NOY'S CORNER THIS PAST WEEK...
(MINI-READS followed by FULL REPORTS below)

JUNE 9: FIL-CHINESE COMMUNITY CELEBRATES ONLY  PHL INDEPENDENCE DAY THIS YEAR; DROPPED FIL-CHINESE FRIENDSHIP AND  DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS DAY
[It can be remembered that during the reception for the 65th founding anniversary of People’s Republic China last year the Chinese envoy broke the tradition by not ending his speech with a toast for Philippine president’s good health. Instead, Ngu ended by proposing “a toast to the prosperity and happiness of our peoples, to the friendship and cooperation between China and the Philippines, to the health of all the guests.” ]


FFCCCII President Angel Ngu
 June 9, 2015 - The Federation of Filipino-Chinese Chambers of Commerce and Industry drops 2 events in the supposedly three-in-one celebration Monday, June 8. The group of Fil-Chinese businessmen used to celebrate three events in one occasion: the Filipino-Chinese Friendship Day, the establishment of Philippines-China diplomatic relations and Philippine Independence Day, however, this year they decided to only celebrate the 117th Philippine Independence Day. FFCCCII President Angel Ngu, who was with President Aquino in Japan, said that he called an emergency meeting Saturday. “It’s our decision to change it.” “We saw that in the West Philippine Sea the tension seems to be escalating. So we think as Filipinos, we think perhaps this is not a good time,” Ngu said. “First of all, it should be a good relationship, given what’s been happening, I think we have to keep ourselves for our Independence Day rather than have a celebration of Filipino-Chinese friendship day.”  READ MORE..PLUS Speech of President Aquino at the FFCCCII and the Filipino-Chinese community’s celebration of the 117th Philippine Independence Day ....

ALSO: Palace on Chinese: We’re ‘good’ friends


P-NOY's SPOKESMAN LACIERDA 
Neighbors engaging in a word war doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve already burned bridges. A Malacañang spokesman on Monday said Manila continues to have “good [and] positive relations” with its affluent neighbor China despite the two sides having been embroiled in a territorial dispute in the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea). Edwin Lacierda said the Philippines has “no conflict with the Chinese people.”  “Our differences are with the approach of the leadership in dealing with the South China Sea [issue]. But on the whole, with respect to the Chinese people, we continue to establish good relations with them,” Lacierda told reporters. “We have a multi-level relationship with China. We have always mentioned this. We have people-to-people exchanges, we’ve got trade, we’ve got cultural. The discussions in the South China Sea [are] just one of those… We cannot limit ourselves to the negatives,” he said. Lacierda made the statements ahead of a commemorative program in Pasay City (Metro Manila) late Monday afternoon marking the 40th anniversary of the forging of diplomatic relations between Manila and Beijing. READ MORE...

ALSO: PNoy to Chinese envoy, other diplomats: Respect int'l law


THE P-NOY SMILE: China's Ambassador to Manila Zhao Jianhua meets with President Benigno Aquino III. China embassy website
President Benigno Aquino III on Friday marked the country's Independence Day with a call for mutual respect among nations. In his message during the traditional Independence Day vin d'honneur, Aquino told foreign diplomats that countries must foster greater cooperation in confronting the world's problems. "Excellencies, as we are determined to join your nations in the struggle to overcome the obstacles you face, so too do we ask you to join us. In this way, we can truly forge a global community in which each nation-state realizes that their growth and stability hinge on their ability to work with others," Aquino said in his toast at the Casa Real de Iloilo, Iloilo City. "This is the clearest path towards a world where there is mutual respect, where we are all bound by international law and by a single definition of our entitlements and obligations; where we are all brothers, all of equal footing, working side-by-side," the president added. Among the diplomats who were present during the Independence Day celebration in Iloilo was Chinese Ambassador to the Philippines Zhao Jianhua. READ MORE...

ALSO BLOGWATCH.TV: Choosing the right leader by learning from PNoy’s mistakes
[Hypocrisy is easily one of the major flaws of President Aquino or the current Aquino government. Aquino certainly knows how to selectively apply his sense of justice and is unapologetic in doing the things he used to criticize.]


Fresh from his “hugely successful” trip to Canada, as he claims it, and the recent revelation that he is already in talks with Senator Grace Poe regarding the upcoming elections, perhaps it’s about time to discuss some important points about the elections in 2016 in relation to the Aquino presidency.
President Aquino, as his fans would defend him, may not be as bad as other presidents in the past but he is certainly not the best. Arguably, there are many errors he committed and has been committing that present lessons every voter should learn something from. The list would be quite long so let’s go straight to the details. Hypocrisy Hypocrisy is easily one of the major flaws of President Aquino or the current Aquino government. Aquino certainly knows how to selectively apply his sense of justice and is unapologetic in doing the things he used to criticize. He did something similar to what the Marcoses have done in the past when he allowed his alter ego in the Department of Social Welfare and Development to hide street children in a costly and questionable way. Despite the hyped up “Daang Matuwid” slogan, the Aquino government has not made major progress in dismantling the culture of corruption in the Philippine government. Traditional politics continues to be an unwanted presence. Hopefully, Filipinos have not forgotten Aquino’s DAP issue yet. READ MORE...

ALSO Bongbong to Aquino: Fire Purisima
["How in heaven’s name can we even allow this man to remain as a police officer? Why can’t we do the only decent thing of removing Purisima and hauling him to court for leading our SAF 44 to their graves?" Marcos asked.]


Last February, President Benigno Aquino III accepted the resignation of Gen. Alan Purisima as Philippine National Police chief in connection to the botched Oplan Exodus which led to the death of 44 police commandos during an encounter with Moro rebels in Mamasapano, Maguindanao last January. Malacañang Photo Bureau/Rey Banique
- Sen. Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. on Tuesday called on President Benigno Aquino III to fire resigned Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Alan Purisima and charge him in court over the Mamasapano incident.
Purisima, who was under a six-month preventive suspension for graft charges, will return to active duty tomorrow. READ: Ombudsman’s suspension of Purisima ends today "Charge him in court for usurpation of authority or official functions, for violating the chain of command, for gross misconduct and negligence that needlessly cost the lives of our policemen, among other serious violations," Marcos said in a privilege speech. The senator noted that Purisima is being given a special treatment despite his hand in the planning and execution of the botched Oplan Exodus which led to the death of 44 Special Action Force (SAF) commandos. "How in heaven’s name can we even allow this man to remain as a police officer? Why can’t we do the only decent thing of removing Purisima and hauling him to court for leading our SAF 44 to their graves?" Marcos asked. READ MORE...

ALSO: Cha-cha no-vote: Palace hand or lack of numbers?


Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. ERNIE PEÑAREDONDO
MANILA, Philippines - Leaders of the House of Representatives were able to muster 267 lawmakers to attend the last session day – more than the 217 affirmative votes needed to approve the Resolution of Both Houses No. 1, also known as economic Charter change. However, many lawmakers were surprised when Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., principal author of the measure, went up the rostrum at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday and adjourned the proceedings. “I should’ve seen things coming because some Liberal Party (stalwarts) before the expected voting did not appear to be keen on approving it, which to me was unusual to say the least,” a proponent of the measure said. Based on information from colleagues, as well as some House leaders, somebody from Malacañang instructed allies to block the voting on the measure, a source said. “I learned that the Speaker informed the President – I think through text – as a courtesy, telling him that we’re going to approve RBH 1,” the House leader said. “And I suspect that the President replied in the negative. I think it’s also their way of holding the Speaker hostage, to make him follow the party (Liberal Party) line. After all, he’s still just one man and administration allies are many.”  President Aquino has not hidden his dislike for the resolution while pressuring the House to pass the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), the lawmaker said. READ MORE...

ALSO STANDARD EDITORIAL CARTOON:  Failocracy (06/12/2015) By Chong Ardivilla | Jun. 12, 2015 at 12:01am


 

 





 

FROM PHNO: HAVE ANOTHER 'HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY! PEOPLE' :-'(


READ FULL MEDIA NEWS REPORT:

Fil-Chinese community celebrates PHL Independence Day: Celebration of Fil-Chinese friendship, diplomatic relations dropped


FFCCCII President Angel Ngu

MANILA, JUNE 15, 2015 (ANG MALAYA NET BLOG) Ishi Gonzales - June 9, 2015 - The Federation of Filipino-Chinese Chambers of Commerce and Industry drops 2 events in the supposedly three-in-one celebration Monday, June 8.

The group of Fil-Chinese businessmen used to celebrate three events in one occasion: the Filipino-Chinese Friendship Day, the establishment of Philippines-China diplomatic relations and Philippine Independence Day, however, this year they decided to only celebrate the 117th Philippine Independence Day.

FFCCCII President Angel Ngu, who was with President Aquino in Japan, said that he called an emergency meeting Saturday. “It’s our decision to change it.”

“We saw that in the West Philippine Sea the tension seems to be escalating. So we think as Filipinos, we think perhaps this is not a good time,” Ngu said.

“First of all, it should be a good relationship, given what’s been happening, I think we have to keep ourselves for our Independence Day rather than have a celebration of Filipino-Chinese friendship day.”

After President Aquino compared the Chinese government to Nazi Germany, Chinese Ambassador Zhao Jianhua had a press conference. “Such a comment made by the Philippine president seriously hurt the feelings of the Chinese people,” he said.

“It’s an irresponsible act to compare China, an ally of the Philippines during the World War II, to Nazi Germany,” the Chinese envoy added.

It can be remembered that during the reception for the 65th founding anniversary of People’s Republic China last year the Chinese envoy broke the tradition by not ending his speech with a toast for Philippine president’s good health.

Instead, he ended by proposing “a toast to the prosperity and happiness of our peoples, to the friendship and cooperation between China and the Philippines, to the health of all the guests.”

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Speech of President Aquino at the FFCCCII and the Filipino-Chinese community’s celebration of the 117th Philippine Independence Day

June 8, 2015

Speech of His Excellency Benigno S. Aquino III President of the Philippines At the FFCCCII and the Filipino-Chinese community’s celebration of the 117th Philippine Independence Day

[Delivered at PICC, Pasay City, on June 8, 2015]

Tonight, we gather as friends in order to anticipate the 117th anniversary of the proclamation of Philippine independence this Friday; and to celebrate the longstanding friendship between the Filipino and Chinese peoples, as well as the contributions of Chinese-Filipinos to our national development.

These occasions hold significant meaning for all of us, perhaps best illustrated in the image you see before you.


Mariano Ponce (standing, wearing a kimono and hakama) and Sun Yat-Sen (seated) at Ponce's residence in Yokohama, Japan, circa 1899. Mariano Ponce (standing, wearing a kimono and hakama) and Sun Yat-Sen (seated) at Ponce’s residence in Yokohama, Japan, circa 1899.

This picture was taken in 1899, in Yokohama, Japan. The man seated is Sun Yat Sen, honored as the Father of Modern China. Standing beside him is Mariano Ponce: a close personal friend of both Dr. Sun Yat Sen and our national hero, Dr. Jose Rizal, and thus a member of the generation who fought for the establishment of an independent Philippines.

In 1898, a year before this photograph was taken, we Filipinos proclaimed our independence in Kawit, Cavite. In 1911, Sun Yat Sen overthrew the oppressive Qing Dynasty. Both these men were spurred to action by the principles of freedom and equality, and the desire for progress, peace, and stability for their countrymen. These very aspirations brought them together, as friends and as partners who sought to help each other in their respective struggles.

Many of you would have heard the saying: “A picture is worth a thousand words.” This photograph encapsulates the solidarity and the drive for independence of our forefathers. These, and friendship, are the legacies our founding generations have left to us, borne of shared experiences. We Filipinos had to reclaim our sovereignty from foreign colonizers; we had to do so again in 1986, from a dictatorship imposed by one of our own countrymen. China has likewise had to reclaim its dignity and sovereignty from the impositions of foreigners in the past. Thus, today, we are given an opportunity to revisit the fundamental bases of our relationship: a relationship consecrated by the heroes we revere and focused on our goals for our peoples: prosperity, stability, and the rule of law.

The full integration of Chinese-Filipinos into our society is itself proof of the solidarity that can be realized from such a relationship. History has shown us that Chinese-Filipinos were not treated as full citizens of the Philippines back in the day, yet your forefathers chose to set this aside, in favor of contributing to national development. Indeed: in every sphere of public life, whether in the days of our forefathers or in the present, excellence has been displayed by Chinese-Filipinos. General Ignacio Paua fought alongside the heroes of our revolution in the struggle to claim Philippine independence. Decades later, it would be General Vicente Lim engaging in battle during the Second World War. In politics, we have Sergio Osmeña, our first Speaker of the House, our first elected Vice President, and our President from 1944 to 1946. In law, there is the example of Claudio Teehankee, who did not hesitate to stand up for the rights of the people during the Marcos dictatorship. Filipino art and culture bear the mark of Ang Kiukok, a National Artist for Visual Arts. As Filipinos, they, in their everyday lives, did their part to build our nation.

This is being continued by the FFCCCII. Your economic and civic contributions are vast; you have provided jobs to so many of your countrymen through the companies you manage and own. At the same time, you have taken it upon yourself to empower them in other ways: building classrooms for public schools and housing for Filipinos affected by Typhoon Yolanda; providing assistance to victims of other tragedies, including that of the recent Valenzuela fire; conducting medical missions, and supporting our national police, among others. For everything you have done and you will continue to do, let me express our gratitude: thank you for all your efforts. [Applause]

This is the kind of solidarity that must go beyond our national borders; it is the kind of solidarity all nations of goodwill must strive to accomplish. Countries can no longer rely solely on their own strengths. In many ways, our successes and failures are dependent on the successes and failures of partners and friends in the global community. Challenges such as pandemics, global terrorism, and climate change, or even those related to economic growth, become infinitely less daunting when we work to overcome them in unison with others.

That is why we have always been determined to work with other nations to improve our collective fortunes, economic or otherwise. For example, as proof of our intentions to have friendly relations with the People’s Republic of China, we need only look at the sector of tourism.

