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BY DEAN DELA PAZ: TRUMP'S BILLION-DOLLAR INHERITANCE


JANUARY 24 -It is no secret that American president Donald J. Trump had inherited an empire from his father which he had grown to what it is now is. From a row of apartments in New York City it now encompasses every point of the global compass. It is an empire Trump had eventually parlayed into a springboard to the most powerful position on the planet. Here we analyze a totally different kind that Trump likewise inherits. It has a value in the billions. Hopefully those values quickly fall. In his first week in office as the 45th president of the United States, Trump receives one of the worst presents a public official can get from another who, in his last days in office, in a paradoxically well-delivered valedictory, peddled the image of an economy brimming with progress, opportunity, strength and hope despite its administration’s latent rejection at the electoral polls just a few weeks before. As we can validate through our own experiences with Filipino politicians, solons and other scum, as well as in the hyperbolic speeches they deliver, however fiery, grand and eloquent, most dissertations are pure rhetoric if not political fiction. America’s departing president cannot be blamed for clinging on to imagery however debunked by the very environment surrounding the stage upon which he chose to deliver his final valedictory. Chicago, in the last eight years that he had been president is not exactly the city he envisioned since declaring his quest for the White House two full terms earlier. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Rey Arcilla - Philippines First


JANUARY 24 -REY ARCILLA
I BELIEVE it is a bit premature, if not unfair, for some segments of our society to urge President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong to “stay away” from US President Donald Trump whom they claim is more “alarming” than his predecessor because of his “in-your-face kind of imperialism”. In his inaugural address, Trump said: “From this moment on, it’s going to be only America First. America First. Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families.” I see nothing wrong with that. It’s nationalism, not imperialism! Isn’t that what is expected of any national leader? It is the same sentiment that Digong has been expressing from the start of his administration. In other words, “Philippines First”. I take that to mean that whatever decision Digong makes in our relations with the US or any other state from here on will be based solely on what will be best for our country and people. I trust him to do just that and am willing to give him time to prove it. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Ellen Tordesillas - A 'Tokhang' survivor seeks Supreme Court protection


JANUARY 27 -By Ellen Tordesillas HORROR stories about the Duterte administration’s Oplan Tokhang don’t get less appalling even if they have become a daily happening. The latest is the narration by a survivor, Efren Morillo of Payatas in Quezon City. Here are excerpts from the petition filed yesterday by Centerlaw before the Supreme Court for the issuance of the Writ of Amparo on behalf of the families of victims of a Tokhang operation carried out by the Quezon City Police District at Group 9, Area B, Payatas, Quezon City in August last year: “In the afternoon of 21 August 2016, Marcelo Daa Jr., Raffy Gabo, Anthony Comendo, Jessie Cule and Efren Morillo were in Daa’s house. Morillo was there to collect a debt from Daa, while Daa, Gabo, Comendo and Cule were passing time until their six o’ clock workshift in the evening as garbage collectors. “A little after one o’ clock in the afternoon, five men and two women in civilian clothes suddenly arrived. They entered the wooden gate and rushed inside the yard, startling Daa, Cule and Morillo, who were playing pool in a hut on one side. The men pulled out short firearms and aimed them at the latter. Gripped by fear, Daa, Cule and Morillo put up their hands in surrender. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Dahli Aspillera - Leni attacks, Bato amends
(Through what talent, skill, authority did Leni assign herself the right to tell people accomplished in their fields, to do what she wants them to do, to think for them. Ano ba accomplishments niya before Jesse? Sino ba siya before Jesse Robledo?)


JANUARY  26 -By Dahli Aspillera President Leni Robledo, through her spin meisters, is ordering former Senator Ferdinand Bongbong Marcos to stop “dreaming or hallucinating” that there was massive electoral fraud in the May 2016 polls. Leni thinks it is within her position to tell anyone what to think, say, do. How much more elegant if she just stayed quiet and let the authorities take over. Leni Robledo, likewise attacks again, telling the country’s President Duterte what he should do. Leni says that the President must kowtow to the CBCP. Leni sees it her right to is order the president to be obedient to the romano bishops, to stop criticizing the CBCP leaders, to behave. What business is it of Leni to tell the President what to do, especially since her persuasion about the CBCP is debatable. Unless her purpose is to gain points with the bishops’ votes? Who appointed the questionably-elected vice president to spew out orders and demand obeisance from others; dictate what anybody should think or say? Considering that these others are far more intellectual, experienced, smarter, and a heck of a lot more experienced, with political know-how than she? READ MORE...


