AQUINO'S 1-DAY JAPAN TRIP COSTS P8.8M

JUNE 24  -The government spent about P8.8 million for President Benigno Aquino III's working visit to Japan on Tuesday. This was according to Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr., the Presidential Communications Operations Office (PCOO) said in its website. The PCOO also said that Aquino, who left this morning for Tokyo via a chartered flight, had a 41-member delegation. Among those who accompanied the President were Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert Del Rosario, Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin, Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima and Budget Secretary Florencio Abad. Funding for Aquino's visit covers transportation, accommodation, food, equipment and other requirements of the President and his delegation. Earlier, Aquino met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and discussed areas of cooperation and regional security concerns, among other issues. He expressed support to Abe's proposal to expand the role of the Japanese military to enable it to help allies. He then proceeded to Hiroshima to deliver a keynote address at the Consolidation for Peace for Mindanao Conference, an event organized by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Research and Education for Peace of the Universiti Sains Malaysia. The PCOO said Aquino will visit the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park before returning home Tuesday night. In his predeparture speech earlier, Aquino assured that his visit to Japan will be worthwhile. "Mamayang gabi na rin po ang uwi natin, at ngayon pa lang ay nakikita na natin ang positibong bunga ng biyaheng ito," Aquino said.THIS IS THE FULL REPORT

(ALSO) Aquino: Beneficial if Japan can defend allies under attack

JUNE 24  -Amid the "increasingly severe" regional situation, President Benigno Aquino III on Tuesday supported Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to expand Japan's military role. In a joint press statement with Abe following their summit meeting and expanded working luncheon in Tokyo, Aquino expressed his support for Abe's proposal to reinterpret Japan's pacifist constitution to allow its military to defend not only Japan but also allies that come under attack. "We are told of ambiguities as regards the bounds of Japan's ability to respond even in the midst of an attack on its allies. In this regard, there have been some debates on the Japanese government's plan to revisit certain interpretations of its Constitution," Aquino said in his televised speech. "We believe that nations of goodwill can only benefit if the Japanese government is empowered to assist others and is allowed the wherewithal to come to the aid of those in need, especially in the area of collective self-defense," he added. Abe's ruling party is in the midst of tough negotiations with its coalition partner over his proposal to reinterpret the Japanese constitution to allow what is known as collective self-defense. The Japanese military can currently only use force to defend Japan. Aquino said the he does not view Abe's push with alarm since this could bring the Philippines and Japan closer to their shared goal of regional peace, stability and prosperity. READ MORE...

ALSO: PNoy arrives in Japan, set to discuss China sea dispute 

JUNE 24 --President Benigno Aquino III is now in Japan to hold a summit meeting with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The Official Gazette announced in its Twitter account around 10:30 a.m. that the President has landed at the Haneda Airport in Tokyo for his one-day working visit. Presidential Communications Operations Office head Herminio Coloma Jr. said the two leaders may talk about the ongoing territorial disputes of the two countries with China. "[B]atid din natin na mayroon tayong kahawig na mga concerns hinggil sa freedom of navigation, freedom of aviation, patungkol naman sa ating maritime entitlements sa South China Sea at sila naman sa East China Sea. Kaya maraming pag-uusapan na topics of mutual interest ang dalawang lider," Coloma said in an interview with state-run dzRB. In his pre-departure speech, Aquino did not specifically mention the sea disputes as part of his agenda, but he said he will discuss with Abe the important issues affecting both nations, including peace and prosperity in the region. The President also stressed the need for greater cooperation and partnership between the Philippines and Japan. "Sa ganitong tibay at lalim ng ugnayan ng Pilipinas at bansang Hapon, ipinaparamdam sa ating hindi tayo nag-iisa. Ang Japan nga po ang isa sa dalawang bansang mayroon tayong strategic partnership, at ito po’y talagang makabuluhan at kapaki-pakinabang para sa ating mga bansa. Sa ugnayan pong tulad nito, kailangan ang patuloy na konsultasyon sa isa’t isa upang lalo pang tumibay ang ating alyansa," Aquino said. READ MORE...

