MAKATI, CITY PHILIPPINES 'SELFIE CAPITAL OF THE WORLD' - TIME MAG

The Philippines’ financial center, Makati, has emerged as the city with the most number of “selfie” photos uploaded on the social network, prompting Time magazine to name it the “Selfie Capital of the World.” Pasig and Cebu cities also made it to the top 10 cities listed to have uploaded the most number of selfies on the Internet.
Out of 459 cities checked, Makati and Pasig had 258 selfie takers per 100,000 people. Time examined hundreds of thousands of selfies, self-shot photographs uploaded on social media. “Makati City, known as the financial center of the Philippines, can now boast another distinction: It is the Selfie Capital of the World,” Time editor Chris Wilson wrote in a report posted on Tuesday. “The city, part of metropolitan Manila and home to 500,000 people, produces more selfies per capita than any other city in the world,” Wilson added. Makati Information Officer Joey Salgado said this is not surprising because on workdays, more than three million employees, shoppers and visitors take photos of themselves and upload them on social media sites. He said this could also be because Makati has so many “interesting and safe places to visit for dining, entertainment, events and well-known personalities people bump into everyday that they want to share with their online friends.” Manhattan, New York placed second with 202 selfie-takers per 100,000 people; followed by Miami, Florida with 155 selfie-takers; Anaheim and Santa Ana, California, 147; Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, 141; Tel Aviv, Israel, 139; Manchester, England, 114.
They were followed by Milan, Italy; Cebu City; and George Town, Malaysia.

ALSO: CULTURE WATCH: Selfie Mania

Are you ready to learn a couple of new words this month? If you know them both, you are a prudent trend watcher. The first word is selfie. It is defined as a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically taken with a smart phone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website. It has been named word of the year by Oxford Dictionary editors, after the frequency of its usage increased by 17,000% over the past 12 months.1 If you are a Facebook fan, you are probably seeing dozens of these on a daily basis. Let me be quick to say that an occasional selfie (especially with a grandkid or pet) is absolutely normal. The second word is related to the first, but is never going to make word of the year. It has been around a long time, but is rarely used. Narcissism – an exceptional interest in, or admiration of oneself.2 The root of the word is rooted in Greek mythology. The true narcissist of today sees their biggest fan everyday in the mirror. The following defines the mindset of a narcissist: What I want is all that matters. When we discuss issues, my opinions are always right. Yours are wrong or else of minimal importance. If you expect to have input, you are undermining me.3 In researching this, I was shocked at the number of websites that offer testing to determine if we fit in that category. The reason I have picked these two words is because I think the first word, selfie, is symptomatic of a troubling cultural trend that I have chosen to identify as narcissism. We are entering a new world where it is considered perfectly normal to be preoccupied with self. Advancing and pleasing ourselves is the priority in our world today. Many of our kids are growing up with a warped sense of entitlement which shouts, “I want what I want when I want it.”

ALSO: Spiritual Selfies

Yesterday, my girlfriend sent me a screenshot of a selfie collage posted by a grown man she knows. In every picture, he was looking pensively off in the distance while his less-tortured arm and hand took a picture of his deepness. This person is in his 30’s. This is not okay. This display of self-importance wears a bit thin, and it goes to my concern with my generation regarding our spiritual journeys: I wonder if we need fewer spiritually tormented selfies in the world? Don’t imagine I’m pointing a finger; I’m first in line here. I constantly struggle to balance prophecy and humility, truth and grace. I could link you to multiple blogs of mine in which I am indicted by the previous paragraph. I have cleaned up my own relational messes as recently as last week. Where is the Servant Jesus in all that? you would ask. I don’t really know, but notice how pissed I am and how the church jacked me up and also notice the numerous things about me. My personal things. Because I have Big Feelings that should be noticed.


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Makati City ‘selfie capital of the world’ – ‘Time’

MANILA, march 17, 2014 (MANILA TIMES) by Ritchie Horario Reporter - The Philippines’ financial center, Makati, has emerged as the city with the most number of “selfie” photos uploaded on the social network, prompting Time magazine to name it the “Selfie Capital of the World.”

Pasig and Cebu cities also made it to the top 10 cities listed to have uploaded the most number of selfies on the Internet.

