ANOTHER 'AUNOR' MAKING WAVES IN MUSIC   

SHE is the niece of the country’s one and only Superstar and the people’s National Artist…Nora Aunor. But, Marion Aunor who is becoming a celebrated singer and recording artist tries her very best not to mention her auntie’s name. Not because she or her family has not love lost for the superstar. She is only careful not to be accused of trying to link her name with her as Noranians may think she is using her auntie to get to where she wants in the business. “I admire my aunt for what she has achieved as a singer and actress, but I just want people to think of me as my own person, not Nora’s niece and not even my mom’s daughter, although I loved them both,” she said over merienda one afternoon at Annabel’s on T. Morato Ave. recently.

Marion is the daughter of Maribel (more familiarly known as Lala) Aunor and granddaughter of the legendary Mamay Belen, now in her early ‘80s, and the woman behind Nora Aunor when she was just starting to join singing competitions in Metro Manila many moons ago. Marion won third place in the 2013 Himig Handog, and that jumpstarted her quest to be a professional singer. Marion signed a deal with Star Recrods on March 7 last year although she debuted in February 2013 when “If You Ever Change Your Mind,” which she also wrote, was released. The song was one of the 12 finalists selected from the 2,500 songs from the auditions. It won third place in the 2013 Himig Handog P-Pop Love Songs. She was part of the Middle East Leg of the World Tour of the Philippine daytime television series Be Careful With My Heart. On May 3, 2013, her song entry “Do, Do, Do” was chosen as one of the 12 finalists for the second Philippine Popular Music Festival. She later decided to withdraw from the competition due to her talent management’s decision. Her eponymous album was released on July 4, also last year. * READ MORE...

ALSO Curtis' first Hollywood movie: ‘Blood Ransom’ with Anne Curtis screens in Manila 

IT HAS been two years since Anne Curtis went to the United States of America to shoot a film directed by Filipino American filmmaker Francis de la Torre. It is called Blood Ransom. Now, Viva Films is releasing the film for Curtis’s fans to enjoy it. Last week, Curtis and her American co-star Alexander Dreymon met the press to promote the film. It is by far Anne Curtis’d biggest break as an actor, marking her debut in the international filmmaking arena. The action-packed love story-suspense-thriller is a project of Tectonic Films. Apart from Curtis and Dreymon, the film also features performances by Samuel Caleb Hunt and Jamie Harris.

It opens in the Philippines on Oct. 29 and in the US on Oct. 31. Blood Ransom undoubtedly brings Anne a step closer to a career in Hollywood—one thing local artists aspire for. Naturally, this thrills her. In an interview with Star Studio, the Showtime host related how she auditioned and landed Blood Ransom’s central character of Crystal, the mysterious woman kidnapped by Jeremiah (Dreymon) who refuses to return to her boyfriend, Roman (Jeremiah’s boss). “My friend Sam Richelle sent me a script asking if I’d be interested in a film to be shot in the States and if I’d be willing to audition for the role. I read the scene for the audition piece and told myself, ‘why not?’ So, I nervously gave it a shot,” Anne related. She is no stranger to the international scene having previously ventured in it via a stint in America’s Next Top Model, where she donned creations by Filipino designer Francis Libiran. Shooting Blood Ransom took Anne away from home and her Showtime hosting job for almost a month. Filming with De la Torre and the Blood Ransom team took place in California. * READ MORE...

ALSO 'Marcos musical' success abroad: UK critics praise Gia, other Filipinos 

PHOTO: GIA Atchison who plays Imela's best friend in the musical. Singing about the
Philippines in the United Kingdom is ‘surreal,’ but a source of ‘pride’  A CRITIC describes Gia Macuja-Atchison’s voice as “glorious, expressive, haunting.” The reviews are in and critics have showered “Here Lies Love,” which moved from New York to London, with glowing notices. The musical’s cast members, led by Mark Bautista as Ferdinand Marcos, Natalie Mendoza as Imelda Marcos and Gia Macuja-Atchison as Estrella Cumpas, have been receiving the lion’s share of the praise.