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Trump’s billion- dollar inheritance

MANILA, JANUARY 30, 2017 (MALAYA) By DEAN DELA PAZ January 24, 2017 - It is no secret that American president Donald J. Trump had inherited an empire from his father which he had grown to what it is now is. From a row of apartments in New York City it now encompasses every point of the global compass. It is an empire Trump had eventually parlayed into a springboard to the most powerful position on the planet. Here we analyze a totally different kind that Trump likewise inherits. It has a value in the billions. Hopefully those values quickly fall.

In his first week in office as the 45th president of the United States, Trump receives one of the worst presents a public official can get from another who, in his last days in office, in a paradoxically well-delivered valedictory, peddled the image of an economy brimming with progress, opportunity, strength and hope despite its administration’s latent rejection at the electoral polls just a few weeks before.

As we can validate through our own experiences with Filipino politicians, solons and other scum, as well as in the hyperbolic speeches they deliver, however fiery, grand and eloquent, most dissertations are pure rhetoric if not political fiction.

America’s departing president cannot be blamed for clinging on to imagery however debunked by the very environment surrounding the stage upon which he chose to deliver his final valedictory. Chicago, in the last eight years that he had been president is not exactly the city he envisioned since declaring his quest for the White House two full terms earlier.

READ MORE...

Against his predecessor, Barack Hussein Obama ran on a platform of change. Change did indeed come to Chicago, Obama’s adopted hometown. Racial gang violence reigns in Chicago. It is a self-declared haven for illegal immigrants and its officials openly defy the law by refusing to impose its provisions, basing their defiance on a warped sense of politically partisan popularity. The city’s society thus worsened, random killings escalated and its peace and order situation quickly deteriorated inside eight years -- ugly realities one would think did not exist given the rose-colored rhetoric of Obama’s valedictory, the applause of his diehard followers and the America he imagined he was passing on to Donald Trump.

The profoundly dark realities of Chicago versus the rosy picture of the American economy that Obama painted is perhaps another eloquent testimony to validate the reasons Hillary Clinton lost to Trump as opposed to the various others both Clinton and Obama stubbornly blame.

The first culprits blamed were the wishy-washy indiscretions of the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation regarding investigations into potentially criminal security breaches by Clinton. Another culprit pursued by a lackluster and losing presidential candidate lucky to get a single digit fraction of the electoral votes was the physical integrity of counting machines in less than a handful of key states. Then they pounced on the validity of the electoral system against the number of popular votes even where that question had been settled long before. Now they are blaming the Russians.

In each, both the numbers derived from their protestations, or the absence of definitive evidence to found their accusations favor Trump’s mandate, even further widening it in some cases.

To determine the credibility of Trump’s mandate, in view of the economy he inherits, let us conduct an inventory of the liabilities inherited from Obama.

Let us start with gross domestic productivity (GDP).

The lowest GDP growth rate was in the Truman administration immediately following World War II. The growth rate then of 1.7 percent was understandable coming as it did from an economy that focused resources on the war effort rather than productivity.

The highest growth was registered during the Johnson years at 5.3 percent following the Kennedy administration’s 4.3 percent, both considered economic renaissance periods. The lowest ever was posted by the Obama administration at 1.5 percent for the two periods he was president. Admittedly, Obama inherited challenges from his predecessor. The previous Bush administration had however registered a growth rate of 2.1 percent way higher than Obama’s.

Other economic indices simply validated the tanking of the GDP growth rates under Obama. Directly relevant to Clinton’s loss at the electoral polls, these impact on voting constituencies more than accusations of Russian influences.

In 2008, the civilian labor force participation rate was approximately 66.25 percent. This fell to 65.75 percent when Obama took over. Unfortunately, from there it slid, only once significantly rising in 2010, but generally crashing for the most part to a sliver over 64 percent. For the electorate this means that under Obama a good third was out of the labor force.

Other economic indices signified similar destitution. The number under the poverty line grew by 17 percent. Median household income stayed petrified during Obama’s eight-year period. The number dependent on state subsidies remained unchanged.

All told, these are the billion dollar liabilities Trump inherits from Obama’s failures.


Philippines First By Rey O. Arcilla January 24, 2017


REY ARCILLA


I BELIEVE it is a bit premature, if not unfair, for some segments of our society to urge President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong to “stay away” from US President Donald Trump whom they claim is more “alarming” than his predecessor because of his “in-your-face kind of imperialism”.

