PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



PHNO PRESIDENTIAL (DU30) NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

ASEAN SEPT 7 -OBAMA SCRAPS MEET WITH RODY AT ASEAN MEET
[RELATED: Growing tensions between PH, US seen]


SEPTEMBER 7 =US President Barack Obama speaks at the Lao National Cultural Hall in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster An expletive-laced tirade by President Duterte apparently proved too much for US President Barack Obama, who scrapped a bilateral meeting with the “colorful” Philippine leader that would have taken place here yesterday on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit. It was a spectacular fallout between the US and the Philippines, longtime allies that have seen relations plunge under a barrage of insults from Duterte since he came to office on June 30.
“Clearly, he’s a colorful guy” with “colorful statements,” Obama said, reacting to Duterte’s latest diatribe, during a news conference Monday night after the Group of 20 summit in China. Hours later, US officials announced that the meeting, which highly placed sources said Manila had requested, had been scrapped. It is rare for the US president to cancel bilateral meetings. One such case was when Obama scrapped a summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin in August 2013. This was after Moscow granted temporary asylum to National Security Agency whistle-blower Edward Snowden when China let him leave Hong Kong instead of extraditing him to the US as requested by Washington. READ MORE...RELATED, Growing tensions between PH, US seen...

ALSO Duterte: I didn’t [actually] curse Obama; directed at State dept
[BUT HE THINKS UN CHIEF A FOOL FOR RAISING RIGHTS ISSUE]
[RELATED: Widodo asks Duterte to help settle Indon hajj pilgrims’ woes in Manila]


SEPTEMBER 10 -COLD SHOULDER UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon (left) sits tight as President Duterte arrives while US President Barack Obama (right) takes his seat at the start of the East Asia summit on the last day of the Asean summit in the Laotian capital of Vientiane on Thursday. AP JAKARTA—President Rodrigo Duterte on Friday said he told US President Barack Obama that he never called him a “son of a bitch,” but he maintained a defiant stance on his war on drugs, saying UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon was a fool for bringing up human rights. Obama canceled a planned meeting with Mr. Duterte on the sidelines of this week’s Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) summit in Vientiane, Laos, after the Philippine leader cussed him in an outburst over reports that he would raise concerns about human rights violations in the Philippine war on drugs. “I do not have any master except the Filipino people, nobody but nobody. You must be respectful. Do not just throw away questions and statements. Putang ina, I will curse you in that forum,” Mr. Duterte told reporters, using the Filipino phrase for “son of a bitch,” before flying to Laos on Monday.While on a visit to Indonesia on Friday, Mr. Duterte told a group of Filipinos in a meeting at Shangri-La Jakarta hotel that the slur was not directed at Obama and that he told him so during a brief meeting before the Asean leaders’ gala dinner in Vientiane on Wednesday. “I told him in a holding room, ‘President Obama, I’m President Duterte. I never made that statement. Check it out,’” Mr. Duterte said. READ MORE... RELATED, Widodo asks Duterte to help settle Indon hajj pilgrims’ woes in Manila...

ALSO: By Jojo Robles - Substance vs form
[Sure, Duterte could use a little more prudence and lose a lot of the gutter-speak, especially when talking to the press and about foreign leaders. But to ignore what Duterte is saying by focusing on how he delivers his message is to make the same mistake as those who thought he was too rough, uncouth and vulgar to become president. Duterte, as he said, serves no one but the people of his country. To ignore all he’s been doing for his people is to insult their wisdom in choosing Duterte to serve them.]


SEPTEMBER 7 -MANILA STANDARD JOJO ROBLES -
President Rodrigo Duterte announced his arrival on the world stage in a way that only he could. Right before Duterte left Davao City for his first trip as head of state, the potty-mouthed Philippine president, bristling at the thought that US President Barack Obama would lecture him on human rights abuses taking place simultaneous with his campaign against illegal drugs, used language that was undiplomatic, to say the least. In reply to a reporter’s hypothetical question, Duterte cut loose with a withering tirade about the US’ own record on human rights, its policy of overseas intervention and its continued treatment of its former colony as its vassal. In trademark Duterte fashion, the speech was laced with choice epithets and threats which were heard all the way to China, where Obama was attending the G-20 summit of wealthy nations. The upshot of Duterte’s outburst was the cancellation of his scheduled meeting with Obama on the sidelines of the ongoing summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in Vientiane, Laos. “He’s a colorful guy,” Obama joked and shrugged, after hearing about Duterte’s anti-American rant. Later yesterday, Duterte seemed to have backed away from his tough-guy position. In a statement, Duterte acknowledged that he made “strong comments to certain press questions,” which “came across as a personal attack on the US president.” READ MORE...

ALSO: Duterte expresses regret over strong comments
[RELATED: Senators remind Duterte: You shape foreign policy]


SEPTEMBER 7 -Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte arrives at the National Convention Center for scheduled bilateral meetings with ASEAN leaders on the sidelines of the 28th and 29th ASEAN Summits and other related summits Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016 in Vientiane, Laos. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez
VIENTIANE – Hours after US President Barack Obama cancelled their scheduled meeting, President Duterte expressed regret yesterday that his tirade against the leader of the most powerful nation came across as a personal attack. The meeting was supposed to take place on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit here. “While the immediate cause was my strong comments to certain press questions that elicited concern and distress, we also regret it came across as a personal attack on the US president,” Duterte said in a statement read by Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar. He said the meeting was “mutually agreed upon” to be moved to a “later date.” The 71-year-old former prosecutor and Davao City mayor on Monday threatened to curse Obama to his face if the latter lectured him over concerns about a brutal war on illegal drugs that has claimed more than 2,400 lives in the Philippines. READ MORE...RELATED,  Senators remind Duterte: You shape foreign policy...

