MORE PEOPLE BEING DRAWN TO BUTTERFLY FARMING

MANILA,
June 29, 2004  (STAR) Time was when wellwishers used to shower newlyweds with grains of milled white rice.

This traditional practice has been discarded, particularly in recent decades when big rice shortage perennially stared the nation right in its face.

Among those now used in wedding rites instead of rice are butterflies, those gentle, beautiful, and molticolored creatures fondly described by some "romantics" as "flying flowers."

As a DENR-Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau (ERDB) researchers once wrote: "Seeing ample of them in your garden can convey peace and joy to your heart because butterflies are God-given gifts."

There are now about 350 butterfly breeders nationwide, according to PCARRD’s Yella A. Atienza. This excludes the butterfly gardens, genebanks, and parks set up by government and private entities.

For instance, one of the attractions in the Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SBMA) complex is an enclosed butterfly garden, which we had visited two years ago.

ERDB also maintains a butterfly genebank on storied Mt. Makiling.

Marinduque, for all its many butterfly farms, notably the Marinduque Butterfly Park, can be considered as the "butterfly capital of the Philippines."

That butterfly breeding has flourished in the province can be attributed mainly to the initiative of the Marinduque State College (MSC), which generously shares its expertise to the people within its service area.

"Butterfly farming is very viable," asserted PCARRD.

To start a venture, one needs only P5,000 to P10,000. From 250 to 300 eggs laid, only five percent mortality is incurred.

From 1,000 to 4,000 pupa of mixed species of butterflies are exported every week to Canada, England, and other countries, PCARRD reported. – RAF


Reported by: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2004  by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE