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BY ALAN ROBLES: MARCOS BURIAL LACKED MILITARY GRANDEUR, COMPLAINS RENEGADE LOYALIST


NOVEMBER 21 -ALAN ROBLES Last week's quick and secretive burial of Ferdinand Marcos at the Heroes' Cemetery was a "bangkay blitz" that lacked "military grandeur," a loyalist military renegade denounced.
"It was disappointing, it didn't do justice to our great leader," shouted former Colonel Bert Dugo, who served in the military during Martial Law. "You know," he revealed to some reporters whom he was threatening at gunpoint, "I actually drew up a burial plan for the late president but the family never used it." Dugo said his ceremony would have been "magnificent" with "thousands of soldiers marching in a long column to honor Our Great Leader." "The coffin would have been mounted on a flatbed truck, with former Defense Secretary Juan Ponce Enrile standing at attention for hours." He admitted he hadn't consulted Enrile about his planned role. READ MORE...

ALSO: By E. Tordesillas - The public’s right to know about the President’s health


NOVEMEBR 23 -President Duterte’s absence in two traditional events in the 2017 summit of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation or APEC once again raises the need for Malacañang to inform the public of the health of the 71-year-old chief executive. We know it’s a sensitive subject for Duterte but the public’s concern is valid and recognized by the Constitutional provision of “the right of the people to information on matters of public concern.” Section 12 of Art. VII states that, “In case of serious illness of the President, the public shall be informed of the state of his health." Malacañang may say that the President has no “serious illness.” Fine. A medical bulletin would put a stop to rumors going around about the President’s health. In Lima, Peru, Duterte told reporters that the reason for his absence in the gala dinner Saturday and the group photo on Sunday was jet lag. ““Alam mo kung bakit? Jet lag.Hindi naman ano but lightheaded because exactly at that time that’s my sleeping time back home in the Philippines. Talagang ang mata ko hindi ko mapigilan minsan and even as I was listening to the others, magsasara yung mata ko. Sabi ko mag-uwi na lang muna ako.” READ MORE...

ALSO By Robert Labayen - Who are your heroes? What are your values?


NOVEMBER 17 -By Robert Labayen:  Culture is the best teacher.
Culture is the sum of what we believe in, who we look up to, what we value and what we do every day. We can tell a culture’s values by the people and deeds it honors. That’s why we have busts and monuments. We use actual people to represent our ideals because it is better to understand the actions of a real person than the fundamentals of a concept. History has proven that ideologies must have a face in order to be relatable. Communism in Asia had Mao Tse-Tung, African-American Civil Rights had Martin Luther King, Jr., non-violent protest had Mahatma Gandhi, compassion had Mother Teresa, Catholicism has Pope Francis. If you believe in the Bible, even God had to present Himself in the human form of Jesus. Although some religions think that the Catholic Church’s way of honoring saints is a form of idolatry, I believe Catholics know how to build a culture through heroes and stories. (I think, however, that the saints in their robes look too ancient. I hope there’s a way to “humanize” them some more. ) A leader should know that there’s something more important than his competence and managing skills. READ MORE...


ALSO: TEDITORIAL - Who is there left to trust?


NOVEMBER 25 -SCREENGRAB: TED LOCSIN JR
WATCH VIDEO.....


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OPINION: Marcos burial lacked military grandeur, complains renegade loyalist


NOVEMBER 21 -ALAN ROBLES

MANILA, NOVEMBER 28, 2016 (ABS-CBN) Alan Robles Posted at Nov 21 2016 07:52 PM - Last week's quick and secretive burial of Ferdinand Marcos at the Heroes' Cemetery was a "bangkay blitz" that lacked "military grandeur," a loyalist military renegade denounced.

"It was disappointing, it didn't do justice to our great leader," shouted former Colonel Bert Dugo, who served in the military during Martial Law.

"You know," he revealed to some reporters whom he was threatening at gunpoint, "I actually drew up a burial plan for the late president but the family never used it."

Dugo said his ceremony would have been "magnificent" with "thousands of soldiers marching in a long column to honor Our Great Leader."

"The coffin would have been mounted on a flatbed truck, with former Defense Secretary Juan Ponce Enrile standing at attention for hours."

He admitted he hadn't consulted Enrile about his planned role.

READ MORE...


GOOGLED PHOTO -Ferdinand Marcos salutes military during martial law

The renegade colonel said, following the first truck would be another flatbed which would have former First Lady Imelda Marcos standing in an armor-plated terno and singing her beloved immortal songs such as "Feelings."

"It would have been just 'Feelings' actually, that's the only thing she can croak," the colonel said.

He explained that when Mrs Marcos exhausted herself from singing, the truck's loudspeakers would play recorded screams of Martial Law torture victims.

"There would have been no difference between that and her singing."

The military renegade said there would be a third vehicle, a large golden container truck painted with dollar signs.

"That would represent the Marcos billions, just to show what the Filipinos lost when they drove away the family."

"It would have been beautiful."

Waving his pistol, Dugo shouted, "I know what you're going to ask next, what about security? I also had a plan for that."

"Before the funeral parade started, I would have launched drones to recon the route. If they found angry protesters, that would be the signal for my backup plan to ensure a peaceful ceremony."

"Attack helicopters would zoom in, launching rockets to peacefully disperse the crowd. Then light armor from the mechanized battalion would smash through any resistance, followed by APCs with infantry to repel deadly threats such as young demonstrators shouting bad words and waving dangerous lethal-type signs."

The colonel said that "once the route was secure, the funeral procession would proceed peacefully; the body would be buried and to secure the grave against unauthorized trespassers, I would have built a defensive position with barbed wire and artillery positions - I would have called it Firebase Ferdie."

"From that secure area, my forces would have conducted mopping up operations against UN human rights investigators."

Asked if the military would have actually conducted such an operation, he shouted "of course! don't you know the military loves Marcos?"

When asked about his background Col. Dugo said he had commanded a composite task force called the "Torture Everybody Command" and had been forced to retire "because of some incident involving a lot of bodies that couldn't be found."


The public’s right to know about the President’s health Ellen T. Tordesillas
Posted at Nov 23 2016 02:41 AM | Updated as of Nov 23 2016 02:46 AM

President Duterte’s absence in two traditional events in the 2017 summit of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation or APEC once again raises the need for Malacañang to inform the public of the health of the 71-year-old chief executive.
We know it’s a sensitive subject for Duterte but the public’s concern is valid and recognized by the Constitutional provision of “the right of the people to information on matters of public concern.”

Section 12 of Art. VII states that, “In case of serious illness of the President, the public shall be informed of the state of his health."

Malacañang may say that the President has no “serious illness.” Fine. A medical bulletin would put a stop to rumors going around about the President’s health.

In Lima, Peru, Duterte told reporters that the reason for his absence in the gala dinner Saturday and the group photo on Sunday was jet lag.

““Alam mo kung bakit? Jet lag.Hindi naman ano but lightheaded because exactly at that time that’s my sleeping time back home in the Philippines. Talagang ang mata ko hindi ko mapigilan minsan and even as I was listening to the others, magsasara yung mata ko. Sabi ko mag-uwi na lang muna ako.”

READ MORE...

(You know why? Jet lag. It’s not really lightheaded because exactly at that time that’s my sleeping time back home in the Philippines. I really cannot control my eyes and even when I’m listening to others, my eyes close. So I said, I’ll go home first.)

If his skipping the dinner afforded him the chance to sleep, it’s a puzzle why he was not able to make it to the group photo session Sunday afternoon. The photo of the Leaders in the host country’s native attire is the picture that symbolizes APEC unity for that particular year.

All the 20 countries were represented by their highest official in the photo session except the Philippines that was represented by a Cabinet member - Foreign Secretary Perfecto Yasay.

Yasay must have been elated but how about the other leaders, especially the host, Peru President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski?

Former President Fidel V. Ramos said the gala dinner could have been an opportunity for Duterte to exchange ideas with world leaders which could be helpful for the country in the future.

It was not the first time that Duterte skipped a scheduled meeting in a Leaders Summit. He was a no-show at the ASEAN- United States meeting during the 2016 ASEAN summit in Laos last September. Presidential Adviser Jesus Dureza said the President ''was not feeling."

Back in Manila, Duterte said the real reason he did not attend the meeting was he does “not like the Americans.”

During the campaign in February, Duterte skipped a forum with doctors when he suffered migraine.

Duterte is overly sensitive about questions concerning his health. Last July, he went ballistic when a reporter asked for his medical report. His reply was to ask the reporter how the vagina of his wife smelled.

The foul retort runs counter to his claim of transparency in his governance. He even issued an executive order on Freedom of Information (FOI) that will take effect on Nov. 25.

A post-Peru trip medical bulletin would underscore the effectiveness of his FOI order.


OPINION: Who are your heroes? What are your values? Robert Labayen Posted at Nov 17 2016 01:23 PM


Robert Labayen

Culture is the best teacher.

Culture is the sum of what we believe in, who we look up to, what we value and what we do every day.

We can tell a culture’s values by the people and deeds it honors. That’s why we have busts and monuments. We use actual people to represent our ideals because it is better to understand the actions of a real person than the fundamentals of a concept.

History has proven that ideologies must have a face in order to be relatable. Communism in Asia had Mao Tse-Tung, African-American Civil Rights had Martin Luther King, Jr., non-violent protest had Mahatma Gandhi, compassion had Mother Teresa, Catholicism has Pope Francis. If you believe in the Bible, even God had to present Himself in the human form of Jesus.

Although some religions think that the Catholic Church’s way of honoring saints is a form of idolatry, I believe Catholics know how to build a culture through heroes and stories. (I think, however, that the saints in their robes look too ancient. I hope there’s a way to “humanize” them some more. )

A leader should know that there’s something more important than his competence and managing skills.

READ MORE...

What really makes a leader are the vision and the values he champions. Several studies have already shown that people perform better when they find their work meaningful.

When I was young, I saw an office poster that said “An employee works 8 hours for a good pay, 10 hours for a good boss and 24 hours for a good cause." In the book The Leadership Challenge, James Kouzes and Barry Posner cited studies by McGill University’s Prof. Henry Mintzberg in which he found that employees want to feel like they belong to something. They could belong to a good cause.

In a TED talk, author Simon Sinek said that “great leaders inspire action” when they make us “know why we’re doing what we’re doing."

The famous Think Different commercial by Apple honored some of the world’s radical thinkers or whom they called “the crazy ones” who “push the human race forward.” These became the heroes of people who use Apple and maybe, Apple employees, too. I read somewhere Steve Jobs described Apple employees as people excited to get up in the morning because they know they are helping make the world a better place.

A leader must also remember that he stands on the shoulders of those who came before him. It is good, therefore, to respect the virtues and principles that past leaders have advocated because past generations have already invested so much in these ideals.

Once in a while from out of the blue, we are given leaders whose values don’t resonate with ours. When this happens, let us try not to forget who we really are. A new leader’s beliefs and behavior may set a new norm. Or they may impose on us morals we can’t agree with. If we are discerning, a good culture can outlast a bad leader.

Culture is the best teacher. That’s how values are passed from generation to generation. That’s how our behaviors become instinctive. We don’t need a policy or a law to know what’s right and what’s wrong, what’s good and what’s evil.
--------
If you have concerns about your job or if you wish to suggest a topic, you may email me at rglabayen@gmail.com
Read more about ExecuTips on www.robertlabayen.com
About the Author:
Robert Labayen spent 22 years in advertising prior to joining ABS-CBN in 2004. He was VP-Creative Director at Saatchi & Saatchi and Executive Creative Director at J. Walter Thompson, two of the country's leading ad agencies. He is currently the Head of Creative Communications Management at ABS-CBN. His job involves inspiring people to be their best. He is a writer, painter and songwriter.


OPINION: Who is there left to trust? ABS-CBN News Posted at Nov 26 2016 04:38 AM

Watch also in iWantv or TFC.tv
Teddy Locsin Jr. talks about mistrust and uncertainties as the country grapples with the drug problem. – ANC, The World Tonight, November 25, 2016

 
http://news.abs-cbn.com/video/opinions/11/25/16/opinion-who-is-there-left-to-trust


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