ALSO: Duterte brings up drugs at ASEAN business summit
[RELATED: Palace: Drug war critics should be morally superior]


SEPTEMBER 7 -Leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) from left Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen, Philippine's President Rodrigo Duterte and Brunei Foreign Minister and Prime Minister Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah walk back to their seats following the opening ceremony of the 28th and 29th ASEAN summits at National Convention Center in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. AP/Gemunu Amarasinghe
MANILA, Philippines — The Association of Southeast Asian Nations needs stronger resolve and action in fighting transnational crime, President Rodrigo Duterte said on Wednesday. The Philippine president noted that transnational crime is one of the most difficult and complex problem that the region faces. "The trade in illicit and illegal drugs in particular has emerged as a pressing problem for our country’s undermined social cohesion and the rule of law in the socio-economic program of the country," Duterte said in his speech at the ASEAN Business and Investment Summit in Luang Prabang, Laos. READ MORE...RELATED,
Palace: Drug war critics should be morally superior...

ALSO:
Duterte suffers migraine, skips Asean morning meet with US, India leaders

[RELATED: OPINION - The President’s economic challenge]


SEPTEMBER 8 -U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, left, glances at Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, right, at the start of 11th East Asia Summit on the last day of the 28th and 29th ASEAN Summits and other related summits at the National Convention Center Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016 in Vientiane, Laos. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
President Rodrigo Duterte failed to attend the regional leaders’ meeting with the heads of United States and India because he was not feeling well, a Cabinet official said on Thursday. “He was not feeling well in the morning so he missed the two sessions,” Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Jesus Dureza said in a statement, referring to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) summit in Vientiane, Laos. READ: Duterte skips meeting with US, India leaders “But he was able to attend the East Asia Summit with 18 world leaders and the rest of the day’s remaining schedule until departure for Indonesia early evening today,” Dureza added. In a text message, foreign affairs spokesperson Charles Jose said: “We heard that he was not feeling well but he was there at the East Asia Summit.” Duterte is set to fly to Indonesia on Friday night for a 24-hour working visit.THE FULL REPORT, WATCH VIDEO...RELATED, OPINION
The President’s economic challenge...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Obama scraps meet with Rody


SEPTEMBER 7 =US President Barack Obama speaks at the Lao National Cultural Hall in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

VIENTIANE, SEPTEMBER 12, 2016 (PHILSTAR) By Jose Katigbak, STAR Washington Bureau  September 7, 2016 - An expletive-laced tirade by President Duterte apparently proved too much for US President Barack Obama, who scrapped a bilateral meeting with the “colorful” Philippine leader that would have taken place here yesterday on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit.

It was a spectacular fallout between the US and the Philippines, longtime allies that have seen relations plunge under a barrage of insults from Duterte since he came to office on June 30.

“Clearly, he’s a colorful guy” with “colorful statements,” Obama said, reacting to Duterte’s latest diatribe, during a news conference Monday night after the Group of 20 summit in China. Hours later, US officials announced that the meeting, which highly placed sources said Manila had requested, had been scrapped.

It is rare for the US president to cancel bilateral meetings. One such case was when Obama scrapped a summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin in August 2013. This was after Moscow granted temporary asylum to National Security Agency whistle-blower Edward Snowden when China let him leave Hong Kong instead of extraditing him to the US as requested by Washington.

READ MORE...

In Hangzhou after the G-20 meeting, Obama told a press conference that he had asked his staffers to speak with their Philippine counterparts and to “make sure if I’m having a meeting, it’s productive and we’re getting something done.”

Obama called the Philippines a close “friend and ally” of the US.

'ROOKIE' MISTAKE

Duterte made a “rookie” mistake by announcing beforehand that if Obama lectured him on the issue of drug-related extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, the situation could turn ugly, said former State Department spokesman PJ Crowley.

By telegraphing his intention in a vulgar language, Duterte ensured Obama would cancel a meeting with him in Laos, Crowley said in an interview with BBC World News America on Monday.

Obama flew to Laos on Monday for the ASEAN summit after attending the G20 meeting in Hangzhou.

Duterte’s war on crime has claimed more than 2,400 lives in just over two months.

“You must be respectful. Do not just throw questions and statements. Son of a whore, I will curse you in that forum,” Duterte told reporters when asked about his message for Obama.

Duterte, who has quickly earned a global reputation for his acid tongue, then used typically colorful language to describe their planned meeting if rights issues came up.

“We will be wallowing in the mud like pigs if you do that to me,” he said. Duterte had previously also branded US Ambassador Philip Goldberg as a “gay” whom he disliked. The statement also included “son of a whore.” Duterte had earlier sought to taint the reputation of Pope Francis’ mother in similar fashion.

US officials said instead of meeting with Duterte, Obama would meet with South Korean President Park Geun-hye.

Before the cancellation of the meeting was announced, Obama said “the Filipino people are some of our closest friends and allies and the Philippines is a treaty ally of ours. But I always want to make sure that if I’m having a meeting that it’s actually productive and we’re getting something done.”

Since taking office in June, Duterte has sanctioned the killing of drug dealers to wipe out the drug menace in the Philippines and more than 2,400 people, most of them suspected drug dealers, have been reported killed.

He has also previously cursed or insulted UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and senior UN officials.

Duterte was elected to office in a landslide this year after pledging to kill 100,000 people in an unprecedented war on crime.

When faced with criticisms over an apparent spate of extrajudicial killings in his crime war by the UN, he responded with what has become familiar abuse.

“Maybe we’ll just have to decide to separate from the United Nations. If you are that disrespectful, son of a whore, then I will just leave you,” he said last month.

Crucial time

The setback in US-Philippine relations comes at a crucial time in the region, with China seeking to cement control over the contested South China Sea.

The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan also have competing claims to the strategically vital waters, but have watched China expand its presence by building artificial islands in key locations.

An international tribunal ruled in July that China’s claims to the waters – through which $5 trillion in global shipping trade passes – had no legal basis.

The verdict was widely seen as a sweeping victory for the Philippines, which filed the suit under the previous administration of president Benigno Aquino III. But China has vowed to ignore the ruling.

And Duterte has sought to heal relations with China rather than inflame them by pressing the tribunal’s ruling.

Under Aquino, the Philippines had forged closer military ties with the US to deal with the China threat. But Duterte has cast doubt on that strategy.

Obama’s aides had previously said he wanted to discuss the South China Sea issue with Duterte in Laos.

