POPE FRANCIS TWEETS IN 9 LANGUAGES

ROME—Pope Francis may have millions of followers on Twitter but he has a long way to go before he can catch up with US President Barack Obama. But while the US president may have an edge in the number of Twitter followers, the Pope apparently has one advantage—he tweets in nine languages. In the latest illustration of how important the microblogging site has become for the Church’s communication with the faithful and nonbelievers, the Pontiff on Thursday sent a tweet to 12 million followers, seeking their prayers. Obama, in comparison, has 42 million Twitter followers. With Francis absent from Rome on a spiritual retreat this week, no official events were organized to mark the first anniversary of his election. But the first Pontiff from Latin America did not remain absent from the Twittersphere, a domain in which he is now one of the biggest players on the planet. “Please pray for me,” a message from his official @Pontifex account said in an echo of what Francis said in person a year ago in the more traditional papal setting of a postelection appearance on the balcony of St. Peter’s. Or, “Orate pro me” as he put it on his feed in Latin, one of the languages in which he reaches out to followers across the globe. The Latin account has been a surprise hit with 225,000 followers already, to the delight of the ancient language’s dwindling band of teachers across the world. The historic lingua franca of the Church is never likely to catch up with Spanish, in which Francis has recently broken through the 5-million barrier. English is the second most successful of the papal Twitter languages with 3.8 million people receiving messages as of Thursday afternoon....

ALSO: FB CEO Zuckerberg says US government a threat to Internet

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday he had called President Barack Obama to complain that the US government is undermining confidence in the Internet with vast, secret surveillance programs. In a post on his own Facebook page, the founder of the huge social network expressed anger towards Washington, in what appeared to be a reaction to new revelations about US government surveillance. “I’ve called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future,” he wrote. “Unfortunately, it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform.” Zuckerberg’s comments come amid growing tensions between the tech sector and US administration over leaked documents describing the vast surveillance ability of the secretive National Security Agency and other intelligence services. “The Internet works because most people and companies do the same. We work together to create this secure environment and make our shared space even better for the world,” he said. “This is why I’ve been so confused and frustrated by the repeated reports of the behavior of the US government. When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we’re protecting you against criminals, not our own government.” He added: “The US government should be the champion for the Internet, not a threat. They need to be much more transparent about what they’re doing, or otherwise people will believe the worst.”
The comments came a day after a report citing leaked NSA documents said the spy agency had imitated a Facebook server to inject malware into computers to expand its intelligence collection capacity.

ALSO: Don’t rely on Google Maps to search for Malaysia plane, says Google

Photo misleading: Concerned people should not rely on Google Maps to search the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 as it is not live satellite feed. With the search entering its fourth day on Tuesday, several concerned citizens called The Star, believing that they have discovered the missing airplane after scrolling through the Google Maps satellite images. Pointing out various airplane images in Google Maps, which clearly shows images of an airplane, most members of the public believed that it was the lost airplane. A concerned reader who called in, pointed out a location at the Vietnamese island of Cầu Ma Thięn Lănh, located south west of Ho Chi Minh City as the location of the airplane while another individual emailed the location coordinates of the missing airplane close to the Kenyir Dam in Terengganu. A spokesperson from Google Malaysia said while various pictures of airplanes will be there at various locations throughout, these are not live images. “Yes, the images may be there, but it is not real time satellite images as the images may have provided to us several weeks or months ago,” he said when contacted......


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Pope Francis tweets in 9 languages

MANILA, March 24, 2014 (INQUIRER) Agence France-Presse 4:45 am | Saturday, March 15th, 2014

ROME—Pope Francis may have millions of followers on Twitter but he has a long way to go before he can catch up with US President Barack Obama.

But while the US president may have an edge in the number of Twitter followers, the Pope apparently has one advantage—he tweets in nine languages.

In the latest illustration of how important the microblogging site has become for the Church’s communication with the faithful and nonbelievers, the Pontiff on Thursday sent a tweet to 12 million followers, seeking their prayers.

Obama, in comparison, has 42 million Twitter followers.

With Francis absent from Rome on a spiritual retreat this week, no official events were organized to mark the first anniversary of his election.

But the first Pontiff from Latin America did not remain absent from the Twittersphere, a domain in which he is now one of the biggest players on the planet.

“Please pray for me,” a message from his official @Pontifex account said in an echo of what Francis said in person a year ago in the more traditional papal setting of a postelection appearance on the balcony of St. Peter’s.

Or, “Orate pro me” as he put it on his feed in Latin, one of the languages in which he reaches out to followers across the globe.

The Latin account has been a surprise hit with 225,000 followers already, to the delight of the ancient language’s dwindling band of teachers across the world.

The historic lingua franca of the Church is never likely to catch up with Spanish, in which Francis has recently broken through the 5-million barrier.

English is the second most successful of the papal Twitter languages with 3.8 million people receiving messages as of Thursday afternoon.

Francis is not the first Pope to tweet. His predecessor,

Benedict XVI, started shortly before announcing his decision to retire because of failing health.

The new Pope from Argentina quickly demonstrated that the 140-character limit was perfect for the punchy delivery of the key messages he wants to transmit to his flock.

His entry to the Twittersphere came four days after his election. “Dear friends, I thank you from my heart and I ask you to continue to pray for me,” he said.

The central importance of prayer has been a recurring theme of the tweets that have followed, at an average of just under one a day.

Some are barely comprehensible to non-Catholics, for example Feb. 8’s: “The Sacraments, especially Confession and the Eucharist, are privileged places of encountering Christ.”

But it is not all theology.

The immediacy of the social medium also offers the leader of the world’s 1.2 billion Roman Catholics to react quickly to global events, or voice his views on the social issues of the day.

Messages that have made particular waves included one, in October, that reinforced Francis’ anticapitalist credentials.

“If money and material things become the center of our lives, they seize us and make us slaves,” he tweeted.

On Nov. 9, he wrote: “I ask all of you to join me in prayer for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda especially those in the beloved islands of the Philippines.”

Francis also has a good line in homespun practical tips for living a more satisfied life, for example: “I cannot imagine a Christian who does not know how to smile.”

The image of a Pope who is never without his smartphone is an appealing one for many, but in reality there is a large team behind the Vatican tweeting operation.

The process is not without certain risks given the largely unregulated nature of Twitter.

Zuckerberg says US government threat to Internet Agence France-Presse
10:19 am | Friday, March 14th, 2014 17 316 297Next big U.S. bankruptcy?


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. AP FILE PHOTO

WASHINGTON–Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday he had called President Barack Obama to complain that the US government is undermining confidence in the Internet with vast, secret surveillance programs.

In a post on his own Facebook page, the founder of the huge social network expressed anger towards Washington, in what appeared to be a reaction to new revelations about US government surveillance.

“I’ve called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future,” he wrote.

“Unfortunately, it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform.”

Zuckerberg’s comments come amid growing tensions between the tech sector and US administration over leaked documents describing the vast surveillance ability of the secretive National Security Agency and other intelligence services.

“The Internet works because most people and companies do the same. We work together to create this secure environment and make our shared space even better for the world,” he said.

“This is why I’ve been so confused and frustrated by the repeated reports of the behavior of the US government. When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we’re protecting you against criminals, not our own government.”

He added: “The US government should be the champion for the Internet, not a threat. They need to be much more transparent about what they’re doing, or otherwise people will believe the worst.”

The comments came a day after a report citing leaked NSA documents said the spy agency had imitated a Facebook server to inject malware into computers to expand its intelligence collection capacity.

The report by former Guardian reporter Glenn Greenwald said the NSA had developed malware that allows it to collect data automatically from millions of computers worldwide.

Some of the documents leaked by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden in recent months have said the NSA had access to servers of tech giants such as Facebook, Google and Yahoo.

These companies have strongly denied giving any access except under a legal requirement, and have said more transparency about the programs could reassure their customers.

An agreement in January allowed the companies to publish broad details of government data requests, but many activists have called for far more information.

Zuckerberg, in his posting Thursday, reiterated his call for more openness.

“As the world becomes more complex and governments everywhere struggle, trust in the Internet is more important today than ever,” he said.

“To keep the Internet strong, we need to keep it secure. That’s why at Facebook we spend a lot of our energy making our services and the whole Internet safer and more secure.

“We encrypt communications, we use secure protocols for traffic, we encourage people to use multiple factors for authentication and we go out of our way to help fix issues we find in other people’s services.”

Zuckerberg’s comments drew a quick response online, with 73,000 people hitting the “like” button within an hour and more than 8,000 “shares.”

Dozens of people commented on Facebook, mostly to praise Zuckerberg.

“Thank you Mark! It’s good to know that you do have us in mind first!” one Facebook member wrote. But another warned: “I hope this is sincere and not like Google’s ‘don’t be evil’ two-faced mantra.”

Don’t rely on Google Maps to search for Malaysia plane, says Google The Star Online-Asia News Network 4:51 pm | Tuesday, March 11th, 2014 63 10.8K 53572014's Best Retinol Cream


Misleading images of a plane on Google Maps. The Star Online-Asia News Network

PETALING JAYA — Concerned people should not rely on Google Maps to search the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 as it is not live satellite feed.

With the search entering its fourth day on Tuesday, several concerned citizens called The Star, believing that they have discovered the missing airplane after scrolling through the Google Maps satellite images.

Pointing out various airplane images in Google Maps, which clearly shows images of an airplane, most members of the public believed that it was the lost airplane.

A concerned reader who called in, pointed out a location at the Vietnamese island of Cầu Ma Thięn Lănh, located south west of Ho Chi Minh City as the location of the airplane while another individual emailed the location coordinates of the missing airplane close to the Kenyir Dam in Terengganu.

A spokesperson from Google Malaysia said while various pictures of airplanes will be there at various locations throughout, these are not live images.

“Yes, the images may be there, but it is not real time satellite images as the images may have provided to us several weeks or months ago,” he said when contacted.

He said that Google Maps or Google Earth images are usually contributed by third party sources, who provide images several weeks or months earlier.

“These images which are captured would sometimes contain images of airplanes usually on its flight path and cannot be presumed as a possible crash site,” he added.


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