At the time of my state visit to China in 2011, the Philippines was sending almost 830,000 tourists to China; while Chinese tourists visiting the Philippines only numbered around 190,000. The situation has seen some improvement over the years. In 2013, over 426,000 Chinese tourists visited the Philippines. This still does not compare, however, to the almost 1 million Filipinos who traveled to China, visited its historical and cultural sights, and contributed to its economic growth in 2013. The discrepancy is heightened especially when you take into consideration that our country represents only around 1/13th of China’s total population.

This trend continues in trade and investment. In 2011 again, during that same visit to China, I spoke to a gathering of businessmen. It was pointed out that, back then, Filipino foreign direct investments into China totaled roughly $2.8 billion, while Chinese investments into the Philippines were at roughly $600 million.

Indeed: The kind of world we live in today demands greater solidarity from all nations, based on the truism that stronger relationships between nations redound to the benefit of their peoples, and also to the entire world. In trade and investment, as with all other aspects of the relations between the Philippines and China, there is much that we can improve on—as long as our relationship is strengthened by mutual respect, the determination to maintain fairness and harmony, and a firm commitment to the rule of law. Let me emphasize that this does not only take place on the level of governments: everyone, including businessmen and captains of industry like yourselves, has a role to play.

It is my hope that we all bear this in mind, as we commemorate the independence of the Philippines—an occasion that likewise underscores our interdependence with the world and, consequently, our desire, then as today, to be and to act as a responsible member of the community of nations. Moving forward, may we all strive to do our part in enhancing cooperation and unity, as our forefathers did: whether to uplift the lives of Filipinos on our shores, or to work towards fostering stability that will redound to the benefit of all.

Thank you, and good day.


MANILA TIMES

Palace on Chinese: We’re ‘good’ friends June 8, 2015 11:13 pm by CATHERINE S. VALENTE REPORTER


P-NOY's SPOKESMAN LACIERDA

Neighbors engaging in a word war doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve already burned bridges.

A Malacañang spokesman on Monday said Manila continues to have “good [and] positive relations” with its affluent neighbor China despite the two sides having been embroiled in a territorial dispute in the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea).

Edwin Lacierda said the Philippines has “no conflict with the Chinese people.”

“Our differences are with the approach of the leadership in dealing with the South China Sea [issue]. But on the whole, with respect to the Chinese people, we continue to establish good relations with them,” Lacierda told reporters.

“We have a multi-level relationship with China. We have always mentioned this. We have people-to-people exchanges, we’ve got trade, we’ve got cultural. The discussions in the South China Sea [are] just one of those… We cannot limit ourselves to the negatives,” he said.

Lacierda made the statements ahead of a commemorative program in Pasay City (Metro Manila) late Monday afternoon marking the 40th anniversary of the forging of diplomatic relations between Manila and Beijing.

READ MORE...
The Filipino-Chinese Chambers of Commerce and Industry Inc. and the Filipino-Chinese community had announced that President Benigno Aquino 3rd and Beijing’s envoy to Manila Zhao Jianhua would be attending the event at the Philippine International Convention Center.

Lacierda said the President will deliver a speech to highlight contributions of the Filipino-Chinese community to the growth of the country’s economy and to the enhancement of Filipinos’ lives.

“We continue to invest in China as they continue to look for possible investments here in the Philippines as well. So, if you are going to limit yourself only to the South China [Sea] issue, certainly, it will color your perspective. But if you look at it from a broader perspective where we have established good relations with China and we are friends — the Chinese people are here, Filipinos are there,” he added.

“We cannot limit ourselves to the negatives. Our view of our relations with China has always been positive and we view that concern in the South China Sea also in the positive note that we are going to deal with this issue on the South China Sea by way of international arbitration. And that’s what we have been doing now,” Lacierda said.

The Palace official answered in the affirmative when asked if it makes sense to celebrate Filipino-Chinese Friendship Day despite China’s perceived aggression and bullying in contested waters.

“Just to be clear, we have no conflict with the Chinese people. Our conflict, for instance…Our differences are with the approach of the leadership in dealing with the South China Sea [row]. But on the whole, with respect to the Chinese people, we continue to establish good relations with them. And we certainly look forward to better relations with China,” Lacierda said.


PHILSTAR

PNoy to Chinese envoy, other diplomats: Respect int'l law By Louis Bacani (philstar.com) | Updated June 12, 2015 - 1:52pm


China's Ambassador to Manila Zhao Jianhua meets with President Benigno Aquino III. China embassy website

MANILA, Philippines - President Benigno Aquino III on Friday marked the country's Independence Day with a call for mutual respect among nations.

In his message during the traditional Independence Day vin d'honneur, Aquino told foreign diplomats that countries must foster greater cooperation in confronting the world's problems.

"Excellencies, as we are determined to join your nations in the struggle to overcome the obstacles you face, so too do we ask you to join us. In this way, we can truly forge a global community in which each nation-state realizes that their growth and stability hinge on their ability to work with others," Aquino said in his toast at the Casa Real de Iloilo, Iloilo City.

"This is the clearest path towards a world where there is mutual respect, where we are all bound by international law and by a single definition of our entitlements and obligations; where we are all brothers, all of equal footing, working side-by-side," the president added.

Among the diplomats who were present during the Independence Day celebration in Iloilo was Chinese Ambassador to the Philippines Zhao Jianhua.

Zhao made headlines earlier this week after not attending the Filipino-Chinese friendship day, which was marred by the continuing territorial dispute between the Philippines and China.

The country is celebrating its 117th Independence Day in the face of a big threat to its sovereignty - China's aggression in the West Philippine Sea.

Manila has filed an arbitration case before an international tribunal to question Beijing's execessive territorial claims. The Asian giant, however, has refused to participate and has increased its efforts of building artificial islands in the contested waters.

During his state visit to Japan last week, Aquino again criticized China's unlawful maritime actions, likening its large-scale reclamation to Nazi Germany's imperialism before World War II.


BLOGWATCH.TV (PHILIPPINE ONLINE CHRONICLE)

Choosing the right leader by learning from PNoy’s mistakes By Bernadine Racoma, as originally posted on Blog Watch /Philippine Online Chronicles

Fresh from his “hugely successful” trip to Canada, as he claims it, and the recent revelation that he is already in talks with Senator Grace Poe regarding the upcoming elections, perhaps it’s about time to discuss some important points about the elections in 2016 in relation to the Aquino presidency.

President Aquino, as his fans would defend him, may not be as bad as other presidents in the past but he is certainly not the best. Arguably, there are many errors he committed and has been committing that present lessons every voter should learn something from.

The list would be quite long so let’s go straight to the details.

Hypocrisy

Hypocrisy is easily one of the major flaws of President Aquino or the current Aquino government. Aquino certainly knows how to selectively apply his sense of justice and is unapologetic in doing the things he used to criticize.

He did something similar to what the Marcoses have done in the past when he allowed his alter ego in the Department of Social Welfare and Development to hide street children in a costly and questionable way.

Despite the hyped up “Daang Matuwid” slogan, the Aquino government has not made major progress in dismantling the culture of corruption in the Philippine government.

Traditional politics continues to be an unwanted presence. Hopefully, Filipinos have not forgotten Aquino’s DAP issue yet.

READ MORE...
Just like how other presidents did it, Aquino appointed dubious characters in government and shamelessly defended his erring appointees. He likewise attempted to create a rubber stamp Legislature, and succeeded for the most part. He may have not stolen a single centavo from the government’s coffers but he allowed or at least failed to plug the holes that permitted theft to happen.

Also worth noting is Aquino’s most recent EDSA People Power celebration.

The day for celebrating freedom of expression and a peaceful ousting of a dictatorship was marked by hypocrisy manifesting in Aquino’s prevention of protesters from assembling to voice out their disappointment in the Aquino government.

An Aquino, no less, betrayed the very spirit of People Power.

Hypocrisy has been the uniting factor in almost all of Aquino’s misdeeds, errors in judgment, and unapologetic commission of mistakes and sins of omission.

Hypocrisy manifests in both his words and deeds. His recent Labor Day speech alone says a lot about his fondness for lip service. While he was calling or suggesting for businessmen to give higher wages, he seemed oblivious to the fact that the P15.00 wage increase he approved does not jibe with what he was saying.

President Noynoy in Yolanda visit

Endless blame game

President Benigno Simeon BS Aquino III did not acquire the moniker “Boy Sisi” for nothing.

The next leader should be a person who can offer solutions to problems, not someone who keeps passing the blame to his predecessor or to subordinates. Credit grabbing is tolerable but constantly blaming others for one’s mistakes and misdeeds is beyond unacceptable.

Hubris and Messiah complex

President Aquino, through his very own words and his propaganda team, is audaciously presenting himself as the leader this country badly needs. For his drumbeaters and followers, he is the Messiah, the one who will bring salvation and prosperity to a forsaken land.

This has made Aquino believe that he is infallible, that everything he is doing is right.

This country needs a leader who listens to his people and not only to those who are within his close circles. Moreover, we need a president who knows and practices humility even at the peak of his popularity and while welding vast powers, clout, and the ability to influence people through money.

The BBL and Mamasapano issues are excellent demonstrations of President Aquino’s hubris and Messiah complex.

Many reject or are at least calling for more thoughtful deliberations on the BBL and yet, because of his strong belief that he is right in his decision over the BBL, President Aquino is ignoring the sensible opposition to the BBL and asserting that there’s no other way to achieve peace in Mindanao but through his chosen way, the BBL.

To make matters worse, he even topped everything with presumptuousness and arrogance.

Remember how he treated the Fallen44 and their families. Instead of consoling them, he even had the gall to indirectly brag his own experience of losing a family member (as part of the “ill-treated” Aquino “family of heroes” during Martial Law) and told the Fallen44 families that they were already even. “Patas na rin tayo ngayon:” this was allegedly what Aquino said to the Fallen44 families.

Refusal to take responsibility

In connection to the Mamasapano issue, it should not be forgotten how President Aquino refused to take responsibility for his actions. He couldn’t even say sorry for the outcomes of his questionable actions.

Instead of owning up to his thoughtless and reckless actions, he even used technical arguments through his alter egos, particularly the assertion that PNP does not have a chain of command.


Photo from Renato Reyes Jr's Facebook account.

Lying, misleading, and failure to fulfill promises

President Aquino promised a lot of things during his campaign but he failed to deliver on most of these promises. ABS-CBNNews.com has an “Aquino Promises” tracker section of its website and the partial assessments spell mediocrity or average at best.

KKKKKKKKK…

This PNoy defect is already common knowledge that even his allies would likely acknowledge it. Hopefully, people will vote for candidates who are not deeply attached to or influenced by friends, allies, family members, party mates, and others who fit in the K words now fondly associated with Aquino (kamag-anak, kapartido, kaibigan, kabarilan, kaklase, kakampi, etc).

Inaction and incompetence

Many would say that experience is not a necessity in becoming a good leader. However, President Aquino has proven that it’s better if a candidate is able to show a track record of competence, commitment, and conscience. President Aquino’s lackluster performance as a lawmaker and his actions in dealing with the Hacienda Luisita issues should have been telltale signs enough of the kind of person and politician he is. Still, people chose him over other candidates because of reasons other than competence, conscience, and a sense of commitment.

Divisiveness

The next leader ought to be a unifying figure, not someone who encourages factionalism. The idea of a completely unified nation might be idealistic but at the very least, there should be sincere effort on the part of the country’s leader to bring people together in the common goal of achieving meaningful progress. President Aquino, even before becoming the president, already showed how he is more inclined to carry on the Aquino banner instead of acting like a true leader who cares about the welfare of everyone.

Lack of Propriety and Poor Diplomacy

President Aquino’s tactlessness and lack of a sense of propriety would have been tolerable if only he were consistently exercising them. It’s unfortunate that he is only tactless and rude against his adversaries and those who refuse to blindly subscribe to his opinion.

This nation can live with a president who tactlessly expresses his opinions and asserts his desires as long as this tactlessness is not selective and is exercised to demonstrate a strong will to do what is right regardless of whoever gets offended.

Hopefully, there will be candidates in the upcoming elections that can show traits that are the exact opposite of President Aquino’s undesirable attributes.

The ideal is someone who is a real statesman, someone who understands and exercises propriety and diplomacy but is bold in his plans and actions to push for reforms that benefit the country regardless of who or what stands in the way, and without giving special treatment to friends and allies.

Needless emphasizing, the next leader should not be a thief, liar, an indecisive decision maker, unscrupulous politician, a hypocritical crusader, false advocate, and arrogant bearer of a supposedly trustworthy name in Philippine politics.

It wouldn’t be fair to say that there’s nothing positive about President Aquino or the current Aquino government.

It may not be easy digging these positives, but they do exist and they can serve as criteria or guides in choosing Aquino’s successor.

There might be a need to mentally isolate these positive attributes from the entirety of President Aquino’s persona, though, since many of his words and actions would tend to negate these supposedly good characteristics.

Aversion to stealing

President Aquino is not a thief! This is one strong argument many Aquino fans can use without getting a good retort from critics. It’s difficult to accuse President Aquino of having stolen from the government’s coffers. He is clean probably because he is not that interested in money. As critics would put it, his interests are more on younger women, guns, and cars, and he can already afford all of them with the money he has inherited from his rich family.


DEFENDED BUYING PORSCHE: President Benigno Aquino III said he did not think people would react negatively that “once in a while” he can “smile in the face of the many problems left for me to deal with.” “And if [driving the car] now and then relaxes me, surely it would redound to the country’s benefit when I have to make decisions,” he said in an interview FROM POLITICS.OFWNOW.COM

The next leaders of the country should have no interest in building their own wealth through government funds or through the abusive and wrong exercise of government authority and influence.

While it’s not enough for someone to simply refuse the temptation of getting one’s hands on the monies of the government, the resolve to refuse to become a thief is already an impressive start for any politician who wants to lead the Philippines.

Fixation on the crimes of past officials

Again, as mentioned in the opening paragraph, it’s important to isolate the good traits from the negating bad traits of President Aquino.

His fixation to the alleged crimes of his predecessors is not necessarily bad as long as you ignore the fact that he does not apply the same fixation to former administration allies who are now his allies.

It’s difficult to deny that he is being selective in his crusade against corruption.

He even said nothing when his DOJ Secretary announced that DOJ is unlikely to file a third batch of PDAF cases.

However, if President Aquino could only manage to be as fixated to all commissions of corruption and misdeeds in the government as he is deeply attached to former president Gloria Arroyo’s cases, he is likely to produce dramatically better results in his fight against corruption.

The “Daang Matuwid” slogan could have made more sense and spared from the accusations of being hypocritical.

There’s nothing wrong with persecuting erring public officials deemed to be political adversaries as long as the same persecution applies to all other erring officials. A corrupt congressman who was once associated with the past administration should never be shielded from prosecution or even persecution just because he switched sides.

Past crimes should not be forgotten for the sake of moving on. If a public official stole taxpayers’ money, he or she should be brought to justice. Unifying the country does not require the granting of forgiveness to thieves in past administration nor does it require people to forget about how congressmen, senators, cabinet secretaries, and other government officials abused their powers and deprived people of the funds that should have been used for their benefit.

That’s why it’s important to ask aspiring leaders about their stand on how they plan to run after the corruption of outgoing officials. It greatly helps to evaluate candidates based on their pronouncements on how they intend to address the persistent problem of corruption in the government.


bir_comm_kim_henares

Choosing the right person for the BIR

Many would hate Kim Henares but it can be argued that she is by far the best person to have led the Bureau of Internal Revenue. She is fearless and determined.

Even with all the criticisms and questionable policies or impositions like the (tax on tax) toll tax and the inconveniences with the
e-filing system and the BIR’s poor sense of technology, Henares has remained steadfast and has become a credible face for the country’s tax collection operations. You may hate her but in your righteous consciousness you know you love her. And we have to thank Aquino for the good choice.

This does not change the fact that Aquino made objectionable appointments elsewhere, but it’s a good example of doing the right decisions for crucial matters. The next aspiring leaders should choose the right people to work with.

Not associated with religion

Recently, President Aquino invited some religious people to do a “pray over” for him but this did not necessarily make him that associated with religious groups. Unlike his immediate predecessor, President Aquino is not fond of pleasing and mingling with church groups.

Even his controversial support for the MILF does not make him associated with Muslims. It will be preferable to have a successor to Aquino who could be similar to him in being unattached to religious organizations. The absence of religious influences, usually, leads to more objective decisions and policies.


sonaPNoy

Being an above average to good speaker who also speaks fast

President Aquino sounds like he is always rushing when he does his speeches. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, though.

He relatively quickly ends his speeches so his being a fast talker is somewhat welcome. He may have not inherited the brilliance of his father nor has he adopted the composure of his mother but he is in no way a bad speaker.

He can be convincing when he talks. More importantly, it’s easy to figure out if he is lying or trying to avoid an issue.

You would rarely catch President Aquino trying to lie or doing the spins on issues on his own. This is a good thing for other politicians to have although it should be paired with the absence of a propaganda team that does the lying and spinning that the President can’t properly do.

President Aquino continues to enjoy some support from people not necessarily because people are blindly being loyal to him or to Cory Aquino. It can be argued that he also has good traits and achievements that make up for his wrongs and convince people that he is not as bad as what others want to make him appear.

BLOGWATCH.TV (PHILIPPINE ONLINE CHRONICLE)


PHILSTAR

Bongbong to Aquino: Fire Purisima By Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) | Updated June 9, 2015 - 5:47pm


Last February, President Benigno Aquino III accepted the resignation of Gen. Alan Purisima as Philippine National Police chief in connection to the botched Oplan Exodus which led to the death of 44 police commandos during an encounter with Moro rebels in Mamasapano, Maguindanao last January. Malacañang Photo Bureau/Rey Banique

MANILA, Philippines - Sen. Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. on Tuesday called on President Benigno Aquino III to fire resigned Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Alan Purisima and charge him in court over the Mamasapano incident.

Purisima, who was under a six-month preventive suspension for graft charges, will return to active duty tomorrow.

READ: Ombudsman’s suspension of Purisima ends today

"Charge him in court for usurpation of authority or official functions, for violating the chain of command, for gross misconduct and negligence that needlessly cost the lives of our policemen, among other serious violations," Marcos said in a privilege speech.

The senator noted that Purisima is being given a special treatment despite his hand in the planning and execution of the botched Oplan Exodus which led to the death of 44 Special Action Force (SAF) commandos.

"How in heaven’s name can we even allow this man to remain as a police officer? Why can’t we do the only decent thing of removing Purisima and hauling him to court for leading our SAF 44 to their graves?" Marcos asked.

READ MORE...
Marcos admitted that he admired Aquino for accepting the resignation of Purisima as PNP chief and for acknowledging the latter's role in planning the Mamasapano operation while under suspension.

However, the senator noticed that the president seems to be protecting Purisima who should have been charged for his illegal participation in the operation.

"Nasaan ang delicadeza at ang palabra de honor? Ano na lamang ang sasabihin ng taumbayan? Ano ang iisipin ng mga naiwan ng ating SAF 44? Na sila ay pinaikot at nilinlang lamang ng ating pamahalaan?" the senator added.

Marcos reiterated that the Mamasapano incident is not just an issue between two friends.

"Hindi po maaari na ang ating pangulo at si Purisima lamang ang nag-uusap at nagkakasundo tungkol sa isyu ng Mamasapano massacre at ng kanyang pagbibitiw," Marcos explained.

The senator added that the discussions on the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law were affected by the bloody incident. He said that justice will be served to the fallen 44 SAF commandos if Purisima will be charged for his involvement in the operation.

"Mr. President, please listen to the call of the widows of our fallen SAF 44. Please heed the pleas of our people to remove Gen. Purisima from the service and to bring the killers of our fallen policemen to justice, and for their mementos and other personal belongings returned to their loved ones," Marcos said.

A few weeks ago, several lawmakers challenged Aquino to speed up the delivery of justice for the victims of the Mamasapano incident.


PHILSTAR

Cha-cha no-vote: Palace hand or lack of numbers? By Paolo Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 12, 2015 - 12:00am


Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. ERNIE PEÑAREDONDO

MANILA, Philippines - Leaders of the House of Representatives were able to muster 267 lawmakers to attend the last session day – more than the 217 affirmative votes needed to approve the Resolution of Both Houses No. 1, also known as economic Charter change.

However, many lawmakers were surprised when Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., principal author of the measure, went up the rostrum at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday and adjourned the proceedings.

“I should’ve seen things coming because some Liberal Party (stalwarts) before the expected voting did not appear to be keen on approving it, which to me was unusual to say the least,” a proponent of the measure said.

Based on information from colleagues, as well as some House leaders, somebody from Malacañang instructed allies to block the voting on the measure, a source said.

“I learned that the Speaker informed the President – I think through text – as a courtesy, telling him that we’re going to approve RBH 1,” the House leader said. “And I suspect that the President replied in the negative. I think it’s also their way of holding the Speaker hostage, to make him follow the party (Liberal Party) line. After all, he’s still just one man and administration allies are many.”

President Aquino has not hidden his dislike for the resolution while pressuring the House to pass the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), the lawmaker said.

READ MORE...
“Maybe it was unacceptable that the BBL is facing rough sailing while such a fundamental and long overdue Charter reform like RBH 1 is enjoying wide support from the House, and it’s not his pet project,” the lawmaker said.

RBH 1 seeks to lift restrictions on foreign ownership on certain sectors and industries through the phrase “unless otherwise provided by law” to be added to some provisions of the Constitution.

This means the restrictions on foreign ownership will remain in the Constitution until Congress enacts laws to remove or change them.

Described by proponents in the House as “very simple yet effective,” proposal was meant to open the doors to foreign capital to generate jobs.

A counterpart bill of Sen. Ralph Recto is pending in the Senate.

‘Not enough numbers’

Rumors of Malacañang’s blocking the passage of the measure immediately swirled at the House on Wednesday night.

However, Belmonte told reporters shortly after adjourning session that he did not push through with the voting as he felt there were not enough numbers to approve RBH 1.

“We didn’t have the numbers so we decided that we didn’t like to take the risk,” he said, adding he did not receive any phone call from Aquino.

Belmonte said some House members, whom he did not identify, came forward at the last minute to say that they wanted to include additional amendments.

“There’s no time to be arguing with them, I had to make a decision and I did… and there were also some movements by other (blocs), I felt things were now uncertain,” Belmonte said.

“We just wanted to show that (economic Charter change) ccould be done. The Senate will have its own work,” he added.

Belmonte’s remarks were different from what he told journalists hours before, when he was optimistic about the attendance as well as the outcome.

Authors of RBH 1 wanted the resolution passed as they wanted the nationwide plebiscite to coincide with the 2016 national and local elections.

It’s possible that RBH 1 may still be put to a vote shortly after Congress opens its third and final session on July 27, Belmonte said.

At Malacañang, Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said they respect processes in the House in dealing with proposed measures, including the manner by which economic provisions in the Constitution could be amended.

Speaking over radio dwIZ, Coloma said the House was able to muster attendance much bigger than the needed quorum, but they would just have to let the lawmakers decide on the Cha-cha initiative on their own, being part of a “co-equal and separate branch of government.

“We don’t know everything or (we don’t know) fully (well) the whole background of their decision-making, and they are the only ones who decide, so we respect their decision,” he said. – With Aurea Calica


MANILA STANDARD EDITORIAL

Failocracy (06/12/2015) By Chong Ardivilla | Jun. 12, 2015 at 12:01am










 


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