Nevertheless, the South China Sea issue is expected to once again be discussed at the three days of meetings hosted by ASEAN, which will be attended by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.

The gathering will see the 10 ASEAN members meet by themselves, then with leaders from the US, Japan, South Korea and China.

Other leaders to come for an East Asia summit on Thursday include those from Australia, India and New Zealand.

Laos is the final Asian visit of Obama’s eight-year presidency, during which he has sought to refocus American military, political and economic resources on the region.

It is also the first visit by a sitting US president to Laos, which the US secretly carpet bombed for nearly a decade in the Vietnam War, killing tens of thousands of people.

Obama is expected to announce today greater help in clearing the bombs.

WATCH VIDEO THIS NEWS FROM THE FRANCE MEDIA BLOG:
Philippines president Duterte insults Barack Obama, calling him a "son of a wh***" (In Tagalog a casual cliche curse 'putang ina'! Visit our website : http://www.france24.com

 
https://youtu.be/g2Um0TJLEp4
Philippines: Filipino president Duterte insults Barack Obama, calling him a "son of a whore" FRANCE 24 English FRANCE 24 English Subscribe360,010 Add to Share More 411,923 views 930 360 Published on Sep 5, 2016 Subscribe to France 24 now : http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN

----------------

RELATED FROM THE MANILA TIMES

Growing tensions between PH, US seen BY MICHAEL JOE T. DELIZO, JEFFERSON ANTIPORDA AND ANGELICA BALLESTEROS ON SEPTEMBER 7, 2016 TODAY'S HEADLINE PHOTOS, TOP STORIES


ASEAN DEBUT President Rodrigo Duterte (right) attends the plenary session of the opening ceremony of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) Summit in Vientiane on Tuesday. AFP PHOTO BY ROSLAN RAHMAN

THE CANCELLATION of President Rodrigo Duterte’s meeting with US President Barack Obama is likely to raise tensions between the Philippines and US at a time Manila needs the support of allies against China’s military buildup at the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea), analysts said on Tuesday.

Political analyst Ramon Casiple said Duterte’s latest outburst against the US and Obama would likely prompt Washington to review its relations with the Philippine leader.

“Obviously the meeting was postponed because of the statement of the President. He insulted another leader that is why he (Duterte) was cut off,” Casiple said in an interview.

Prof. Richard Javad Heydarian of De La Salle University’s political science department described the cancellation of the planned meeting as a “diplomatic snub.”

“Obama’s diplomatic snub clearly shows growing tensions in Philippine-US bilateral relations,” he told The Manila Times.

But the “fundamentals of bilateral security and economic relations are expected to continue,” he said.

‘Wasted opportunity’

For former Philippine ambassador to Washington Jose Cuisia Jr., the scrapped meeting was a “wasted opportunity” for Duterte, who could have discussed important issues with Obama apart from Washington’s concern over the rising number of deaths of drug suspects.

The ex-diplomat said Obama would have been “very courteous and very polite” in discussing human rights with Duterte, and not in a lecturing manner as earlier reported by the press.

“When you’re partners, you discuss your differences just like what couples do,” he said in an interview with The Manila Times.

“It’s very unfortunate. I hope that it will really not affect the strong bilateral relations between the Philippines and the US,” Cuisia added.

The Philippines is the US’ oldest Asian partner and is designated by Washington as a “major non-North Atlantic Treaty Organization ally.”

Cuisia noted that the Philippines received over $1.3 billion military and economic assistance from the US in recent years.

In Laos, Obama mentioned increased military cooperation with the Philippines, and Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar noted that during the G20 summit, Obama backed the Philippines’ position that China should observe international law in connection with the sea dispute.

Undiplomatic

It was Senate President Pro-Tempore Franklin Drilon who gave Duterte a lecture on Tuesday, on how the President should conduct himself diplomatically.

“Talk about starting off on the wrong foot,” Drilon said in a statement.

“It is unfortunate that such meeting did not push through because of unnecessary rhetoric over human rights issues. We must remember that our foreign policy is shaped in accordance with our national interest. Unfriendly rhetoric and undiplomatic statements will not bring us anywhere,” he said.

Drilon’s colleagues however don’t see any negative consequences from Duterte’s tirades.

“I don’t think this would have any long-lasting or serious consequences in PH-US relations,” Senate President Aquilino Pimentel 3rd said in an interview.

Senator Sherwin Gatchalian backed Duterte’s aggressive assertion of Philippine foreign policy independence.

“In a way, it is promising to see that our President is strong enough to rattle even the most powerful leader in the world,” he said.

Senators Juan Edgardo Angara and Joseph Victor Ejercito said the incident could affect the relations between the two nations but this could easily be addressed with skillful diplomacy.

In the House of Representatives, Northern Samar Rep. Raul Daza feared that the Philippines could be headed for isolation.

“I’m afraid that if we continue this kind of course, we might be isolating ourselves from the rest of the world,” he said.

VIDEO: PRESIDENT DUTERTE's SPEECH BEFORE LEAVING THE PHILIPPINES
Pres. Duterte, bibiyahe na papuntang Laos para sa 2016 Asean Summit
FROM GMA News and Public Affairs GMA News and Public Affairs

 
https://youtu.be/SzhPJwjbCAY
BP: Pres. Duterte, bibiyahe na papuntang Laos para sa 2016 Asean Summit GMA News and Public Affairs GMA News and Public Affairs Subscribe1,172,188 Add to Share More 25,124 views 234 4 Published on Sep 5, 2016 Balita Pilipinas Ngayon rounds up the top stories from around the Philippines GMA’s regional stations in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. It’s hosted by Mark Salazar and Maki Pulido and airs at 4:00 PM (PHL Time), Mondays to Fridays on GMA News TV Channel 11.


