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PHNO PRESIDENTIAL (DU30) NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

ECONOMIC EXPERT: 'WHITE HOUSE SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW WHAT DUTERTE MEANS'
(Peter Wallace: “I’m not sure that the foreign community will ever be able to understand it but I think people in the US government will, right? I think the people in the White House are smart enough to know that what he’s saying is not what he intends,” he added.)
[RELATED: Duterte reminded - A successful president is a statesman]


OCTOBER 5 -President Rodrigo Duterte reviews an honor guard with his Vietnamese counterpart Tran Dai Quang during a welcome ceremony at the presidential palace in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Sept. 29. AP
The White House is “smart enough” to weigh on the verbal attacks of President Rodrigo Duterte against the United States, a businessman and economic expert said on Wednesday. On Tuesday, Duterte launched fresh tirades against US President Barack Obama, saying he could “go to hell.” “It’s his manner of speaking, right? It’s his expressionism. He doesn’t mean for Obama to go to hell, right? It’s just the way he talks, right?” Peter Wallace told reporters in a Palace briefing. READ: Duterte to Obama: Go to hell! “I’m not sure that the foreign community will ever be able to understand it but I think people in the US government will, right? I think the people in the White House are smart enough to know that what he’s saying is not what he intends,” he added. Wallace, an Inquirer columnist, believes Duterte only wanted an “equal partnership” with its allies. “I don’t see him as trying to divorce himself from America. That would make no sense, right? He’s just trying to establish an equal partnership and that’s a different thing,” he said. READ MORE...RELATED,
Duterte reminded: A successful president is a statesman...

ALSO FIRST 100 DAYS: Duterte rates himself ‘6’ in scale of 1-10; highest rating in Mindanao 88%
[RELATED: Duterte opens text hotline vs corruption]


OCTOBER 7 -PRESIDENT Duterte INQUIRER PHOTO/JOAN BONDOC
President Rodrigo Duterte gave himself a modest rating for his performance in his first 100 days in office, though three-quarters of Filipinos were satisfied with how he was doing despite coming under fire abroad for his deadly crackdown on suspected drug dealers and users. “On a scale of 1-10, I give myself a 6,” the President said in a text message to the Inquirer. “To me it is a modest achievement. I’m not ambitious in scoring myself. I only deal with reality. Success to me is something else.” Despite his self-rated “modest achievement,” his popularity soared during his first three months in office in an apparent endorsement by Filipinos of his brutal crackdown on crime. The unprecedented purge has left more than 3,500 people dead and raised fears of mass extrajudicial killings, triggering global condemnation from the United States, United Nations and European Union. Seventy-six percent of Filipinos polled by Social Weather Stations (SWS) on Sept. 24-27 said they were “satisfied” with Mr. Duterte’s performance, with just 11 percent reporting being “dissatisfied.” Thirteen percent were undecided. READ MORE...
RELATED, Duterte opens text hotline vs corruption...

ALSO: Duterte says he's 'lonely'; At home in Palace, 'I'm alone'
[RELATED: 22 things to know about 'Duterte Harry']


OCTOBER 7 -Tough-talking Rodrigo Duterte on Friday said it's "lonely" to be president, as he offered a glimpse of his personal struggles as the Philippines' chief executive. "It's lonely, I'm alone," Duterte said in a Banana Congress in turf Davao City, adding in jest that there are no women by his side, only security aides who leave him after making sure "I go home alive." "Hindi ko man mayakap mga gwardya, lalaki man. Walang babae, kung minsan mga aide ko umuuwi naman yan sila paghatid sa akin just to make sure I go home alive after that mabangungot ako wala sila pakielam," he added. Duterte, whose family lives in Davao City, said he usually returns to the presidential residence in Malacanang by 2:00. "My earliest go home time to Malacanang on the average is 2:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, then I wake up because my day starts at 1:00 so I tend to all the business of the government and again I go home," Duterte said. He said he is usually swamped with work, and that he has to read plenty of folders from various government departments. READ MORE...RELATED,
22 things to know about 'Duterte Harry'...

ALSO Palace to Leni: Aside from int’l aid, President also wants respect
[RELATED: Panelo - EDCA valid; Duterte can terminate defense deal]


OCTOBER 7 -Malacañang on Wednesday responded to the statement of Vice President Leni Robredo that President Rodrigo Duterte’s manner of speaking may affect international aid to the country's anti-poverty initiatives.
At a press briefing, presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella said the President is not after the international support but the country’s dignity. “I can understand. But if you notice the tone—and this is in no reference to the Vice President—but according to how the suggestion was framed, that we should be careful because of the aid—that the aid may be cut. From the President’s perspective, it’s not so much the aid that we’re after. It’s just that we want to be received the dignity and not subservient,” Abella said. He said the President seemed to be urging the Filipinos to stand by its country. “If you notice, he said dapat handa tayo, na we should be ready. In other words, for him, the great issue is the dignity that we have as a Filipino nation, not so much now na baka mahirapan tayo. Hindi sinasabing walang kwenta iyon,” Abella explained. READ MORE...Panelo: EDCA valid; Duterte can terminate defense deal...

ALSO: Lorenzana tells Duterte: US troops in Mindanao are safe
[RELATED: Defense chief not expecting int'l backlash over Duterte tirades]


OCTOBER 7 -Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana on Friday said the small number of US troops in Mindanao, whom President Rodrigo Duterte wants to leave, are not in danger and can protect themselves against terrorist attacks. Speaking before foreign correspondents at a briefing, Lorenzana said he explained to the President that the U.S. special forces are safely housed in the Philippine military’s Camp Navarro in Zamboanga City. “I clarified that with him and I told him that the US troops are not in danger because there are just very few of them, just about 107 people, who are actually housed in Camp Navarro in Calarian in Zamboanga City,” Lorenza told the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines. “All they do is operate their drones and some intelligence equipment to help our troops in the south and I told him they are not in danger of being harmed by any terrorist. At same time they are actually combatants, they are not civilians so they can protect themselves,” he added. READ MORE...RELATED, Defense chief not expecting int'l backlash over Duterte tirades...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

‘White House smart enough to know what Duterte means’


President Rodrigo Duterte reviews an honor guard with his Vietnamese counterpart Tran Dai Quang during a welcome ceremony at the presidential palace in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Sept. 29. AP

MANILA, OCTOBER 10, 2016 (INQUIRER) By: Nestor Corrales @NCorralesINQ October 5th, 2016 - The White House is “smart enough” to weigh on the verbal attacks of President Rodrigo Duterte against the United States, a businessman and economic expert said on Wednesday.

On Tuesday, Duterte launched fresh tirades against US President Barack Obama, saying he could “go to hell.”

“It’s his manner of speaking, right? It’s his expressionism. He doesn’t mean for Obama to go to hell, right? It’s just the way he talks, right?” Peter Wallace told reporters in a Palace briefing.

READ: Duterte to Obama: Go to hell!

“I’m not sure that the foreign community will ever be able to understand it but I think people in the US government will, right? I think the people in the White House are smart enough to know that what he’s saying is not what he intends,” he added.

Wallace, an Inquirer columnist, believes Duterte only wanted an “equal partnership” with its allies.

“I don’t see him as trying to divorce himself from America. That would make no sense, right? He’s just trying to establish an equal partnership and that’s a different thing,” he said.

READ MORE...

READ: Action, not words

The businessman said the public should not take Duterte’s words literally.

“The way he talks is not the way in which he thinks,” he said.

Wallace said the President only wanted to be “a truly independent country.”

“He’s trying I think to establish that the Philippines is a truly independent country. It is no longer a colony of the US. It is no longer subservient in any way to the US. It wants its independence and in a fairly dramatic way that he’s trying to put that across, right?” he said.

In the same press briefing, presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella said the government’s independent foreign policy also meant that Duterte wanted an “equal footing” with other countries.

“He wants the Philippines to be on equal footing with others whether they are big or not. He wants just an equal footing,” Abella said.

“It is basically expressing an independent foreign policy that it is not exclusive—that it is inclusive. That we are not to be held down by just one treaty,” he added.

RELATED STORIES

Duterte: I’m no fan of US

On Obama ‘slur’: I never made statement; it’s media spin

VIDEO : Duterte says Obama can go to hell, E.U. to purgatory

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RELATED FROM ABS-CBN

Duterte reminded: A successful president is a statesman Trishia Billones, ABS-CBN News
Posted at Oct 07 2016 03:44 PM


President Rodrigo Duterte jests in his speech during his visit to Police Regional Office 13 Headquarters in Camp Rafael C. Rodriguez, Butuan City on October 6. ROBINSON NIÑAL/PPD

A former security adviser has reminded President Rodrigo Duterte that a successful president is one who can conduct himself like a statesman.

"It’s true what the president said: I was not elected to be a statesman; I was elected as president. But a successful president is a statesman," Jose Almonte, who served under former President Fidel V. Ramos, said on ANC's Headstart Friday.

Almonte added, a successful president has to be a statesman "by definition," noting that "a statesman is a man of that state—a state’s man. Man of the state—the state are the people, the country, and the government."

"If you detach yourself from that, who are you as president?," he said.

But Almonte rated the first 100 days of the Duterte presidency as excellent because Duterte supposedly addressed three essential issues—ending internal war with communist rebels, repairing broken politics, and leveling the playing field in land and landless.

Almonte emphasized, there are two factors that can “derail the president’s noble intent": the anti-narcotics campaign with the extrajudicial killings, and the external relations the country is pursuing.

"The external relations of the Philippines has to be handled really with caution, with vision, and with great imagination because we are not an island," he said.

"Of course, we are friends of the United States for a long time, and the EU and others, but it does not mean that we cannot be friends with others, China, Russia," he added.

"The general principle is let us be friends with everybody," he said.

Read: Duterte dares US, EU: Withdraw assistance, go ahead


INQUIRER

FIRST 100 DAYS: Duterte rates himself ‘6’ in scale of 1-10  Philippine Daily Inquirer / 01:18 AM October 07, 2016


PRESIDENT Duterte INQUIRER PHOTO/JOAN BONDOC

President Rodrigo Duterte gave himself a modest rating for his performance in his first 100 days in office, though three-quarters of Filipinos were satisfied with how he was doing despite coming under fire abroad for his deadly crackdown on suspected drug dealers and users.

“On a scale of 1-10, I give myself a 6,” the President said in a text message to the Inquirer. “To me it is a modest achievement. I’m not ambitious in scoring myself. I only deal with reality. Success to me is something else.”

Despite his self-rated “modest achievement,” his popularity soared during his first three months in office in an apparent endorsement by Filipinos of his brutal crackdown on crime.

The unprecedented purge has left more than 3,500 people dead and raised fears of mass extrajudicial killings, triggering global condemnation from the United States, United Nations and European Union.

Seventy-six percent of Filipinos polled by Social Weather Stations (SWS) on Sept. 24-27 said they were “satisfied” with Mr. Duterte’s performance, with just 11 percent reporting being “dissatisfied.” Thirteen percent were undecided.

READ MORE...

SWS asked respondents about Mr. Duterte’s performance as President without reference to the drug war.

The survey, which covered 1,200 adults nationwide, had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Highest rating

In Mindanao, where Mr. Duterte is from, respondents gave him the highest rating, with 88 percent satisfied and just 4 percent not satisfied.

Net satisfaction with Mr. Duterte was +65 (76 percent satisfied minus 11 percent dissatisfied). SWS considers a net approval rating of more than 70 percent “excellent” and 50-69 percent “very good.”

“The President seems to be off to a very good start,” his spokesperson, Ernesto Abella, told reporters as he assessed the survey. “The people trust what he is doing.”

In a statement, Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar said this was “not the time for complacency” as much work still needed to be done.

“More than ever, we ask for the full support of all Filipinos behind the President’s reform agenda so that we can achieve lasting peace and prosperity in the years ahead,” he also said.

Threatened by crime

Earl Parreño of the Institute for Political and Electoral Reform said the drug war resonated more with those aged 25 to 44 because this group was the “most economically productive and they feel threatened by the crimes happening in the country.”

People are applauding Mr. Duterte’s anticrime stance because most of them feel the negative impact of the illegal drug trade in the country, Parreño said.

He noted that even nondrug dependents were affected when one of their family members or friends was a drug user.

The President’s high ratings in the survey signaled a huge jump in support from the May election, which he won in what was considered a landslide but still with just 37.6 percent of the votes.

In the Philippines, the presidential election is decided simply by whoever gets the most votes, and his nearest rival secured 22.6 percent.

Happy to slaughter

Mr. Duterte, a former mayor of Davao City, stormed to victory largely on his pledge to eradicate crime in six months.

He promised that tens of thousands of people would be killed in his crackdown on crime and that he would pardon himself and police if they were charged with mass murder.

Since taking office on June 30, Mr. Duterte has continued his threats and incitements to kill, while unleashing abusive tirades at his critics.

Last week, he said he would be “happy to slaughter” 3 million drug addicts, as he likened his war on drugs to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler’s extermination of Jews.

Apology to Jews

Following an international outcry, he apologized to Jewish people for his Hitler reference but insisted he was “emphatic” in his desire to kill all drug addicts.

He has also said his crime war will continue for at least 12 months.

But the President has also said he is not breaking any laws, insisting that police are killing only in self-defense and many of the other deaths are a result of gang violence.

Mr. Duterte has unleashed a number of expletive-laced tirades against his critics, telling US President Barack Obama “you can go to hell” and saying he may eventually decide to “break up with America.” He has also lashed out at the European Union and the United Nations. —WITH REPORTS FROM CHRISTINE O. AVENDAÑO; ANA ROA, INQUIRER RESEARCH; AFP /TVJ

RELATED STORIES

Traffic, poverty must also be Duterte priorities, analysts say
Analyst: Duterte should push federalism
President’s men: Not perfect, but …

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Duterte opens text hotline vs corruption By Edith Regalado and Christina Mendez (The Philippine Star) | Updated October 9, 2016 - 12:00am 0 4 googleplus0 0


“I am opening a new daily program over PTV 4 that will be aired every morning and it will do nothing but run the complaints texted to the hotline that will be sent directly to Malacañang,” the President said during the National Banana Congress held at the SMX Convention Center at the SM Lanang Premiere here on Friday afternoon. “Just let me know if there is corruption in a city hall, in the (application of) business permit…During my time (as mayor of Davao City), these are processed in three days.” Ace Morandante

DAVAO CITY, Philippines – To get rid of corruption in government, President Duterte will open an anti-corruption text hotline and the complaints will be aired every morning over government-run PTV 4.

“I am opening a new daily program over PTV 4 that will be aired every morning and it will do nothing but run the complaints texted to the hotline that will be sent directly to Malacañang,” the President said during the National Banana Congress held at the SMX Convention Center at the SM Lanang Premiere here on Friday afternoon.

“Just let me know if there is corruption in a city hall, in the (application of) business permit…During my time (as mayor of Davao City), these are processed in three days.”

Duterte said he needs the help of every Filipino in the fight against corruption.

“I am pleading to the people. I promised you no corruption. But if I do not get your help, if you surrender, then there is nothing I can do. All you have to do is text what office, whether local or national, who is the official causing the delay, and I will call him or her to go to Malacañang for them to explain why,” he said.

“If you do not help me, I cannot erase corruption. I cannot just go to any office and start asking anybody…You have to tell me.

“If you do not help me ferret out the bad guys, don’t complain,” he added.

The President also warned pranksters, saying they would be dealt with accordingly.

“I don’t like anybody fooling me. I don’t like you to fool me because I used to fool around,” he said in jest, recalling how his mother used to punish him by having him kneel on munggo seeds as he faced the altar.

Duterte said that all he wants is to have a good name.

“There is no issue against me with regard to graft and corruption. Women, yes, but money, no,” he said.

He asked where he would bring the money when he does not have anything to spend it on. He noted that he could not even get out of Malacañang or go anywhere without the President Security Group following him.

Duterte remains baffled why corruption is prevalent in government transactions despite his stern warning to government officials and employees that they will face his wrath if they will not stop their wrongdoings.

“I cannot understand really and so I’d like to know where the corruption is still prevalent,” he said.

He lamented anew that the country would not progress if corruption and criminality are not properly addressed.

“What could bring us down is really corruption and criminality,” he said.

The President announced his anti-corruption campaign after he received international condemnation for his bloody war against drugs, which was marked by alleged summary killings and human rights abuses.


ABS-CBN

In 100th day as president, Duterte says he's 'lonely' ABS-CBN News Posted at Oct 07 2016 07:39 PM | Updated as of Oct 07 2016 07:58 PM

MANILA - Tough-talking Rodrigo Duterte on Friday said it's "lonely" to be president, as he offered a glimpse of his personal struggles as the Philippines' chief executive. "It's lonely, I'm alone," Duterte said in a Banana Congress in turf Davao City, adding in jest that there no women by his side, only security aides who leave him after making sure "I go home alive."

 "Hindi ko man mayakap mga gwardya, lalaki man. Walang babae, kung minsan mga aide ko umuuwi naman yan sila paghatid sa akin just to make sure I go home alive after that mabangungot ako wala sila pakielam," he added. Duterte, whose family lives in Davao City, said he usually returns to the presidential residence in Malacanang by 2:00. "My earliest go home time to Malacanang on the average is 2:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, then I wake up because my day starts at 1:00 so I tend to all the business of the government and again I go home," Duterte said.

He said he is usually swamped with work, and that he has to read plenty of folders from various government departments.

READ MORE...

The 71-year-old leader said he also skips dinner. "I do not eat dinner so I just eat finger food, sandwiches kinakain ko [I eat sandwiches]. That's the routine," said Duterte. President Rodrigo Duterte takes his oath of office during the Inauguration Ceremony at the Malacanang Palace on June 30, 2016. Malacanang Photo ×

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Duterte also lamented how as president he lost his privacy and is not even allowed to lock his bedroom door. "I do not have the privacy because you're not supposed to lock your door, you are not allowed to do that.

Although they have not really tried opening it up without knocking and I have it experienced once na ginigising ako you cannot lock the door, and I don't know why," Duterte said.

He said he was told to leave his door unlocked, a policy he believes would help the presidential security group catch thieves.

"Basta makatulog ka dyan and you leave it unlocked. Well I suppose kapag may magnanakaw mahuli nila agad," he said. "That's the rationale of the life of a president," Duterte added. Duterte also hit his critics and said presidency is his destiny.

"A columnist is threatening me that I will be ousted by the people. I never wanted to be a politician, a president. It's my destiny," Duterte said.

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RELATED FROM RAPPLER.COM (FLASHBACK FEBRUARY 2016)

22 things to know about Mayor 'Duterte Harry' Pia Ranada and Editha Caduaya Published 8:30 AM, September 18, 2015 Updated 4:41 PM, February 26, 2016


'FEARLESS.' Then Davao City vice-mayor Rodrigo Duterte poses in front of an NPA camp in Compostela Valley. Photo by Karlos Manlupig.

The tough-talking mayor can't sleep without an old blanket from his mother and is a closet bookworm

MANILA, Philippines – He has been nicknamed "The Punisher" and the "Dirty Harry" or "Duterte Harry" of Mindanao for his no-nonsense approach to crime.

He recently announced he no longer has plans for 2016, but his avid supporters haven't given up and continue to woo him. There was even wild talk of throat cancer being a reason for his sudden announcement, a claim he quickly dismissed as unfounded and malicious.

He said, "The Presidency is destiny. No amount of lying, deception and distortion of truth would help. As for me, I believe I have been truthful to the people on my health conditions."

Beyond controversy, there's more to Rodrigo Duterte than meets the eye. Here are 22 things you may not know about the popular, 70-year-old mayor.

1. Born in Visayas, grew up in Mindanao

DUTERTE'S DAD. Vicente Rodrigo was governor of the undivided Davao in the 1950s.

When his supporters say Duterte would be a true “president from the South,” they point to his intimate ties with the two regions.

While Duterte made his mark in Davao City, he was born in Maasin, Leyte. His father hails from Cebu and was even mayor of one of its cities. Duterte’s Cebuano relatives include the influential Durano and Almendra families.

2. Goes to his parents' graves for big decisions

When faced with a big decision or problem, Duterte visits the graves of his parents in Wireless cemetery, the oldest and most congested cemetery in Davao City.

Both parents were public servants. His father, Vicente, was the last governor of the undivided Davao in the 1950s. His mother, Soledad or Nanay Soleng, was a school teacher, civic leader, and philanthropist.

3. Was a “problem child”

His mother once described Duterte as an adventurous kid who was always out of the house. According to legend, a 14-year-old Duterte even flew a small plane above his neighborhood without his parents’ consent.

According to a TIME profile, Duterte had to endure beatings from his mother. He was kicked out of Ateneo de Davao High School and was “exiled” by his father to a high school 57 kilometers from Davao.

After formal flying training in college, Duterte supposedly flew a plane over his old high school to throw a rock at the school roof.

He still harbored bitter feelings over an incident in which he was scolded by the Dean of Discipline in front of his classmates. But days after the rock-throwing, he apologized to the school administration.

4. Closet bookworm

This tough-talking “bad boy” is passionate about the written word. His close friends say he devours books on every imaginable topic, including Philippine history (particularly Mindanao history), economics, food security, and politics.

He has read biographies on Napoleon Bonaparte, Lee Kwan Yew, and Barack Obama. As for fiction, he’s an avid reader of Robert Ludlum and Sydney Sheldon.

5. Keeps an old blanket for comfort

Like anyone else, Duterte has creature comforts too. He cannot sleep without a certain very old ramie blanket given to him by his mom when he was just a year old. He brings it everywhere he goes and tries to patch it up when it falls apart.

In the mid-1990s, on the way to Indonesia for a trade mission, a Davao City official saw a "rag" packed among Duterte's things and ordered it to be thrown away.

Duterte supposedly replied, "Kung itapon niyo 'yan kayo na lang pumunta sa trade mission ninyo. Balik ako ng Davao. (If you throw that, you go ahead with the trade mission. I will return to Davao.) I cannot sleep without it."

6. Longest-serving mayor of Davao City

Digong is among the country’s longest-serving mayors. He has been Davao City mayor for 7 terms, totalling more than 22 years. When not a mayor, he was vice mayor under his daughter, Sara, or congressman.

During his terms, he implemented a smoking ban in public places, a mining ban, an anti-discrimination ordinance, and a 911 emergency response system, among others. Many credit him for uplifting Davao City from its reputation as a murder capital to one of the safest, most-liveable cities in the country.

7. Cried when he saw Yolanda’s devastation in Tacloban

He was one of the first mayors to come to the ravaged city’s aid. Toting P7 million in cash for donation, he flew to Tacloban to personally lead a humanitarian team composed of Davaoeño doctors, nurses, and search-and-rescue personnel.

Reporters who have covered him for a long time say he cannot control his tears in times of great sorrow or injustice.

After his visit and with tears in his eyes, he described the scene of destruction to reporters, “God must have been somewhere else or he forgot that there is a planet called Earth.”

8. Single but...

His mayor's profile in the Davao City website says he's single but he is associated with at least two women. Elizabeth Zimmerman, his ex-wife, is the mother of his 3 adult children Paolo, Sarah, and Sebastian. Honeylet, a nurse, is the mother of 11-year-old Veronica.

He has said in public that he has 3 girlfriends but they do not show up in public functions.

9. Ladies' man

You can always expect Duterte to "flirt" with at least one girl during his public appearances. These are never serious advances. He's often satisfied with just having his picture taken with the girl. He's never had a girlfriend below 25 years old.

He tends to be over-protective of women, at one point even opposing swimsuits in the Mutya ng Davao pageant.

He likes women with a medical background. At least two of his girlfriends were nurses.

10. Loves big bikes, spurns luxury cars

He doesn't hide his fondness for big macho motorcycles, once owning a second-hand Harley Davidson and now a Yamaha Virago. But he detests luxury cars. Even his kids own only a pick-up and van.

11. Favorite songs

His favorite tunes are the classic Cebuano song "Balud sa Kapalaran" sung by Max Surban, love song "MacArthur's Park" first recorded by Richard Harris, and the uplifting "You Raise Me Up" popularized by Josh Groban.

Duterte is such a fan of Cebuano singer Surban that he asked the artist to compose all of his past campaign jingles.

12. Favorite food

If you want to impress the mayor with your cooking, it's best to learn how to make Nilaga, native chicken adobo, and bulad or dried fish.

13. Inspects Davao City on a big bike, or incognito, in a taxi

The hands-on mayor is known to patrol his city’s streets twice a week. The TIME article shows him doing so on one of his big motorcycles, leading a convoy complete with blaring sirens and M16 rifles. But local news reports show him foregoing the pomp, opting to inspect in a regular taxi, surprising his would-be passengers.

14. Curses profusely

This is one politician who refuses to censor himself. Even his weekly television show is taped so that bleeps can be added over his curse words.

He ignores formal requests by media groups and even schools to refrain from using expletives during his speeches. He's also not above mimicking persons, including government officials, for fun.

15. Net worth

According to his 2014 Statement of Assets, Liabilities and Networth (SALN), his networth is P21.97 million. This includes 4 residential lots and two cars.

16. Soft spot for indigenous peoples, Muslims

He was the first to give formal representation to the Lumad and Muslim community, designating deputy mayors to represent their interests in the local government.

The anti-discrimination ordinance he championed was reportedly a response to news he received that Muslims were being discriminated against by real estate agents.

17. Built a drug rehabilitation center in Davao City

Though he openly supports the killing of drug addicts and dealers, he is not one to refuse second chances to drug addicts who want to reform.

He used city government funds to build a P12-million drug rehabilitation and treatment center which provides 24-hour services. In 2003, he offered a P2,000 monthly allowance to drug addicts who promised to kick the habit.

18. Would talk with, rather than fight, China

When asked how he would handle the country’s territorial dispute with China, Duterte said he would rather talk things over with the Chinese.

“While we must never surrender our sovereignty on the West Philippine Sea islands, we must face the reality that a non-confrontational approach would be the best option. There is a bit of Chinese blood in almost all of us Filipinos and I believe the Chinese are a reasonable people,” he has said.

19. Pro-contraception, pro-LGBT

A supporter of the Reproductive Health law, Duterte has encouraged family planning in Davao City. Back in 2005, he gave cash incentives to those who availed of the city’s free vasectomy and tubal ligation services. Duterte is also openly supportive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights.

In 2009, he criticized the Commission on Elections for delisting the Ang Ladlad Party List, a group which represents Filipino gays and lesbians. Duterte says his anti-discrimination ordinance has helped Davao become an LGBT-friendly place.

“Sa Davao, walang binabastos na bakla. Kasi ayaw ko ng oppression (In Davao, no gay person is disrespected. Because I don't like oppression),” he said during a TV guesting on Gandang Gabi Vice.

On the same guesting, he announced his support for same-sex marriage.

20. Declined national government posts, awards

Begging out of the presidential race was not the first time Duterte declined accolades. He has been offered the Interior Secretary post 4 times, by presidents Fidel Ramos, Joseph Estrada, Gloria Arroyo, and Benigno Aquino III. He rejected all of them saying, “I’m not qualified.”

In April last year, he also declined a nomination for the World Mayor Prize, given by an international body to outstanding mayors. He said he was just doing his job and that “As a matter of principle, I don’t accept awards.”

21. Surrounded by urban legends

Colorful urban legends surround Duterte. There is one in which he supposedly pushes a drug trafficker from a flying helicopter. One in which he treats taxi drivers to dinner. Another in which he beats up a Philippine military soldier, breaking his two front teeth. One incident, confirmed by the mayor himself, involves him forcing a tourist to swallow a cigarette butt.

22. Sympathizes with the Left

Duterte, unafraid of visiting remote New People's Army camps, respects the causes of Leftist groups but disagrees with their armed struggle.

In previous mayoral elections, he took in Left-leaning candidates in his city council state.

Controversially, he allowed a hero's burial and funeral march for NPA leader Leonardo Pitao or Kumander Parago.

In 2012, he gave money to an NPA camp ravaged by Typhoon Pablo. – with reports from Reynaldo Santos Jr/Rappler.com


GMA NEWS

Palace on Leni’s comments: Aside from int’l aid, President also wants respect Published October 5, 2016 5:17pm By TRISHA MACAS, GMA News

Malacañang on Wednesday responded to the statement of Vice President Leni Robredo that President Rodrigo Duterte’s manner of speaking may affect international aid to the country's anti-poverty initiatives.

At a press briefing, presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella said the President is not after the international support but the country’s dignity.

“I can understand. But if you notice the tone—and this is in no reference to the Vice President—but according to how the suggestion was framed, that we should be careful because of the aid—that the aid may be cut. From the President’s perspective, it’s not so much the aid that we’re after. It’s just that we want to be received the dignity and not subservient,” Abella said.

He said the President seemed to be urging the Filipinos to stand by its country.

“If you notice, he said dapat handa tayo, na we should be ready. In other words, for him, the great issue is the dignity that we have as a Filipino nation, not so much now na baka mahirapan tayo. Hindi sinasabing walang kwenta iyon,” Abella explained.

“Ang sinasabi na dapat tinitignan natin—actually if you notice, this is my opinion: He seems to be a one-man social revolution. Parang tinuturuan niya tayo na igalang ang ating pagka-bansa,” he stressed.

The tough-talking Duterte announced that he would pursue an independent foreign policy after he returned from his ASEAN Summit debut and official visit to Indonesia.

The announcement was made amid growing criticisms against his war on drugs, especially those coming from the United Nations, the United States, and the European Parliament.

But the President hinted on Tuesday night that he would eventually break up with the US while suggesting that he would rather work with Russia and China.

Earlier in the day, Robredo expressed fears that Duterte’s remarks against world leaders and institutions could affect international support for the government's anti-poverty initiatives.

"Ako parating nandoon 'yung pangamba, parating nandoon 'yung pangamba kasi napakahalaga nu'ng good relations natin with the international community," Robredo said when asked if she feared Duterte's words would eventually affect her office's programs for the poor.

"Marami tayong inaasahang tulong galing sa kanila and bawat insidente na puwedeng magdulot ng strain sa relations na 'to nakakabahala," Robredo said. — RSJ, GMA News

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Panelo: EDCA valid; Duterte can terminate defense deal By Rosette Adel (philstar.com) | Updated October 5, 2016 - 4:15pm 4 345 googleplus0 1


In this Oct. 5, 2016 photo, Chief Legal Presidential Counsel Salvador “Sal Panelo” listens to the members of the media at the Kapihan sa Manila Bay forum. Philstar.com/Rosette Adel

MANILA, Philippines – Chief Presidential Legal Counsel Salvador “Sal Panelo” said Wednesday that President Rodrigo Duterte has the option to terminate the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement, which the president said he wanted reviewed.

Panelo clarified that although Duterte is bound to implement the EDCA, there is also a provision to terminate the executive agreement, which gives the US access to specific Armed Forces of the Philippines bases and outposts.

“The president under the agreement need not continue or implement it because there is a provision there that says so,” Panelo said at the Kapihan sa Manila Bay forum.

“The agreement also says either party can terminate the agreement, so the president has an option,” he added.

Under the EDCA, either party can terminate the agreement by writing through diplomatic channels. The agreement requires one year's notice before it is considered terminated.

On Sunday,Duterte vowed to review the two-year-old EDCA.. He said that the the defense deal "[is] only signed by an aide and (former defense secretary Voltaire) Gazmin" and not by then President Benigno Aquino III.

Analysts have pointed out, however, that the signing of agreements is usually done by authorized representatives of the governments involved. The 1951 Mutual Defense Treaty between the Philippines in the US, for example, was not signed by then President Elpidio Quirino but by Foreign Affairs Secretary Carlos Romulo.

Panelo said the defense deal is valid since Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin was authorized to sign it.

Gazmin and US Ambassador Philip Goldberg signed the defense deal at Camp Aguinaldo on April 28, 2014. The Supreme Court ruled in January that the agreement does not violate the constitution.

“I’ve seen documents that Gazmin was authorized by Aquino,” Panelo said adding that there was even a memorandum of ratification showign this.

"It is a valid agreement but what we are saying that it is subject to review and evaluation," the chief presidential legal counsel added.

Panelo said he has informed Duterte that the agreement is valid, however, the EDCA, the Visiting Forces of Agreement and the Mutual Defense Treaty are all subject to review.

Meanwhile, Kabayan partylist Rep. Harry Roque, in a separate statement, expressed support for the possible abrogation of the EDCA. He said the document is not even a “treaty.”

“That it is within presidential prerogative to recall a treaty for any international agreement for that matter is ironically confirmed by US law and practice,” Roque said.


GMA NEWS

Lorenzana tells Duterte: US troops in Mindanao are safe Published October 7, 2016 4:32pm By MICHAELA DEL CALLAR

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana on Friday said the small number of US troops in Mindanao, whom President Rodrigo Duterte wants to leave, are not in danger and can protect themselves against terrorist attacks.

Speaking before foreign correspondents at a briefing, Lorenzana said he explained to the President that the U.S. special forces are safely housed in the Philippine military’s Camp Navarro in Zamboanga City.

“I clarified that with him and I told him that the US troops are not in danger because there are just very few of them, just about 107 people, who are actually housed in Camp Navarro in Calarian in Zamboanga City,” Lorenza told the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines.

“All they do is operate their drones and some intelligence equipment to help our troops in the south and I told him they are not in danger of being harmed by any terrorist. At same time they are actually combatants, they are not civilians so they can protect themselves,” he added.

READ MORE...

Duterte, who has issued hostile remarks against the US government following its criticisms of his bloody crackdown against illegal drugs and perceived human rights violations, last month said US forces, which has a temporary presence in Zamboanga, should leave because they could become a target of Islamic militants.

Later on, Duterte, according to Lorenzana, said he does not want the Americans to leave immediately “but maybe in the future.”

Lorenzana said such policy coincides with the Philippine military's plan for the US forces to stay until such time the Philippines has upgraded its intelligence capabilities and equipment in the South.

“In the meantime, US forces are being used to provide us some intelligence information like the product of their drone that are flying over Basilan, Sulu and in central Mindanao. When we acquire our own drones in the near future then we can go without the help of the Americans in the south,” he said.

The small group of military experts in Southern Philippines provides counter-terrorism training and advice to the Armed Forces of the Philippines. Foreign troops are barred by the Constitution to engage in combat mission in the country.

In 2015, Washington scaled down the number of its rotating troop presence in Mindanao, 13 years since the Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines or JSOTF-P was activated. Under the JSOTF-P, around 500 US soldiers were deployed in the south on a rotation basis.

US and Philippine military cooperation in Mindanao has led to the capture and death of top leaders of the extremist Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) and other foreign terrorists.

The ASG, which is included in the US government’s foreign terrorist organization list, has claimed responsibility for several terror attacks in the country and is notorious for kidnapping foreigners in exchange for huge ransom or beheading them if there is no payoff.

Washington maintained that American troops are not involved in combat operations, but said they can retaliate if attacked. —NB, GMA News

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RELATED FROM GMA NEWS

Defense chief not expecting int'l backlash over Duterte tirades Published October 7, 2016 4:01pm By VERONICA PULUMBARIT, GMA News

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana is not seeing any international backlash that may arise from President Rodrigo Duterte's inflammatory statements against the United States, the European Union and the United Nations.

"I don't think there's a backlash," Lorenzana said Friday at a forum organized by the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines (FOCAP).

He said there were no negative reactions from countries such as South Korea, New Zealand and Australia regarding Duterte's statements.

"I talked to some of the ambassadors here," Lorenzana said as he assured the public of the support of traditional Philippine allies.

Lorenzana also said Duterte is not out to create enemies for the country despite his strongly worded public tirades.

Just this week, reacting to criticisms on his administration's war against drugs and criminality, Duterte told US President Barack Obama to "go to hell" and the EU to "go to purgatory."

Aid to PHL

Duterte even dared the US, EU, and the UN to withdraw the aid they have been extending to the Philippines.

Asked if Duterte's inflammatory statements could discourage the US from extending assistance to the Philippines, Lorenzana said it's a possibility but added the Philippines can cope without the $50-100 million annual military aid from the US.

On the observation that even with the military aid from the US the Philippines still has yet to achieve its goal of modernizing its military, Lorenzana said Congress is more supportive now of the Armed Forces of the Philippines' (AFP) goals, especially with the AFP Modernization Act under Republic Act Number 10349.

“Congress is actually giving us money now for the procurement of equipment,” Lorenzana said.

The proposed budget for the Department of National Defense (DND) for 2017 is P130 billion, which is “seven percent higher than last year,” Lorenzana said.

He did admit that the AFP budget remains insufficient as it currently stands at 1.2 percent of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

He said the military budget of other countries is at 3 percent of their GDP, noting that the GDP of other countries — or the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced by a country – is also considerably higher than the Philippines'.

“Sensitive”

Lorenzana admitted that Duterte takes criticisms against the drug war personally. “It's just that the president is so sensitive when it comes to comments on his war on drugs. He's very sensitive,” he said.

“He feels that, why do they criticize me when I am doing something good for my country,” Lorenzana said.

Lorenzana said the president is wondering why the Philippines' supposed allies are merely observing and not helping the country fight against criminals.

Duterte has been criticized in the international community for the rising death toll in the Philippines since he assumed power on June 30.

According to data from the Philippine National Police (PNP), from July 1 to October 4, 2016 (6:00 a.m.), there have been 1,377 drug suspects killed and 22,503 others arrested in 23,549 operations carried out under Oplan Double Barrel, which targets both big-time and small-time drug suspects.

Under PNP's Project Tokhang, where police personnel visit the houses of drug suspects, 732,698 drug personalities voluntarily surrendered, including 52,868 drug pushers and 679,830 drug users.

The PNP said 1,634,111 houses have been visited under Project Tokhang during the same period, July 1 to October 4. —KBK, GMA News


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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