In his inaugural address, Trump said:
“From this moment on, it’s going to be only America First. America First. Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families.”

I see nothing wrong with that. It’s nationalism, not imperialism! Isn’t that what is expected of any national leader?

It is the same sentiment that Digong has been expressing from the start of his administration. In other words, “Philippines First”.

I take that to mean that whatever decision Digong makes in our relations with the US or any other state from here on will be based solely on what will be best for our country and people. I trust him to do just that and am willing to give him time to prove it.

READ MORE...

***

Trump also said:
“The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”

Doesn’t that sound familiar too? Digong said something in a similar vein during his inauguration or at least on several occasions.

Before Digong, this country has been ruled by the privileged few – the oligarchs, the elite, the big businessmen, the political dynasties, the “trapos”, ad nauseam, whose only aim has been to promote and protect their personal interests – to the detriment of the vast number of the underprivileged in our midst.

Further, Trump said in his inaugural address:
“For too many of our citizens, a different reality exists: Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; an education system, flush with cash, but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of knowledge; and the crime and gangs and drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential.”

Familiar? You bet! Particularly the last one which Digong has been addressing with great intensity knowing that the very future of the nation depends on it.

***

With the two seeming to operate on the same wave length, there is a good chance Trump will deal with the Philippines fair and square. That could result, hopefully, in better relations with the most powerful nation in the world, ultimately benefiting all the segments of our society.

As Digong has been saying on numerous occasions, an independent foreign policy does not mean ditching old friends for new ones. What it means is improving existing relations and at the same time cultivating other ties – both geared toward promoting and protecting our own national interests. No more, no less.

***

I didn’t know that the US has a federal law barring former military service members who have been out of uniform for less than seven years from holding the defense portfolio?

On his first day in office, Trump had to sign a bill passed by the US Congress granting his nominee for secretary of defense, General James Mattis who retired in 2013, a one-time exception from the law before he could be confirmed by the US Senate.

The law is intended to preserve civilian authority over or, control of, the military.

I believe it is a good law and our Congress should consider passing one.

***

Digong has asked the Catholic Church hierarchy (there are really good ones in its ranks, I’m sure) what it has done or, for that matter, is doing to help in his war against illegal drugs.

A fair question, if you ask me.

Isn’t the Church supposed to minister to the poor and the downtrodden? Isn’t that one of Christ’s teachings?

Instead of criticizing Digong’s sincere efforts to fight the drug menace which has now engulfed ninety percent of our barangays, shouldn’t it be asking how it can help solve the problem?

No one could put it more succinctly and in plain language than Digong himself. Here is what he said:
“May isang simbahan pa roon ipinapakita ‘yung mga extrajudicial. Anong ginawa ng simbahan? Kayong simbahan ng Katoliko. Milyon ang kita ninyo linggo-linggo all throughout the Philippines, karaming simbahan. Saan ang pera ng tao?

“Kami, ‘yung pera namin, ine-explain namin sa tao. Kayo? Kayong mga pari, mga Obispo. Ang gaganda ng suot ninyo, mga kotse. Meron ba kayong isang bahay lang maski limang kwarto para rehab? Anong ginawa niyo sa simbahan ninyo?

“Nagbibilang kayo ng pera instead of going around the neighborhoods explaining to the people why they should not be in that industry because they will die. [Ngayon] gusto ninyong matapos ang patayan? All you have to do is to preach kasi karamihan dito Katoliko.

“Kung mahusay ka na pari, ipaintindi mo, ‘Mamamatay ka. Umalis ka sa droga.’ Eh di nakakatulong pa kayo. Hindi instead na maghintay kayo na may namatay na, you criticize the police, you criticize me. For what? Kayo ‘yung may mga pera eh.”

***

Of the many sins of commission and omission of the Noynoy Aquino administration, I believe the worst is the unnecessary loss of the lives of 44 gallant members of the PNP Special Action Force in the so-called Mamasapano Massacre two years ago.

It will be recalled that both the investigations conducted by the PNP and the Senate concluded that Aquino was ultimately responsible for the gruesome incident.

It is only proper that a resolution of the case be arrived at before it goes the way of the so-called Maguindanao massacre of 58 people more than seven years ago without justice being rendered to the victims and their families up to now.

In reviving the case, Digong said he has only one question:
“Akin lang is bakit hindi pinapasok ‘yung – sa Awang, sa Davao City, Gen San – bakit hindi tinawag ‘yung air assets?... Karaming helicopter diyan… Bakit hindi ninyo tinawag ang AFP Chief of Staff, ang Tactical Operations Group of the Philippine Air Force?... Iyon lang.”

***

Today is the 272ndday of the tenth year of Jonas Burgos’ enforced disappearance.

The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will not be part of the continuing cover-up. The Burgos family implores Digong to haul the perpetrators to justice and bring Jonas back home even with the appointment of Gen. Eduardo Ano as AFP chief who was implicated in the abduction of Jonas almost ten years ago.

***
From an internet friend:
Why do strokes often happen in the bathroom?

This was written by by a UiTM Professor with the national sports board. He has been advising people not to wet the head and hair first when showering as this is the wrong sequence. This causes the body to adjust its temperature too quickly because we are warm-blooded. By performing this incorrect sequence, blood rushing up to the head may cause capillary or artery breakage, hence, a stroke and a fall. The way to shower is to start wetting the body from the feet up to the shoulders slowly. A sensation of vapor coming out of the crown on the head or bristling of body hair may be felt for some people. Follow this procedure then shower as usual. This is especially useful for people with high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even migraine.
Please share, it could save a life!


Tokhang survivor seeks Supreme Court protection By Ellen Tordesillas January 27, 2017


By Ellen Tordesillas

HORROR stories about the Duterte administration’s Oplan Tokhang don’t get less appalling even if they have become a daily happening.

The latest is the narration by a survivor, Efren Morillo of Payatas in Quezon City.

Here are excerpts from the petition filed yesterday by Centerlaw before the Supreme Court for the issuance of the Writ of Amparo on behalf of the families of victims of a Tokhang operation carried out by the Quezon City Police District at Group 9, Area B, Payatas, Quezon City in August last year:

“In the afternoon of 21 August 2016, Marcelo Daa Jr., Raffy Gabo, Anthony Comendo, Jessie Cule and Efren Morillo were in Daa’s house. Morillo was there to collect a debt from Daa, while Daa, Gabo, Comendo and Cule were passing time until their six o’ clock workshift in the evening as garbage collectors.

“A little after one o’ clock in the afternoon, five men and two women in civilian clothes suddenly arrived. They entered the wooden gate and rushed inside the yard, startling Daa, Cule and Morillo, who were playing pool in a hut on one side. The men pulled out short firearms and aimed them at the latter. Gripped by fear, Daa, Cule and Morillo put up their hands in surrender.

READ MORE...

“The armed men handcuffed Daa and Morillo. They pulled electric wire from the ceiling of the hut which they used to tie Cule’s hands. They fetched Gabo and Comendo who were at the hammock at the back of the house and also tied their hands with electric wire. Then, they made Daa, Morillo, Cule, Gabo and Comendo sit side by side on a bench. The whole time, the armed men kept accusing the five captives of being involved in illegal drugs. Realizing that the armed men are policemen, Daa, Morillo, Cule, Gabo and Comendo piteously protested their innocence of any crime.

“The armed men entered the house. Cowering inside were Marcelo Daa Jr.’s live-in partner, Maribeth Bartolay, and also his Aunt Ising. The armed men proceeded to ransack the house, rummaging through personal effects and furniture. They took a cellphone and tablet device they found therein. They forced Maribeth to take off her silver necklace and rings and hand these over to them. They also took Marcelo’s collection of metals which the latter painstakingly acquired by scavenging. All the while, the armed men were laughing and mocking Maribeth and Ising: “Ilabas ‘nyo na ‘yung Pokemon! Saan mo ba nilagay ‘yung Pokemon?”

“The armed men emerged from the house carrying silver foil and a lighter in the shape of a gun. They crowed to Daa, Morillo, Cule, Gabo and Comendo that the items prove the latter’s involvement in illegal drugs. The five captives fervently denied owning the said items.

“The armed men hustled Daa, Morillo, Cule, Gabo and Comendo to the back of the house. One of the armed men took Daa and Morillo to a makeshift room at the back connected to the house, but whose two walls are missing. One opening leads to a ravine about three meters away. The armed man made Daa sit on a wooden chair and Morillo on the arm rest thereof. Then, without warning, he pointed his firearm at Morillo and shot him on the chest. Morillo fell to the ground bleeding, but he did not lose consciousness. Next, the armed man shot Daa, who fell to the ground beside Morillo. Daa was shot a second time on the head as he lay on the ground. He died.

“Lying beside Daa, Morillo played dead. When the armed man left the room, Morillo crawled out of the opening and onto the edge of the ravine. Pressing one hand over his bleeding chest, he slid down the ravine and landed on the bank of a stream at the bottom thereof. Morillo crossed the stream, trudged up the hill on the other side and walked until he reached the highway. There, providentially, he encountered an acquaintance who was the barker of a jeepney. The latter and the jeepney driver took pity on him and acceded to his request to be brought to a hospital near his home in Montalban, Rizal.

“Morillo was brought to the Montalban Infirmary in Kasiglahan Village, Rodriguez, Rizal. Unfortunately, there was no doctor on duty at the infirmary so that only first aid could be applied to his chest wound. Moreover, personnel at the infirmary reported his condition of being shot to policemen at the Community Police Action Center (COMPAC) near thereat.

“Policemen from the COMPAC went to the infirmary to see Morillo. At the latter’s behest, the policemen went to Morillo’s house in San Isidro, Montalban, Rizal to inform his mother, Victoria Morillo about what happened and take her back with them to the infirmary.

“Morillo recounted to the Montalban policemen the attack against him and his friends earlier that afternoon by policemen in Quezon City. But much to his alarm the Montalban policemen insisted that they turn him over to Quezon City Police Station 6, whose area of responsibility includes Bgy. Payatas, the place of the incident.

“Morillo pleaded not to be handed over to Station 6, insisting that he did not commit any crime and that in fact he is a victim himself. He was terrified when he realized the likelihood that the policemen who shot him and killed Daa, Cule, Gabo and Comendoare assigned at the said station. Despite his pleas, the Montalban policemen loaded Morillo in an ambulance and brought him to Quezon City Police Station 6 in Bgy. Batasan Hills, Quezon City. The only concession given him was the company of his mother Victoria in the ambulance.

“Morillo arrived by ambulance at Quezon City Police Station 6 at nine o’ clock in the evening. There he was made to wait indefinitely, the policemen unmindful of his serious wound. Morillo slipped in and out of consciousness as he lay on the ambulance stretcher. At one point, he heard a voice say: “Matibay ang bata na ‘yan. Alas tres pa may tama na, hanggang ngayon buhay pa.”

“Finally, after many pleas by his mother Victoria, the policemen transported Morillo to East Avenue Medical Center. Morillo was shot at three o’ clock in the afternoon but because the Montalban police foot-dragged in taking him to the hospital, he only received proper medical attention at around midnight, or nine hours later.

“Morillo survived his gunshot wound and recuperated at the East Avenue Medical Center. However, his fear for his life did not ebb because during the whole ten (10) days that he was confined at the hospital, policemen from QCPD Police Station 6 kept him captive in his hospital room.Thankfully, officials from the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) later on arrived and rescued him from the said policemen.

“Marilyn Malimban, the live-in partner of one of the victims Jessie Cule, also fears that the policemen who killed Jessie and his friends would come back and harm her. Her fears are grounded on facts because during the wake of Jessie in their residence at Area B, Group 7, Sto. Nino, Bgy. Payatas, some unidentified men arrived. From inside the house, Marilyn heard them ask her landlady: “Sino rito ang asawa ng namatay?” She went inside her room and stayed there until the men left.

“A few days after the killings, a television reporter of GMA 7, Jay Taruc, and his crew visited the place of the incident in Area B, Group 9, Bgy. Payatas and sought to interview witnesses. However, No one agreed to speak with him or even come near him because unbeknownst to him, the police escort he took with him to the area is PO3 Allan Formilleza, one of the policemen involved in the killings. All the members of the community were terror-stricken at the sudden appearance of Formilleza that day.

“In the afternoon of 27 October 2016, three policemen involved in the killings – PO3 Allan Formilleza, PO1 James Aggarao and PO1 Melchor Navisaga – again went to the Daa residence in Area B, Group 9, Bgy. Payatas. Marla Daa, the younger sister of one of the victims Marcelo Daa, Jr., was home alone at that time. Brazenly and without asking for permission, Formilleza, Aggarao and Navisaga entered the gate and started taking videos of the whole compound and house. One of them was even carrying an M-16 Armalite rifle. Despite her profound fear, Marla mustered the courage to ask: “Bakit kayo nagvi-video?” The three ignored her. After several minutes, they left.

“Again in the afternoon of 22 November 2016, one of the policemen involved in the killing was spotted in the area. The said policeman got out of a vehicle and went to the store near the road. He asked the owner of the store, Nica: “Saandito may bentahan ng droga?” Recognizing the man as one of the killers, Nica replied: ‘Walana nga e, pinagpapatay ‘nyona.’ The policeman did not answer and simply walked away.”

Respondents in the petition include the PNP itself, represented by PNP Chief Ronald dela Ros; PSSupt. Guillermo Lorenzo T. Eleazar, QCPD director; P/Supt. Lito Patay, QCPD PS 6 Station Commander; P/SI Emil S. Garcia; PO3 Allan Formilleza; PO1 James Aggarao and PO1 Melchor Navisaga and/or any of their agents.

With the help of the CHR and Centerlaw, Efren Morillo, Martino Morillo, Victoria Morillo, Ma. Belen Daa, Marla Daa, Maribeth Bartolay, Lydia Gabo, Jennifer Nicolas and Marilyn Malimban, mustered enough courage to bring the police officers to the court.

Centerlaw’s Romel Bagares said the “This Petition for the issuance of the Writ of Amparo is the Petitioners and aggrieved parties’ cry for help and protection against further violation of their constitutional and human rights to life, liberty and security.”


Leni attacks, Bato amends By Dahli Aspillera January 25, 2017 VICE


By Dahli Aspillera

President Leni Robledo, through her spin meisters, is ordering former Senator Ferdinand Bongbong Marcos to stop “dreaming or hallucinating” that there was massive electoral fraud in the May 2016 polls. Leni thinks it is within her position to tell anyone what to think, say, do. How much more elegant if she just stayed quiet and let the authorities take over.

Leni Robledo, likewise attacks again, telling the country’s President Duterte what he should do. Leni says that the President must kowtow to the CBCP. Leni sees it her right to is order the president to be obedient to the romano bishops, to stop criticizing the CBCP leaders, to behave. What business is it of Leni to tell the President what to do, especially since her persuasion about the CBCP is debatable. Unless her purpose is to gain points with the bishops’ votes?

Who appointed the questionably-elected vice president to spew out orders and demand obeisance from others; dictate what anybody should think or say? Considering that these others are far more intellectual, experienced, smarter, and a heck of a lot more experienced, with political know-how than she?


LENI TELLS DUTERTE: RESPECT THE CHURCH AND CRITICS GMA NEWS

Through what talent, skill, authority did Leni assign herself the right to tell people accomplished in their fields, to do what she wants them to do, to think for them. Ano ba accomplishments niya before Jesse? Sino ba siya before Jesse Robledo?

READ MORE...

Marcos has questioned Robredo’s victory before the PET of the Supreme Court, saying that he was robbed of some three million votes because of a cheating scheme allegedly masterminded by the previous administration. Marcos lost his vice presidential bid to Robredo by just 263,473 votes.

Comelec spokesman James Jimenez said that the claims of the Marcos camp “appear to be speculative in character, and are consistent with [Comelec] theory.”

Jimenez refused to explain the data appearing on the unused SD cards, citing the sub judice rule, because the case remains pending before the Presidential Electoral Tribunal of the Supreme Court. He also said it would be premature to interpret the alleged data found in the SD cards since the decryption process remains ongoing. “The most prudent course of action now is to await the result of the decrypting process.”

***


BATO DELA ROSA

“I want to melt in shame...I am very offended, sorry that this crime happened and those involved are my people. If I have my way, I will kill you policemen involved. But I cannot do that.”

This was PNP chief Ronald “Bato” de la Rosa’s reaction to news that a Korean kidnapped and killed inside his Camp Crame. He was very offended with what happened to Hanjin executive Korean Jee Ick Joo, who was abducted in October last year.

One of the accused revealed that the businessman was strangled and killed inside the camp by officer Sta. Isabel. The PNP chief said he had to explain to South Korean officials what happened.

Like I wrote in my recent column, it is inevitable that there are a few criminals among the many good policemen. By the law of average, there will always be a few Ninja types among the 170,000 Filipino policemen. A few would be corrupt. These few would kidnap for ransom, kotong, murder. Even in religious schools, a few seminarians become criminal priests. In the PNP, they are weeded out, prosecuted, incarcerated.

PNP Chief Director General Ronald “Bato” de laRosa is as efficient, honest and hardworking as one can find anywhere around here. He cannot help it that a few bad apples got allowed into the PNP organization. These few Ninja cops were raised badly by somebody else with inferior values, other than the PNP.

Two or four or six criminal Ninja cops out of 170,000 righteous law enforcers cannot be blamed on De la Rosa. Those bad cops’ blood is not his blood. He did not give them their genes, cannot take responsibility for their conduct.


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