ALSO: Why Malaysia, unlike Philippines, keeps quiet on sea row

JUNE 25  -Malaysia also has overlapping claims with China on several coastal territories in the South China Sea, but it has a "broad consensus" with the Asian power. This is what the Chinese Foreign Ministry claimed in its statement to the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday, answering queries on why Malaysia has been downplaying the sea row when its Southeast Asian neighbors like the Philippines and Vietnam have been outspoken against China's show of force in the maritime region. "Malaysia and China have disputes in the South China Sea. But the two sides share broad consensus on appropriately handling the disputes issues," the Chinese agency said. Asked to give a reaction on the matter, the Malaysia government did not respond to the US-based newspaper. The Philippines' and Vietnam's rivalries with China have escalated the past year as Beijing started reclamation work in Philippine-claimed waters and put up two oil rigs in what Vietnam considers part of its maritime territory. The Philippines has also lodged an arbitration case against China under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea--a move Beijing condemned as unneighborly. Japan, meanwhile, was recently embroiled in a more heated rivalry with China over the East China Sea, with the row reaching its height in Chinese and Japanese military planes and ships almost colliding in the contested area. Malaysia, on the other hand, has been more interested in furthering positive relations with China by avoiding making remarks and moves that may trigger Beijing's retaliation. In a study for the US state department, envoy John Finkbeiner said Malaysia has lessened economic dependence on the US and strengthened trade relations with China. READ MORE...

ALSO: Aquino spokesman hits back at China

JUNE 27  --Presidential Spokesperson Edwin Lacierda hit back at China after the Asian giant's foreign ministry accused the Philippines and Japan of stirring tensions in disputed waters. In his Twitter account, Lacierda said China is guilty of the very thing of which it accuses the Philippines. On Wednesday, China Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying criticized the meeting between President Benigno Aquino III and Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and urged the two nations to stop making trouble. "It is our opinion that relevant countries should show sincerity and move towards the same direction with China, rather than deliberately stir up tension and bring additional complicated factors to the regional situation," Hua said. The Chinese official was making a reaction to the statement of Aquino, who supported Abe's proposal to reinterpret Japan's constitution to allow its military to defend allies that come under attack. China remains locked in a territorial dispute with Japan and the Philippines. While it keeps criticizing the two nations, it also continues to expand its military presence in the contested waters. Earlier this week, the Chinese state media even showed a new map of China which includes an expanded claim in the South China Sea and has extended Beijing's maritime claims from the original nine-dash line to a ten-dash line. But Malacañang belittled the newly unveiled map of China, saying it also violates the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. "To put it simply, dinrowing lang nila ‘yon. Lahat naman ng drawing na ‘yan ay na-supersede na ng UN Convention on the Law of the Sea," Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said in a press briefing yesterday.

