
FOLLOW @ http://alturl.com/gx4e2


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