DAP STILL A BIG PROBLEM: GOVT STILL UNSURE ON HOW MUCH SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET IT NEEDS --ABAD 

JULY 30 --PHOTO: JANET TRANSFERRED — The convoy of high-profile detainee, Janet Lim Napoles, enters Camp Bagong Diwa in Taguig City late Monday night, where the alleged ‘pork barrel’ scam mastermind – shown at, left during her July 11 arraignment for plunder – is now incarcerated. Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad yesterday said the government is still trying to finalize the amount of the proposed supplemental budget it needs for projects previously funded by the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) – three key provisions of which were recently declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court (SC). President Aquino, in his penultimate State of the Nation Address (SONA) last Monday, called on Congress to pass 2014 supplemental budget bill to enable the executive branch to continue projects discontinued after the adverse SC ruling on DAP. “We are proposing the passage of a supplemental budget for 2014 so that the implementation of our programs and projects need not be compromised,” the President said in Filipino in his SONA speech. DAP ON INVENTORY MODE. But the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) appears unprepared for the supplemental budget proposal. It has yet to finalize the budget requirements for the DAP projects discontinued following the SC ruling, though the President wants the measure passed immediately. * READ MORE...

PRESIDENT AQUINO ADVANCES 2015 BUDGET FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH 

JULY 30 --Abad: Proposed P2.606-trillion 2015 Budget signals brighter development prospects President Benigno S. Aquino III—through the Department of Budget and Management (DBM)—today submitted the government’s proposed P2.606-trillion 2015 National Budget to Congress, in fulfillment of the Administration’s commitment to further facilitate rapid, inclusive, and sustainable growth in the country. The Administration’s proposed expenditure program for 2015 is 15.1 percent higher from the current year’s P2.265-trillion budget, representing 18.4 percent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product and reflecting the jump in the Administration’s growth assumption of 7.0-8.0 percent for 2015. “Our proposed spending program is an expression of the President’s unerring commitment to bring inclusive socio-economic development to the people. In 2011, we started our budget reform agenda from the jump-off point of good governance, with the end goal of lifting more Filipinos out of poverty.

“It has been four years since President Aquino assumed his position, and the 2015 proposed Budget—aptly themed Kaunlaran Para sa Lahat—shows the progression of our priorities. Now that we’ve set many of the critical foundations of good governance, we’re working harder at bringing inclusive growth to the country through transparent, accountable, and participatory budgeting,” Budget and Management Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad said. According to Abad, the 2015 Budget takes off from the achievements that the Administration has so far recorded over the last four years, including various fiscal reform accomplishments, as well as several groundbreaking investments in social protection and economic services.

“The Philippines was once considered the weak man of Asia, so to speak. By now, however, we’ve earned quite a reputation as one of the region’s most promising economies, given the expansion of our GDP and our unprecedented governance gains. “This time around, the challenge is for us to make public spending even more efficient and effective, especially in the wake of the previous year’s calamities. Thousands of Filipinos are still recovering from the effects of Super Typhoon Yolanda and other disasters that struck the country in 2013, and this budget—in line with the Administration’s Philippine Development Plan—will carefully account for these communities’ needs. No one should be left behind; this principle is the driving force of our 2015 expenditure program,” Abad said. Allocation by sector --* READ MORE...

ALSO: PNoy's half-trillion Special Purpose Funds (SPF) 'customary' but not 'pork' - Palace 

President Aquino's P501 billion Special Purpose Funds (SPF) in the proposed 2015 budget will not be an unlimited presidential pork barrel, Malacañang said Thursday. Presidential Communications Operations Office chief Herminio Coloma Jr. said the SPF was intended for contingency expenditures and that including it in the national budget was based on "established management practice." "It is customary that a certain portion of the annual budget is set aside for contingency expenditures that are essentially variable and not amenable to precise determination at the time of budget preparation," Coloma said.

"For example, calamities. We only know that there is an average of 20 typhoons every year, but we do not know exactly how many, and we are... While we hope that there will be minimal damage, we also know from experience that there can be considerable damage," Coloma added. Of the total amount of SPF, P378 billion are programmed appropriations or those which the availability of funds has already been determined and assured. The remaining P123 billion are unprogrammed appropriations. For the next fiscal year, the SPF releases include the following: Programmed Appropriations...* CONTINUE READING...

(ALSO) SONA 2014: Who's sleeping, who's texting

JULY 30 --Given the prestige of the State of the Nation Address (SONA) and the limited number of people who were given the privilege to witness, in person, President Aquino deliver his speech, those who were inside the Batasan Pambansa's plenary hall should consider themselves lucky. Philstar.com is among those privileged few, and while we're listening to President Aquino deliver his speech, we were also watching the special guests inside the plenary hall. Some guests were busy with their cellular phones and some were seen with their heads banging on their seats, asleep. Aquino gave his penultimate speech on Monday, July 28, 2014, highlighting the benefits of the controversial Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP). Given the fact that the DAP is one of the most controversial issues that resulted to burning arguments among the officials and the public, the attendees should have been all ears. But then again, you cannot force every one to abide by this expectation. ENJOY VIEWING ALL 10 PHILSTAR PHOTOS.....

ALSO Boo Chanco column: Two years is still a lot of time  

Lame duck? No, P-Noy isn’t a lame duck president just yet. He turned emotional and uncomfortably paranoid towards the end of his SONA because he is apparently taking personally the fierce and relentless criticism the past few months over DAP as well as the other shortcomings of his administration. His defensive stance is understandable. His only real legacy, so far, his anti corruption promise, is in danger of being lost. True, we still can’t accuse P-Noy of stealing a centavo, but the DAP and PDAF revelations seem to indicate some lapses in judgment that goes against the grain of the Daang Matuwid mantra. At the very least, he can be accused of turning a blind eye to the corruption of the pork barrel until the mess accidentally erupted in public view. If Janet Napoles didn’t detain Benhur Luy against his will, we would have never known how big and how bad this pork barrel business has become.

Then, there is the matter of taking short cuts that were later on declared unconstitutional. And even if we grant for the sake of argument that DAP had good intentions, the fact that they used it to win favors from senators makes P-Noy complicit to the abuse. The other thing that bothers me with the Palace lately is how on the one hand they made a big thing of saying that DAP is abolished because it is no longer needed, that it has accomplished its purpose. It is academic. Then some weeks later, P-Noy warns that the Supreme Court ruling sends a “chilling effect” on the economy, giving the impression DAP is a vital mechanism without which the economy’s growth may falter. The SONA continued the defense of DAP, but not as combative as was with the Ulat sa Bayan last week. Impressive as the enumeration of some DAP projects may be, the question remains why this route was taken when they could have gone to Congress which they controlled anyway. In any case, P-Noy seemed to have learned some lessons from the strong adverse public reaction. He was defensive, but no longer obnoxiously so. By presenting flesh and blood beneficiaries of DAP funded projects, he tried to win the public over, hoping they would look past the short cuts taken for the benefits delivered. Nevertheless, the SONA glossed over areas where his administration fell short. There was no mention of DOTC and its failures... nor the Agri department. * READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA NEWS REPORT:

DAP still a big problem; Government unsure on how much supplemental budget it needs – Abad


JANET TRANSFERRED — The convoy of high-profile detainee, Janet Lim Napoles, enters Camp Bagong Diwa in Taguig City late Monday night, where the alleged ‘pork barrel’ scam mastermind – shown top, left during her July 11 arraignment for plunder – is now incarcerated. (Linus G. Escandor II)

MANILA, AUGUST 4, 2014 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Mario Casayuran - Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad yesterday said the government is still trying to finalize the amount of the proposed supplemental budget it needs for projects previously funded by the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) – three key provisions of which were recently declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court (SC).

President Aquino, in his penultimate State of the Nation Address (SONA) last Monday, called on Congress to pass 2014 supplemental budget bill to enable the executive branch to continue projects discontinued after the adverse SC ruling on DAP.

“We are proposing the passage of a supplemental budget for 2014 so that the implementation of our programs and projects need not be compromised,” the President said in Filipino in his SONA speech.

DAP ON INVENTORY MODE

But the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) appears unprepared for the supplemental budget proposal. It has yet to finalize the budget requirements for the DAP projects discontinued following the SC ruling, though the President wants the measure passed immediately.

* Abad said concerned government agencies have already been directed to report the status of the DAP-funded projects to determine which items require additional funding from Congress.

“We are still doing an inventory of the status of the projects. Most have actually been completed and the rest in varying stages of implementation. We have directed agencies to report as soon as possible,” Abad said in a text message.

HOUSE READY TO ACT

While Abad said that the government is still finalizing the amount of the proposed supplemental budget, House leaders have already vowed to immediately pass the measure to ensure the continued implementation of projects funded by the DAP. The House leaders also pledged to pass the joint resolution that would clarify definitions on government savings.

“Congress will immediately respond and act on the executive branch’s proposed supplemental budget for the projects left hanging by DAP’s non-implementation. Alam naman natin ang kahalagahan ng mga programang nabitin kaya’t asahan ng ehekutibo na aksyon agad ang ating tugon (The executive should expect prompt action of the House as we are aware of the importance of the program),” said Davao Rep. Isidro Ungab, chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations.

During his SONA speech, President Aquino admitted that he had to suspend some projects to comply with the SC decision on the DAP. He noted though that “we must not deprive our countrymen of benefits, and that these should reach them in the soonest possible time.”

The President also asked Congress to pass a joint resolution that will bring clarity to the definitions and ideas still being debated regarding DAP. He recognized that only lawmakers, as authors of the country’s laws, could shed light on these issues.

The Supreme Court had earlier ruled certain acts of the administration’s major economic stimulus program, including the cross-border transfer of savings outside the executive branch, as unconstitutional, dealing a blow to Aquino’s reform agenda.

The President has challenged the SC ruling on DAP, arguing it was legally implemented for projects that pushed economic growth. A motion for reconsideration has already been filed before the SC, which has yet to act on it.

The DBM had earlier released a list of the 116 DAP-identified projects amounting to P144 billion. The funds went to capital infusion of the Central Bank, infrastructure projects, housing program, upgrade of state weather equipment, social services, among others.

Around P17 billion went to various local projects endorsed by lawmakers, local government officials and government agencies.

NO NEED TO CLIP PRESIDENT’S POWERS

Meanwhile, Speaker Feliciano “Sonny” Belmonte Jr. said he does not see the need to pass a measure limiting the President’s power to impound funds, saying the SC had already did so when it struck as unconstitutional key provisions of the DAP.

The House chief said the High Court already tempered the President’s power to impound funds and the Congress would not in any way defy that ruling.

“There is no need for Congress to prioritize the passage of bills seeking to clip the powers of the President to impound public funds because the SC already did that, subject to the motion for reconsideration,” he said in an interview after the House leadership has been urged to move forward the passage of the proposed Budget Impoundment Control Act.

Authors of the measure – Leyte Rep. Ferdinand Martin Romualdez, who heads the House independent minority bloc, and administration ally Eastern Samar Rep. Ben Evardone had pressed Belmonte to include in the list of their legislative priorities the measures seeking to limit the President’s fiscal powers.

Deputy Majority Leader and Citizens Battle against Corruption party-list Rep. Sherwin Tugna also agreed with Belmonte, saying it would be “superfluous” if a law seeking to temper President’s power to impound funds would be enacted.

“For me, there is no need to do that. The 1987 Constitution and the recent SC ruling on DAP are the legal basis for the prohibition on the Executive department to impound funds that will not fall under the category of savings. Enacting a law to that effect is superfluous,” he said.

FROM THE PRESIDENTIAL OFFICIAL GAZETTE

PRESIDENT AQUINO ADVANCES 2015 BUDGET FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTHPosted on July 30, 2014


GOOGLE IMAGES.

From the Department of Budget and Management

Abad: Proposed P2.606-trillion 2015 Budget signals brighter development prospects

President Benigno S. Aquino III—through the Department of Budget and Management (DBM)—today submitted the government’s proposed P2.606-trillion 2015 National Budget to Congress, in fulfillment of the Administration’s commitment to further facilitate rapid, inclusive, and sustainable growth in the country.

The Administration’s proposed expenditure program for 2015 is 15.1 percent higher from the current year’s P2.265-trillion budget, representing 18.4 percent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product and reflecting the jump in the Administration’s growth assumption of 7.0-8.0 percent for 2015.

“Our proposed spending program is an expression of the President’s unerring commitment to bring inclusive socio-economic development to the people. In 2011, we started our budget reform agenda from the jump-off point of good governance, with the end goal of lifting more Filipinos out of poverty.

“It has been four years since President Aquino assumed his position, and the 2015 proposed Budget—aptly themed Kaunlaran Para sa Lahat—shows the progression of our priorities. Now that we’ve set many of the critical foundations of good governance, we’re working harder at bringing inclusive growth to the country through transparent, accountable, and participatory budgeting,” Budget and Management Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad said.

According to Abad, the 2015 Budget takes off from the achievements that the Administration has so far recorded over the last four years, including various fiscal reform accomplishments, as well as several groundbreaking investments in social protection and economic services.

“The Philippines was once considered the weak man of Asia, so to speak. By now, however, we’ve earned quite a reputation as one of the region’s most promising economies, given the expansion of our GDP and our unprecedented governance gains.

“This time around, the challenge is for us to make public spending even more efficient and effective, especially in the wake of the previous year’s calamities. Thousands of Filipinos are still recovering from the effects of Super Typhoon Yolanda and other disasters that struck the country in 2013, and this budget—in line with the Administration’s Philippine Development Plan—will carefully account for these communities’ needs. No one should be left behind; this principle is the driving force of our 2015 expenditure program,” Abad said.

Allocation by sector

* Social services continue to take the lion’s share of the proposed 2015 budget, attesting to the Administration’s continuing pursuit of its antipoverty goals. Social protection and welfare services—which include the provision of basic education and universal health care—account for 37.1 percent of the proposed expenditure program, with P967.9 billion now devoted to the sector.

This amount is 15 percent higher than the P841.8 billion that currently supports social services under the 2014 National Budget, and will allow the Administration to strengthen its K-12 program, as well as the Universal Health and Conditional Cash Transfer programs.

Economic services are still a major mover in the President’s inclusive growth campaign, with the 2015 proposed budget directing P700.2 billion towards this sector. This comprises 4.9 percent of the country’s GDP and accounts for 27 percent of the expenditure program for the next fiscal year. At least P339.4 billion in funds will go towards various infrastructure programs, including the construction of national roads and integrated transport systems nationwide.

FROM PHILSTAR

PNoy's half-trillion SPF 'customary' but not 'pork' - Palace By Louis Bacani (philstar.com) | Updated July 31, 2014 - 5:51pm 1 0 googleplus0 0


President Benigno Aquino III is shown signing 2015 Budget. Malacanang Photo Bureau

MANILA, Philippines — President Aquino's P501 billion Special Purpose Funds (SPF) in the proposed 2015 budget will not be an unlimited presidential pork barrel, Malacañang said Thursday.

Presidential Communications Operations Office chief Herminio Coloma Jr. said the SPF was intended for contingency expenditures and that including it in the national budget was based on "established management practice."

"It is customary that a certain portion of the annual budget is set aside for contingency expenditures that are essentially variable and not amenable to precise determination at the time of budget preparation," Coloma said.

"For example, calamities. We only know that there is an average of 20 typhoons every year, but we do not know exactly how many, and we are... While we hope that there will be minimal damage, we also know from experience that there can be considerable damage," Coloma added.

Of the total amount of SPF, P378 billion are programmed appropriations or those which the availability of funds has already been determined and assured. The remaining P123 billion are unprogrammed appropriations.

For the next fiscal year, the SPF releases include the following:

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

Programmed Appropriations

* Calamity Funds – P14 billion Contingency Funds – P2 billion International Commitment Fund – P7.4 billion Pension and Gratuity Funds – P140.6 billion Miscellaneous Personnel and Benefit Fund – P118 billion E-Government – P1 billion Rehabilitation and Reconstruction – P1 billion Budgetary Support to Government-Owned and -Controlled Corporation (GOCC) such as PhilHealth, Napocor, and others – P62.7 billion Allocation to Local Government Units – P33 billion Unprogrammed appropriations (major components)

Budgetary support to GOCCs – P5 billion Armed Forces of the Philippines modernization – P10 billion Equity buyout of the Metro Rail Transit Corporation – P53.9 billion Critics claim that the SPF serve as the President's pork barrel since the release of the funds is up to the discretion of the Chief Executive.

Like the SPF, the congressional pork barrel or the Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) was also a lump sum appropriation that was under the discretion of government officials - senators and congressmen.

Amid the controversies arising from the PDAF scam and the executive department's Disbursement Acceleration Program, the Palace assured that the government will not allow the SPF to be misused.

"Availment of special purpose funds also involves close—or also requires close adherence to financial control and accountability measures," Coloma said.

"This must be fully justified by the concerned head of department or agency and may involve vetting by the appropriate Cabinet cluster before being recommended for approval by the President. Actual disbursement is subject to regular auditing rules and regulations," he added.

SONA 2014: Who's sleeping, who's texting By AJ Bolando (philstar.com) | Updated July 30, 2014 - 10:45am 559 23.7K googleplus2 2


President Benigno Simeon Aquino III delivered his fifth State of the Nation Address at the Batasan Pambansa Complex in Quezon City, Monday, July 28, 2014. AJ BOLANDO

MANILA, Philippines - Given the prestige of the State of the Nation Address (SONA) and the limited number of people who were given the privilege to witness, in person, President Aquino deliver his speech, those who were inside the Batasan Pambansa's plenary hall should consider themselves lucky.

Philstar.com is among those privileged few, and while we're listening to President Aquino deliver his speech, we were also watching the special guests inside the plenary hall. Some guests were busy with their cellular phones and some were seen with their heads banging on their seats, asleep.

Aquino gave his penultimate speech on Monday, July 28, 2014, highlighting the benefits of the controversial Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP). Given the fact that the DAP is one of the most controversial issues that resulted to burning arguments among the officials and the public, the attendees should have been all ears. But then again, you cannot force every one to abide by this expectation.






BOO CHANCO COLUMN:

Two years is still a lot of time DEMAND AND SUPPLY By Boo Chanco (The Philippine Star) | Updated July 30, 2014 - 12:00am 8 43 googleplus1 3


By Boo Chanco

Lame duck?

No, P-Noy isn’t a lame duck president just yet. He turned emotional and uncomfortably paranoid towards the end of his SONA because he is apparently taking personally the fierce and relentless criticism the past few months over DAP as well as the other shortcomings of his administration.

His defensive stance is understandable. His only real legacy, so far, his anti corruption promise, is in danger of being lost. True, we still can’t accuse P-Noy of stealing a centavo, but the DAP and PDAF revelations seem to indicate some lapses in judgment that goes against the grain of the Daang Matuwid mantra.

At the very least, he can be accused of turning a blind eye to the corruption of the pork barrel until the mess accidentally erupted in public view. If Janet Napoles didn’t detain Benhur Luy against his will, we would have never known how big and how bad this pork barrel business has become.

Then, there is the matter of taking short cuts that were later on declared unconstitutional. And even if we grant for the sake of argument that DAP had good intentions, the fact that they used it to win favors from senators makes P-Noy complicit to the abuse.

The other thing that bothers me with the Palace lately is how on the one hand they made a big thing of saying that DAP is abolished because it is no longer needed, that it has accomplished its purpose. It is academic. Then some weeks later, P-Noy warns that the Supreme Court ruling sends a “chilling effect” on the economy, giving the impression DAP is a vital mechanism without which the economy’s growth may falter.

The SONA continued the defense of DAP, but not as combative as was with the Ulat sa Bayan last week. Impressive as the enumeration of some DAP projects may be, the question remains why this route was taken when they could have gone to Congress which they controlled anyway.

In any case, P-Noy seemed to have learned some lessons from the strong adverse public reaction. He was defensive, but no longer obnoxiously so. By presenting flesh and blood beneficiaries of DAP funded projects, he tried to win the public over, hoping they would look past the short cuts taken for the benefits delivered.

Nevertheless, the SONA glossed over areas where his administration fell short. There was no mention of DOTC and its failures... nor the Agri department.

* He blamed the impending power crisis to weather, inadequate maintenance of existing power plants and delays in construction of new power plants without acknowledging his own government’s contribution to the problem. Beyond saying Sec Ikot Petilla was ordered to meet with the congressional energy oversight committee, the ERC and private power industry, nothing was offered by way of how he plans to deal with the crisis.

It is the same thing with the rice crisis. He blamed “hoarders” for the current price hike. No mention of failure of his own Agri secretary’s self sufficiency program, which he promised in past SONAs and the delayed importation this year. And with regards the hoarders, his own officials failed to curtail their market influence or even arrest them.

This brings up P-Noy’s biggest problem… his weak cabinet members and key officials who should have been changed by now. Two years is still a lot of time for P-Noy to redeem himself and leave a good legacy. But he has to let go of the barnacles in his administration.

Given that the first six months of 2016 should be considered lost to the election campaign, P-Noy effectively only has a year and a half to catch up. Catching up is impossible unless he is able to demand and get excellent performance from his team.

It bothered me when he said: “Sa lahat po ng naabot natin, masasabi ko pong ako po’y kuntento na po ako.” He sounded as if his physical end is near and it isn’t healthy to have a head of state who feels personally beleaguered, paranoid. Then also, one must not be contented because there is always so much to accomplish yet.

P-Noy should focus on the very visible deliverables in the next year and a half. NAIA, for starters!

Governance

Sometimes I wonder if we are capable of good governance. It seems once we get some power in our hands, we tend to abuse authority entrusted to us.

Take the homeowners association in a gated QC village where I have lived for the past 31 years. Some years ago, the officers of the association wanted to build a community center. They justified it by saying they will have function rooms where our children can have their parties close to home.

I made an impassioned plea to our purok leader who represents our street at the board to forget this plan. In a purok meeting, I pointed out that such a new construction is a useless expenditure of the residents’ money. No, I was told, a senator has promised access to his pork barrel funds.

I still insisted that the so called community center will be a white elephant, they will spend beyond budget and in the end they will come back to the residents asking for higher dues. They did raise our dues this year and last Monday, the current association president sent a letter to residents calling for a fund raising because the association coffers are in deficit.

I can now tell my former purok leader and his fellow board members I told you. According to the current president, the center was budgeted at P14 million, went up to P18.9 million and there is a pending additional works billing that will bring total cost to P22.6 million.

The center’s function rooms are unable to generate any income. In their words, “Unfortunately, to-date, there have been very few who have used the community center for their projected functions. Worst, it would appear that renting out the community center will even result in a loss to the association considering the low rental rate and the minimum monthly electrical charge.”

I thought they studied the economics of it? Now they want to reduce the number of roving security guards, supposedly because they have also installed a CCTV system costing P3.7 million. As I told my former purok leader, the association should stick to its basic functions: 1) security and 2) grounds maintenance.

In the meantime, security has been iffy in our gated community. The association itself sends regular security circulars reporting robberies happening.

Doesn’t this sound like the national government?

We are a small community of professionals and business leaders and one would expect better governance. They built two P10-billion ports in Subic and Batangas that remain hardly utilized after completion. My homeowners association built an idle community center we can’t afford... the same edifice complex... the same hubris.

You guys know who you are. Why don’t you do the honorable thing and own up to your mistake? Take responsibility for the mess you created the way we urge our local and national leaders to take responsibility for the mess they create. Maybe a million from each of you should take care of the deficit in association finances.

I am sure the governance problems in our homeowners association are not uncommon. Good governance is probably not in our genetic make up as Quezon imagined. How sad.

Airport taxis

I received this e-mail from a reader who complained for the second time about airport taxis. This is another proof of an airport general manager who has miserably failed.

I recently planed in from London via PAL at terminal 2.

Exiting the terminal I went to the information desk to ask where I can get a taxi. The guy at the desk told me to go to Bay 19.

The taxi service at bay 19 wanted to charge me P1,200 for the short trip to McKinley Hill where I live. I told them that the reasonable charge is only P450. They told me there was no other taxi service, and when I turned around and walked away they ran after me and lowered the price to P800.

I saw some yellow (metered) cabs across the street and took the ride home. I eventually paid only P350 for the ride home!

What bothers me is that these overcharging cabs have NAIA management blessing. The information desk pointed me to them when they could have pointed me to the cheaper alternative across the street.

What kind of management do we have at NAIA? Regards.

 


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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