Out of 459 cities checked, Makati and Pasig had 258 selfie takers per 100,000 people. Time examined hundreds of thousands of selfies, self-shot photographs uploaded on social media.



“Makati City, known as the financial center of the Philippines, can now boast another distinction: It is the Selfie Capital of the World,” Time editor Chris Wilson wrote in a report posted on Tuesday.

“The city, part of metropolitan Manila and home to 500,000 people, produces more selfies per capita than any other city in the world,” Wilson added.

Makati Information Officer Joey Salgado said this is not surprising because on workdays, more than three million employees, shoppers and visitors take photos of themselves and upload them on social media sites.

He said this could also be because Makati has so many “interesting and safe places to visit for dining, entertainment, events and well-known personalities people bump into everyday that they want to share with their online friends.”

Manhattan, New York placed second with 202 selfie-takers per 100,000 people; followed by Miami, Florida with 155 selfie-takers; Anaheim and Santa Ana, California, 147; Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, 141; Tel Aviv, Israel, 139; Manchester, England, 114.

They were followed by Milan, Italy; Cebu City; and George Town, Malaysia.

The international magazine built a database of over 400,000 Instagram “selfies” and found that Makati City and neighboring Pasig City are the world’s selfie capital.

Television host Ellen DeGeneres made history when she posted a selfie with the Oscar winners that was re-tweeted 3.377 million times.

The Oxford dictionary defined selfie as “a photo that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” “Selfie” was Oxford’s word of the year in 2013.

Many believe that the term selfie originated from the word “selca,” the shortened combination of the self-camera coming from either Japan or South Korea, where phones with front cameras originated. The word “selca” could also mean the act of capturing one’s own picture or as “sel-pic” short for self-picture.

Some people claimed that they take selfies when they feel good or are wearing something nice, to annoy friends, for self-assurance and to track changes in the body. With Jiggy Marquez

FROM ALRASUB.COM

Philippine: Makati, Pasig ‘selfie capitals’ of the world

MANILA, Philippines – Makati City and Pasig City are the “Selfie Capitals of the World,” TIME Magazine reported Tuesday.

“Makati City, known as the financial center of the Philippines, can now boast another distinction: It is the Selfie Capital of the World,” TIME editor Chris Wilson said in a post on the magazine’s website Tuesday.

Wilson added, “The city, part of metropolitan Manila and home to 500,000 people, produces more selfies per capita than any other city in the world.”

TIME made a database of over 400,000 Instagram “selfies” and found that the two cities had the world’s most number of “selfies”.

The photos were downloaded from photo sharing application Instagram from Jan. 28 to Feb. 2 and March 3-7, 2014.

Cebu City also ranked ninth in the list of the Top 10 selfie-taking cities in the world.

The Top 10 are:

Makati City and Pasig, Philippines - 258 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Manhattan, New York - 202 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Miami, Florida - 155 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Anaheim and Santa Ana, California - 147 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Petaling Jaya, Malaysia - 141 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Tel Aviv, Israel - 139 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Manchester, England - 114 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Milan, Italy - 108 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
Cebu City, Philippines - 99 selfie-takers per 100,000 people
George Town, Malaysia - 95 selfie-takers per 100,000 people source: inquirer

CULTURE WATCH: Selfie Mania Selfie Mania By Wendell Cantrell


selfie_mania

Are you ready to learn a couple of new words this month? If you know them both, you are a prudent trend watcher.

The first word is selfie. It is defined as a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically taken with a smart phone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website. It has been named word of the year by Oxford Dictionary editors, after the frequency of its usage increased by 17,000% over the past 12 months.1

If you are a Facebook fan, you are probably seeing dozens of these on a daily basis. Let me be quick to say that an occasional selfie (especially with a grandkid or pet) is absolutely normal.

The second word is related to the first, but is never going to make word of the year. It has been around a long time, but is rarely used.

Narcissism – an exceptional interest in, or admiration of oneself.2 The root of the word is rooted in Greek mythology.

A young man named Narcissus was very handsome and knew it. One day he saw his reflection in a stream, and he instantly fell in love with his image. What he saw staring back at him from the water was so beautiful that he couldn’t pull himself away. He sat and gazed for days, becoming obsessed with his own appearance. He became trapped in his own ego, eventually turning into the Narcissus flower, and the rest is mythology.

The true narcissist of today sees their biggest fan everyday in the mirror.

The following defines the mindset of a narcissist:

What I want is all that matters.
When we discuss issues, my opinions are always right.
Yours are wrong or else of minimal importance.
If you expect to have input, you are undermining me.

In researching this, I was shocked at the number of websites that offer testing to determine if we fit in that category.

The reason I have picked these two words is because I think the first word, selfie, is symptomatic of a troubling cultural trend that I have chosen to identify as narcissism.

We are entering a new world where it is considered perfectly normal to be preoccupied with self. Advancing and pleasing ourselves is the priority in our world today. Many of our kids are growing up with a warped sense of entitlement which shouts, “I want what I want when I want it.”

A recent analysis in the American Freshman Survey reveals that college students are more likely than ever to call themselves gifted and driven to succeed, in spite of the fact that their test scores and time spent studying are decreasing.

Psychologist Jean Twenge, the lead author of the analysis, says this tendency towards narcissism is up 30 percent in the last thirty years.

Should we be surprised in an era where a You Tube video can make a kid a faux celebrity in the digital world?

Dr. Keith Ablow, a psychiatrist and TV commentator, has been concerned of late with the toxic psychological impact of media and technology on our youngsters, and how it literally regards them as lead actors in their own fictionalized life stories.

He is concerned about an epidemic of depression, suicides, and homicides as the real self-loathing and hatred of others that lies beneath all of the narcissism rises to the surface. He believes the toll from this trend could be unimaginable, dwarfing the toll of any epidemic we have ever known. And it will be the hardest to defeat.

He is, by profession, speaking medically. Maybe he is being a bit cataclysmic, but he has certainly identified a problem. I would like us to look briefly at the spiritual aspect of it.

In honor of a great author, C.S. Lewis, who died on the same day in 1963 as JFK, I am going to add a 21st century script to the Screwtape Letters:

Wormwood (the junior devil), I have an idea that I believe can raise one of our favorite assets, pride, to a level that can take out a generation. Let’s embrace and encourage frequent using of all these social media sites where young people can fool themselves into thinking they have hundreds or thousands of “friends.” They can delete unflattering comments. They can block anyone who disagrees with them. They can choose to show the world only flattering photos of themselves (by the dozens).

What should be our plan to combat this great epidemic as it takes shape?

First we need to understand the true enemy. Our adversary (the Devil) knows our sinful nature well and the desires that battle within us.

James 4:1 tells us, “What causes fights and quarrels among you? Don’t they come from your desires that battle within you?” So, we have seen the enemy clearly, and as the saying goes, it is us! Secondly, let’s get our kids off the self-esteem bandwagon. I know many of you, like me, have been concerned at education’s emphasis on guarding (and growing) kids’ self esteem. We must not let them fail in anything, and to be sure, we’ll dare not keep score in soccer games. Thirdly, we need to model and teach moderation and boundaries with social networks. Lastly, we should be modeling our Lord’s humility. Paul points that out clearly in Phil. 2:3-4, “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.”

A regular look in the mirror of God’s word will show me a picture that I wouldn’t want posted for all my friends to see.

How about you?

Questions or comments may be directed to culturewatch@dentonbible.org

(1) The Guardian 11/18/13.

(2) World English Dictionary

(3) www.psychologytoday.com

(4) www.foxnews.com 1/8/13

FROM THE DEEPERSTORY.COM

Spiritual Selfies by Jen Hatmaker


PHNO POSTED THIS PHOTO

My friend Alan Hirsch was recently talking about growing up. He described his 50’s as “living in his own skin,” compared to the angst of his 20’s and 30’s which included much wrestling, struggling, trying to fit pieces of the puzzle together that don’t seem to connect. This trajectory toward peace sounds like a balm. There is something beautiful about getting older, settling in, becoming softer, less abrasive, less tortured.

I am somewhere between these seasons. I am on the front edge of a generation that deconstructs, turning new soil for the gospel in an increasingly post-Christian society. We assess the exodus as worthy of urgent attention, so we beat our drums and wave our arms and question the establishment. Much of the young generation emerged from organized religion with numerous wounds, and the healing process occupies the enormous brunt of our narrative.

But.

Sometimes I reach cynical saturation. Sometimes I just cannot handle another lengthy dissertation on our hurt feelings.

Sometimes I worry that our journey toward the kingdom takes on a disproportionate level of narcissism.

Jesus the One and Only can very much get lost in the story of our personal angst, the latter usurping the former. Because while we may disagree vehemently on methods or doctrine, we can surely agree that we serve a you-first, me-last Savior.

That is not even a gray area.

Yesterday, my girlfriend sent me a screenshot of a selfie collage posted by a grown man she knows. In every picture, he was looking pensively off in the distance while his less-tortured arm and hand took a picture of his deepness. This person is in his 30’s. This is not okay.


i-dont-always-downvote-but-when-i-do-its-a-selfie-or-repost

This display of self-importance wears a bit thin, and it goes to my concern with my generation regarding our spiritual journeys:

I wonder if we need fewer spiritually tormented selfies in the world?

Don’t imagine I’m pointing a finger; I’m first in line here.

I constantly struggle to balance prophecy and humility, truth and grace. I could link you to multiple blogs of mine in which I am indicted by the previous paragraph. I have cleaned up my own relational messes as recently as last week.

Where is the Servant Jesus in all that? you would ask. I don’t really know, but notice how pissed I am and how the church jacked me up and also notice the numerous things about me. My personal things. Because I have Big Feelings that should be noticed.


PHNO POSTED THIS PHOTO

Last Sunday, my husband Brandon preached on the believer’s freedom in 1 Corinthians 10: 23-33. It is extremely beautiful theology, which underscores God’s bent toward freedom but our responsibility to steward our liberties carefully.

The entire passage boils down to a simple habit:

Preferring others.

I should prefer your history, your convictions, your predilections, your station. Assessing my words and actions through the grid of your conscience is the substance of Paul’s instruction. How will this sound to you? How will this make you feel? How will this affect you? How can there be less of me and more of you in this interaction?

This position is the height of Christian maturity.

The beauty of this theology is that it works in all circumstances. Sometimes, we prefer the conscience of a fellow believer, even if, for a thousand different factors, he doesn’t share our freedoms. This means we consider the weight of our words when we cast stones at Christians who’ve built before us, who build differently than us. We discern the cost of our stories, preferring to honor rather than always dismantle. There is a way to tell our truth without inflicting permanent collateral damage.

“Do not cause anyone to stumble, whether Jews, Greeks or the church of God…” (vs. 32)

Sometimes this means preferring the conscience of the unbeliever, respecting her baggage or fears, not projecting our convictions or weirding out the conversation. It means making space for different worldviews in the relationship, creating a safe place to belong over a place to be right. People were drawn to Jesus’ grace long before they understood his divinity.

“For I am not seeking my own good but the good of many, so that they may be saved.” (vs. 33)

Preferring one another is truly the highest way to live, not just for the health of community but for ourselves. Honestly, it is exhausting maintaining the dissenting view all the time. The anguish gets old. There is actually more pressing kingdom work to engage than kicking everyone else’s tail constantly.

Let the teenagers duke it out in the parking lot behind the Sac ‘N Pac in the glow of their headlights; they’ll settle down in a few years. How about the grownups sit on the porch together and pour some sweet tea? We’re old enough to know no one actually wins those fights.

Obviously, preferring others doesn’t apply to the context of abuse or terror, exploitation or harm. Scripture isn’t a template for victimization. That is a separate conversation entirely.

But within ordinary relationships among Christians and atheists and agnostics and Old-Schoolers and Young Bucks and different denominations and cultures, preferring one another could quite literally change the world.

What would it look like to prefer your nemesis? Would it mean laying down a few barbs and finding a shred of common ground to capitalize on? What about preferring someone who doesn’t share your convictions?

If being right took a back seat, would it change the way you communicated? If we preferred our spouses, marriages would leap back to life. If we preferred others, churches would regain their prophetic voices.

Preferring one another is the first spiritual pavestone toward healing and mending, releasing and empowering, connecting and loving. It is the way Jesus came and the substance by which we are saved.

We can dismantle one another with precision, particularly behind the protective covering of the internet, but when all the dust settles, we’re left with carnage, and that is not a legacy worthy of a Savior who washed the filthy feet of his betrayer.

May we be creators, not just critics, preferring building over deconstructing – building up people, communities, the church of God.

I’ll prefer you, and you prefer me, and everyone wins.

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