FACEBOOK REMAINS CYBERCRIMINALS' FAVORITE TARGET SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE

Facebook remains the preferred target for cybercriminals who specialize in stealing social network accounts. Based on Kaspersky Lab’s statistics in the first quarter of 2014, fake sites imitating Facebook accounted for 10.85% of all instances when the heuristic Anti-phishing component was triggered. Kaspersky's statistics showed only fake Yahoo pages sparked more phishing alerts, leaving Facebook the prime target among social networking sites. It said that Facebook fakery is a global business, with cybercriminals attacking the site in a variety of languages including English, French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Turkish and Arabic. Kaspersky said unauthorized access to Facebook accounts or any other social network can be used to spread phishing links or malware. It added that cybercriminals also use stolen accounts to send spam to the victims’ contact lists and publish spam on their friends’ walls where it can be seen by other users, or to spread messages asking their friends to send urgent financial assistance. "Hijacked accounts can also be used to collect information on individuals for use in future targeted attacks," the secure content developer said. "Smartphone or tablet owners who visit social networks from their mobile devices are also at risk of having their personal data stolen." Nadeszhda Demidova, Kaspersky's web content analyst, said that cybercriminals have developed several way of luring their victims into pages with phishing content by sending links to phishing web pages via email or through social networks. “Fraudsters often lure their victims by promising them ‘interesting content’. When users follow the link provided, they land on a fake login page that contains a standard message asking them to log in before viewing the page. If users don’t become suspicious and enter their credentials, their data will immediately be dispatched to cybercriminals,” added Demidova. Kaspersky advices Facebook users: • If you receive an email notification from Facebook or a message that your account may be blocked, never enter your credentials in a form attached to that message. Facebook never asks users to enter their password in an email or to send a password via email. • Place the cursor on the link and check if it leads to the official Facebook page. Moreover, you should manually type the Facebook URL into the address bar – cybercriminals are capable of concealing the addresses to which they are leading you. • When you have manually entered the URL in the address bar, check it again after the page has loaded to make sure it has not been spoofed. • Remember that Facebook uses the HTTPS protocol to transmit data. The absence of a secure connection probably means that you are visiting a fraudulent site even if the URL address seems to be correct. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: How Cybercriminals Target Social Media Accounts

Social platform attacks target websites with large user bases, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram. A majority of current attacks simply use the social platforms as a delivery mechanism, and have been modeled after the older Koobface malware. However, researchers are now anticipating that advanced attacks against social media networks will be able to leverage a user’s contacts, location, and even business activities. This information can then be used to develop targeted advertising campaigns toward specific users, or even help spark crime in the virtual or real world. Most often, social platform attacks are able to breach users’ accounts by stealing their authentication credentials upon login. This information is then used to discreetly pull personal data from users’ online friends and colleagues. A recent Stratecast study states that 22% of social media users have fallen victim to a security-related incident, and recent documented attacks support the numbers. The Pony botnet affected Facebook, Google, Yahoo, and other social media users, stealing more than two million user passwords. Facebook estimates that anywhere from 50-100 million of its monthly active user accounts are fake duplicates, and as many as 14 million of those are "undesirable" on the site. READ MORE...

ALSO: Facebook website returns to service after crash

Facebook Inc.'s website crashed briefly on Thursday, temporarily preventing computer and mobile phone users from reaching the site around the globe. During the outage, Facebook users ranging from Australia to South Korea to India and Britain were greeted with a message saying "Sorry, something went wrong". The cause of the outage was not immediately known. Its exact duration could not be confirmed but service was restored in less than an hour. It prevented users from posting to the social networking site "for a brief period of time", a Facebook spokesman said. "We resolved the issue quickly, and we are now back to 100 percent," he said. "We're sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused." THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

(ALSO) Outrage At Outage: Panic As Facebook Crashes

As the social networking stalwart goes offline around the world, users joke that it is a sign the world is ending. The crash happened at around 9am, with the Facebook blue branding displayed alongside the message: "Sorry, something went wrong." On Twitter, users joked that they were lost without the social network. Jon Pudny wrote: "It's the end of the world ... #Facebook is DOWN!!" Jenny Oag said: "Oh my god. Facebook is down it's the end of the world. Quick everyone, learn how to use a pen and get the candle lights out." Some pondered whether the internet stalwart's demise was a sign of impending doom. Aidan Spurrier wrote: "Facebook is down worldwide ... the apocalypse has begun." READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Facebook remains cybercriminals' favorite social networking site

MANILA, JUNE 23, 2014 (PHILSTAR) Facebook remains the preferred target for cybercriminals who specialize in stealing social network accounts.

Based on Kaspersky Lab’s statistics in the first quarter of 2014, fake sites imitating Facebook accounted for 10.85% of all instances when the heuristic Anti-phishing component was triggered.

Kaspersky's statistics showed only fake Yahoo pages sparked more phishing alerts, leaving Facebook the prime target among social networking sites.

It said that Facebook fakery is a global business, with cybercriminals attacking the site in a variety of languages including English, French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Turkish and Arabic.

Kaspersky said unauthorized access to Facebook accounts or any other social network can be used to spread phishing links or malware.

It added that cybercriminals also use stolen accounts to send spam to the victims’ contact lists and publish spam on their friends’ walls where it can be seen by other users, or to spread messages asking their friends to send urgent financial assistance.

"Hijacked accounts can also be used to collect information on individuals for use in future targeted attacks," the secure content developer said. "Smartphone or tablet owners who visit social networks from their mobile devices are also at risk of having their personal data stolen."

Nadeszhda Demidova, Kaspersky's web content analyst, said that cybercriminals have developed several way of luring their victims into pages with phishing content by sending links to phishing web pages via email or through social networks.

“Fraudsters often lure their victims by promising them ‘interesting content’. When users follow the link provided, they land on a fake login page that contains a standard message asking them to log in before viewing the page. If users don’t become suspicious and enter their credentials, their data will immediately be dispatched to cybercriminals,” added Demidova.

Kaspersky advices Facebook users:

• If you receive an email notification from Facebook or a message that your account may be blocked, never enter your credentials in a form attached to that message. Facebook never asks users to enter their password in an email or to send a password via email.

• Place the cursor on the link and check if it leads to the official Facebook page. Moreover, you should manually type the Facebook URL into the address bar – cybercriminals are capable of concealing the addresses to which they are leading you.

• When you have manually entered the URL in the address bar, check it again after the page has loaded to make sure it has not been spoofed.

• Remember that Facebook uses the HTTPS protocol to transmit data. The absence of a secure connection probably means that you are visiting a fraudulent site even if the URL address seems to be correct.

FROM McAfee.COM

How Cybercriminals Target Social Media AccountsJanuary 8, 2014

Social platform attacks target websites with large user bases, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

A majority of current attacks simply use the social platforms as a delivery mechanism, and have been modeled after the older Koobface malware.

However, researchers are now anticipating that advanced attacks against social media networks will be able to leverage a user’s contacts, location, and even business activities. This information can then be used to develop targeted advertising campaigns toward specific users, or even help spark crime in the virtual or real world.

Most often, social platform attacks are able to breach users’ accounts by stealing their authentication credentials upon login. This information is then used to discreetly pull personal data from users’ online friends and colleagues.

A recent Stratecast study states that 22% of social media users have fallen victim to a security-related incident, and recent documented attacks support the numbers.

The Pony botnet affected Facebook, Google, Yahoo, and other social media users, stealing more than two million user passwords. Facebook estimates that anywhere from 50-100 million of its monthly active user accounts are fake duplicates, and as many as 14 million of those are "undesirable" on the site.

Another social media attack that is expected to take a stronghold of user information in 2014 is the "false flag" attack that tricks a user into revealing personal information or authentication credentials under the guise of the site itself.

Upon changing the password, the attack will steal the username and password information to then steal personal information about the user. Users should remain alert to any "urgent" request from the site to reset a password.

Enterprises are also expected to leverage social platforms for "reconnaissance attacks" either directly or through third parties to collect valuable user and organization information about rivals.

This data can provide businesses with a competitive edge in future business endeavors, and these attacks are expected to climb in 2014.

To prevent social media breaches, protect user information, and secure company data, increased vigilance by individual users and enterprise policies are the best ways to ensure data breaches are avoided.

FROM REUTERS

Facebook website returns to service after crash Thu Jun 19, 2014 3:07pm IST


A Facebook error message is seen in this illustration photo of a computer screen in Singapore June 19, 2014. Credit: Reuters/Thomas White


REUTERS - Facebook Inc.'s website crashed briefly on Thursday, temporarily preventing computer and mobile phone users from reaching the site around the globe.

During the outage, Facebook users ranging from Australia to South Korea to India and Britain were greeted with a message saying "Sorry, something went wrong".

The cause of the outage was not immediately known. Its exact duration could not be confirmed but service was restored in less than an hour.

It prevented users from posting to the social networking site "for a brief period of time", a Facebook spokesman said.

"We resolved the issue quickly, and we are now back to 100 percent," he said. "We're sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused."

(Reporting by Supriya Kurane and Sampad Patnaik in Bangalore and Eric Auchard in London; editing by Dale Hudson and Jason Neely)

FROM NEWS.SKY.COM

Outrage At Outage: Panic As Facebook Crashes


Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg

As the social networking stalwart goes offline around the world, users joke that it is a sign the world is ending.

The crash happened at around 9am, with the Facebook blue branding displayed alongside the message: "Sorry, something went wrong."

On Twitter, users joked that they were lost without the social network.

Jon Pudny wrote: "It's the end of the world ... #Facebook is DOWN!!"

Jenny Oag said: "Oh my god. Facebook is down it's the end of the world. Quick everyone, learn how to use a pen and get the candle lights out."

Some pondered whether the internet stalwart's demise was a sign of impending doom.

Aidan Spurrier wrote: "Facebook is down worldwide ... the apocalypse has begun."

Meanwhile Latika Bourke said: "Is this a sign of the impending rapture?"

But the panic was short-lived and by 9.30am users reported the site was functioning again.

So far, Facebook has not explained why the problem occurred.

Facebook crashed in the US in February this year, after previously going offline for four hours in October last year due to network maintenance.

The network has 1.3 billion monthly active users, making it one of the most popular websites in the world.

It is listed on the Nasdaq stock exchange.

The outage is expected to have cost the website hundreds of thousands of dollars.


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