INQUIRER

Duterte: I didn’t curse Obama
[BUT HE THINKS UN CHIEF A FOOL FOR RAISING RIGHTS ISSUE]
By: Gil C. Cabacungan @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 01:57 AM September 10th, 2016


COLD SHOULDER UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon (left) sits tight as President Duterte arrives while US President Barack Obama (right) takes his seat at the start of the East Asia summit on the last day of the Asean summit in the Laotian capital of Vientiane on Thursday. AP

JAKARTA—President Rodrigo Duterte on Friday said he told US President Barack Obama that he never called him a “son of a bitch,” but he maintained a defiant stance on his war on drugs, saying UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon was a fool for bringing up human rights.

Obama canceled a planned meeting with Mr. Duterte on the sidelines of this week’s Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) summit in Vientiane, Laos, after the Philippine leader cussed him in an outburst over reports that he would raise concerns about human rights violations in the Philippine war on drugs.

“I do not have any master except the Filipino people, nobody but nobody. You must be respectful. Do not just throw away questions and statements. Putang ina, I will curse you in that forum,” Mr. Duterte told reporters, using the Filipino phrase for “son of a bitch,” before flying to Laos on Monday.

While on a visit to Indonesia on Friday, Mr. Duterte told a group of Filipinos in a meeting at Shangri-La Jakarta hotel that the slur was not directed at Obama and that he told him so during a brief meeting before the Asean leaders’ gala dinner in Vientiane on Wednesday.

“I told him in a holding room, ‘President Obama, I’m President Duterte. I never made that statement. Check it out,’” Mr. Duterte said.

READ MORE...

He quoted Obama as saying to him, “My men will talk to you.”

He said he replied, “OK.”

Mr. Duterte admitted uttering “son of a bitch,” but said it was “not in relation to Obama.”

“I was not fighting America,” he added.

Directed at US state dep’t

Mr. Duterte said his remarks were directed at the US state department, which has raised concerns over potential human rights violations in his war on drugs that has left almost 3,000 dead in just over two months.

“I got really angry about these threats over this human rights issue. This is the fault of the crazy people in the state department,” he said.

Mr. Duterte said he clarified his comments to Obama when they met in Laos.

Obama and Mr. Duterte shook hands and had a brief chat before the Asean gala dinner, easing the standoff, officials said.

The White House said the two men exchanged “pleasantries,” suggesting nothing substantive was discussed.

Mr. Duterte blamed the controversy on “media spin.”

He cited the apology of TV5’s Ed Lingao as proof of the media’s erroneous interpretation that he called Obama a “son of a bitch.”

Wrong translation

When Lingao learned that the slur against Obama was based on wrong information fed by his Davao correspondent, he quickly apologized, realizing that “I never made any reference to Obama,” he said.

READ: Duterte diplomacy: Philippine leader’s global insults

The acid-tongued Mr. Duterte also blamed the diplomatic bust-up on the foreign media’s erroneous translation of “putang ina” into English as “son of a whore.”

He said “putang ina” was an ordinary expression used by everyone in the Philippines and it should not be taken at face value.

The better translation, he said, is “son of a bitch,” as American media rendered the expression, or “son of a gun.”

British English media rendered the expression as “son of a whore,” which the White House took as an insult to Obama.

At a news conference marking the end of his trip to Laos on Thursday, Obama said he was unfazed by Mr. Duterte’s jibe.

“I don’t take these comments personally because it seems as if this is a phrase he’s used repeatedly, including directed at the Pope and others,” Obama said, adding that such choice words were “a habit, a way of speaking” for Mr. Duterte.

Mr. Duterte has called Pope Francis a “son of a bitch” for causing traffic jams in Manila during his visit to the Philippines last year.

He has also called the US ambassador to Manila, Philip Goldberg, a “gay son of a bitch” and the United Nations “sons of bitches.”

READ: US says Duterte’s ‘bakla’ comment vs Goldberg ‘inappropriate’

‘I don’t give a shit’

Mr. Duterte said he cared nothing about what the foreign press wrote about him.

“I don’t give a shit. Why? Because I am not the president of the international community. So what if my reputation is bad? I said I don’t give a shit. I am the President of the Republic of the Philippines, not the republic of the international community. You can all go to hell, I will do what I think is best for my country,” he said.

Mr. Duterte blamed the “jaundiced” and “yellow” group—a reference to supporters of his predecessor, Benigno Aquino III—for fueling the controversy, and criticized the US state department for pinning extrajudicial killings on his war on drugs.

Ban a ‘fool’

Mr. Duterte said he thought UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon was a fool for bringing up the issue of human rights violations weeks before the Asean summit in Laos.

READ: Duterte: Obama, Ban mum when I raised killings during PH-US war

“Even Ban Ki-moon weighed in,” he said. “Also gave a statement before, several weeks ago, about human rights violation. I said, ‘You’re another fool.’”

That was in June, after the newly elected Mr. Duterte told reporters that corrupt journalists were legitimate targets of assassination, which Ban took as an endorsement of extrajudicial killings.

“I unequivocally condemn his apparent endorsement of extrajudicial killing, which is illegal and a breach of fundamental rights and freedoms,” Ban told UN correspondents at a New York reception on June 8.

Mr. Duterte said Ban raised human rights again in passing in a speech at the closed East Asia leaders’ meeting during the Asean summit in Laos on Thursday.

He said that was the reason why he deviated from his prepared speech and spoke about human rights violations by the Americans in the Philippines.

“I said there has to be a limit to one’s stupidity,” he said. With reports from AFP

----------------------------

RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

Widodo asks Duterte to help settle Indon hajj pilgrims’ woes in Manila
Written by PNA Sunday, 11 September 2016 00:00


DUTERTE AND WIDODO IN INDONESIA

JAKARTA — Indonesian President Joko Widodo asked visiting President Rodrigo Duterte here Friday to help resolve the problem of Indonesian citizens departing for hajj pilgrimage from his country.

A total of 177 Indonesian citizens were caught using Philippine passports for the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

Widodo informed his Philippine counterpart that of the 177,168 have returned home but nine others were still in the Philippines.

“Nine are still in Manila. We have asked him to help settle their problem immediately,” he told a joint press conference held with Duterte at the Presidential Palace after their meeting.

Jokowi reminded that in addition to the 177 citizens, 700 others were already in Saudi Arabia for pilgrimage who had departed from the Philippines.

