ABS-CBN: JUANA CHANGE ASKS PNoy: GUSTO MO BANG MAKATULONG?

Political activist Mae Paner believes President Benigno Aquino III has changed since he was elected and that this might eventually lead to his downfall. In an interview in radio DZMM on Sunday, Paner, also known as "Juana Change," said she is afraid that the President will end up behind bars after his term ends. She added that Aquino has come a long way since 2010, when she supported his campaign. "I've seen PNoy before, na parang mababa ang loob. Ngayon sinusulat ang history, na parang siya mismo ang sumusulat kung paano siya aalalahanin ng history after 2016," Paner said. Paner said it scared her that Aquino rejected the resignation of Budget Secretary Florencio Butch Abad, since it seems like the President does not listen to anyone -- even those who voted for him. "Dapat tinanggap niya 'yun. Nag-resign na nga si Secretary Abad, eh di imbestigahan niyo para patunayan na wala siyang kasalanan.

Pero hindi eh. Nag-decide sila na mag-holding hands, mag-hold-on together. Dapat ang kanta nila, 'Let It Go'," she said. "Ang iginigiit niya ay kapag tinanggal si Secretary Abad, that is tantamount to admitting that the DAP is bad. But that is scary because he does not consider what the Supreme Court is saying," she added. "Dapat bigyan niya ng benefit of the doubt. Ako good ako, pero Supreme Court 'yan eh, sige na nga, imbestigahan 'yan."

However, Paner stressed that she does not regret supporting Aquino in 2010, saying that because of what is happening, the public has started to express its dismay and this will eventually lead to discussion and awareness. "Ako hindi ako nagsisisi. Dahil sa kanya, may pinupuna ako," she said. "Makikita mo 'yung pagbabago sa kamalayan ng mga tao. Dahil sa ginagawa niya, nagigising ang kamalayan ng mga tao." Paner also left a message for the President and other public officials. "Learn to reflect and be quiet. Sinasabi niyo na tuwid tayo, pero paano nangyari 'yun, may nakarating nga ba talaga kay Janet [Napoles]?" she said. "When liars believe their own lies, scary 'yan. I am so afraid for PNoy kung magpapatuloy siya sa kanyang pagmamatigas. Ngayon pa lang nakakatakot na siya, lalo na pagdating ng 2016, kapag wala na siyang impunity, mas nakakatakot 'yan," Paner added. * READ MORE...

ALSO by Conrado de Quiros: Fallout  

INQUIRER: Hoping against hope, I had hoped something like this would happen at the State of the Nation Address (Sona). P-Noy needed to say something dramatic to offset the impact of the Supreme Court ruling on the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP), and he would. Toward the end of it, he would show some humility and express a willingness to bow down to the will of the Supreme Court. Its ruling was unanimous after all, which showed how fairly clear and inescapable the call of conscience went. The justices themselves had to bow down to it. So did the President. Then at the very end of it, he would announce that Butch Abad had resigned. He would praise him to high heavens for it. He would submit to the fact that the DAP was unconstitutional, as decreed by the Court, but submit as well that Abad truly did it in good faith, believing that it would do the things he promised it would.

He knew Abad well and personally believed in him. Without prejudging his liability in whatever abuse might have proceeded from DAP, he was confident in his innocence. But he would rise above his personal prejudices, he would be president to the many and not just to the few. He would accept that resignation. Well, that won’t happen. He won’t say those things, he did not accept Abad’s resignation. He won’t make things better. I don’t know if Malacañang truly appreciates the implications of P-Noy’s rejection of Abad’s resignation. Those implications are legion, none of them good. First off, it rattles the credibility of government with the force of a 7-magnitude earthquake. Not least the credibility of Abad’s resignation itself. As the reactions of the past several days show, they are one of widespread disbelief, if not cynicism, several people calling it a moro-moro. Toby Tiangco, for one, does, calling it bad script, bad acting, and bad taste. If Abad had really wanted to resign, he said, he would have made it irrevocable. * READ MORE...

ALSO by Atty. Dodo Dulay: Malacañang’s lies to justify DAP 

MANILA TIMES: Palace officials should stop trying to justify the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP)—the presidential pork barrel concocted by PNoy and Budget Secretary Butch Abad. The more they do, the more they’re being caught in a lie. For instance, in the recent Supreme Court ruling declaring the DAP as unconstitutional, the High Court wryly observed that Malacañang wasn’t entirely truthful when it claimed that all 116 PAPs (project, activity, program) funded by DAP had the corresponding “appropriation covers” in the General Appropriation Act (GAA) or budget law.

The Supreme Court said: “Upon careful review of the documents contained in the seven evidence packets, we conclude that the ‘savings’ pooled under the DAP were allocated to PAPs that were not covered by any appropriations in the pertinent GAAs.” In other words, the DAP was funding items which were not even included in the budget law, in violation of the constitutional requirement that “no money shall be paid out of the Treasury except in pursuance of an appropriation made by law.” One of these irregular PAPs is the P1.6-billion Disaster Risk, Exposure, Assessment and Mitigation (DREAM) project under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST).

“Aside from this transfer under the DAP to the DREAM project exceeding by almost 300% the appropriation by Congress…the Executive allotted funds for personnel services and capital outlays. The Executive thereby substituted its will to that of Congress. Worse, the Executive had not earlier proposed any amount for personnel services and capital outlays in the in the…2011 GAA,” the High Court chidingly remarked. The High Court also discovered other disbursement anomalies such as Special Allotment Release Order (SARO) being issued to the Philippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development (DOST-PCIEETRD) for the “establishment of the advanced failure analysis laboratory,” which did not correspond to the program listed in the GAA.

But Malacañang’s dishonesty doesn’t end there. In order to justify the Palace’s use of the so-called “unprogrammed funds” for DAP, “the [Office of the Solicitor General] assured the [Supreme Court] that the revenue collections exceeded the original revenue targets for fiscal years 2011, 2012 and 2013,” Justice Antonio Carpio noted in his absorbing separate opinion. Under the budget law, unprogrammed funds can be used only if the revenue collections exceed the original revenue targets as certified by the Bureau of Treasury (BTR). * READ MORE...

(ALSO) CBCP on Aquino's DAP speech: Respect SC 

RAPPLER.COM: Leaders should be 'humble,' Philippine bishops say after President Benigno Aquino III slammed the High Court for an 'unreasonable' decision 'RESPECT SC.' Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas, president of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines, urges respect for the Supreme Court after Philippine President Benigno Aquino III criticized one of its rulings against his administration. Respect the Supreme Court (SC), the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) said Monday, July 14, after President Benigno Aquino III slammed the Philippines' top justices for ruling against his administration's spending program. In a statement, CBCP president Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas said Aquino's “right to express himself” on the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) “must be respected,” as the SC declared 3 schemes under the DAP unconstitutional. “But it is equally important for our people to hold fast to the basic tenets of the democratic way of life enshrined in our Constitution – it is for the judiciary to interpret the law with definitiveness in the process of resolving justiciable issues,” said Villegas, who also urged respect for the SC even if it upheld the Church-opposed Reproductive Health law. “We must respect the Supreme Court. Where there was error, there must be humble admission and immediate rectification,” Villegas said. 'Respect democratic institutions' * READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA NEWS REPORT:

Juana Change asks PNoy: Gusto mo bang makulong?


MAE PANER: JUANA CHANGE

MANILA, JULY 15, 2014 (ABS-CBN) by Rose Carmelle Lacuata, ABS-CBNnews.com - Political activist Mae Paner believes President Benigno Aquino III has changed since he was elected and that this might eventually lead to his downfall.

In an interview in radio DZMM on Sunday, Paner, also known as "Juana Change," said she is afraid that the President will end up behind bars after his term ends.

She added that Aquino has come a long way since 2010, when she supported his campaign.

"I've seen PNoy before, na parang mababa ang loob. Ngayon sinusulat ang history, na parang siya mismo ang sumusulat kung paano siya aalalahanin ng history after 2016," Paner said.

Paner said it scared her that Aquino rejected the resignation of Budget Secretary Florencio Butch Abad, since it seems like the President does not listen to anyone -- even those who voted for him.

"Dapat tinanggap niya 'yun. Nag-resign na nga si Secretary Abad, eh di imbestigahan niyo para patunayan na wala siyang kasalanan. Pero hindi eh. Nag-decide sila na mag-holding hands, mag-hold-on together. Dapat ang kanta nila, 'Let It Go'," she said.

"Ang iginigiit niya ay kapag tinanggal si Secretary Abad, that is tantamount to admitting that the DAP is bad. But that is scary because he does not consider what the Supreme Court is saying," she added.

"Dapat bigyan niya ng benefit of the doubt. Ako good ako, pero Supreme Court 'yan eh, sige na nga, imbestigahan 'yan."

However, Paner stressed that she does not regret supporting Aquino in 2010, saying that because of what is happening, the public has started to express its dismay and this will eventually lead to discussion and awareness.

"Ako hindi ako nagsisisi. Dahil sa kanya, may pinupuna ako," she said. "Makikita mo 'yung pagbabago sa kamalayan ng mga tao. Dahil sa ginagawa niya, nagigising ang kamalayan ng mga tao."

Paner also left a message for the President and other public officials.

"Learn to reflect and be quiet. Sinasabi niyo na tuwid tayo, pero paano nangyari 'yun, may nakarating nga ba talaga kay Janet [Napoles]?" she said.

"When liars believe their own lies, scary 'yan. I am so afraid for PNoy kung magpapatuloy siya sa kanyang pagmamatigas. Ngayon pa lang nakakatakot na siya, lalo na pagdating ng 2016, kapag wala na siyang impunity, mas nakakatakot 'yan," Paner added.

"Kung sakaling ang mga paratang, mapatunayan na siya ay guilty, nakikita ko siya sa kulungan sa 2016," she warned.

Paner also has a wish for the President.

"Gusto ko kayong bigyan ng bagong tenga, bagong puso, at bagong isip na para sa bayan. "Yung para sa bayan lang. Gusto mo ba na in 2016, gusto mo bang makulong?"

FROM THE INQUIRER

Fallout There’s the Rub By Conrado de Quiros |Philippine Daily Inquirer12:07 am | Tuesday, July 15th, 2014


There’s the Rub: By Conrado de Quiros

Hoping against hope, I had hoped something like this would happen at the State of the Nation Address (Sona).

P-Noy needed to say something dramatic to offset the impact of the Supreme Court ruling on the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP), and he would. Toward the end of it, he would show some humility and express a willingness to bow down to the will of the Supreme Court. Its ruling was unanimous after all, which showed how fairly clear and inescapable the call of conscience went. The justices themselves had to bow down to it. So did the President.

Then at the very end of it, he would announce that Butch Abad had resigned.

He would praise him to high heavens for it. He would submit to the fact that the DAP was unconstitutional, as decreed by the Court, but submit as well that Abad truly did it in good faith, believing that it would do the things he promised it would. He knew Abad well and personally believed in him. Without prejudging his liability in whatever abuse might have proceeded from DAP, he was confident in his innocence. But he would rise above his personal prejudices, he would be president to the many and not just to the few.

He would accept that resignation.

Well, that won’t happen. He won’t say those things, he did not accept Abad’s resignation.

He won’t make things better.

I don’t know if Malacañang truly appreciates the implications of P-Noy’s rejection of Abad’s resignation. Those implications are legion, none of them good.

First off, it rattles the credibility of government with the force of a 7-magnitude earthquake. Not least the credibility of Abad’s resignation itself. As the reactions of the past several days show, they are one of widespread disbelief, if not cynicism, several people calling it a moro-moro. Toby Tiangco, for one, does, calling it bad script, bad acting, and bad taste. If Abad had really wanted to resign, he said, he would have made it irrevocable.

* He can’t be blamed for saying so. Only recently we had a government official who resigned—or was forced to—and she made it irrevocable. Who was Margie Juico. Juico was only the victim of the intrigues of the people who now find themselves in hot water, she was not guilty of committing a wrong, as Abad has been deemed so by the Supreme Court. Yet she never thought twice about pleading her case. She never thought twice about clinging to her position. She resigned, immediately, spontaneously, irrevocably. That is buo ang loob, that is resolve, that is class.

Secondly, it blunts the whole impact of the jailing of Senators Bong Revilla, Jinggoy Estrada, and Juan Ponce Enrile. That would have been a high point of the Sona, if not the apex of it. For the first time since the War, a Philippine government has had the wit and will to jail not one but three senators for corruption. Of course they remain to be convicted by a court of law for what they have done, but that was a good beginning, that promised the dawning of a new day.

What happens to all that now? How can P-Noy mention that in the Sona, let alone make a big deal of it, without inviting a storm of protest, without provoking hisses and catcalls? It puts into question the nature of the presidential resolve. “You have no problems jailing three senators, but you have a problem merely accepting the resignation of one of your own?” Abad does not merit jailing—until such time as the Ombudsman can show corruption on his part.

But he deserves to resign: He knowingly authored something unconstitutional. “You not only cannot find wrong with him, you find only right with him?”

It may not increase P-Noy’s political vulnerability to impeachment—he has the numbers—but it increases his moral vulnerability to it. Not accepting Abad’s resignation removes the buffers or fail-safes to the presidency. It conveys the message that the President was in it all along, he was party to the plot, he gave it his full blessings from start to finish.

And thirdly, it wrecks the whole concept of accountability in government. Being accountable has been one of the things the current administration has been proudest about, contrasting itself with the previous one which considered itself above accounting to anyone. But you start saying things like, “I cannot accept the notion that doing right by our people is a wrong,” and you bring that accountability into question.

Put baldly, it’s just saying, “I cannot accept the Supreme Court interpretation of the DAP.” Or it’s just saying, “I cannot accept the Supreme Court ruling on the DAP.” Or it’s just saying, “The Supreme Court is wrong and I am right.” Or it’s just saying, “I am the ultimate arbiter of what is wrong and what is right.” Or it’s just saying, “I have the right to veto the Supreme Court when I think it is wrong.” Or, a la Romy Neri, “Let me be the judge of that.” Take your pick, but not one of that can make you feel very comfortable about the state of democracy.

Being personally honest and trustworthy is not an entitlement to it.

Of course the President can always say, “In the end, I will be accountable only to my Boss, who is the people.” But unfortunately in a democracy, the people manifest their voice through the judiciary too, through the courts too, through the Supreme Court too. You start disregarding those institutions, you start imagining the people speak directly to you, and you sow the seeds of discontent. You know what they say: You talk to God in your quiet moments, and it is called prayer. God talks to you in your fitful moments, and you should seek help. What is true of God is true of the Boss as well.

Things like “I will be accountable only to my Boss” sound very nice, but in the end they really mean only one thing: “I will be accountable only to myself.”

That’s an engraved invitation to a fallout.

FROM THE MANILA TIMES

Malacañang’s lies to justify DAP July 14, 2014 11:19 pm by ATTY. DODO DULAY


DODO DULAY

Palace officials should stop trying to justify the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP)—the presidential pork barrel concocted by PNoy and Budget Secretary Butch Abad. The more they do, the more they’re being caught in a lie.

For instance, in the recent Supreme Court ruling declaring the DAP as unconstitutional, the High Court wryly observed that Malacañang wasn’t entirely truthful when it claimed that all 116 PAPs (project, activity, program) funded by DAP had the corresponding “appropriation covers” in the General Appropriation Act (GAA) or budget law.

The Supreme Court said: “Upon careful review of the documents contained in the seven evidence packets, we conclude that the ‘savings’ pooled under the DAP were allocated to PAPs that were not covered by any appropriations in the pertinent GAAs.”

In other words, the DAP was funding items which were not even included in the budget law, in violation of the constitutional requirement that “no money shall be paid out of the Treasury except in pursuance of an appropriation made by law.”

One of these irregular PAPs is the P1.6-billion Disaster Risk, Exposure, Assessment and Mitigation (DREAM) project under the Department of Science and Technology (DOST).

“Aside from this transfer under the DAP to the DREAM project exceeding by almost 300% the appropriation by Congress…the Executive allotted funds for personnel services and capital outlays. The Executive thereby substituted its will to that of Congress. Worse, the Executive had not earlier proposed any amount for personnel services and capital outlays in the in the…2011 GAA,” the High Court chidingly remarked.

The High Court also discovered other disbursement anomalies such as Special Allotment Release Order (SARO) being issued to the Philippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development (DOST-PCIEETRD) for the “establishment of the advanced failure analysis laboratory,” which did not correspond to the program listed in the GAA.

But Malacañang’s dishonesty doesn’t end there.

In order to justify the Palace’s use of the so-called “unprogrammed funds” for DAP, “the [Office of the Solicitor General] assured the [Supreme Court] that the revenue collections exceeded the original revenue targets for fiscal years 2011, 2012 and 2013,” Justice Antonio Carpio noted in his absorbing separate opinion.

Under the budget law, unprogrammed funds can be used only if the revenue collections exceed the original revenue targets as certified by the Bureau of Treasury (BTR).

* However, when the High Court required Malacañang to submit the corresponding certification from the BTR, what the Palace submitted instead were certifications from the BTR and the Department of Finance (DOF) that dividend collections from the shares of stock held by the Government in government-owned and controlled corporations exceeded the yearly target (or programmed) dividends.

This prompted Justice Carpio to complain that “(t)he certifications do not state that the revenue collections exceeded the original revenue targets as submitted by the President to Congress.”

The distortions foisted by the Palace aren’t surprising since even the brains behind the DAP can’t seem to get his story straight.

In his letter to PNoy last December 23, 2013, Abad said the government shelled out almost P141 billion for DAP-funded projects from 2011 to 2013. This conflicts with the figures published earlier in the Department of Budget and Management (DBM)’s website, which said that the total funds approved for DAP in the same period stood at more than P157 billion—some P142 billion pesos from 2011 to 2012, and more than P15 billion in 2013.

A more recent DBM press release, meanwhile, mentioned another figure: more than P136 billion from 2011 to 2012. Ano ba talaga, Kuya?!

One thing’s for sure though. Most (if not all) of the DAP numbers being thrown at us are definitely false and untrue.
Apparently clueless that he’s digging a deeper hole for his “boss”, even the Presidential mouthpiece, Edwin Lacierda, has been trying to put positive spin to the DAP.

“Ninety-one percent” of DAP funds had been spent properly by the executive branch,” Lacierda declared.

But isn’t that also an admission that Malacañang improperly (and unlawfully) spent the remaining nine percent of DAP funds—the estimated P12.8 billion given to senators as “incentive” during the Corona impeachment trial?

Lacierda also insists that the DAP benefited the country. But how can Lacierda vouch for DAP’s supposed benefits when Malacañang can’t even say where the funds went?

Either Lacierda is talking through his hat or he’s not being candid when he claimed they still didn’t have a copy of the DAP-funded projects more than 6 months after the controversy hit the front pages.

Last Friday, PNoy rejected Abad’s resignation explaining that accepting the DBM secretary’s resignation was “tantamount to acknowledging wrongdoing on my end.”

We’re not surprised. No self-righteous person would do such a thing, right?

[Opinion Section Editor’s note: At 6 p.m. yesterday, President Aquino addressed the nation on TV about the the DAP. He claimed that the money was used to benefit the people, said that the justices’ decision was in error and that he had heard that some of them were making this issue a personal quarrel with him, and announced that he would petition the High Court to review and change its decision. Nothing that the President said contradicts or clarifies any of the points made in this article by Columnist Dulay.]

FROM RAPPLER.COM

CBCP on Aquino's DAP speech: Respect SC Paterno Esmaquel II Published 10:55 PM, Jul 14, 2014 Updated 10:55 PM, Jul 14, 2014


'RESPECT SC.' Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas, president of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines, urges respect for the Supreme Court after Philippine President Benigno Aquino III criticized one of its rulings against his administration. File photo by Noli Yamsuan/Archdiocese of Manila, as posted on www.cbcpnews.com

Leaders should be 'humble,' Philippine bishops say after President Benigno Aquino III slammed the High Court for an 'unreasonable' decision

'RESPECT SC.' Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas, president of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines, urges respect for the Supreme Court after Philippine President Benigno Aquino III criticized one of its rulings against his administration. File photo by Noli Yamsuan/Archdiocese of Manila, as posted on www.cbcpnews.com

MANILA, Philippines – Respect the Supreme Court (SC), the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) said Monday, July 14, after President Benigno Aquino III slammed the Philippines' top justices for ruling against his administration's spending program.

In a statement, CBCP president Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas said Aquino's “right to express himself” on the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) “must be respected,” as the SC declared 3 schemes under the DAP unconstitutional.

“But it is equally important for our people to hold fast to the basic tenets of the democratic way of life enshrined in our Constitution – it is for the judiciary to interpret the law with definitiveness in the process of resolving justiciable issues,” said Villegas, who also urged respect for the SC even if it upheld the Church-opposed Reproductive Health law.

“We must respect the Supreme Court. Where there was error, there must be humble admission and immediate rectification,” Villegas said.

'Respect democratic institutions'

In his statement on Monday, he explained: “The Rule of Law is a fundamental requirement – an objective condition – of the common good. That the Rule of Law is at all times safeguarded is therefore a moral concern. When the Rule of Law is compromised, the common good becomes its victim.”

“The CBCP prays that our nation will tread the path of peace, and that our national leaders may truly be HUMBLE (emphasis his) and respectful of our democratic institutions so that our most sacred freedoms and liberties are always upheld,” Villegas said.

Still on behalf of the CBCP, he earlier called on the Commission on Audit and the Office of the Ombudsman “to tell the nation where the DAP funds went.” (READ: CBCP dares Aquino admin: Probe the corrupt within)

A protegé of the late Jaime Cardinal Sin, Villegas released Monday's statement after Aquino delivered a televised speech against the SC's “unreasonable” decision to declare key executive moves under the DAP as unconstitutional.

Voting 13-0-1, the SC ruled as unconstitutional the following schemes under the DAP, a source of discretionary funds allegedly used to bribe politicians:

the creation of savings prior to the end of the fiscal year and the withdrawal of these funds for implementing agencies

the cross-border transfers of the savings from one branch of government to another

the allotment of funds for projects, activities, and programs not outlined in the General Appropriations Act

(READ: Understanding the SC ruling on the DAP)

Like saying, 'I am the law'

Criticizing this ruling, Aquino on Monday told the SC: We do not want two equal branches of government to go head to head, needing a third branch to step in to intervene. We find it difficult to understand your decision.”

Vice President Jejomar Binay's opposition coalition United Nationalist Alliance (UNA), for its part, described Aquino's speech as a “bad precedent.”

UNA Secretary-General Navotas Representative Tobias “Toby” Tiangco described it as a “veiled threat” to the SC.

“That is what is very dangerous about it. He is questioning the decision of the Supreme Court. It’s like he is saying he is more correct that the Supreme Court in interpreting the law. That is really dangerous. He is saying, ‘I am the law,’” Tiangco told Rappler.

He added: “Even if you are President, you need to respect the law. The speech is worse than DAP itself. He does not want to follow the law.” – Rappler.com


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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