The Hollywood Reporter hailed the cast as “24-carat party people,” singling out Atchison’s “When She Passed By,” a “heartbroken rejection ballad” as among the standouts. Britishtheatre.com called Bautista “surprisingly sexy” and Mendoza “wonderful.” The website also described Atchison’s voice as “glorious … expressive, haunting, stuffed with clarity and meaning.” Rehearsals for “Here Lies Love” was about to wrap up when the Inquirer caught up with Atchison, who plays Estrella, the best friend of Imelda. * READ MORE...

(ALSO) Here Lies Love, National Theatre, review: 'Don't cry for me Filipinos?' 

PHOTO: Sensational: Natalie Mendoza as Imelda Marcos, in 'Here Lies Love' by David Byrne and Fatboy Slim Photo: Tristram Kenton“ ---Here Lies Love” are the words that the Philippines’ most notorious politician Imelda Marcos – still going at 85 – once said she wanted as her tombstone epitaph. But this “disco musical” about her life – co-devised by the transatlantic talents of American singer-songwriter David Byrne (of Talking Heads fame) and Brighton-based beat-master Norman Cook (aka Fatboy Slim) – has nothing of a funeral wake about it. An imported hit from New York’s Public Theater, where it premiered last year, it “christens” the National’s newly and brilliantly refurbished third theatre – formerly the Cottesloe, now the Dorfman (after the NT’s stalwart donor Lloyd Dorfman) – using an effervescent mass of laser lights, pounding beats, psychedelic projections and bopping bodies on the dance floor.

Most of those bodies belong to the audience. You can sit this one out, if you like, in the comfort of seats in the galleries. But I suspect it’s more fun being gently cajoled this way and that by ushers. The willing herd take their place around shifting podiums to become up-close and personal witnesses to the remarkable story of a woman from a modest background who was wooed and won by politician Ferdinand Marcos, infatuated the people in turn but became too seduced by the trappings of power, finally paying the price when she ignominiously fled the country in the people’s uprising of 1986. The temperament and trajectory might put you in mind of Eva Peron, but this tackles its beauteous biographical subject in a very different style from Andrew Lloyd Webber’s (currently running) Evita. If there were a song for every one of the thousand plus shoes in Imelda’s infamous collection, we’d be here til Christmas. But though the 90-minute piece, directed by Alex Timbers, is packed with numbers (there’s scant dialogue), it moves swiftly and succinctly through the essentials. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Martin still has unfulfilled dreams  

After 32 years in the business, you’d think Martin Nievera has seen and done it all, and yet, Martin himself will be the first to admit that he still has a lot of unfulfilled dreams. One of them is to be in a band. Yes, Martin, who has sold out all of the country’s major venues and performed in other parts of the world as well, still dreams of doing and achieving things, and says that is what keeps him going. “Thirty-two years in the business, 52 years old, and I still have dreams and I can still fulfill them,” says Martin, whose achievements have taken him so far beyond his Concert King title.

If there is anything Martin has proven in all the time he has been in the business, it’s that the truly good never stop trying to be better. One of the things he dreams of achieving that he hasn’t done yet is singing in a band. Thus, he was overjoyed when his recording company PolyEast Records gave him the chance to record an album titled Big Mouth, Big Band. But before you go thinking that Martin has started crooning standards, the album is actually a collection of songs by some of the biggest bands in the music business — Earth Wind and Fire (Sing a Song), Chicago (Will You Still Love Me), Queen (Love of my Life), Toto (I Won’t Hold You Back), the Doobie Brothers (What A Fool Belies) and Kansas (Dust in the Wind) — hence the tag “big band” — performed by Martin, with actual instrumentalists and arrangements for each one. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Charice says no plans of transitioning to become male   

Charice Pempenco with Oprah Winfrey Photo from Charice Pempengco's Instagram account. MANILA, Philippines – Although she admits that her “soul is male,” singer Charice Pempengco said she has no plans of having operations to become male. In an interview with Oprah Winfrey for the TV host's “Where Are They Now” program on her cable network OWN aired Sunday (Monday morning Manila time), Charice said: “Basically, like, my soul is male. But I'm not gonna go through that stage where I'm gonna change everything.”  She added: “Not my change my body. I would change like this—cut my hair, wear boy clothes and everything. But that's all.”

The 22-year-old reunited with Winfrey in the television series more than a year after she came out as a lesbian in 2013. The “Pyramid” singer admits she knew she has been a lesbian when she was five years old. “I was in grade school and I saw this girl. And I knew I was different. I didn't know what it was but I just knew at that time, it felt special,” she said. “When I was 10, I was like, “That's it. I'm gay.' Like I found the word.” Charice added she was “a mess” before coming out. “When I was this person, it felt like it was a character I was portraying for my mom, for my family to be happy,” she explained. * READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Another Aunor making waves in music


Marion Aunor

MANILA
, OCTOBER 27, 2014 (MANILA STANDARD) By Isah V. Red- SHE is the niece of the country’s one and only Superstar and the people’s National Artist…Nora Aunor.

But, Marion Aunor who is becoming a celebrated singer and recording artist tries her very best not to mention her auntie’s name. Not because she or her family has not love lost for the superstar. She is only careful not to be accused of trying to link her name with her as Noranians may think she is using her auntie to get to where she wants in the business.

“I admire my aunt for what she has achieved as a singer and actress, but I just want people to think of me as my own person, not Nora’s niece and not even my mom’s daughter, although I loved them both,” she said over merienda one afternoon at Annabel’s on T. Morato Ave. recently.

Marion is the daughter of Maribel (more familiarly known as Lala) Aunor and granddaughter of the legendary Mamay Belen, now in her early ‘80s, and the woman behind Nora Aunor when she was just starting to join singing competitions in Metro Manila many moons ago.

Marion won third place in the 2013 Himig Handog, and that jumpstarted her quest to be a professional singer.

Marion signed a deal with Star Recrods on March 7 last year although she debuted in February 2013 when “If You Ever Change Your Mind,” which she also wrote, was released.

The song was one of the 12 finalists selected from the 2,500 songs from the auditions. It won third place in the 2013 Himig Handog P-Pop Love Songs. She was part of the Middle East Leg of the World Tour of the Philippine daytime television series Be Careful With My Heart.

On May 3, 2013, her song entry “Do, Do, Do” was chosen as one of the 12 finalists for the second Philippine Popular Music Festival. She later decided to withdraw from the competition due to her talent management’s decision.

Her eponymous album was released on July 4, also last year.

* This year, Marion was a finalist in the Myx VJ Search. Also, she was chosen to interpret one of the finalist songs in the 2014 Himig Handog. The song was entitled “Pumapag-ibig” and was written by Jungee Marcelo. She performed the song with Rizza Cabrera and Seed Bunye.


Marion Aunor with Mommy Lala Aunor and grandma Mamay Belen (center)

With the release of her album, she said, “Very excited na mas marami pang people na makabili at makarinig ng music ko. I want to know what their response is. I’m really looking forward to those people na magsasabi na, ‘wow, I can really relate to your songs,’ ‘yung mga ganyan.”

Marion said her experiences and the people around her have inspired her in writing the songs in her album.

“The theme of my album? It’s so hard [to describe] kasi maraming genre na na-touch ako sa album. But maybe piano and songwriter type of thing, ‘yun ang pinaka-common ground sa songs kasi magkakaiba po talaga. Like if you go through the album it doesn’t seem like it’s all just from one album. Parang different genres. So maybe just songwriting from my own experiences,” she said.

Marion’s album, which is now available in all record bars nationwide, has 12 songs—six original tracks and six covers.

Known for her Himig Handog P-Pop Love Song hit “If You Ever Change Your Mind,” she is currently part of ABS-CBN’s Star Magic family.

LISTEN TO HER NOW: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzeIDdVLQqE

 
If You Ever Change Your Mind by Marion Aunor (Official Music Video)

‘Blood Ransom’ with Anne Curtis screens in Manila By Isah V. Red | Oct. 18, 2014 at 05:50pm MANILA STANDARD


In her first Hollywood movie,
Anne Curtis stars opposite
Alexander Dreymon in Blood Ransom

IT HAS been two years since Anne Curtis went to the United States of America to shoot a film directed by Filipino American filmmaker Francis de la Torre. It is called Blood Ransom.

Now, Viva Films is releasing the film for Curtis’s fans to enjoy it.

Last week, Curtis and her American co-star Alexander Dreymon met the press to promote the film.

It is by far Anne Curtis’d biggest break as an actor, marking her debut in the international filmmaking arena. The action-packed love story-suspense-thriller is a project of Tectonic Films. Apart from Curtis and Dreymon, the film also features performances by Samuel Caleb Hunt and Jamie Harris.

It opens in the Philippines on Oct. 29 and in the US on Oct. 31.

Blood Ransom undoubtedly brings Anne a step closer to a career in Hollywood—one thing local artists aspire for. Naturally, this thrills her.

In an interview with Star Studio, the Showtime host related how she auditioned and landed Blood Ransom’s central character of Crystal, the mysterious woman kidnapped by Jeremiah (Dreymon) who refuses to return to her boyfriend, Roman (Jeremiah’s boss).

“My friend Sam Richelle sent me a script asking if I’d be interested in a film to be shot in the States and if I’d be willing to audition for the role. I read the scene for the audition piece and told myself, ‘why not?’ So, I nervously gave it a shot,” Anne related.

She is no stranger to the international scene having previously ventured in it via a stint in America’s Next Top Model, where she donned creations by Filipino designer Francis Libiran.

Shooting Blood Ransom took Anne away from home and her Showtime hosting job for almost a month. Filming with De la Torre and the Blood Ransom team took place in California.

* Challenges included a scene where she and Dreymon, as ill-fated lovers on the run, had a highly passionate kissing scene.

The actress recounted, “I had quite a difficult time understanding exactly what my director was looking for. I was doing my kissing scene as I’ve always done in my films and TV shows here in the Philippines, but he kept on cutting the scene and telling me to kiss with more passion and longer. Honestly, I couldn’t understand what was wrong with how I was kissing.”

“So, this went on for several takes, until finally, Alexander just told me straight up, ‘Anne, I think Francis wants us to French Kiss.’ I was in awkward shock for maybe a split second, as I’ve never French kissed in any of my films or TV shows. But I just quickly said, ‘Oh, ok, game!’ and went ahead and did it, got Francis’ approval and it was a perfect take!”

Looking back, Anne cherishes the experience and is glad she took the once-in-a-lifetime chance.

Still part of her Star Studio interview went, “I gave it everything I could. It didn’t seem hard or feel like I was making a sacrifice by leaving work in the Philippines behind because I was enjoying myself and felt it would be an awesome learning experience as an actress.”

Back home, fans, friends and family have expressed pride and joy in Anne’s latest achievement. They include her boyfriend, Erwan Heussaff, his actress-model-sister, Solenn, and Anne’s ex-flame, TV host-actor Luis Manzano.

Netizens raved at her performance as well the minute she posted Blood Ransom’s trailer on her Twitter account. So far, it has over a million hits on YouTube.

For more information on Blood Ransom, visit Viva Films’ Facebook: VIVAFilms and follow us on twitter: @VIVA_Films and IG: viva_films.

FROM THE INQUIRER

UK critics praise Gia, other Filipinos By Bayani San Diego Jr. | Philippine Daily InquirerOctober 21, 2014 | 12:18 am


 CRITIC describes Gia Macuja-Atchison’s voice as “glorious, expressive, haunting.”

Based on Atchison’s e-mail, the Filipinos in the cast are having a ball—aptly, in a roundabout way.

Although she is hardly a West End newcomer, she finds the “Here Lies Love” marathon quite grueling.

Small cast

“Rehearsals went very fast. I won’t lie. This is unlike any other show I have ever done. It’s very tough. There are so many factors involved: Intricate dance moves, close and tight harmonies, elaborate costume changes, plus a set that moves around the actors and the audience,” she says.

Rehearsals started at 10 a.m. and ended at 6 p.m., six times a week, she recounts.

“We are a small cast of 17. Everyone is constantly doing something on or off stage. No time to sit down and rest,” she says.

She is not complaining, though. “I am enjoying every minute. Working at the National Theatre is such an honor. Working with this award-winning team is such a fantastic experience,” she adds.

(Preview performances in the Dorfman Theater at the National Theatre began on Sept. 30; the musical opened on Oct. 13.)

“The National Theatre, like the Royal Shakespeare Company, is subsidized by the British government … so it is highly respected here,” she says.

The Filipino cast members “are having a blast singing about our country,” she reports.

David Byrne and Fatboy Slim’s “Here Lies Love” traces the rise and fall of former First Lady Imelda Marcos with a disco-infused sound track.

It is a story that she is very familiar with, Atchison says. “My father, Cesar P. Macuja, worked in the Marcos government for many years.

He was deputy to the prime minister (Cesar Virata) and was undersecretary of trade and industry. He was the first high government official to resign 10 days before the Edsa revolution (in 1986). So you can say my family and I are quite familiar with Imelda Marcos and many of her friends and their lifestyle.”

To prime herself for the show, she says, “I am vocalizing every day. I am trying to familiarize myself with the music by listening to the recordings, as well as researching on the material.”

Currently on leave as head of the singing department of the Grosvenor School of Performing Arts, the teacher has no qualms about enrolling in a regular dance class “because the show requires a bit of dancing.”

Nerve-wracking audition

She admits that the dance tryout was “the most nerve-wracking part of the audition.”

The audition masters, however, “were very considerate and made us all feel fairly confident in the end.”

The “Here Lies Love” adventure has been a goose-bump experience for the Pinoys in the cast so far, she says.

“It’s very surreal singing about our country in London. We couldn’t be more proud, though. [With this show,] we hope to make more people aware of Philippine culture, making us even more proud to be Filipino … we can shout [about our country] to the whole world,” she says.

Atchison, sister of prima ballerina Lisa Macuja, has been based in London since 1998, when she joined the cast of “Miss Saigon” (covering for Gigi and Ellen) and later “The Lion King” (covering for Princess Nala)—both long-running productions in the West End.

Prior to her move to the United Kingdom (where she met and married Robert Atchison, “leader of the ‘Lion King’ orchestra”), she appeared in several plays in Manila, from “Les Miserables” to “Into the Woods.”

“The theater is my home away from home. I love it! I’ve been working professionally in the industry for more than 20 years,” she says. “I teach it now to my students and my own children. I am honored to be able to share my talents in this new, groundbreaking musical on the Philippines.”

FROM UK TELEGRAPH

Here Lies Love, National Theatre, review: 'Don't cry for me Filipinos?' By Dominic Cavendish9:28AM BST 14 Oct 2014  UK TELEGRAPH

REVIEWS:
The life of Imelda Marcos, told in disco music... It's a bold idea, says Dominic Cavendish, but it works
4 out of 5 stars.


Natalie Mendoza stars as Imelda Marcos, in 'Here Lies Love' by David Byrne and Fatboy Slim Photo

“Here Lies Love” are the words that the Philippines’ most notorious politician Imelda Marcos – still going at 85 – once said she wanted as her tombstone epitaph. But this “disco musical” about her life – co-devised by the transatlantic talents of American singer-songwriter David Byrne (of Talking Heads fame) and Brighton-based beat-master Norman Cook (aka Fatboy Slim) – has nothing of a funeral wake about it.

An imported hit from New York’s Public Theater, where it premiered last year, it “christens” the National’s newly and brilliantly refurbished third theatre – formerly the Cottesloe, now the Dorfman (after the NT’s stalwart donor Lloyd Dorfman) – using an effervescent mass of laser lights, pounding beats, psychedelic projections and bopping bodies on the dance floor.

Most of those bodies belong to the audience. You can sit this one out, if you like, in the comfort of seats in the galleries. But I suspect it’s more fun being gently cajoled this way and that by ushers. The willing herd take their place around shifting podiums to become up-close and personal witnesses to the remarkable story of a woman from a modest background who was wooed and won by politician Ferdinand Marcos, infatuated the people in turn but became too seduced by the trappings of power, finally paying the price when she ignominiously fled the country in the people’s uprising of 1986.

The temperament and trajectory might put you in mind of Eva Peron, but this tackles its beauteous biographical subject in a very different style from Andrew Lloyd Webber’s (currently running) Evita. If there were a song for every one of the thousand plus shoes in Imelda’s infamous collection, we’d be here til Christmas. But though the 90-minute piece, directed by Alex Timbers, is packed with numbers (there’s scant dialogue), it moves swiftly and succinctly through the essentials.

* Projection designer Peter Nigrini gives us chronological steers by flashing up dates and fascinating bits of archive footage. And Byrne, who drew initial inspiration from the fact that Imelda loved to boogie, uses real-life quotation in his lyrics, making the words direct, simple and colloquial.

If there is no absolute stand-out tune (“Don’t Cry for Me Filipinos” as it were), much of the music – not least the title track – is instantly catchy and avoids electro monotony. The show makes the effective point, through it’s immersive techniques, that the Marcos machine put one nation under a groove – and a spell; we are encouraged to applaud their early, more enlightened moves, only gradually do their actions darken.

Though it delivers “360” degree theatre, it can’t be said to achieve a fully rounded portrait of its anti-heroine; perhaps there was always less there than met the eye. But Natalie Mendoza is still sensationally good as this self-styled queen of hearts, beginning on a note of serene purity and transforming – via increasing pill dependency, the anguish of infidelity and multiple costume changes - into a more snarling specimen.

There’s strong support too from Gia Macuja Atchison as her rejected childhood friend Estrella, from a sleek-haired Mark Bautista as Ferdinand Marcos and from Dean John-Wilson as Ninoy Aquino, Imelda’s one-time lover, who became the rallying point for opposition only to be brutally assassinated.

The show doesn’t quite grasp that holy grail of combining club-nite excitement with fully engrossing theatre. But my goodness it comes close and what a way to launch the Dorfman.

Until January. Tickets: nationaltheatre.org.uk

FROM PHILSTAR

Martin still has unfulfilled dreams DIRECTLINE By Boy Abunda (The Philippine Star) | Updated October 21, 2014 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


One of the things Martin Nievera dreams of achieving that he hasn’t done yet is singing in a band. —Photo by VER PAULINO

After 32 years in the business, you’d think Martin Nievera has seen and done it all, and yet, Martin himself will be the first to admit that he still has a lot of unfulfilled dreams.

One of them is to be in a band. Yes, Martin, who has sold out all of the country’s major venues and performed in other parts of the world as well, still dreams of doing and achieving things, and says that is what keeps him going. “Thirty-two years in the business, 52 years old, and I still have dreams and I can still fulfill them,” says Martin, whose achievements have taken him so far beyond his Concert King title. If there is anything Martin has proven in all the time he has been in the business, it’s that the truly good never stop trying to be better.

One of the things he dreams of achieving that he hasn’t done yet is singing in a band. Thus, he was overjoyed when his recording company PolyEast Records gave him the chance to record an album titled Big Mouth, Big Band. But before you go thinking that Martin has started crooning standards, the album is actually a collection of songs by some of the biggest bands in the music business — Earth Wind and Fire (Sing a Song), Chicago (Will You Still Love Me), Queen (Love of my Life), Toto (I Won’t Hold You Back), the Doobie Brothers (What A Fool Belies) and Kansas (Dust in the Wind) — hence the tag “big band” — performed by Martin, with actual instrumentalists and arrangements for each one.

* The album was thus quite tedious and expensive to do, explains Martin, who finished the 12 songs in four days. “One of my dreams is to be in a band. I’ve never been in a band. So PolyEast, which doesn’t need to do this because it’s very expensive to do what we’re doing where you have a band, you have actual paper arrangements for each musician, then you have ad-libs by actual instrumentalists like a cellist, a trumpet player, a trombone player, and every instrument of the album is live. Everything is raw. Everything’s organic, which is I think what the industry wants today, not stuff where you’re trying to turn computers into music.”

“Everyone thinks ‘big band’ means ‘Big Band’ like (Michael) Bublé or (Frank) Sinatra,” says Martin. “No. These are the hits of the big bands, not Big Band music.” He also revealed plans to come up with a second album that has essentially the same concept, but this time, with the music of “big” OPM bands.

Being able to take on new projects and dream of new frontiers to conquer is what keeps Martin going after all this time. As a performer, Martin has failed and been knocked down so many times that by now, he has already mastered what it takes to get back up.

How did he do it? “I just focused on work. I didn’t try to bounce back on anything. I didn’t say, ‘Ah, gano’n? Watch this.’ Hindi ko ginamit ‘yun. I never announced a come-back, I never announced that I’m going to be making it again. I never forced it down anyone’s throat that I’m going to be something again. I just did it.”

Today, Martin has learned to take each moment that he’s onstage and make those the best moments of his career. If he is, say, on ASAP, and he’s only given four lines of a song to sing, he will make them the best four lines of his career.

“If you have only four lines, then make them the best four lines of your life. Make your performance the best show on earth. Don’t go there with a bitter attitude and say, ‘Bakit wala akong solo today?’ or ‘Bakit aapat lang ang linya ko?’ You make them the best four lines of your life and then you go home proud, that you did something good. That’s the new Martin. I always remind myself, ‘Make every moment golden.’ Don’t count your golden moments, make every moment golden.”

Charice says no plans of transitioning to become male By Chuck Smith (philstar.com) | Updated October 20, 2014 - 3:50pm 5 114 googleplus0 0


Charice Pempenco with Oprah Winfrey Photo from Charice Pempengco's Instagram account

MANILA, Philippines – Although she admits that her “soul is male,” singer Charice Pempengco said she has no plans of having operations to become male.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey for the TV host's “Where Are They Now” program on her cable network OWN aired Sunday (Monday morning Manila time), Charice said: “Basically, like, my soul is male. But I'm not gonna go through that stage where I'm gonna change everything.”

She added: “Not my change my body. I would change like this—cut my hair, wear boy clothes and everything. But that's all.”

The 22-year-old reunited with Winfrey in the television series more than a year after she came out as a lesbian in 2013.

The “Pyramid” singer admits she knew she has been a lesbian when she was five years old.

“I was in grade school and I saw this girl. And I knew I was different. I didn't know what it was but I just knew at that time, it felt special,” she said. “When I was 10, I was like, “That's it. I'm gay.' Like I found the word.”

Charice added she was “a mess” before coming out. “When I was this person, it felt like it was a character I was portraying for my mom, for my family to be happy,” she explained.

* She also admits suffering from depression after her father Ricky Pempengco was murdered in 2011.

“When my father got murdered, that's when everything fell apart. I got more depressed,” she said.

“Losing my dad, we didn't have closure. When I went to the funeral, I just saw him there and regretted everything... I took all those feelings and pain in me and that made me stronger to tell myself that it's time to stand up and get there,” Charice said.

Charice's mother Raquel Pempencgo raised the singer alone after she and Ricky separated.

When asked if it was her father's death that liberated her, Charice said: “It's just terrible, the feeling after he died, the feeling of being alone, I was alone. Very few friends I just told and I know my mom felt it. I just felt that she didn't just want to admit it.”

Charice and Raquel had a public falling out after the singer's coming out. But Charice said that all is well between her and her mother.

“I can say now that we are really like best friends,” Charice said of her mother. “I can't ask for more, I am happy.”


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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