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PHNO PRESIDENTIAL (DU30) NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

DUTERTE HINTED: I'M ABOUT 'TO CROSS THE RUBICON' WITH THE U.S.
[RELATED: Duterte's 'cross the Rubicon' remark does not equate to cutting US ties, says Yasay]
(Yasay told the media that the president might have made the comments in such a "manner to dramatize what he feels are the areas that would need further strengthening" in terms of the country's relationship with the US. He added that the president wants to undertake an independent foreign policy without neglecting that the Philippines is part of the international community.)
[RELATED(2): Stop hypocrisy, Rody tells 2 US senators]
([TO Senators Leahy, Cardin] “Do not interfere in our affairs. I will ask him now: why are you shooting the black people there when they’re on the ground? They can, we cannot. And I say that’s hypocrisy,” Duterte said in his speech following his arrival from a two-day working visit in Vietnam. Duterte said the US must mind its own business for it does not have any moral ascendancy to criticize, given its own issues with killings.)


SEPTEMBER 26 -President Rodrigo Duterte on Monday hinted that he's about to go past a point of no return in terms of the Philippines' relationship with the United States, revealing that he had sought help from Russia about the matter. "I'm about to cross the Rubicon between me and the United States. At least for the next six years. I would need your help," he said, referring to his meeting earlier this month with Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Mevdevev at the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit. The Philippines and the US are treaty allies, having signed a mutual defense treaty in 1951 and a visiting forces agreement in 1998. The US is also the Philippines' biggest foreign investor and the country's second biggest export market next to Japan. But the relationship has been frayed under Duterte, who has bristled at criticism about the rising death toll of his administration's drug war from the US and other institutions such as the United Nations and the European Union. He has repeatedly expressed his desire to rid Mindanao of American troops supposedly to pursue peace talks, while declaring earlier this month that he wanted to stop joint patrols with the US in the South China Sea amid a maritime dispute with Beijing. READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte's 'cross the Rubicon' remark does not equate to cutting US ties, says Yasay... RELATED(2) Stop hypocrisy, Rody tells US...

ALSO Duterte to UN, US, EUR: Probe me but follow Philippine laws
(He recalled being probed by UN rapporteur Philip Alston for killings in Davao City when he was still mayor. “I do not have to remind him again… they know it already,” he said.)
[US mood hardens as Duterte fuels outrage; US diplomat warns Duterte vs US anti-posturing]


SEPTEMBER 26 -A police SWAT member stands guard as police operatives examine the scene where two bodies lay on a road after being killed in a police drug "buy-bust" operation before dawn Friday, Sept. 23, 2016 in Pasig city, east of Manila, Philippines. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said on Thursday he will invite the U.N. chief and European Union officials to investigate his bloody anti-drug crackdown, but only if he can question them in public afterward to prove their human rights concerns are baseless. More than 3,000 suspected drug dealers and users have been killed since July and more than 600,000 others have surrendered for fear of being killed in Duterte's crackdown. Despite growing alarm, Duterte said he won't stop the campaign. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez
President Duterte is ready to face investigation by the United Nations, the United States and the European Union over alleged summary executions of drug suspects, but only if they promise to follow “the process in my jurisdiction.” “I am willing – any and all questions, I will answer, ipadala mo na iyong mga EU na bright, mga bobo, iyong mga p**g i**g ito, maniwala kayo diyan (send the bright ones from EU. They’re stupid, those sons of b**s, believe me),” he said. “But if they think they are really brighter than us, oh, come here,” Duterte said. “What I want is everybody should be placed under oath. So in the end, if it is proven that you are lying, I can proceed (with) a case against you. If you just listen and take down notes, then get the garbage of De Lima, that’s b**t,” he said, referring to Sen. Leila de Lima, with whom he has locked horns over human rights issues. He recalled being probed by UN rapporteur Philip Alston for killings in Davao City when he was still mayor. “I do not have to remind him again… they know it already,” he said. READ MORE...RELATED,
US mood hardens as Duterte fuels outrage, US diplomat warns America may cut aid.....

ALSO: Damage control after Duterte's tough talks
(FROM THE Associated Press: By Jim Gomez, the chief Philippines correspondent for The Associated Press and is based in Manila.)
[RELATED: Palace - 'Difficult' shift in foreign policy will bring prosperity]
(Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said the Philippines should be allowed to chart its own course and fulfill its destiny on its own terms. “There is a shift that’s happening. So, it is not unfortunate but it is part of a process, difficult as it may be, but it is part of a process, which the president sees is setting our own independent chart, our own independent course,” Abella said in press briefing.)


SEPTEMBER 27 -In this Sept. 22, 2016 phoot, President Rodrigo Duterte challenges the United Nations special rapporteur to come to the Philippines and probe the alleged extrajudicial killing activities in the country, during his speech at the inauguration of the Filinvest Development Corporation Misamis 3x135 MW circulating fluid bed coal thermal plant in Villanueva, Misamis Oriental. PPD/King Rodriguez
The new Philippine president uses an expletive to warn key ally Barack Obama not to lecture him on human rights and, in another impromptu speech, declares a dramatic policy change in policy such as removing US counterterrorism forces out of his country's volatile south. His key officials walk back the remarks and say everything is normal.  And the world wonders which pronouncement is the one that will stick. Impassioned speeches by Rodrigo Duterte about the United States, the European Union and the United Nations have repeatedly led his government to issue clarifications, though he has been on the job less than three months. Here's a sampling of Duterte's broadsides — and the ensuing clarifications by him or other Philippine officials. ___ 'SOB' (BUT WON'T CUT UMBILICAL CORD) The statement: "I do not have any master except the Filipino people, nobody but nobody. You must be respectful. Do not just throw questions. Putang ina, I will swear at you in that forum." READ MORE...RELATED, Palace: 'Difficult' shift in foreign policy will bring prosperity ...

ALSO Rody: De Lima will be jailed
[RELATED: Hysterical Leila flies off the handle]


SEPTEMBER 26 -President Rodrigo Duterte said yesterday Senator Leila De Lima would be pinned down by testimonies of New Bilibid Prison (NBP) inmates who have accused her of receiving money from drug lords. AP/Bullit Marquez
Cases have not been filed against Sen. Leila de Lima for her alleged involvement in illegal drugs but President Duterte is confident that his fiercest critic would land in jail. Duterte said yesterday De Lima would be pinned down by testimonies of New Bilibid Prison (NBP) inmates who have accused her of receiving money from drug lords. “Now that she (De Lima) is in trouble, she wants to drag me. She will really go to jail. I’m sure of that because of the testimonial evidence,” the President said during the induction of officers of the Malacañang Press Corps, the Malacañang Cameramen Association and the Presidential Photojournalists Association. “She will be jailed when everybody says, five (witnesses) could say that they contributed money. So on a national scale… who brought in the narco politics? It is here already.” Asked if his statement is a go-signal for the justice department to file charges against De Lima, Duterte replied: “Yes, of course.” “(Cases will be filed) after the investigations are finished. I am sure of my evidence,” he added. READ MORE...RELATED, Hysterical Leila flies off the handle...

ALSO De Lima to Duterte: ‘What do you see in me that you find sexual?’
[RELATED: Duterte downplays de Lima's emotional outburst]


SEPTEMBER 26 -AFTER getting several sexual innuendos, Senator Leila de Lima could not resist herself asking President Rodrigo Duterte this question: What do you see in me that you find sexual? “The President’s foul mouth has again desecrated the hollowed grounds of Malacañan [Palace] with another round of his vile personal attacks against me,” de Lima said in a statement on Monday. De Lima said she cannot resist asking the President such question. “Why is your mind so fixated on my sexual aspect? You are so obsessed with me. Why???” she asked. Duterte earlier called de Lima an “immoral woman” for allegedly having an affair with former driver Ronnie Dayan, who had alleged collected drug money at the New Bilibid Prison for her campaign kitty.
READ: Duterte: De :Lima’s sexcapades led her to crime, drug payoffs The President had also linked De Lima to a certain “Warren,” an employee of the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA). READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte downplays de Lima's emotional outburst ...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Duterte hinted: I'm about 'to cross the Rubicon' with the United States

MANILA, OCTOBER 3, 2016 (GMA NEWS) Published September 26, 2016 - President Rodrigo Duterte on Monday hinted that he's about to go past a point of no return in terms of the Philippines' relationship with the United States, revealing that he had sought help from Russia about the matter.

"I'm about to cross the Rubicon between me and the United States. At least for the next six years. I would need your help," he said, referring to his meeting earlier this month with Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Mevdevev at the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit.

The Philippines and the US are treaty allies, having signed a mutual defense treaty in 1951 and a visiting forces agreement in 1998. The US is also the Philippines' biggest foreign investor and the country's second biggest export market next to Japan.

But the relationship has been frayed under Duterte, who has bristled at criticism about the rising death toll of his administration's drug war from the US and other institutions such as the United Nations and the European Union. He has repeatedly expressed his desire to rid Mindanao of American troops supposedly to pursue peace talks, while declaring earlier this month that he wanted to stop joint patrols with the US in the South China Sea amid a maritime dispute with Beijing.

READ MORE...

Duterte, meanwhile, has expressed openness to welcome more investments from China and Russia. He has also raised the possibility of buying arms from the two nations.

Congress approval

When asked to clarify his statement, Duterte noted that United States needed to get the Congress' approval before its President can declare war to help an ally.

"There is a RP-US Pact that was in the ‘50s. It says that an attack on the Philippines would be an attack of the United States," Duterte said.

"But in the United States Constitution, it says that before a President can declare war, with anybody in defense of an ally, he has to Congress for permission to go to war. That’s the problem. So if Congress will not give him that authority, what will happen to us?"

In the same press conference, Duterte said he didn't have any plans to junk alliances.

"I am not really going to break ties but we are opening alliances with China," he said. —JST, GMA News

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Duterte's 'cross the Rubicon' remark does not equate to cutting US ties, says Yasay By Levi A. So (philstar.com) | Updated September 27, 2016 - 1:35pm 2 149 googleplus0 0


Philippines' Foreign Minister Perfecto Yasay addresses the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. AP/Andres Kudacki

MANILA, Philippines — Foreign Affairs Secretary Perfecto Yasay said Tuesday that President Rodrigo Duterte's "cross the Rubicon" statement does not mean that the Philippines is veering away from its traditional friendship with the United States.

Yasay's defense of the president's critical comments against the longtime Philippine ally was not the first one.

The Philippine foreign minister, who just came back from his US visit, said during a press briefing Tuesday that he also calmed fears in Washington DC of souring Philippine-US relations in favor of China. He said such claims are unfounded.

Duterte, in his latest remarks on Monday, said he told Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev that he is "about to cross the Rubicon" — an idiom meaning to pass a point of no return — with the US on the sidelines of the Association of South East Asian Nations Summit earlier this month. He said no one knew about their one-on-one talk where he also asked for Russia's help in terms of trade and commerce in the six years of his term.

The US is the second biggest export market of the Philippines next to Japan.

He added that he also told Chinese President Xi Jinping that he would open up all avenues of trade and commerce for China.

"They can come in. Wala pang panahon because I could not amend the Constitution right now. Then I can give them 60 years plus another 60 years. By that time you won't need your factory here already."

Yasay told the media that the president might have made the comments in such a "manner to dramatize what he feels are the areas that would need further strengthening" in terms of the country's relationship with the US.

He added that the president wants to undertake an independent foreign policy without neglecting that the Philippines is part of the international community.

Yasay noted that the Philippines' relationship with China has "cooled off" during the previous administration, which filed an international arbitration case against Beijing over South China Sea disputes.

The Philippine foreign minister noted that the dispute should not prevent Manila's stronger ties with Beijing as they could pursue other aspects of relationship like trade, people-to-people connectivity, cultural ties and infrastructure development.

"Ang sinasabi ng presidente, sa pagkakaintindi ko, is that kung may ino-offer ang mga ibang bansa gaya ng China o Russia in so far as let's say engaging our country with trade relationship and arrangement and assistance that they're willing to offer, we should not be arrogant to reject it," Yasay said.

"This is actually in pursuance of our national interest."

The specifics of what the president wants to pursue with the two countries, however, are not yet known, Yasay added.

Crafting an independent foreign policy In pursuing an "independent" foreign policy, Yasay said national interest must be prioritized. Next to consider is the convergence of mutual interests of the countries.

Foreign policy analyst Dindo Manhit said three principles must be considered in crafting an independent foreign policy.

RELATED: How should the Philippines engage the world?

First, the approach must favor the country's fundamental interests. Second, it must adhere to national and international law. Lastly, it must be accomplished in the least costly manner.

Manhit noted that the country could still enjoy its independence "without squandering its hard-earned, advantageous relationships with other countries."

Yasay, however, repeated that the Philippines is not burning bridges with the US. — Video report by Efigenio Toledo IV

-------------------------

RELATED(2) FROM PHILSTAR

Stop hypocrisy, Rody tells US By Edith Regalado, Paolo Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated October 1, 2016 - 12:00am 12 147 googleplus0 0


Presi­dent Rodrigo Duterte lamented the earlier comments of US Senators Patrick Leahy and Benjamin Cardin in raising the issue on the brutal campaign against illegal drugs that left over a thousand suspects dead. STAR/File photo

DAVAO CITY, Philippines – Presi­dent Duterte yesterday called on US officials to stop being hypocrites and meddling in his campaign against illegal drugs.

Duterte lamented the earlier comments of US Senators Patrick Leahy and Benjamin Cardin in raising the issue on the brutal campaign against illegal drugs that left over a thousand suspects dead.

“I would like to appeal… answering the two senators… to the government of the United States, stop this hypocrisy game and we’re all right. Stop being hypocrites. Do not pretend to be the moral conscience of the world. Do not be the policeman because you do not have the eligibility to do that in my country,” he said.

Duterte told the US senators not to interfere in the affairs of the country.

“Do not interfere in our affairs. I will ask him now: why are you shooting the black people there when they’re on the ground? They can, we cannot. And I say that’s hypocrisy,” Duterte said in his speech following his arrival from a two-day working visit in Vietnam.

Duterte said the US must mind its own business for it does not have any moral ascendancy to criticize, given its own issues with killings.

Leahy had said Duterte should not undercut the judiciary but instead strengthen it.

“If President Duterte is serious about improving conditions in the Philippines, he should be focusing on improving services for Filipinos, not casting them aside; holding law enforcement accountable, not giving them a blanket license to kill suspects; and strengthening the judiciary, not undercutting it,” Leahy said.

Cardin, on the other hand, had said he was disturbed by the reports of thousands killed in Duterte’s campaign against illegal drugs.

“I have been a strong supporter of Philippines’ law enforcement institutions, including recently introducing legislation which would increase law enforcement cooperation between our two countries. But these recent reports of thousands of extrajudicial killings as well as detentions and a lack of respect for international human rights commitments are profoundly troubling. They undermine our mutual goals of upholding liberal democratic values in the region and strengthening international law,” Cardin added.

Duterte shot back by telling the US officials of the proper way to arrest a suspect, much more so if he or she is an African-American.

“You arrest him. You grapple with him. Pin him to the ground, place him under handcuff and bring him to the station. Do not shoot him, with the video and the cameras all around. So I’m returning the courtesy. You know the drill. You criticize people outside of your Congress,” he said.

Duterte has had an uneasy relationship with the United States since he won a presidential election in May.

He says he is charting an independent foreign policy outside the influence of the US, and has taken steps to revive ties with China, which had been strained under his predecessor over longstanding territorial conflicts in the South China Sea.

Duterte on Wednesday declared an end to joint military exercises with US forces, saying the upcoming scheduled war games would be the “last one.”

He told the Filipino community in Hanoi that he will maintain the military alliance with the US because of the Mutual Defense Treaty signed in 1951.

Duterte yesterday maintained his stand against the joint military exercises with the US, saying next month’s war games would be the last under his term.

“In my term, yes. I don’t know if that treaty would take some form. But in my term, yes. I would not be using my entitlements as commander-in-chief. I would simply say that that is the foreign policy,” Duterte told a press conference here upon arrival from Vietnam.

Duterte pointed out the joint war exercises in October would be the last under his six-year administration and not just for 2016.

He said there is no sense continuing with the joint exercises with the American forces since these do not benefit their Filipino counterparts.

He mentioned the recent purchase of F-50 jets from South Korea which he branded as simply for ceremonial purposes.

“We have the jet planes but they don’t allow us to buy the missiles. So what would be the point? Ceremonial, good. I agree,” he said.


PHILSTAR

Duterte: Probe me but follow Philippine laws By Christina Mendez (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 27, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


A police SWAT member stands guard as police operatives examine the scene where two bodies lay on a road after being killed in a police drug "buy-bust" operation before dawn Friday, Sept. 23, 2016 in Pasig city, east of Manila, Philippines. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said on Thursday he will invite the U.N. chief and European Union officials to investigate his bloody anti-drug crackdown, but only if he can question them in public afterward to prove their human rights concerns are baseless. More than 3,000 suspected drug dealers and users have been killed since July and more than 600,000 others have surrendered for fear of being killed in Duterte's crackdown. Despite growing alarm, Duterte said he won't stop the campaign. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines - President Duterte is ready to face investigation by the United Nations, the United States and the European Union over alleged summary executions of drug suspects, but only if they promise to follow “the process in my jurisdiction.”

“I am willing – any and all questions, I will answer, ipadala mo na iyong mga EU na bright, mga bobo, iyong mga p**g i**g ito, maniwala kayo diyan (send the bright ones from EU. They’re stupid, those sons of b**s, believe me),” he said.

“But if they think they are really brighter than us, oh, come here,” Duterte said.

“What I want is everybody should be placed under oath. So in the end, if it is proven that you are lying, I can proceed (with) a case against you. If you just listen and take down notes, then get the garbage of De Lima, that’s b**t,” he said, referring to Sen. Leila de Lima, with whom he has locked horns over human rights issues.

He recalled being probed by UN rapporteur Philip Alston for killings in Davao City when he was still mayor.

“I do not have to remind him again… they know it already,” he said.

READ MORE...

“What I don’t like is that they threaten me. So I was quiet about it. When I was mayor, that’s already fine. But now I am President, we are getting embarrassed. I am used to it, but not our people,” he said,

Duterte maintained that domestic laws are above international laws, and that he cannot be made accountable on the basis of laws of other countries.

“I will ask them. It’s provided in the Constitution. And if they come here, I have the laws, the penal laws and the Constitution. And I would just tell them, find something here that is wrong, where you can be charged. Because if it is not a criminal offense, then any other country cannot turn it or cannot categorize it as a crime,” he said.

“I am a citizen of this Republic, the crimes and felonies are in our books,” he added.

“Before international law, there is the Constitution which is the bedrock (of Philippine democracy).”

While Filipinos speak many dialects, he said the Philippines is bound by its laws.

“You disregard the flag, the Constitution, there will be trouble,” he pointed out.

“Find me a fault there, if there is because you have to begin with the criminal laws of my land.”

He also made clear he is unfazed by a warning from Standard and Poor’s that the country’s credit rating might be affected by the current campaign against drugs.

Spewing out expletives, he said he is not afraid of S&P’s and other credit raters. “You want me to answer, you answer also. We’re on the same boat. Who are you to threaten me?”

Duterte said he has tasked his legal team to prepare a draft invitation for any international body that would want to come and probe summary executions in the country.

“It is up to them. But I have asked my lawyer here, legal (team) to prepare the letter to invite them to come and investigate. But I said it should be something live and not a one-way affair,” he said in remarks at the oath taking of officers of media covering Malacañang.

Duterte again repeated his attacks against US President Barrack Obama, reminding him of police abuses targeting African-Americans.

“Even Obama, we’ll ask him so he must be prepared. Now, why should I prepare? Who are you? In the context of things, who are you? Why are you asking me? What about you, killing the black people? Do not be such a hypocrite,” he said.

“Why me? Those who have stayed in America for a long time, let’s not fool each other. What is their treatment there of foreigners, or if you are not white? Now, you who have studied in America, have lived in America, tell me straight, walang bolahan. How are you treated there in America if you are not white?” he added.

Duterte also vented his anger at columnists whom he thought were more concerned about the impact of his attacks against the US, than about him and his constituents.

Hypocrisy

He berated the US anew for what he called its hypocrisy and for invading Iraq supposedly in search of weapons of mass destruction.

After wasting Iraq, the US, Britain and their allies never recovered even fireworks, he said.

“That’s their hypocrisy,” Duterte pointed out.

“Kung hindi lang bawal magpatay ng Americano, patayin kita dito (If it’s not unlawful to kill an American, I’ll kill you here),” he said.

Duterte reiterated that he wanted Americans in the probe. “Ano sa palagay nila sa akin, gago (What do they think of me, stupid)?” he said.

The President reiterated that he does not care if he goes down in history as a killer or a disgraced politician.

“If I go down in history as a killer or disgraced, as I am the one impeached, it’s okay. Assassination, fine. I do not lose my honor in both. It’s fine with me,” he said.

Duterte reiterated that he has long put his integrity and his presidency and even his life on the line in his intensified war against illegal drugs.

At the same time, Duterte reiterated he cannot allow his accusers to draw “garbage” of information from De Lima and make a report out of it.

“That’s about stupid,” he said.

He said any investigation should be a two-way street where all parties concerned would also be allowed to ask questions.

“Magtanong muna sila sa lahat then magtanong ako sa kanila (They may ask questions, and then I’ll ask them too). Rapporteur of EU, rapporteur of UN, whoever is interested, rapporteur of the state department, or Obama,” he said.

Duterte said Obama may come to the country to personally ask questions, but the President said he should also be allowed to ask Obama pertinent questions regarding the abuses and the killing of African-Americans in the US.

“Tutal wala naman siya ginawa na kasi (He has done nothing anyway because) he’s out, maybe he can come here and find time to ask me questions and I’ll answer him. I have some interesting questions to ask. I would just term it very interesting questions. You know what’s sauce for the gander is sauce for the goose,” he said.

“It cannot be just a one-way traffic here. Even if I am a President of a small republic, I will see to it that in matters of principle, we are in parity, tabla (equal). Even if we’re not as popular as America,” he added.

The President said he would never allow UN rapporteurs to work on a wrong premise fed by his political enemies.

UN's ALSTON WHEN HE WAS MAYOR

Duterte recalled that he talked with Alston when he was mayor of Davao but nothing came out of the investigation.

“There was no result. And for all the time that I was investigated by the human rights and the rapporteur, nothing came out of it,” the President said.

The President again fired a broadside at De Lima, whom he accused of having immoral relations with her driver and for benefiting from drug money from convicts.

“Then a secretary of justice here, and if you have noticed, she kept on hammering at me. And I said, if you have a good case, if the goods are there with you, file a case,” he said.

Duterte said De Lima has been banking on the testimony of her key Senate witness, self-confessed killer Edgar Matobato, but still she dilly-dallied in the filing of charges against him.

He vowed yesterday to have De Lima put behind bars on non-bailable charges.

“Kasi nandiyan na daw ‘yung witness niya si Matobato, so go ahead. Wala siyang ginawa. Now, nandito na sila, naipit na siya (She has Matobato as witness, go ahead. She did nothing. Now, she’s in trouble),” he said.

“But this De Lima, she screwed her driver and screwed the nation,” the President said.

“Our problem is not my mouth. It’s drug addicts numbering about three million, and we have new surrenderees. My slurs and my curses –they are but manifestation of the anger inside me,” he said. “Wag nila akong takutin (Don’t threaten me).”

Duterte said it’s the US, the EU and the UN that should be investigated “because they have committed far more injustice.

“Even then there were already killings. Look at the statistics. That would make you a good journalist because you are fair, factual,” he said.

He added he is ready to “resign tonight” once it is established that he is behind the summary killings.

He reiterated that the local police are not in the business of “mummifying” slain drug suspects, as such practice is an expertise of drug syndicates.

UN WILL INVESTIGATE IN GENEVA, NOT IN MANILA

Meanwhile, the UN said its review of the human rights situation in the Philippines on Sept. 28 will be done from Geneva and not in Manila.

Tess Debuque, UN Information Center Manila, has clarified an 18-man team from the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights will conduct its review at the Palais des Nations at 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. (9 p.m. to midnight in Manila), and not in Manila as reported earlier.

A UN advisory said the Philippines will undergo a review because it is one of 164 states that have ratified the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Signatories to ICESCR undergo regular review.

The committee will discuss with a Philippine delegation a range of issues relating to the implementation of the ICESCR.

The advisory said the committee’s meetings with the Philippine delegation at the Palais des Nations will be public and will be webcast at http://webtv.un.org/ .

The Philippines has submitted a report to the ICESCR.

The committee will release its findings on Oct. 10.

Other countries being reviewed are Costa Rica, Cyprus, Poland, Tunisia, Lebanon and the Dominican Republic. – Rainier Allan Ronda

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

US mood hardens as Duterte fuels outrage By Matthew Pennington (Associated Press) | Updated October 1, 2016 - 2:46pm 42 381 googleplus0 2


In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte addresses Philippine Marines in suburban Taguig City, Manila. As the body count mounts in the Philippines' war on drugs, and its combative president's rhetoric plumbs new depths, the mood in Washington toward the key Asian ally is hardening. AP/Bullit Marquez

WASHINGTON — As the body count mounts in the Philippines' deadly war on drugs, and its combative president's rhetoric plumbs new depths, the mood in Washington toward a key Asian ally is hardening.

Influential U.S. lawmakers are warning that the extra-judicial killings in the drug war — President Rodrigo Duterte on Friday compared it to the Holocaust — could affect American aid.

And while the Obama administration maintains that its 65-year-old alliance with the Philippines remains "ironclad," a senior U.S. diplomat is cautioning Duterte against more anti-U.S. posturing.

"I think it would be a serious mistake in a democratic country like the Philippines to underestimate the power of the public's affinity for the U.S. That's people power," Assistant Secretary of State Daniel Russel told The Associated Press.


FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2015 (AQUINO GOVT), file photo, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel, speaks during a news conference in Bangkok, Thailand. The U.S. and the Philippines have agreed on locations where American forces will have access, as the U.S. looks to reassert its presence in Asia, officials said March 18. Russel, top U.S. diplomat for East Asia, said an upcoming ruling by an international tribunal on a case brought by the Philippines that challenges the legal basis of China’s claims to virtually all of the South China Sea would be a critical moment for “rules-based” future of the region. (AP Photo/Nattasuda Anusonadisai, File) More

Russel did not draw a direct comparison, but past Philippine presidents have been toppled by popular protests dubbed "people power," including former dictator Ferdinand Marcos, who was ousted in 1986.

Duterte has bristled at U.S. criticism of the drug war and repeatedly spoken about dialing back security cooperation — although he says he will maintain the alliance. This week he said that joint military exercises of Filipino and American troops scheduled for next week in the Philippines will be the last such drills.

His foreign secretary quickly said the decision was not final. Such a step would impede Washington's plans to expand the footprint of U.S. forces in Southeast Asia to counter China.

The previous Philippine government signed an agreement to give the U.S. forces access to five Philippine military bases. That reflected Manila's anxiety over the territorial ambitions of China with which it has competing claims in the disputed South China Sea.

"If he followed through on this pledge it would be devastating to alliance management," said Gregory Poling, a fellow with the Southeast Asia program at the Center for Strategic Studies. "How does one sustain a military alliance if your militaries don't exercise together?"

The Obama administration has consistently played down the significance of such pronouncements from Duterte, which have typically been walked back by other Philippines officials.

HITLER COMPARISON

On Friday, the Philippine leader said that Adolf Hitler had killed 3 million Jews and that he himself would be "happy to slaughter" 3 million addicts. More than 3,000 people have died in the crackdown on drug pushers and users since Duterte took office three months ago.

In Hawaii to meet with Southeast Asian defense ministers, Defense Secretary Ash Carter hinted at U.S. impatience with the Philippine government over Duterte's remarks. "Just speaking personally for myself, I find these comments deeply troubling," Carter said. A day earlier, he had described the U.S. relationship with the Philippines as "ironclad."

The State Department has tended to parry questions about Duterte's outbursts. Spokesman Mark Toner also described the Holocaust reference as "troubling." However, Sen. Ben Cardin, top-ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, pulled no punches.

'HITLER-INSPIRED'

"It is reprehensible and, frankly, disgusting that a democratically elected leader is talking about the mass murder of his own people, with Hitler's Holocaust as his inspiration, no less," he said.

Cardin and Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy, author of a law that prohibits U.S. assistance to foreign security forces that commit gross human rights abuses, took to the Senate floor this week to decry the drug war. They accused Duterte of terrorizing Filipinos through his drug war and endorsing "mass murder."

Leahy, a senior figure on the Senate Appropriations Committee, said because of the "systemic challenges" in the Philippines it may be necessary to consider further conditions on aid until the Duterte government "demonstrates a commitment to the rule of law."

The aid Manila gets from Washington is substantial — although it may pale next to the investment that could potentially flow from regional economic powerhouse China, where Duterte is expected to visit in October in a bid to improve ties with Beijing.

US AID IN 2015 AQUINO GOVT

The Philippines received about $175 million in U.S. development assistance in fiscal 2015 and $50 million in foreign military financing. In 2016, it has gotten $75 million for counterterrorism and maritime security. Since 2011, it has received three decommissioned U.S. Coast Guard cutters to bolster its meager navy.

Russel said Thursday it was no surprise that senior lawmakers were looking to monitor where U.S. assistance funds were going, given the "collateral damage" from the drug war. But he added it's premature to impose restrictions on aid.

He stressed Washington's desire to work with Duterte. He said the U.S-Philippine relationship — rooted in a 1951 mutual defense treaty — remains very popular in the Southeast Asian country, notwithstanding Duterte's repeated references to rights abuses committed a century ago under American colonial rule.

"All politicians have to be responsive to both the mainstream public attitude and the national security and economic interests of their country. All of that leads to continued close ties between our two countries," Russel said.

___

AP National Security Writer Robert Burns in Hawaii contributed to this report.


PHILSTAR

Damage control after Duterte's tough talk By Jim Gomez (Associated Press) | Updated September 27, 2016 - 3:22pm 6 167 googleplus0 0


In this Sept. 22, 2016 phoot, President Rodrigo Duterte challenges the United Nations special rapporteur to come to the Philippines and probe the alleged extrajudicial killing activities in the country, during his speech at the inauguration of the Filinvest Development Corporation Misamis 3x135 MW circulating fluid bed coal thermal plant in Villanueva, Misamis Oriental. PPD/King Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines — The new Philippine president uses an expletive to warn key ally Barack Obama not to lecture him on human rights and, in another impromptu speech, declares a dramatic policy change in policy such as removing United States counterterrorism forces out of his country's volatile south. His key officials walk back the remarks and say everything is normal.

And the world wonders which pronouncement is the one that will stick.

Impassioned speeches by Rodrigo Duterte about the United States, the European Union and the United Nations have repeatedly led his government to issue clarifications, though he has been on the job less than three months.

Here's a sampling of Duterte's broadsides — and the ensuing clarifications by him or other Philippine officials.

___

'SOB' (BUT WON'T CUT UMBILICAL CORD)

The statement: "I do not have any master except the Filipino people, nobody but nobody. You must be respectful. Do not just throw questions. Putang ina, I will swear at you in that forum."

READ MORE...

— Duterte in a September 5 speech, using the Tagalog phrase for "son of a bitch" in answer to a reporter, who asked what he'll do if President Barack Obama questions his deadly anti-drug fight when they meet in Laos during the annual summit of leaders of the 10-nation Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

The backtrack: Obama responded by canceling a much-awaited meeting with Duterte, who expressed regret over his remarks. The two leaders, however, met informally in a holding room before a gala dinner in Laos, where Duterte said he told Obama the SOB remark wasn't directed at him. The brash Duterte capped the tempestuous week in US-Philippine ties by discussing, in another Laos meeting with Obama and other world leaders, how US colonial forces killed Muslims in his country's south in the early 1900s. Back home, Duterte railed at the US again in a speech but said he would not "cut our umbilical cord to countries we are allied with."

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MIGRAINE OR PRINCIPLES?

The statement: "I purposely did not attend the bilateral talks between ASEAN countries and ... the president of the United States. I really skipped that ... Now, the reason is not I am anti-West. The reason is not, I do not like the Americans. It's simply a matter of principle for me."

—Duterte in a Sept. 12 speech at the Malacanang presidential palace in Manila.

The backtrack: The remarks by Duterte, who has been critical of Obama and US security policies, came four days after his much-noticed absence from the summit of ASEAN leaders and the US president in the Laotian capital of Vientiane.

Duterte's spokesman, Martin Andanar, and at least three Cabinet officials, however, told the media in Vientiane at the time that the Philippine leader couldn't attend the annual ASEAN-US summit because he had a migraine and wasn't feeling well.

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DRIVING US FORCES OUT OF THE SOUTH

The statement: "The special forces, they have to go. They have to go in Mindanao. There are many whites there, they have to go."

—Duterte in a Sept. 12 speech. He added that he was reorienting the Philippines' foreign policy and that Americans were under threat of attack by Muslim militants. "I do not want a rift with America, but they have to go. It'll become more heated. If they see an American, the latter will really be killed. Ransomed off, then killed."

The backtrack: Duterte's key officials initially explained that his remarks were based on fears for the safety of the Americans. But his defense secretary, Delfin Lorenzana, later played down the safety issue: "The fears of the president that they might be subject to reprisal by the Muslims is a little bit, may not happen because they're only in the camp and they don't go out of the camp alone or unless they're accompanied by our troops or they are also armed. ... (T)hese people are also combatants. They are not civilians that are subject to kidnapping by terrorists.

Duterte later suggested he only made the remarks to pacify restive Muslims opposed to the US presence in the south: "I didn't say (they) have to leave immediately. I said, 'There will be sometime in the future that I will ask the special forces to go' ... I never said, 'Get out of the Philippines,' for after all, we need them there in the (South) China Sea."

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RATINGS OUTBURST

The statement: "The issue here is not my mouth. And they would say the ratings on business, on the economy, so be it, you get out of here. Then we will start on our own. I can go to China, I can go to Russia. I had a talk with them, they are waiting for me, so what the hell."

—Duterte, after US-based firm Standard & Poor last week maintained its investment-grade rating and stable outlook for the Philippines but added that a credit rating upgrade in the next two years under Duterte was unlikely. It also warned it may lower that rating if reforms stall.

The backtrack: Presidential spokesman Martin Andanar took a more optimistic stance. "We welcome S&P's decision as it gives government greater resolve to make our economy growth robust, sustainable, and inclusive. The fundamentals of the economy are solid and strong. ... Peace and order is a must for investors to invest more in the country."

___

ON BREAKING OFF FROM THE UNITED NATIONS:

The statement: "Maybe we'll just have to decide to separate from the United Nations. If you're that rude, son of a bitch, we'll just leave you. So take us out of your organization, you have done nothing here anyway."

—Duterte at a news conference in August, reacting to concerns by U.N.-appointed human rights rapporteurs about drug-related killings.

The backtrack: Foreign Secretary Perfecto Yasay later assured that the Philippines isn't bolting out of the 193-nation world body and clarified the context of the president's remarks: "I can assure you that he remains committed to the United Nations, of which the Philippines is one of the founding members, and to the purposes and objectives of which this august body stands for."

___

EDITOR'S NOTE — Jim Gomez is the chief Philippines correspondent for The Associated Press and is based in Manila.

----------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Palace: 'Difficult' shift in foreign policy will bring prosperity By Alexis Romero (philstar.com) | Updated September 29, 2016 - 7:24pm 23 47 googleplus0 0


ABELLA

MANILA, Philippines — Malacañang said Thursday that the Philippines is undergoing a “difficult” shift towards an independent foreign policy that will have a positive effect on its well-being and prosperity.

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said the Philippines should be allowed to chart its own course and fulfill its destiny on its own terms.

“There is a shift that’s happening. So, it is not unfortunate but it is part of a process, difficult as it may be, but it is part of a process, which the president sees is setting our own independent chart, our own independent course,” Abella said in press briefing.

“It may be difficult and it may be challenging, but, definitely, the president sees it as something that will actually add to our well-being and prosperity as a nation,” he added.

Abella was asked to react to the statements of former Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario, who described President Duterte’s policy direction as unfortunate. Del Rosario said the administration’s foreign policy could “alienate its major economic partners” and create “an unwelcoming environment to foreign investors.”

President Duterte has been hurling tirades and invectives at the United States, the European Union and the United Nations for supposedly interfering with the government's war on drugs.

The US, EU, and UN have raised concerns over the alleged extrajudicial killings of drug suspects in the Philippines and have asked Duterte to uphold the rule of law in his crackdown on narcotics.

“He (del Rosario) is welcome to his own perception. However, we need to bring into consideration the particular policy that the president is bringing us into. In a sense, he’s really bringing a shift in the direction,” Abella said.

Abella said the public should “see the substance” behind Duterte’s style, which involves colorful language and harsh statements.

“As the president says, again and again, and said earlier, look behind my words and see the actual situation on the people and the nation,” the president’s spokesman said.

“So, beyond the style, which is what you termed as harsh, is the substance which is to set the direction of an independent and free Philippines.”


Philippine and US troops at a military exercise. Philstar.com, file

Duterte has been issuing controversial foreign policy pronouncements, the latest of which was his declaration last Wednesday that the upcoming military exercise between the Philippines and the US would be the “last.”

READ: Duterte wants end to Philippines' war games with US

Abella said no timetable has been set with regard to Duterte’s statement on the joint drills but maintained that “it was part of the president’s intention.”

Despite Duterte’s anti-US pronouncements, Abella said the fundamental relationship between Manila and Washington has not changed.

“We continue to surge forward even as we attempt a deeper understanding of each other’s methods,” Abella said.

“The Philippines has not veered away from these basic principles, despite the strong stance of the president. The drug problem in the Philippines itself is so pervasive that it undermines the human rights of the people and the rule of law.”

Abella noted that the president had promised to honor all treaties and pacts during his inaugural address. The joint exercises of the Philippines and the US was in line with the Mutual Defense Treaty forged by the two countries in 1951.

“However, there are also certain modifications in their relationship and so the relationship remains solid according to the agreements, but also there will be other activities that will be more open to other nations too,” Abella said.

Asked if the administration is worried about the possible impact of Duterte’s statements on the economy given that the US is the Philippines’ largest trading partner, Abella replied: “We understand that. And as you can, as you have seen, the president is also strengthening his relationship with neighboring countries and this is part of being more inclusive in our relation, economic relationships.”

READ: Yasay: Duterte open to better relationships with China, Russia


PHILSTAR

Rody: De Lima will be jailed By Alexis Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 27, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


President Rodrigo Duterte said yesterday Senator Leila De Lima would be pinned down by testimonies of New Bilibid Prison (NBP) inmates who have accused her of receiving money from drug lords. AP/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines - Cases have not been filed against Sen. Leila de Lima for her alleged involvement in illegal drugs but President Duterte is confident that his fiercest critic would land in jail.

Duterte said yesterday De Lima would be pinned down by testimonies of New Bilibid Prison (NBP) inmates who have accused her of receiving money from drug lords.

“Now that she (De Lima) is in trouble, she wants to drag me. She will really go to jail. I’m sure of that because of the testimonial evidence,” the President said during the induction of officers of the Malacañang Press Corps, the Malacañang Cameramen Association and the Presidential Photojournalists Association.

“She will be jailed when everybody says, five (witnesses) could say that they contributed money. So on a national scale… who brought in the narco politics? It is here already.”

Asked if his statement is a go-signal for the justice department to file charges against De Lima, Duterte replied: “Yes, of course.”

“(Cases will be filed) after the investigations are finished. I am sure of my evidence,” he added.

READ MORE...

The President said “plenty” of non-bailable cases related to drugs may be filed against the senator, who has been critical of his brutal war on narcotics.

“She’s the one who should be worried. Those are serious charges. She should not adopt a nonchalant attitude about all of these things. I said she opened the portals of narco politics to take hold in the national level,” Duterte said.

De Lima has been accused of receiving millions in drug money to fund her senatorial campaign when she was justice secretary.

In previous speeches, Duterte said De Lima’s affair with her former driver Ronnie Dayan made her violate the law and grant special privileges to drug lords at the NBP.

Last week, some inmates revealed in a House hearing that the NBP became a “little Las Vegas” during De Lima’s stint as justice secretary.

She denied the accusations and claimed that Duterte and his allies are ganging up on her because she launched a probe on the spate of drug-related killings in the country.

DE LIMA FIERCEST CRITIC

De Lima has been a critic of Duterte even before he assumed the presidency. When she was chair of the Commission on Human Rights (CHR), De Lima launched investigations on Duterte’s link to the Davao death squad, a vigilante group blamed for the killing of criminals in the city.

Duterte served as mayor of Davao City for more than 22 years.

Last week, De Lima was ousted by the Senate as justice committee chair due to her supposed bias against Duterte.

The committee had launched an inquiry on the killings of suspected drug personalities.

‘Her sexuality put her down’ Duterte said De Lima has no one to blame for allegations against her but herself.

“She was the one who started it. You’re all spectators who go down national, live, where it was evolving in the days that passed,” the President said.

“Lumaki ang ulo niya (It went to her head). When she was chairman of the (Commission on) Human Rights, somebody might have told her that she can become a president or senator. You know, the ambition was good but her sexuality put her down.”

Duterte said De Lima would be “finished” once intimate videos of her surface.

“I’d ask her ‘Miss de Lima, I’ve kind of a blurred, vague memory of your persona… I’m establishing the character of you. Is this you pumping? So the next question will be drugs,” he said.

“You know, every time I view the video, I lose my appetite.”

Duterte said De Lima need not worry about having affairs once she is in prison.

“She will have about how many lovers there if she wants. I am really tough when it comes to insulting… I am doing nothing and yet she keeps on talking,” he said.

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RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

Hysterical Leila flies off the handle Written by Tribune Wires Thursday, 29 September 2016 00:00 By Angie M. Rosales,Benjamin B. Pulta and Ted Tuvera


OFF TO VIETNAM Rody: De Lima needs rest, on the verge of nervous breakdown


“Enough! Just arrest me, jail me and be done with it.”

This was the gist of an angry, hysterical Sen. Leila de Lima’s press conference yesterday at the Senate with the Senate beat reporters in attendance.

“Arrest me now,” she screamed, completely out of control,as this was the first time reporters saw her breaking down,
complete with hysterics and shouting, crying, saying she can no longer take all these allegations leveled at her by President Duterte and Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre.President Duterte, commenting on de Limas bizarre behavior, advised her to take a break and rest as she appears to be on the verge of a nervous breakdown, following de Lima’s hysterical outburst over claims that the administration’s supposed personal harassment against her hours before the President left for Vietnam.

RP now ‘assassin’ state — Leila

De Lima, commenting on the breaking story of a riot in the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) which resulted in the killing of a high value drug lord, Tony Co, who was stabbed to death and wounding three others, including Jaybee Sebastian, who no longer stays in his plush kubol, his former lodgings but now resides in the Maximum prison cell, with other high value convicts, de Lima suddenly burst out, calling the Philippines under President Duterte an “assassin state.”

De Lima, who faces allegations of being involved in the ilegal drug trade and getting at least P3 million on a regular basis, allegedly from contributions of several drug lrods in the NBP, then under the control of Jaybee Sebastian, whom she described as a government asset, cited the possibility of the said incident, as Malacañang’s way of sending its messages to prisoners who refuse to implicate her in illegal drugs trade inside the NBP as one of those reported injured is convicted carnapper Sebastian, her alleged cohort in the supposed payoffs of drug lord inmates.

As usual, de Lima comes up with conjectures and suspicions, but offers no proof.

She was quick to point out what she noted as the apparent attempt to cast the blame on her, citing a news item where one of President Duterte’s known staunch supporter, Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez said that somebody must be out to silence Sebastian.

“Going into hysterics, she said, “what is being implied by them? Am I to blame again? It is they (allies of Duterte and the President himsef, along with Justice chief Aguirre) who have been putting the squeeze on me and harassing me. This is already too much of their harassment, then they will still do this to me (blame her for the riot and they call themselves men?

"Are these men? They’re cowards, they’re false and they’re liars! That is a bunch of officials that we have now,” de Lima, hysterically said, breaking down in tears during her press conference.

There was no statement from either Duterte or Aguirre or any other government official who made the claim of de Lima that she is being suspected of having a hand in the prison riot.

Rody: Leila on verge of nervous breakdown

Seeing her hysterical display of emotions, Duterte said de Lima was on the verge of a nervous breakdown and advised her to just take a rest.

This was Duterte’s unsolicited advice to his top critic, Senator de Lima, following her dramatic outburst on the administration’s supposed personal harassment against her hours before the President left for Vietnam.

Minus his usual expletives, Duterte said that he’s not really up to destroying de Lima on the personal level, except that she absorbed all the stress caused by the deluge of allegations against her: from being in cahoots with narcotics syndicates up to having a sex video with one of her alleged multiple lovers.

“In all sincerity, as a human being, I think I’m not trying to derogate [de Lima]. She’s a lawyer. She’s bright. It’s just that she’s breaking down,” the President said in a press conference at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) Terminal 2 minutes before boarding his plane bound for Hanoi.

Still injecting his sense of humor, Duterte advised the neophyte lawmaker to take some rest because if she won’t she might end up with a nervous breakdown.

“If she continues yakking, she will have a nervous breakdown. I’m suggesting she take a few days off. She should take a vacation,” he added.

However, the President was serious in his allegation that it was de Lima who opened the chance for drug lords to infiltrate the government that could make the Philippines a “narco-state”.

“I think the most serious charge against her is that the portals of the National Government have been opened by her election as senator because of the drug money. We are now a narco-politics state,” Duterte said.

“Drug money will flow down to the basic unit, the barangays and it will strengthen the hold of narco-politics now existing in our country. It behooves upon me to tell you what is the truth and prevent something catastrophic in the future,” the President stressed.

Leila dares Rody, Aguirre to file case in court

The senator, who has been incessantly at the receiving end of tirades from the President and other government officials over her alleged drug links, dared Malacañang to bring before the courts the issues against her while appealing to spare her former staff members, colleagues and other possible “witnesses” being eyed to testify against her.

“Arrest me now. This is really what you want to do. Put me in prison now. I’m here! Do what you want to me, Mr. President. I’ll wait for you,” she said.

Despite the alleged transgression being committed against her, de Lima said she refused to heed the advice of well-meaning friends for her to consider seeking political asylum, especially in the light of the reported warning given by President on her being eventually jailed for her supposed offenses.

“Why should I do that? I want to fight here in my country. I am not a cpward because I am innocent. It is the cowards who retreat, not Leila de Lima. I was not raised to be a coward.” she angrily said, her voice breaking, she said.

In her press conference, the senator said she would not discount the possibility of the reported riot as yet another tact of the government to persuade the remaining Bilibid 19, the high-profile inmates who had once subjected by her to raids by the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) due to lavish lifestyle inside the NBP, to testify against her in the ongoing inquiry in the House of Representatives.

“If this is the truth, I plead to Malacañang to stop this tragic, desperate and despicable actions. These prisoners are supposed to be under the government’s protection. To threaten them with violence and murder simply because they refuse to be used in the ongoing House hearing is the height of Mafia tactics and gangster-style operations that make this government worse than a Narco-State. It makes this government an Assassin-State, a State that promotes murder and summary execution as policy and as weapon against its perceived enemies,” she said.

She claimed that several of the prisoners refused and continue to refuse to testify against her in the lower house proceedings as their alleged protector, de Lima said, but refused to name them. She cites A1 sources, but Tribune sources in Congress said her sources are probably Sen. Antonio Trillanes and Party list congressman Gary Alejano, as they comment right away that jibes with Leila’s claims and uses this as her claims neing true.

Blame on me for starting misery

While admitting that she had “started all thiis misery by cutting them of from their drug trade and luxurious living quarters,” de Lima said there are those who could not allow themselves to stand as false witnesses against her.

Still, the senator said, she would not discount the possibility that more lives could be lost in the course of undertaking schemes just so she could be pinned down in her alleged drug links.

“This is the worst challenge. This is sheer brazenness, it’s almost surreal, its unimaginable, it’s unprecedented what a sitting president does against a sitting senator because of a personal vendetta and whatever hidden motives he has and uses as his pawns, as tools, as instruments, the likes of Aguirre (to further the President’s evil design,” she said.

“I am begging the President and Aguirre, stop his madness against me,” she said.

“Right now I have no option. I’m just here, I’m just trying to do my job even if of course I’m so distracted. Definitely it has a toll my health, it has a toll on my very well being. It has a toll on my family. My family is suffering! No one in this room can imagine what I carry in my being and I do not know wh tit is always me, me. me. Do I deserve this? I certainly do not.

Enough. Stop it. Stop the madness,” she said, breaking down.

Agurire: Leila fails to prove claims

De Lima’s main tormentor, Justice Secretary Aguirre is unimpressed with the public outburst from de Lima during a press conference where the former human rights chairman accused Malacañang of persecuting her.

“If you become hysterical, if you start raising your voice, people would not understand why you are being hysterical,”, an unimpressed Aguirre said in a press briefing when sought to react on the tear drenched press briefing by de Lima in the Senate where the opposition lawmaker accused the government of fabricating evidence to pin her down.

The senator insists inmates who testified against her were also coerced and tortured.

Belying de Lima’s claim, Aguirre pointed out the inmates were calm, even cracking jokes during the House Committee on Justice hearing on the proliferation of illegal drugs inside the New Bilibid Prison (NBP).

“That is a truthful witness. Present someone like him, Senator de Lima and stop ranting.”Aguirre dared De Lima and urged her to present evidence to show that they fabricated the evidence against her and that they tortured high profile inmates who testified against her.

“State the facts! Where is your evidence? If you allege something you should prove the inmates were tortured ...A lawyer should know better,” Aguirre said.

He also said de Lima is certain to land in jail.


INQUIRER

De Lima to Duterte: ‘What do you see in me that you find sexual? SHARES: 4071 VIEW COMMENTS INQUIRER.net By: Maila Ager, September 26th, 2016 06:20 PM



AFTER getting several sexual innuendos, Senator Leila de Lima could not resist herself asking President Rodrigo Duterte this question: What do you see in me that you find sexual?

“The President’s foul mouth has again desecrated the hollowed grounds of Malacañan [Palace] with another round of his vile personal attacks against me,” de Lima said in a statement on Monday.

De Lima said she cannot resist asking the President such question.

“Why is your mind so fixated on my sexual aspect? You are so obsessed with me. Why???” she asked.

Duterte earlier called de Lima an “immoral woman” for allegedly having an affair with former driver Ronnie Dayan, who had alleged collected drug money at the New Bilibid Prison for her campaign kitty.

READ: Duterte: De :Lima’s sexcapades led her to crime, drug payoffs

The President had also linked De Lima to a certain “Warren,” an employee of the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA).

READ MORE...

READ: Duterte: Warren is De Lima’s new lover

De Lima has called Duterte the “lowest” and the “vilest” man in the country after the latter’s fresh attacks against her.

“All of a sudden he’s now, for me, for me, he’s now he lowest and the vilest man in the country sa sobrang kabastusan na po nya (for his rudeness),” she said in an earlier interview.

“That’s why God forgive him. Naawa na po ako sa inyo mahal na Pangulo, tigilan nyo na po ako (I pity you, our dear President, stop your attacks against me.) Ano pong gusto nyo sa akin? May gusto po ba kayo sa akin?” de Lima added.

READ: De Lima calls Duterte lowest, vilest man in PH

VIDEO: Duterte: Testimonies against De Lima can’t be orchestrated 
https://youtu.be/avxT4JXZmKQ
Duterte: Testimonies against De Lima can’t be orchestrated INQUIRER.net INQUIRER.net Subscribe64,365 Add to Share More 2,723 views 15 2 Published on Sep 25, 2016 President Rodrigo Duterte has said that the testimonies of the witnesses during the House inquiry on the proliferation of illegal drugs at the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) cannot be “orchestrated.”

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RELATED FROM SUNSTAR ONLINE

Duterte downplays de Lima's emotional outburst;  Wednesday, September 28, 2016 By RUTH ABBEY GITA



PRESIDENT Rodrigo Duterte played down on Wednesday Senator Leila de Lima's slamming of his administration for probing her alleged involvement in the illegal drugs trade in the New Bilibid Prison (NBP).

"What will I do to her? I will recommend her to Viva Films or ABS-CBN," Duterte said in a press conference held at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport before he left the country for a visit to Vietnam.

De Lima had several emotional outbursts as she pleads to Malacanang to stop its desperate and despicable actions against her.

Duterte, right after his pre-departure speech, expressed concern over the "most serious" charge against the senator for her alleged drug connections inside the New Bilibid Prison in Muntinlupa City.

"I think the most serious charge against her is [that] the portals of the national government have been opened by her election as senator because of the drug money," Duterte said.

The President also countered that he was maligning De Lima, saying that it was the latter that was "oppressing" him.

"She wants to have me investigated again by the UN [United Stations] through a new [issue]. That's me, I'm the one being oppressed here," he said.
(Sunnex)

VIDEO: Duterte downplays De Lima outburst, says she needs a break

 
https://youtu.be/ErC5B4l2Nxk

Duterte downplays De Lima outburst, says she needs a break INQUIRER.net INQUIRER.net Subscribe64,452 Add to Share More 158 views 8 0 Published on Sep 28, 2016 “I was the one oppressed,” President Rodrigo Duterte told Sen. Leila de Lima on Wednesday amid their escalating word war.

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/819919/d.. .


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