ALSO: West Philippine Sea China’s best shield vs US, paper says

The West Philippine Sea is China’s “natural shield” in the south, which will not only give it a strong defense against the United States, but will also provide food and energy security given the wealth of natural resources in the Reed Bank, according to a strategic assessment paper from the Development Academy of the Philippines. The importance of the West Philippine Sea to China also explains its assertive claims to territories within the Philippines’ Kalayaan Island Group (KIG). The West Philippine Sea is the name given by Manila to that part of the South China Sea that falls within the country’s exclusive economic zone under the United Nations Convention on the law of the Sea. “The West Philippine Sea (WPS) is important as it is regarded as a natural shield of China’s security in the South. Having a strong foothold on the WPS would give China a strategic area of defense consisting of over 1,000 kilometers, the security implication of which is ‘incalculable’,” said the DAP paper titled, “Maintaining the Balance of Power and Increasing the Sphere of Influence over the West Philippine Sea: The China Track.” The paper also noted that controlling the West Philippine Sea would “ensure the economic and political survival of the Communist Party.” The West Philippine Sea is the part of South China Sea that is within the Philippines’ 320-kilometer exclusive economic zone. Filipino military officers, who as students at the DAP Graduate School of Public Development and Management, came up with the 12-page strategic paper focusing on the West Philippine Sea problem through China’s lens last year. DAP provided the Philippine Daily Inquirer a copy of the paper. On Friday, Chinese President Xi Jinping called for stronger frontier defenses on land and sea during a “national meeting” also attended by Prime Minister Li Keqiang and Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli, according to the official Xinhua news agency. The DAP paper noted that an expert from China’s State Ocean Administration had pointed out that “the ocean has become an important area of contention for comprehensive national power and long-term strategic advantage.” The DAP paper emphasized that having control of the South China Sea would “serve as a restraining factor” for the US 7th Fleet, whose area of responsibility covers 124 million square kilometers in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. “The United States has always intended to preserve its strong military presence in [the] West Pacific. Given this fact, Beijing feels that it must have a strong grip on the South China Sea to give themselves some space for strategic maneuvering,” the paper said. China acknowledges its vulnerability both on land and sea, but “believes that any challenges to China’s territorial integrity and sovereignty in the future would mostly come from the ocean, including the West Philippine Sea,” the paper said. “This is the reason why China has been developing its anti access/area denial (AA/AD) capability. In this context, China’s anti-access/area-denial forces increasingly overlap, providing multiple layers of offensive systems utilizing the sea, air, space, and cyber-space,” the paper added. *READ MORE...

 

READ FULL MEDIA NEWS REPORT:

Aquino's 1-day Japan trip costs P8.8M


Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, left, and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pose for photos before their meeting at Abe's office in Tokyo Tuesday, June 24, 2014. AP/Yuya Shino, Pool

MANILA, JUNE 30, 2014 (PHILSTAR) By Louis Bacani — The government spent about P8.8 million for President Benigno Aquino III's working visit to Japan on Tuesday.

This was according to Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr., the Presidential Communications Operations Office (PCOO) said in its website.

The PCOO also said that Aquino, who left this morning for Tokyo via a chartered flight, had a 41-member delegation.

Among those who accompanied the President were Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert Del Rosario, Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin, Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima and Budget Secretary Florencio Abad.

Funding for Aquino's visit covers transportation, accommodation, food, equipment and other requirements of the President and his delegation.

Earlier, Aquino met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and discussed areas of cooperation and regional security concerns, among other issues.

He expressed support to Abe's proposal to expand the role of the Japanese military to enable it to help allies.

He then proceeded to Hiroshima to deliver a keynote address at the Consolidation for Peace for Mindanao Conference, an event organized by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Research and Education for Peace of the Universiti Sains Malaysia.

The PCOO said Aquino will visit the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park before returning home Tuesday night.

In his predeparture speech earlier, Aquino assured that his visit to Japan will be worthwhile.

"Mamayang gabi na rin po ang uwi natin, at ngayon pa lang ay nakikita na natin ang positibong bunga ng biyaheng ito," Aquino said.

Aquino: Beneficial if Japan can defend allies under attack(philstar.com) | Updated June 24, 2014 - 3:01pm


Philippines' President Benigno Aquino III, left, and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attend a joint news conference at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. AP/Yuya Shino, Pool

MANILA, Philippines — Amid the "increasingly severe" regional situation, President Benigno Aquino III on Tuesday supported Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to expand Japan's military role.

In a joint press statement with Abe following their summit meeting and expanded working luncheon in Tokyo, Aquino expressed his support for Abe's proposal to reinterpret Japan's pacifist constitution to allow its military to defend not only Japan but also allies that come under attack.

"We are told of ambiguities as regards the bounds of Japan's ability to respond even in the midst of an attack on its allies. In this regard, there have been some debates on the Japanese government's plan to revisit certain interpretations of its Constitution," Aquino said in his televised speech.

"We believe that nations of goodwill can only benefit if the Japanese government is empowered to assist others and is allowed the wherewithal to come to the aid of those in need, especially in the area of collective self-defense," he added.

Abe's ruling party is in the midst of tough negotiations with its coalition partner over his proposal to reinterpret the Japanese constitution to allow what is known as collective self-defense. The Japanese military can currently only use force to defend Japan.

Aquino said the he does not view Abe's push with alarm since this could bring the Philippines and Japan closer to their shared goal of regional peace, stability and prosperity.

The Japanese leader said he and Aquino discussed the right of collective self defense along with approaches to peace and the transfer of defense equipment.

"In the face of the regional situation becoming increasingly severe, both nations are closely coordinating," Abe said.

Aquino's and Abe's remarks come as both of their nations face China's military expansion in the disputed East and South China seas.

Both countries on Tuesday strengthened their security cooperation to build a peaceful and more stable Asia-Pacific region.

"Prime Minister Abe and I likewise shared the view that prosperity and development cannot exist in a vacuum; that the advancement of our peoples and our region can only be fully realized in a context that fosters stability," Aquino said.

"Japan is a strategic partner of the Philippines; it is thus incumbent upon us to have continuous dialogue as we jointly face the changing dynamics of our regional security environment," he added. -Louis Bacani with AP

PNoy arrives in Japan, set to discuss China sea dispute By Louis Bacani (philstar.com) | Updated June 24, 2014 - 11:38am


President Benigno Aquino III arrives in Japan for his one-day working visit. Malacañang Photo Bureau Twitter account

MANILA, Philippines — President Benigno Aquino III is now in Japan to hold a summit meeting with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The Official Gazette announced in its Twitter account around 10:30 a.m. that the President has landed at the Haneda Airport in Tokyo for his one-day working visit.

Presidential Communications Operations Office head Herminio Coloma Jr. said the two leaders may talk about the ongoing territorial disputes of the two countries with China.

"[B]atid din natin na mayroon tayong kahawig na mga concerns hinggil sa freedom of navigation, freedom of aviation, patungkol naman sa ating maritime entitlements sa South China Sea at sila naman sa East China Sea. Kaya maraming pag-uusapan na topics of mutual interest ang dalawang lider," Coloma said in an interview with state-run dzRB.

In his pre-departure speech, Aquino did not specifically mention the sea disputes as part of his agenda, but he said he will discuss with Abe the important issues affecting both nations, including peace and prosperity in the region.

The President also stressed the need for greater cooperation and partnership between the Philippines and Japan.

"Sa ganitong tibay at lalim ng ugnayan ng Pilipinas at bansang Hapon, ipinaparamdam sa ating hindi tayo nag-iisa. Ang Japan nga po ang isa sa dalawang bansang mayroon tayong strategic partnership, at ito po’y talagang makabuluhan at kapaki-pakinabang para sa ating mga bansa. Sa ugnayan pong tulad nito, kailangan ang patuloy na konsultasyon sa isa’t isa upang lalo pang tumibay ang ating alyansa," Aquino said.

The Department of Foreign Affairs said Aquino and Abe will deliver their respective press statements at 1:25 p.m.

The two leaders are also expected to exchange views on humanitarian assistance and disaster response, maritime cooperation, promotion of trade and investments, people-to-people exchanges and the Mindanao peace process.

Aquino said he will also thank Abe and his nation for helping the Philippines in various areas.

"Hindi po tayo nakakalimot: Nang hagupitin tayo ng bagyong Yolanda noong nakaraang taon, bukod sa isa po sila sa mga bansang pinaka-unang nagbukas-palad sa atin, napakalaki din ng ipinagkaloob nila at patuloy pang ipinapaabot na tulong upang makabangon ang mga sinalanta nating kababayan," Aquino said.

After meeting with Abe, the President will deliver the keynote address at The Consolidation for Peace for Mindanao conference in Hiroshima organized by the Japan International Cooperation Agency and the Research and Education for Peace of the Universiti Sains Malaysia.

Aquino said he will be sharing the country's experience in the completion of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro and the next steps in attaining long-lasting peace in Mindanao.

Why Malaysia, unlike Philippines, keeps quiet on sea row By Camille Diola (philstar.com) | Updated June 25, 2014 - 1:18pm


Sundown over the South China Sea as seen from Malaysia's Kota Kinabalu. Tam Sadek/CC BY-ND

MANILA, Philippines — Malaysia also has overlapping claims with China on several coastal territories in the South China Sea, but it has a "broad consensus" with the Asian power.

This is what the Chinese Foreign Ministry claimed in its statement to the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday, answering queries on why Malaysia has been downplaying the sea row when its Southeast Asian neighbors like the Philippines and Vietnam have been outspoken against China's show of force in the maritime region.

"Malaysia and China have disputes in the South China Sea. But the two sides share broad consensus on appropriately handling the disputes issues," the Chinese agency said.

Asked to give a reaction on the matter, the Malaysia government did not respond to the US-based newspaper.

The Philippines' and Vietnam's rivalries with China have escalated the past year as Beijing started reclamation work in Philippine-claimed waters and put up two oil rigs in what Vietnam considers part of its maritime territory.

The Philippines has also lodged an arbitration case against China under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea--a move Beijing condemned as unneighborly.

Japan, meanwhile, was recently embroiled in a more heated rivalry with China over the East China Sea, with the row reaching its height in Chinese and Japanese military planes and ships almost colliding in the contested area.

Malaysia, on the other hand, has been more interested in furthering positive relations with China by avoiding making remarks and moves that may trigger Beijing's retaliation.

In a study for the US state department, envoy John Finkbeiner said Malaysia has lessened economic dependence on the US and strengthened trade relations with China.

"Malaysia appears to pursue a non-confrontational approach in the sovereignty dispute, which differs markedly compared to Vietnam and the Philippines," Finkbeiner said.

"The first pillar regards Malaysia’s firm commitment to increase its trade and investment ties with the world’s most dynamic economy in order to hedge its other strong economic ties, with the US in particular," he added.

Neither has Malaysia taken seriously Chinese projections and assertions in the South China Sea without beefing up its defense to avert future conflict.

Finkbeiner pointed out that Malaysia's military spending fell in 2009 and 2010 before slightly increasing in 2011, but levels remain unremarkable.

In comparison, the Philippines has heavily invested in military maritime capabilities as well as its Coast Guard the past years seeing Chinese domination in the strategic waterway a threat.

Malaysia, however, does not seem to completely bandwagon with China by maintaining strong military-to-military ties with the US and other Western powers, Finkbeiner said.

"Malaysia’s primary aim was to cultivate a regional balance of power and thus inhibit dominance by any single power," he explained. "Thus Malaysia helped further regional balance between the U.S. and China, much the same way it cultivated its own balance between the two powers."

Aquino spokesman hits back at China (philstar.com) | Updated June 27, 2014 - 9:46am


Presidential Spokesperson Edwin Lacierda, left, has responded to the statement of China Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying accusing the Philippines of stirring up tensions in disputed territories. China Foreign Ministry website/STAR file photo

MANILA, Philippines — Presidential Spokesperson Edwin Lacierda hit back at China after the Asian giant's foreign ministry accused the Philippines and Japan of stirring tensions in disputed waters.

In his Twitter account, Lacierda said China is guilty of the very thing of which it accuses the Philippines.

On Wednesday, China Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying criticized the meeting between President Benigno Aquino III and Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and urged the two nations to stop making trouble.

"It is our opinion that relevant countries should show sincerity and move towards the same direction with China, rather than deliberately stir up tension and bring additional complicated factors to the regional situation," Hua said.

The Chinese official was making a reaction to the statement of Aquino, who supported Abe's proposal to reinterpret Japan's constitution to allow its military to defend allies that come under attack.

China remains locked in a territorial dispute with Japan and the Philippines. While it keeps criticizing the two nations, it also continues to expand its military presence in the contested waters.

Earlier this week, the Chinese state media even showed a new map of China which includes an expanded claim in the South China Sea and has extended Beijing's maritime claims from the original nine-dash line to a ten-dash line.

But Malacañang belittled the newly unveiled map of China, saying it also violates the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

"To put it simply, dinrowing lang nila ‘yon. Lahat naman ng drawing na ‘yan ay na-supersede na ng UN Convention on the Law of the Sea," Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said in a press briefing yesterday. -Louis Bacani

FROM THE INQUIRER

West Philippine Sea China’s best shield vs US, paper says
By Nikko DizonPhilippine Daily Inquirer10:42 pm | Saturday, June 28th, 2014


Map showing the disputed areas in the West Philippine Sea (south China Sea), including the Spratlys Islands and Scarborough Shoal. AFP

MANILA, Philippines – The West Philippine Sea is China’s “natural shield” in the south, which will not only give it a strong defense against the United States, but will also provide food and energy security given the wealth of natural resources in the Reed Bank, according to a strategic assessment paper from the Development Academy of the Philippines.

The importance of the West Philippine Sea to China also explains its assertive claims to territories within the Philippines’ Kalayaan Island Group (KIG).

The West Philippine Sea is the name given by Manila to that part of the South China Sea that falls within the country’s exclusive economic zone under the United Nations Convention on the law of the Sea.

“The West Philippine Sea (WPS) is important as it is regarded as a natural shield of China’s security in the South. Having a strong foothold on the WPS would give China a strategic area of defense consisting of over 1,000 kilometers, the security implication of which is ‘incalculable’,” said the DAP paper titled, “Maintaining the Balance of Power and Increasing the Sphere of Influence over the West Philippine Sea: The China Track.”

The paper also noted that controlling the West Philippine Sea would “ensure the economic and political survival of the Communist Party.”

The West Philippine Sea is the part of South China Sea that is within the Philippines’ 320-kilometer exclusive economic zone.

Filipino military officers, who as students at the DAP Graduate School of Public Development and Management, came up with the 12-page strategic paper focusing on the West Philippine Sea problem through China’s lens last year. DAP provided the Philippine Daily Inquirer a copy of the paper.

On Friday, Chinese President Xi Jinping called for stronger frontier defenses on land and sea during a “national meeting” also attended by Prime Minister Li Keqiang and Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli, according to the official Xinhua news agency.

The DAP paper noted that an expert from China’s State Ocean Administration had pointed out that “the ocean has become an important area of contention for comprehensive national power and long-term strategic advantage.”

The DAP paper emphasized that having control of the South China Sea would “serve as a restraining factor” for the US 7th Fleet, whose area of responsibility covers 124 million square kilometers in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

“The United States has always intended to preserve its strong military presence in [the] West Pacific. Given this fact, Beijing feels that it must have a strong grip on the South China Sea to give themselves some space for strategic maneuvering,” the paper said.

China acknowledges its vulnerability both on land and sea, but “believes that any challenges to China’s territorial integrity and sovereignty in the future would mostly come from the ocean, including the West Philippine Sea,” the paper said.

“This is the reason why China has been developing its anti access/area denial (AA/AD) capability. In this context, China’s anti-access/area-denial forces increasingly overlap, providing multiple layers of offensive systems utilizing the sea, air, space, and cyber-space,” the paper added.

*The paper cited estimates from the US Energy Information Administration that the Spratlys seabed may hold up to 5.4 billion barrels of oil and 55.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, “much of it concentrated in Reed Bank,” also known as Recto Bank off Palawan province.

Aside from the natural gas and oil, the waters in the area are also home to the “richest fisheries in the world.”
“Experts say that the West Philippine Sea provides 25 percent of the protein needs of 500 million people; over 5 million tons of fish are hauled from the fisheries in the WPS each year—10 percent of the global fisheries catch—and five of the world’s top shrimp producers border the sea,” the paper said.

The paper also noted how China has looked down on the Philippines “as a small country with weak military capabilities.”

“Also, China considers the Philippines as nothing but a convenient market of cheap Chinese goods and services.

They perceive the Filipinos as a people who can easily be appeased by a gesture of goodwill after being offended,” the paper said.


china-world map
China’s latest published map shows its claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon. PHOTO sourced from China Daily/ANN


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE