ANDERSON COOPER CLARIFIES ISSUES AGAINST SEC. MAR ROXAS, IGNORES KORINA SANCHEZ COMMENT

"The interior minister, he’s upset with me saying that I tweeted something like there’s no government presence here.
There’s certainly government present. hat I was saying, and I didn’t tweet at all is that I have not seen a big relief effort out in communities by Philippine military personnel during search for bodies." Cooper

ALSO: PRIORITIZING LIVING OVER DEAD: DIVIDED WE STAND

Or maybe the statement from UN Humanitarian Valerie Amos explains it all. In a statement she sent to the AFP, Amos said "We are focusing on the living not the dead ... We are not busy counting bodies but are focusing on supporting those who survived and act accordingly."

ALSO: REMEMBER THE 'BINAY VS KORINA PART 2 IN 2012?

Sanchez was heard (according to Binay's camp) to make remarks such as "mga maiitim at maliliit na mga maligno" (dark, little monsters), on her DZMM program Rated Korina during its August 24, 2012 broadcast.
"Hindi ho ba kaya, noong wala pang DILG secretary ay maraming mga maiitim at maliliit na mga maligno ang siya pong naka-ano dyan, umaabang-abang para makuha po ang pwestong yan. Pero mabuti na lamang po, ay binasbasan po ng kaliwanagan ng pag-iisip ang ating pinuno na si P-Noy (Aquino) at si Secretary Robredo ang kanyang napili para dyan po manungkulan."Sanchez
 

ALSO: ANDERSON COOPER VS KORINA SANCHEZ: GOES VIRAL ON TWEETER

Sanchez had earlier bashed Cooper over his critical reporting on the government’s slow response to the aftermath of Yolanda in Tacloban City. The CNN broadcaster responded in kind in an exchange that provoked a storm of comments from netizens, most of whom chided the two news personalities for their sideshow in the midst of a national disaster.


ANDERSON COOPER CLARIFIES ISSUES AGAINST SEC. MAR ROXAS, IGNORES KORINA SANCHEZ COMMENT
 



MANILA, NOVEMBER 18, 2013
(EXAMINER.COM) POSTED November 14, 2013 - The CNN anchorman Anderson Cooper who is now in Tacloban City to cover the damage and relief operations of the Philippine government explained his tweets that almost questioned the credibility of the persons involved in the distribution of relief goods in Tacloban City this morning, Nov. 14, 2013 (Philippine time).

But if he clarified the issues between him and Sec. Mar Roxas, he ignored Korina Sanchez's statement.

"The interior minister, he’s upset with me saying that I tweeted something like there’s no government presence here.

There’s certainly government present. What I was saying, and I didn’t tweet at all that I have not seen a big relief effort out in communities by Philippine military personnel during search for bodies."

The Philippine government is working so hard to help the victims of Super Typhoon Yolanda that hit the Visayas region last Friday morning, but despite the government's effort to help the needy, some people are still criticizing them.

According to Mr. Cooper, he saw a demolition not a construction job in the city.

"There is no real evidence of organized recovery of relief. It is demolition not a construction job here. I have not seen a large Philippine military presence out around here. The search and rescue never materialized. There are mothers searching for their children, it is a sickening sight five days later," Anderson Cooper tweeted.

Contrary to report, Mr. Cooper hasn't yet erased his controversial tweets. You can still access his account and read all of his tweets that caught the attention of netizens and Ms. Korina Sanchez.

And speaking of Ms. Korina Sanchez, she is now being criticized by netizens because of her previous statement regarding the tweets of the anchorman.

After Yolanda: When prioritizing the living over the dead is just another option
November 15, 2013 EXAMINER.COM

After super typhoon Yolanda ravaged Central Philippines exactly a week ago, bodies of victims who died from possibly the worst natural disaster ever to hit the country lie scattered in the streets, evacuation centers, schools, churches, under the rubble and every other place imaginable that bore witness to their last breath.

Typhoon Yolanda known internationally as Typhoon Haiyan, a Category 5 hurricane, packed strong winds exceeding 180 mph and brought in a dangerous storm surge that engulfed houses and establishments in Central Philippines with Tacloban City, Samar and neighboring areas in the province of Leyte as the hardest hit.

Believed to be the strongest storm ever to make landfall, Yolanda’s hours of rage destroyed not just billions of property, it also took the lives of thousands who perished from the monstrous impact of pounding water and wind combined.

When Yolanda subsided, survivors began the harrowing process of finding loved ones among the dead. Those who were able to find their own were the few “fortunate” ones as many others who did not continue to search in the hopes of either giving their dead a proper burial, being with them for the last time or at least knowing where they would be sent so they could light a candle for them.

After the Storm

In Tacloban, images of grief, chaos and destruction emerged from the few media groups that were able to transmit videos, news reports, inside stories and pictures of the devastated city the day after the storm.

For the first time, the world was able to peek inside Tacloban with its devastated people overwhelmed by fear, grief and incomprehensible loss.

We saw parents tending to their dead children who slipped from their grasps during the storm, people covering the dead with blankets and sacks, children crying, the sick and injured needing medical help, people scavenging for what’s around in order to survive.

The Philippine government who claimed to have been hampered by destroyed infrastructure and impassable roads leading to the affected areas had been continuously criticized by many from both local and international media for its slow response and seemingly flawed logistics in addressing the people’s basic needs.

According to CNN’s Anderson Cooper who came to Tacloban a few days after the storm, there was still no clear indication of who was in “charge of the Philippine side of operation” five days after Yolanda left the Philippines.

Based on survivors’ accounts posted on social media and other news reports, dead bodies were still scattered in the streets, rotting and uncollected, five days later, prompting negative posts against the Aquino administration from netizens all around the world.

Don’t Blame?

However, given the enormity of the tragedy, many are saying that the Philippine government should not be blamed for being overwhelmed by the crisis in Tacloban and other hard hit areas. According to them, no one can absolutely predict the amount of destruction Mother Nature can unleash and anyone can get caught off-guard.

The death toll from Yolanda is currently estimated to have reached over 3,000, veering away from the estimated 2,500 dead bodies that Philippine President Noynoy Aquino initially said was “the figure” that they were “working on”.

With regard to the growing number of still uncollected corpses, Cabinet Secretary Rene Almendras claimed that they are overwhelmed by the number of bodies to be recovered. He further added, according to a news report, that body recoveries stopped at one point because they ran out of body bags.

In the aftermath of Yolanda, mass graves had been built to accommodate hundreds of victims who perished, most of them probably unidentified.

They Had An Option

At a glance, it’s easy to understand why the Aquino government is overwhelmed.

As evident on the pace of relief operations, it does not appear to have enough local resources to stage a large-scale operation to deal with the aftermath of a super storm such as Yolanda. More specifically, it does not have the ability to singlehandedly take care of urgently recovering those who perished from the storm while also attending to the immediate needs of those who survived.

That is understandable.

What is not comprehensible, however, is the inability of the Aquino government to outsource the job to professional emergency response teams who are trained and equipped with the skills and resources to handle the problem of handling those who lost their lives from natural calamities like hurricanes.

There are companies who offer their services to countries plagued by large scale tragedies that require the recovery and the accounting of those who perished. The job of such companies is to help collect and identify the dead with their belongings, create a database, and hopefully reunite them with those they left behind.

In 2004, one of such agencies provided their services during the aftermath of the tsunami in Thailand.

The Philippines, with all the monetary donations pouring in from all over the world, should not have had the problem to pay for such services. Tapping the resources and talent of a dedicated skilled team would have eased the government's burden of handling the monumental task of taking care of the thousands of lives lost that needed immediate attention.

A Matter of Priorities

We do not know what reasons the Aquino government has for not seeking professional help.

Perhaps, they thought they could handle the task themselves or maybe they didn’t think they would have the resources to finance the services.

Or maybe the statement from UN Humanitarian Valerie Amos explains it all.

In a statement she sent to the AFP, Amos said "We are focusing on the living not the dead ... We are not busy counting bodies but are focusing on supporting those who survived and act accordingly."

To the regular bystander, that may just be a statement no different from any other statements made in press briefings by people trying to do their job but for those who lost their loved ones to the storm who want to be reunited for the last time, the impact of those words could be unfathomable.

Divided We Stand

In social media, rampant criticisms for the Aquino government have been met with resistance by those who appeal for kindness, understanding and unity in the wake of this tragedy. According to them, criticizing the government fosters negativity and those who do so should just help instead. Critics, on the other hand, dismiss such accusations by saying pointing out one’s flaws does not equate to not doing anything for the victims.

Interestingly, while diverse perspectives have been thrown at each other in varying degrees of decency, such disagreements have not dampened the generosity of people from all around the world, rich or poor, in extending help to the victims of typhoon Yolanda.

With increased foreign aid and assistance along with local reinforcements from both the Philippine government and the private sectors, the situation in hard hit areas such as Tacloban, Samar and Capiz are expected to improve.

Unfortunately for many of those who perished, innocent children especially, and their loved ones left behind, the chance to connect may now be a lost cause due to a possible oversight that is irreversible - a painful learning experience that may haunt this wounded nation for a long time.

For them, we light a candle.

For those who wish to help :

The American Red Cross

Habitat for Humanity

The Philippine Red Cross

Unicef

How to Help the Victims of Yolanda

When tragedy strikes a few days before Christmas : How do you celebrate?

ALSO:

REPORT FROM ABS-CBN LAST YEAR

9/02/2012 12:35:00 AM
VP Binay VS. Korina Sanchez Round 2

More than a year after filing a complaint against Korina Sanchez, Vice President Jejomar Binay cries foul again to what he consider "unethical remarks" made by the ABS-CBN News anchor.

Sanchez was heard (according to Binay's camp) to make remarks such as "mga maiitim at maliliit na mga maligno" (dark, little monsters), on her DZMM program Rated Korina during its August 24 broadcast.

Hindi ho ba kaya, noong wala pang DILG secretary ay maraming mga maiitim at maliliit na mga maligno ang siya pong naka-ano dyan, umaabang-abang para makuha po ang pwestong yan. Pero mabuti na lamang po, ay binasbasan po ng kaliwanagan ng pag-iisip ang ating pinuno na si P-Noy (Aquino) at si Secretary Robredo ang kanyang napili para dyan po manungkulan.

Binay's camp has filed a formal complaint to ABS-CBN for what they believe "constitute a clear breach of broadcasting standards and ethics."

We are certain that Mrs. Sanchez-Roxas will claim, in her defense, that she did not name the Vice President and she had used the article 'mga' to refer to several unnamed individuals. To us, this is a flimsy defense, read the complaint filed before the ABS-CBN ombudsman.

Vice President Binay had expressed his interest for the vacated post of the late Jesse Robredo.

Last Friday, Sanchez's husband Mar Roxas was just confirmed to be the next DILG secretary.

Interestingly, Sanchez wrote an OP-ed published for the Philippine Star last Thursday, posing a challenge to whoever succeeds the late Jesse Robredo.

I offer this challenge. Can you count with the fingers of both your hands, mayors all over the country that could approximate that of a Jesse Robredo?

A mayor who was able to turn around his city from third class to first class in a span of only two years in office!

An amazing feat by any standard! Assess your mayor or governor.

Did he somehow become richer while in office?

Is he arrogant, only becoming “human” in times of elections or when media is covering him? Did life become better under his term?

Is he or she free from any investigation of anomalies, especially those concerning public funds?

How are the services in your city hall?

How is the garbage collection?

Crime rate? Have businesses flourished? (read entire OP-ed here)

Photo courtesy of http://everythinginbudget.blogspot.com

Anderson Cooper-Korina Sanchez tiff goes viral on the Internet By Gil Cabacungan Philippine Daily Inquirer 1:49 am | Saturday, November 16th, 2013


http://technology.inquirer.net/files/2013/11/korina-sanchez-and-anderson1.jpg
Korina Sanchez and Anderson Cooper FILE PHOTOS

Anderson Cooper-Korina Sanchez tiff goes viral on the Internet By Gil Cabacungan Philippine Daily Inquirer 1:49 am | Saturday, November 16th, 2013

Call it a virtual catfight, a non-issue, or a case of taking things personally, but the recent tit for tat between CNN broadcast journalist Anderson Cooper and ABS-CBN news anchor Korina Sanchez had netizens and TV viewers momentarily distracted from the grim images of the devastation left by Supertyphoon “Yolanda.”

Sanchez had earlier bashed Cooper over his critical reporting on the government’s slow response to the aftermath of Yolanda in Tacloban City.

The CNN broadcaster responded in kind in an exchange that provoked a storm of comments from netizens, most of whom chided the two news personalities for their sideshow in the midst of a national disaster.

In his eponymously named program on CNN aired live from Manila yesterday morning, Cooper said of Sanchez’ earlier remarks: “A radio broadcaster named Korina Sanchez has taken issue with some of my reporting. She also is not just a radio broadcaster; she also happens to be the wife of the Interior Minister (Secretary Manuel Roxas II) who is overseeing the relief effort on the ground. Miss Sanchez seems to be under the mistaken impression that I said I saw no presence of Philippine government on the ground in Tacloban. I never said that.”

Hot topic

Sanchez had criticized Anderson in her radio program on Wednesday afternoon on DZMM after he reported on the government’s less than stellar response to the needs of Yolanda survivors. Said the ABS-CBN news anchor:

“Itong si Anderson Cooper, sabi wala daw government presence sa Tacloban. Mukhang hindi niya alam ang sinasabi niya. (This Anderson Cooper. He said there was no government presence in Tacloban. It seems he doesn’t know what he is saying).”

Sanchez’s remarks became a hot topic on Twitter, something that Cooper was not about to let slip by. Said the CNN journalist:

“Here’s what I actually said: As for who exactly is in charge of the Philippine side of operation, that is not really clear. I am just surprised. I expected on this Day Five, I thought I may have gotten here very late, that things will be well in hand; it does not seem like that. People are desperate, they do not have any place for shelter. It’s very difficult for people to get food, neighbors are helping out neighbors, water is in short supply, it is a very very bad situation here.”

Cooper, who arrived in Manila on Monday, took a dig at Sanchez for not being on the ground to do her reporting.

“Miss Sanchez is welcome to go there (Tacloban City) and I would urge her to go there. I don’t know if she has, but her husband is the interior minister and I’m sure she can arrange a flight,” he added.

Deployed to Ormoc

Cooper was unaware that Sanchez had been deployed to Ormoc City, another town devastated by Yolanda, on Thursday night, her first time to see the destruction in the region.

Sanchez’s coanchors in the news program “TV Patrol,” Ted Failon and Noli de Castro, had flown to Tacloban City earlier—Failon on Thursday, while De Castro had been there since Monday.

The Inquirer sought out Sanchez for comment, but her talent manager GR Rodis said she was “out of reach.” Sanchez, Rodis said over the phone, was “busy distributing relief goods either in Samar or in Northern Cebu. She told me her signal would be spotty.”

An ABS-CBN insider, who refused to be named due to lack of authority to speak on the issue, said both Failon and De Castro shared Cooper’s observation about the government’s slow response in the aftermath of Yolanda’s fury.

Cooper said that as a journalist, he made it a point to be as “accurate as possible” in his reports to “help people on the ground become more efficient.”

He added: “Accuracy is what we care most about here at CNN.”

Stressed the news anchor: “I saw the work being done and the work that is not being done.”

Cooper also took on President Aquino’s comments on the foreign media’s unflattering coverage of the government’s relief efforts, specifically the President’s “counsel” that reports by foreign journalists should not only be accurate but must also be able “to uplift the spirit of the Filipino people and show stories of resilience and hope and faith, and show the world how strong the Filipinos are.”

In his program, Cooper replied: “All week long, in every report we have done, we have shown how strong the Filipinos are. The Filipino people, the people of Tacloban and Samar and Cebu, and all these places where so many have died, they are strong—not just to have survived this storm, but they are strong to have survived the aftermath of this storm,” he said.

“They have survived for a week now, often with very little food, with very little water, with very little medical attention. Can you imagine the strength it takes to be living in a shack, to be living, sleeping on the streets next to the body of your dead children? Can you imagine that strength? I can’t and I have seen that strength day in and day out in the Philippines and we honor them day in day out here in the Philippines, and we honor them with every broadcast that we make.”

Field day

Netizens too, had a field day, tweeting about the issue.

“It’s embarrassing for Filipinos that the wife of a high govt official is the source of so much division at a time when we should be united,” said netizen @Article8Jester.

“Ms. Korina Sanchez, act as a journalist not a wife! ’wag mo naman masyadong pene-personal ang trabaho mo! alam mo ang mali at tama,” said netizen @akosiprettysam.

“Korina Sanchez should have the guts to go to tacloban and see the disaster for herself. Because saying something without the proof is BS,” said netizen @LanceLim27.

“@andersoncooper gets all emotional as he talks about how strong Filipinos are. Just wanna go to him right now and hug him,” said netizen @NickeyyDees.

“Korina hiyang hiya naman daw si Anderson Cooper sa credibility mo,” netizen @markdalas said.

“She reported in ormoc not in tacloban. She should do her reporting in tacloban without a face mask and smell the stench like Mr. Cooper.,” said netizen Jay Labayo.

Some netizens opted to look beyond the Sanchez-Cooper virtual catfight.

“Korina Sanchez vs. Anderson Cooper. duh! this shouldn’t be an issue,” said netizen @aikeevarona.

“Di nman tlaga alam ni Anderson Cooper, o kahit ni Korina Sanchez, o kahit sino, ang nangyayari.Ang tunay na nakakaalam? ’Yung mga nakakaranas,” said netizen @w3cw3c.

“Bashing Korina Sanchez doesn’t make you a better person. Helping “Yolanda” victims does. Move on, people,” netizen @albacharlyn posted on Twitter.

Blogger Niko Batallones chided Anderson for a different reason:
“Diyos ko po, Anderson, bakit mo pinatulan si Korina? “ tweeted @nikobatallones. With a report from Ramon Royandoyan


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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