“We thanked (him) for the cooperation that the Philippine government has extended with regard to the problems of these 700 citizens,” he added.

He assured that the problems of the 700 citizens would be settled by the Philippines and Indonesia acting together.

The Indonesian leader also hailed the cooperation to ensure security in Sulu waters and hoped there would be no more security issues in the waters between the two countries.

“We will conduct joint patrolling to ensure security in the Sulu waters,” he underlined.

On this occasion, Duterte hailed the signing of the trilateral agreement among Indonesia, the Philippines and Malaysia to maintain sea security.

Regarding the frequent cases of piracy in Philippine waters, Duterte said piracy is an international crime.

Before the meeting, President Jokowi took Duterte on a tour of Tanah Abang, the biggest textile marketplace in Southeast Asia, in the afternoon.

Duterte arrived in Jakarta on Thursday evening after attending the Asean Summit in Vientiane, Laos.


MANILA STANDARD COMMENTARY

Substance vs form posted September 07, 2016 at 12:01 am by Jojo Robles


BY  JOJO ROBLES

President Rodrigo Duterte announced his arrival on the world stage in a way that only he could. Right before Duterte left Davao City for his first trip as head of state, the potty-mouthed Philippine president, bristling at the thought that US President Barack Obama would lecture him on human rights abuses taking place simultaneous with his campaign against illegal drugs, used language that was undiplomatic, to say the least.

In reply to a reporter’s hypothetical question, Duterte cut loose with a withering tirade about the US’ own record on human rights, its policy of overseas intervention and its continued treatment of its former colony as its vassal. In trademark Duterte fashion, the speech was laced with choice epithets and threats which were heard all the way to China, where Obama was attending the G-20 summit of wealthy nations.

The upshot of Duterte’s outburst was the cancellation of his scheduled meeting with Obama on the sidelines of the ongoing summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in Vientiane, Laos. “He’s a colorful guy,” Obama joked and shrugged, after hearing about Duterte’s anti-American rant.

Later yesterday, Duterte seemed to have backed away from his tough-guy position. In a statement, Duterte acknowledged that he made “strong comments to certain press questions,” which “came across as a personal attack on the US president.”

READ MORE...

“Our primary intention is to chart an independent foreign policy while promoting closer ties with all nations, especially the US, with which we have had a long-standing partnership,” Duterte’s statement said. “We look forward to ironing out our differences and working in mutually responsible ways.”

According to the statement issued by Malacañang, a mutual agreement has been reached to make the Obama-Duterte meeting happen at “a later date.” There has been no news of such a postponement from the American side.

I listened to Duterte’s speech as he was delivering it and I thought, well, that’s Digong for you. But I never heard him—as the Western media thought they did—cussing Obama and insulting the American president’s mother.

Embroidering the story to make it appear like Duterte was staging a personal attack on Obama was something the media, not Duterte, did. And that was how Duterte, on the eve of his very first foreign trip as President of the Philippines, hogged every headline between Manila and the eastern seaboard of the United States.

* * *

But I don’t believe that the furor caused by Duterte’s undiplomatic language in any way lessens the importance of his message. And that message, quite simply, is that the Philippines and its government should be allowed to do what they think is good for them, without unwanted intervention from foreign powers like the US.

Setting aside the form of Duterte’s delivery, there remains the very important substance of what he wanted to say to Obama, had they met as scheduled and had the American leader—as his State Department had earlier promised—brought up the matter of human rights abuses attending Duterte’s war on drugs.

And Duterte has been consistent in saying that the people who claim that the Manila government was behind the killings have been relying only on reports that have not been verified, from supposed human rights advocates who are really pushing an anti-Duterte agenda.

And the Western press, on which the State Department and Obama have been basing their concerns about human rights violations under Duterte, has invariably taken the position that it needs no further proof other than anecdotal and cherry-picked evidence that its “parachuting” journalists pick up. Duterte’s frustration is shared by many Filipinos, who cannot understand why the foreign media will not look beyond the sensational stories and ask if what’s happening—meaning, the inroads being made against the illegal drug trade—is not really a good thing.

Most Filipinos, after all, have already learned to listen beyond Duterte’s language to get at what he is really saying. This is why what foreigners thought was an attack against Obama was interpreted by Filipinos as a declaration that we will no longer allow ourselves to be dictated upon by stronger nations, regardless of whether they lie to the east like the US or to the west like China.

That is something no Filipino president in many, many decades has ever declared. And it’s something that only someone like Duterte can say.

At heart, what Duterte and many Filipinos want is better treatment from our former colonial masters and current allies. And if you can’t hear that in Duterte’s speech because you’re distracted by the cuss words, don’t worry—you’ll get used to it.

Sure, Duterte could use a little more prudence and lose a lot of the gutter-speak, especially when talking to the press and about foreign leaders. But to ignore what Duterte is saying by focusing on how he delivers his message is to make the same mistake as those who thought he was too rough, uncouth and vulgar to become president.

Duterte, as he said, serves no one but the people of his country. To ignore all he’s been doing for his people is to insult their wisdom in choosing Duterte to serve them.


PHILSTAR

Duterte expresses regret over strong comments By Alexis Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 7, 2016 - 12:00am 0 2 googleplus0 0


Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte arrives at the National Convention Center for scheduled bilateral meetings with ASEAN leaders on the sidelines of the 28th and 29th ASEAN Summits and other related summits Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016 in Vientiane, Laos. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez

VIENTIANE – Hours after US President Barack Obama cancelled their scheduled meeting, President Duterte expressed regret yesterday that his tirade against the leader of the most powerful nation came across as a personal attack.

The meeting was supposed to take place on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit here.

“While the immediate cause was my strong comments to certain press questions that elicited concern and distress, we also regret it came across as a personal attack on the US president,” Duterte said in a statement read by Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar. He said the meeting was “mutually agreed upon” to be moved to a “later date.”

The 71-year-old former prosecutor and Davao City mayor on Monday threatened to curse Obama to his face if the latter lectured him over concerns about a brutal war on illegal drugs that has claimed more than 2,400 lives in the Philippines.

READ MORE...

DUTERTE ANGRILY TO REPORTERS

“You must be respectful. Do not just throw away questions and statements. Son of a whore, I will curse you in that forum,” Duterte told reporters on Monday when asked about his message for Obama.

“We will be wallowing in the mud like pigs if you do that to me,” he addedd.

But the President softened his tone after Washington’s announcement of the cancelation of the bilateral meeting.

“He regrets that his remarks to the press have caused much controversy,” a Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) statement said.

“Both delegations, however, have agreed that in the light of the issues that still need to be worked on, the bilateral meeting between the two nations will be postponed to a later date,” the statement said.

“The President looks forward to ironing out differences arising out of national priorities and perceptions, and working in mutually responsible ways for both countries,” it added.

DFA spokesman Charles Jose said that while the schedules of the two leaders are tight, there might still be a chance for them to meet.

“We’re working for that to happen,” Jose said in a text message from Laos.

In the statement, Duterte stressed the war on drugs and criminality should be won to ensure the people’s rights and liberties are protected and preserved.

“It is imperative that the fight against illegal drugs, terrorism, crimes and poverty must be won in order to preserve the principle and values upon which our democratic way of life is anchored,” he said.

“Our primary intention is to chart an independent foreign policy while promoting closer ties with all nations, especially the US with which we have a longstanding partnership,” Duterte’s statement said.

The DFA said Duterte had “a deep regard and affinity for President Obama and for the enduring partnership between our nations.”

RODY's 'GUTTER LANGUAGE" A HYPERBOLE

Out of context, again Duterte’s chief legal counsel Salvador Panelo said the President’s supposed anti-Obama statements were “taken out of context.”

He said the President’s gutter language was merely “hyperbole.”

“Don’t put meaning to that. It’s just his style,” Panelo said.

“He was not even attacking anyone there. He was only emphasizing that we are a sovereign nation and being the head of state we should be given respect,” he added.

Presidential peace adviser Jess Dureza said Duterte was not surprised when the White House called off his bilateral meeting with Obama.

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said he believes Duterte is not angry with Obama but with Filipinos who keep on asking for his reaction to the US president’s possibly bringing up the issue on killings.

“The President is sensitive when he is questioned about his activities,” the defense chief said. “We are trying to solve a problem. Why do we appear like villains?”

Despite the diplomatic gaffe, Lorenzana maintained the US remains a major ally of the Philippines.

On Monday, Duterte said the US should not interfere in Philippine affairs as the country is no longer a colony.

“The Philippines is not a vassal state. We have long ceased to be a colony of the United States,” he said.

“I do not respond to anybody but to the people of the Republic of the Philippines. I don’t care about him. Who is he?” he added, referring to Obama.

The tough talking Philippine leader clarified that he is not picking a fight with Obama, whom he called “the most powerful president in the planet.” He said he is merely stressing that he is not beholden to anybody but his constituents.

Again, Duterte reminded the US of the killing of African Americans by law enforcers as well as the massacre of Indians by early settlers. He also claimed the US “has a terrible record of extrajudicial killing.”

“Nobody but nobody should interfere. This is an independent country. Nobody has the right to lecture on me. God, do not do it,” Duterte said.

Former foreign affairs chief Albert del Rosario called the cancellation of the bilateral meeting “unfortunate” and a “missed opportunity” as the US is “our only treaty ally and one of three strategic partners.”

“An invaluable occasion to have our leaders meet for the purpose of discussing how to strengthen our comprehensive areas of cooperation would have been a golden opportunity,” he said.

Former DFA undersecretary Lauro Baja said the meeting would have represented the highest form of diplomacy and highlighted the benefits of the two countries’ special relations.

“The cancellation of the meeting is unfortunate. We missed opportunities when the meeting was canceled but it should not affect the overall relations,” Baja said.

He said the President’s advisers should properly advise him on diplomacy and on the intricacies of international relations. – With Pia Lee Brago

----------------------

RELATED FROM RAPPLER.COM

Senators remind Duterte: You shape foreign policy (UPDATED) Rappler.com Published 2:49 PM, September 06, 2016 Updated 3:23 PM, September 06, 2016

'We must remember that our foreign policy is shaped in accordance with our national interest. Unfriendly rhetoric and undiplomatic statements will not bring us anywhere,' says Senate President Pro Tempore Franklin Drilon


REMINDER. (L-R)Franklin Drilon, and Antonio Trillanes IV have some words of advice for President Rodrigo Duterte

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – Several senators on Tuesday, September 6, reminded President Rodrigo Duterte of his role in shaping foreign policy, as the Philippine leader marked his international debut at a meeting of Southeast Asian leaders and their dialogue partners in Vientiane, Laos.

The reminder was prompted by Duterte's tirade against US President Barack Obama over the latter's plan to bring up the human rights situation in the Philippines at their supposed bilateral meeting.

Washington canceled the leaders' scheduled meeting at the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit and related Summits in Laos, but the meeting was reset for a future date after Duterte expressed regret over his "strong statements" against Obama.

“Talk about starting off on the wrong foot….It is unfortunate that such meeting did not push through because of unnecessary rhetoric over human rights issues,” Senate President Pro Tempore Franklin Drilon said in a statement on Tuesday, prior to Duterte's expression of regret over the incident.

“We must remember that our foreign policy is shaped in accordance with our national interest. Unfriendly rhetoric and undiplomatic statements will not bring us anywhere. We should maintain our relations with the US as a strong treaty ally that have been built over decades,” Drilon added.

He said a meeting between the two leaders later date, “would have been an opportunity for the two heads of states to know each other on a personal level.”

“I am hopeful that the long-standing relationship between the two nations will remain to endure and that both leaders will have other opportunities of meeting again under a more comfortable and friendly circumstances,” Drilon said.

Senator Antonio Trillanes IV expressed concern about the possible repercussions of Duterte’s slur against the US leader on the Philippines' bilateral ties with its oldest and most powerful ally.

“President Duterte's vulgar language directed against President Obama is wrong on so many levels and will definitely have detrimental effects on our diplomatic relationship and alliance with the US,” he said.

“You don't just slap the face of the most powerful country in the world and expect to get away with it. It was uncalled for and now our country's security sector would be weakened because of it,” Trillanes added.

No 'drastic' change in PH-US ties


LACSON

Senator Panfilo Lacson said that the incident would have no “drastic” impact on Philippine ties with the US.

“Any statement spoken by a country's leader is always construed as a policy statement. Having said that, I don't see any drastic change in the long-standing friendly relations between the Philippines and the United States. We are one of the United States' strongest allies in the Asia-Pacific region, and it will stay that way,” Lacson said.

“Presidents come after elections and go after their terms end, while alliances between countries remain strong, especially between the United States and the Philippines,” he added.

Lacson expressed hope, however, that Duterte would come to “realize” his role in molding foreign policy as Philippine president.

“I hope our president will soon realize that diplomacy is always part and parcel of a country's foreign policy and being the country's leader, he shapes that policy,” he said.

Senate Minority Leader Ralph Recto said long-standing ties between the two countries "are strong enough that it cannot be weakened or wrecked by a wayward quote."

"An unprovoked tirade will not drain the deep reservoir of goodwill between Filipinos and Americans," Recto said.

But like Lacson, he reminded Philippine officials, in general, to be more mindful of their speech.

"This is the time to remind those who officially speak for us to not only clearly articulate our aspirations, but do so in a manner reflective of how we communicate with our friends which is polite, courteous and respectful," Recto said.

Following Duterte's expression of regret over his statements against Obama, Philippine officials said on Tuesday that the bilateral meeting of the two leaders have been reset at a later date. – Rappler.com


PHILSTAR

Duterte brings up drugs at ASEAN business summit By Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) | Updated September 7, 2016 - 12:54pm 4 307 googleplus0 0


Leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) from left Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen, Philippine's President Rodrigo Duterte and Brunei Foreign Minister and Prime Minister Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah walk back to their seats following the opening ceremony of the 28th and 29th ASEAN summits at National Convention Center in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. AP/Gemunu Amarasinghe

MANILA, Philippines — The Association of Southeast Asian Nations needs stronger resolve and action in fighting transnational crime, President Rodrigo Duterte said on Wednesday.

The Philippine president noted that transnational crime is one of the most difficult and complex problem that the region faces.

"The trade in illicit and illegal drugs in particular has emerged as a pressing problem for our country’s undermined social cohesion and the rule of law in the socio-economic program of the country," Duterte said in his speech at the ASEAN Business and Investment Summit in Luang Prabang, Laos.

READ MORE...

WATCH: Duterte arrives in Laos for ASEAN Summit

Duterte further noted that terrorism and violent extremism threaten to pull the region from its advance to progress.

The Philippine chief executive encouraged the ASEAN business community to unite and to make sure that economic gains will advance at full speed.

"We shall not be cowed. We will press on. We must re-double our efforts to concentrate on intelligence gathering, prevention, interdiction, arrest and prosecution," Duterte said.

Duterte added that the ASEAN must ensure the effective implementation of agreements concluded since its establishment in 1967.

The Philippine leader also urged the ASEAN to make further progress in fulfilling its commitments to its free trade agreements with Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, India and Korea.

The ASEAN Leaders' Summit in Vientiane, Laos will be Duterte's first international appearance after assuming office. He is expected to meet with several of his counterparts at the sidelines of the summit.

RELATED: Duterte in Laos, seeks Asean unity vs terror, drugs

--------------------------

RELATED FROM ABS-CBN

Palace: Drug war critics should be morally superior ABS-CBN News Posted at Sep 11 2016 06:03 PM


EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content / In this picture taken on July 8, 2016, police officers investigate the dead body of an alleged drug dealer, his face covered with packing tape and a placard reading "I'm a pusher", on a street in Manila. Noel Celis, AFP

MANILA - Echoing the words of President Rodrigo Duterte, Malacañang on Sunday stressed that critics must first have "moral ascendancy" before raising concerns on human rights violations amid government's brutal war on narcotics.

"Ipinaliwanag din po ng Pangulo that hindi ho naman lahat ng mga nagrereklamo sa bansa natin ay walang tanong o walang kinalaman o walang question pagdating doon sa human rights 'no, ng mga violations," Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar

"It's really a matter of kung mayroon bang moral ascendancy iyung mga nagtatanong about human rights."
(The President has explained that not everyone who complained do not have any relation or don't have questions regarding human rights violations. It's really a matter of whether those who are asking about human rights have moras ascendancy.)

Andanar said this when quizzed on the most important message that President Duterte imparted to fellow leaders at the Association of Southeast Nations (Asean) summit in Laos last week.

He said Duterte underscored that the Philippines has its "own foreign policy to follow."

"Pagdating po naman sa questions of human rights that kailan bago tayo magtanong o bago natin kuwestyunin ang human rights policy or kung anuman iyong mga paratang natin sa isang bansa ay dapat tingnan ho muna natin iyong context ng ating tanong at context ng isang kampaniya, for instance, laban sa droga ng isang bansa. Dapat intindihin muna natin,"
(When it comes to questions of human rights, before we question the human rights policy or whatever accusation against the country, we should first look at the context of our question and the campaign, for instance, the fight against illegal drugs. We should understand it first.)

Duterte earlier threatened to curse at US President Barack Obama if the American leader broaches the human rights record of the Philippine anti-drug campaign, which has seen the deaths of thousands of suspected criminals.

A planned meeting between the two leaders was cancelled due to Duterte's volatile rhetoric.

During the Asean summit, the firebrand President also reportedly continued his tirade against Washington by slamming its military killings in Mindanao from 1898 to 1946, when the Philippines was still an American colony.

Andanar maintained that Duterte deserves the public's support after he asserted the sovereignty of the Philippines and aired grievances over alleged imperialist abuses.

"The President said in his arrival speech that kahit papaano naman siguro, he made us proud as Filipinos dahil pinaglaban niya ang ating karapatan sa buong mundo. At the same time, nilabas niya iyong more than 400 years of ... iyong sama ng loob ba natin 'no, doon sa mga pinaggagawa ng mga imperialist, ng ating mga colonial masters noon," the Palace official said.
(The President said in his arrival speech that maybe somehow, he made us proud to be Filipinos because he defended our rights before the whole world. At the same time, he also exposed 400 years of... our grievances over what imperialists and our colonial masters have done.)

"Naipalabas niya na we are now following an independent policy, that we are also a sovereign state at dapat tayo ay tumayo sa sarili nating mga paa at dapat iwagayway natin ang ating bandila 'no. We should be proud of our country," he added.
(He showed that we we are now following an independent policy, that we are also a sovereign state, that we must stand on our own feet and proudly brandish our flag. We should be proud of our country.)

Andanar also insisted that police efforts against drug rings are successful, although the "alarming" vigilante killings of suspects must be investigated.

The Philippine National Police reported Saturday that 1,466 suspected drug offenders have been killed by policemen, while another 1,490 were murdered by suspected vigilante groups since Duterte assumed office on June 30.


INQUIRER

Duterte falls ill, skips Asean morning meet with US, India leaders By: Nestor Corrales
@NCorralesINQ INQUIRER.net 04:31 PM September 8th, 2016


U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, left, glances at Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, right, at the start of 11th East Asia Summit on the last day of the 28th and 29th ASEAN Summits and other related summits at the National Convention Center Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016 in Vientiane, Laos. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

President Rodrigo Duterte failed to attend the regional leaders’ meeting with the heads of United States and India because he was not feeling well, a Cabinet official said on Thursday.

“He was not feeling well in the morning so he missed the two sessions,” Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Jesus Dureza said in a statement, referring to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) summit in Vientiane, Laos.

READ: Duterte skips meeting with US, India leaders

“But he was able to attend the East Asia Summit with 18 world leaders and the rest of the day’s remaining schedule until departure for Indonesia early evening today,” Dureza added.

In a text message, foreign affairs spokesperson Charles Jose said: “We heard that he was not feeling well but he was there at the East Asia Summit.”

Duterte is set to fly to Indonesia on Friday night for a 24-hour working visit.

VIDEO: DUTERTE FALLS ILL WITH MIGRAINE

 
https://youtu.be/W2sUJSGqHOU
Duterte falls ill, skips Asean morning meet with US, India leaders INQUIRER.net INQUIRER.net Published on Sep 8, 2016 President Rodrigo Duterte failed to attend the regional leaders’ meeting with the heads of United States and India because he was not feeling well, a Cabinet official said on Thursday.
Read more: http://globalnation.inquirer.net/1443...

-------------------------

RELATED MANILA STANDARD OPINION

The President’s economic challenge posted September 12, 2016 at 12:01 am by Rita Linda V. Jimeno
 


by Rita Linda V. Jimeno

There is another challenge President Rodrigo R. Duterte must now confront, other than crime and drugs—the Philippine economy. The latest survey among some 200 investors from the European Union says that the Philippines is trailing its South East Asian neighbors in terms of competitiveness. Vietnam and Cambodia have become the destination of choice for investors simply because there is greater ease of doing business there. The Philippines received the lowest ratings.

This is sad because the same survey showed that the Philippines was rated at the top in terms of availability of skilled workers at competitive compensation levels. What did the investors say were the reasons they avoided the Philippines then?

They ranked the country lowest in terms of incentives for business and in the stability of government and political systems. They also cited the poor quality of infrastructure, less-than-friendly regulatory regime and customs procedures, and the administrative costs for business. Setting up businesses in the Philippines is indeed daunting.

An investor has to contend first with restrictions in foreign ownership as embodied in the Philippine Constitution itself. The daring ones venture with Philippine partners giving the Filipino partners the bigger share in equity even if the foreign partners were the ones who poured in the company’s entire capitalization.

Next, they have to grapple with more number of stages in setting up a company, eating up months, compared to other countries in the Asean where it only takes days to start up a company.

What is even more unfortunate is that in the 1960s, the Philippines was one of the most progressive countries in Asia. It was next only to Japan. Foreign students would come here to study and job seekers from our Asian neighbors such as China and India would come here to work or start a business.

'DISTURBING STATISTICS'

A paper by Romulo Virola, Candido Astrologo and Patricia Anne Rivera titled “Disturbing Statistics: Philippines compared to our Asean neighbors” said that based on estimates by the World Bank and the United Nations, the Philippines flourished in the 1960s but declined steadily due to a devastating confluence of factors ravaging the core of our national strength. The paper dealt with statistics but did not specify the causes for the decline of the Philippine economy.

In my mind, the primary cause is our political system which makes way for instability and corruption, turning away potential investors. Our too-centralized presidential-unitary system of government has hindered inclusive national development. The poverty level in the Philippines has hovered between 25 and 27 percent in the last two decades.

We have earned the notoriety of being the only country in Asia which has failed to cut in half its poverty level in the last 25 years, that is, from 1990 to 2015.

Take a look the following empirical data:

The 15 most prosperous nations in the world are Norway, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Canada, Australia, Netherlands, Finland, Ireland, the USA, Iceland, Luxembourg, Germany and the United Kingdom. What do they have in common?

They are either in a federal-parliamentary system of government or unitary-parliamentary.

The least corrupt countries of the world are basically the same, namely: Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Netherlands, Germany, Singapore, Canada and New Zealand.

These countries, again, are either in a federal-parliamentary form or unitary-parliamentary form of government.

The Philippine system, on the other hand, is unitary-presidential, characterized by an overly centralized form of government.

Power and financial resources are concentrated in the central government while barely anything is given to the local government units. Thus, the regions outside of Metro Manila have failed to develop, create jobs and provide economic and social services to their constituents.

It was President Duterte’s promise in his first State of the Nation Address that the processing of government permits and licenses will be shortened.

He also said that he wants to shift the system of government to a federal form to ensure inclusive growth.

A hard look at the antiquated economic provisions of the Constitution must be done too to make us competitive. The track of economic and political reforms via constitutional change must be pursued alongside the elimination of crime and drugs.

If Mr. Duterte succeeds in both, he could claim a place in Philippine history never before achieved by any Philippine president.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2016 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE