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EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full news commentary)
FROM MALAYA BUSINESS INSIGHT

BY NESTOR MATA: DUTERTE's FIRST 100 DAYS
(“President Duterte is a master tactician, and he knows exactly what he is doing”. This is how Jose Alejandrino, former presidential assistant on economic affairs under former President Fidel V. Ramos, and former general manager of the defunct newspaper Manila Chronicle, deciphered President Duterte in a Facebook post.)


OCTOBER 8 -PRESIDENT Rodrigo Roa Duterte’s achievements during his first 100 days in office were listed down not by Malacañang’s information office but by a concerned netizen “to open the eyes of some people blinded by their hatred of President to see the plain truth.” The President did not stop in doing his job, despite of the controversies he faced ever since he assumed the presidency, according to netizen Josephine Quino, who shared her list. And her fellow netizens noted that the first 100 days of the Duterte administration was more productive than those of past administrations. The list of Duterte’s 55 accomplishments prepared by Quino cited his war against illegal drugs and crime, which exposed the involvement of local executives, police generals, judges and other top government officials in the drug trade; the surrender of almost 700,000 drug addicts, drug pushers and prosecution of drug lords; the closure of so many illegal drug labs all over the country and the seizure of billions worth of drugs seized in the anti-drug operations; and the crackdown on the illegal drug trade at the New Bilibid Prison ; and the involvement of Senator Leila de Lima in it. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Dahli Aspillera - P50 to a greenback?


OCTOBER 10 -By Dahli Aspillera
the House economic affairs committee tells us. “A weak peso is good for our exporters who earn in dollars. It is also beneficial to our overseas workers and their families here. It is likewise helpful to our booming and highly labor-intensive outsourcing sector that generates income in dollars. “As long as the peso’s decline is driven by market forces, and the drop is not too big and not too sudden, it is generally favorable to the country,” he said. The peso is now hovering at seven-year lows, closing Friday at 48.23 to the greenback. “It is foolish to attribute the peso’s recent weakness to the purported political volatility created by President Duterte’s outbursts against Western powers,” Pimentel said. The lawmaker pointed out that two weeks before Duterte assumed office, the chief economist at the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) actually released a report projecting that the peso would likely hit 50 to a dollar before the end of 2016, as the US Federal Reserve prepares to start raising interest rates. READ MORE...

ALSO: By E. Tordesillas - Wow, Agot Isidro! (Duterte 100 days)


OCTOBER 10 -By Ellen Tordesillas
I HAVE always liked Agot Isidro – her lovely face, her intelligent acting and the dignified manner she conducts herself in showbusiness. Her Facebook post last Friday – the 100th day of the Duterte presidency- made me admire her more. This post by Agot has gone viral liked by 24,000 and shared by 7,836: “Unang-una, walang umaaway sa iyo. As a matter of fact, ikaw ang nang-aaway. “Pangalawa, yung bansa Kung saan ka inuluklok ng 16 million out of 100+ million people ay Third World. Kung makapagsalita ka parang superpower and pilipinas eh. At excuse me, ayaw namin magutom. Mag-isa ka na Lang. wag kang mandamay. Hindi na nga nakakain ang nakararami, gugutumin mo pa lalo. “Pangatlo, may kilala along psychiatrist. Patingin ka. Hindi ka bipolar. You are a psychopath. “ Agot didn’t mention any name but everybody knew who she was referring to. Last week, President Duterte stepped up his tirade against the United States and President Barack Obama, the European Union and the United Nations for their public statements of concern over the unabated killings related to his campaign to eradicate illegal drugs. From Putang Ina, Fuck You, Go to Hell, Go to Purgatory, Duterte announced that he is thinking of invalidating the PH-US Enhanced Defense Cooperation of EDCA because it was not former President Benigno Aquino III who signed it. READ MORE...

ALSO: Challenge to COMP (Mining Chamber)


OCTOBER 10 -By Jose Bayani Baylon
TO most Filipinos, COMP - or the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines - is an alien entity. Since the average citizen has no reason to interact with mining organizations, much less a chamber, COMP could very well disappear from the face of the earth and we will be none the wiser. But COMP has an important role to play in the lives of Filipinos. By being the association of practitioners of responsible mining, it should effectively serve as the “seal of good housekeeping” for any company that is a part of it. And responsible mining practices are what we should be consistently implementing in the country if we are to reap the benefits of the riches that God has endowed our islands with - in a manner that leaves mining communities better off once the mining operations have been concluded than they were before responsible mining started. Which means when they were remote communities that were unserved by Government and its subsidiaries. How many otherwise remote communities now benefit from modern day amenities - utilities such as electricity and water, infrastructures such as roads and bridges and schools and hospitals, all-weather dwelling units and more -- because responsible mining firms came calling? How, for example, could Baguio have ever become Baguio if not for gold and copper mining? READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Duterte’s first 100 days


NESTOR MATA

MANILA, OCTOBER 10, 2016 (MALAYA)  By NESTOR MATA October 06, 2016- PRESIDENT Rodrigo Roa Duterte’s achievements during his first 100 days in office were listed down not by Malacañang’s information office but by a concerned netizen “to open the eyes of some people blinded by their hatred of President to see the plain truth.”

The President did not stop in doing his job, despite of the controversies he faced ever since he assumed the presidency, according to netizen Josephine Quino, who shared her list. And her fellow netizens noted that the first 100 days of the Duterte administration was more productive than those of past administrations.

The list of Duterte’s 55 accomplishments prepared by Quino cited his war against illegal drugs and crime, which exposed the involvement of local executives, police generals, judges and other top government officials in the drug trade; the surrender of almost 700,000 drug addicts, drug pushers and prosecution of drug lords; the closure of so many illegal drug labs all over the country and the seizure of billions worth of drugs seized in the anti-drug operations; and the crackdown on the illegal drug trade at the New Bilibid Prison ; and the involvement of Senator Leila de Lima in it.

READ MORE...

The list also included the closure of online gambling outlets (4,000 outlets during the Arroyo administration and 8,000 outlets during the Aquino administration); the lower street crimes; the exposes against oligarchs who have been evading payment of taxes; the no VIP treatment for government officials in airports; the extension of passport validity to 10 years; the drivers license validity extension up to five years; the cleaning up of the Land Transportation Office (LTO) and( LTFRB); the deputation of Badjaos (Sulu sea gypsies); and so many other achievements in the first 100 days of President Duterte’s presidency..

***

“President Duterte is a master tactician, and he knows exactly what he is doing”.

This is how Jose Alejandrino, former presidential assistant on economic affairs under former President Fidel V. Ramos, and former general manager of the defunct newspaper Manila Chronicle, deciphered President Duterte in a Facebook post.

“President Duterte knows what he is doing,” Alejandrino said. “He has shown in the past (referring to the President’s first 100 days in office) that he is a few steps away ahead of others.”

Alejandrino’s comment was prompted by criticism for Duterte’s unorthodox way of war against illegal drugs, and his colorful remarks against prominent personalities abroad, particularly in the United States, the United Nations and the European Union members.

***

Several world leaders have indeed criticized President Duterte’s anti-drug war and the associated extrajudicial killings of drug lords, drug pushers and drug addicts, but many others have also rained praises on him for “taking a giant step in ensuring a drug-free Philippines.”

One of those who praised Duterte is Hillary Clinton, the candidate for President of the Democratic Party in the coming November U.S. election. She has for the first time added her voice to the ongoing drug war in the Philippines, according to Nikkei Asian Review..

Addressing a group of University students, Hillary Clinton described President Duterte as “the world’s man.” She said “this man is the man women need at home....a man who could take bold decisions to ensure better life at home no matter what would cost him.”

Hillary Clinton explained that other heads of states are scared of possible prosecutions by the International Criminal Courts and as such are not bold enough to take decisions that would go well for citizens of their country.

“You are my man,” Hillary said with a smile. “I got your back!”

Here at home, the Nikkei Asian Review concluded, President Duterte’s tough rhetoric has captured the hearts of Filipino women who are drawn to strong, macho men.

***

When Duterte won the presidency, FiliNews reported in its website that U.S. President Barack Obama believed the Duterte administration can make the Philippines “the fastest richest growing country.”

“President Obama saluted Duterte”, the FiliNews report went on, “handing-off in the meantime Washington’s congratulations for the result of the May 9 races were meaningful of the Philippines’ lively democracy. Duterte is no customary lawmaker.”

“He is one that can be portrayed as a ‘meta-competitor’, one who changes the very origination of and desires from a presidential applicant. In some way, he without any help changed the standards of the amusement. All through the crusade time frame, he crossed one redline after the other, but he figured out how to fabricate an enormous across the country taking after the other. He reminded his adversaries that administration involves life and passing, of heading off to separation, of gambling it all.

“Regardless of quick monetary development of late, the Philippines still experiences one of the most noteworthy rates of unemployment and neediness in Asia – an uber-dynamic area that hosts nine out of 13 financial wonders in present day times.”

That’s how impressed President Obama was about Duterte 100 days ago.

***

President Duterte has ordered Malacañang’s executive secretary and the secretary of foreign affairs to prepare an invitation for the UN and EU, and even for U.S. President Barack Obama, to visit and conduct the investigation of alleged abuse human rights and extra-judicial killings in the war against illegal drugs.

No specific date has been set on when the UN and EU representatives will visit the country, but before this happens the Philippine government must first have terms of reference or establish protocols.

It’s not a one-way street, but a two-way discussion, consultations, and at the end, both sides have to agree with these terms of reference, That is the established protocol that has to be observed, according to Malacañang.


P50 to a greenback? By Dahli Aspillera October 10, 2016


By Dahli Aspillera

the House economic affairs committee tells us.

“A weak peso is good for our exporters who earn in dollars. It is also beneficial to our overseas workers and their families here. It is likewise helpful to our booming and highly labor-intensive outsourcing sector that generates income in dollars.

“As long as the peso’s decline is driven by market forces, and the drop is not too big and not too sudden, it is generally favorable to the country,” he said.

The peso is now hovering at seven-year lows, closing Friday at 48.23 to the greenback.

“It is foolish to attribute the peso’s recent weakness to the purported political volatility created by President Duterte’s outbursts against Western powers,” Pimentel said.

The lawmaker pointed out that two weeks before Duterte assumed office, the chief economist at the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) actually released a report projecting that the peso would likely hit 50 to a dollar before the end of 2016, as the US Federal Reserve prepares to start raising interest rates.

READ MORE...

The BPI report was widely published in local newspapers.

“Actually, the peso is not fundamentally weak. The dollar is simply gaining relative strength because there is growing expectation that after years of zero interest rates, the US Federal Reserve will soon start raising rates,” Pimentel said.

He said the US Federal Reserve is widely expected to start jacking up interest rates shortly after the Nov. 8 presidential elections in America, or before the end of the year.

“Owing to this anticipation, investors around the world, including Filipinos by the way, are starting to park some of their money in dollar-denominated assets, thus, the rising need for dollars. And as the demand for the dollar increases, its value also climbs against other currencies, including the peso.”

The lawmaker said the peso’s depreciation would provide multinational business process outsourcing (BPO) firms operating in the Philippines additional incentive to expand their operations here and step up hiring of Filipino staff.

Like exporters, BPO firms in the country sell their services to overseas clients. They generate revenues in dollars, but spend for their operations here, including the wages of their employees, in pesos.

Philippine exporters of merchandise goods as well as BPO firms have gained progressively because of the peso’s steady decline against the dollar over the years.

Based on Philippine Dealing System figures, the peso averaged 42.44 to a dollar in 2013; 44.39 to a dollar in 2014; and 45.50 to a dollar in 2015. From January to September this year, the peso has so far averaged 46.95 to a dollar.

Pimentel played down the potential domestic inflationary impact of a weaker peso.

“Fortunately for us, crude oil and energy prices in general are still somewhat depressed, so even in our fuel suppliers have to spend a bit more pesos to buy every dollar they need to import petroleum products, the impact on local pump prices is negligible,” he said.

F or more info: Office of Rep. Johnny T. Pimentel, PDP-Laban Member, House committee on economic affairs. Gegi F. Irong Jr. 0917-6238571. rep.pimentel@fastmail.com.


Wow, Agot Isidro! By Ellen Tordesillas October 10, 2016


 By Ellen Tordesillas

I HAVE always liked Agot Isidro – her lovely face, her intelligent acting and the dignified manner she conducts herself in showbusiness.

Her Facebook post last Friday – the 100th day of the Duterte presidency- made me admire her more.

This post by Agot has gone viral liked by 24,000 and shared by 7,836:

“Unang-una, walang umaaway sa iyo. As a matter of fact, ikaw ang nang-aaway.

“Pangalawa, yung bansa Kung saan ka inuluklok ng 16 million out of 100+ million people ay Third World. Kung makapagsalita ka parang superpower and pilipinas eh. At excuse me, ayaw namin magutom.

Mag-isa ka na Lang. wag kang mandamay. Hindi na nga nakakain ang nakararami, gugutumin mo pa lalo.

“Pangatlo, may kilala along psychiatrist. Patingin ka. Hindi ka bipolar. You are a psychopath. “

Agot didn’t mention any name but everybody knew who she was referring to.

Last week, President Duterte stepped up his tirade against the United States and President Barack Obama, the European Union and the United Nations for their public statements of concern over the unabated killings related to his campaign to eradicate illegal drugs.

From Putang Ina, Fuck You, Go to Hell, Go to Purgatory, Duterte announced that he is thinking of invalidating the PH-US Enhanced Defense Cooperation of EDCA because it was not former President Benigno Aquino III who signed it.

READ MORE...

Somebody please tell him that Presidents need not sign executive agreements as long as the signatory is authorized by him and he ratifies the accord.

He also said that he can do away with assistance from the United States and European Union. Anyway, he is strengthening relations with China and Russia. He is going on state visit to China on Oct. 18 to 21.

But just two months ago, he was praising the generosity of the Americans, albeit with nasty side remarks, when he told the soldiers that through the visiting U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, the United States was giving the Philippines $32 million.

He said Kerry is okay but not the U.S. Ambassador Phillip Goldberg, whom he said he is ”bwisit” because of the envoy’s disapproving e comment of his foul remark that he should have been first to rape the Australian missionary who was abused and killed by prisoners in Davao in 1989.

He said: “So, that Kerry, nu’ng pumunta siya dito, nagkain kami. Iniwanan pa kami ni Delfin (Defense Secretary Lorenzana) ng $33 million. Okay ito ah. Bastusin natin ulit para mag-areglo itong buang na it. Pera pala ito. Pera-pera lang.”

When these comments came out, the U.S. Embassy in Manila clarified that “The U.S. funding of $32 million in question is not new funding, but rather cumulative funding previously appropriated that we are currently implementing.” In other words, it’s not because of Duterte that they were giving the $32 million.

The Embassy also stressed that “Assistance provided by these funds is subject to the same rigorous vetting as our other security assistance. All of our security assistance promotes human rights through training content and by promoting professionalism, due process, and the rule of law.” Meaning, given the Duterte government’s blatant disregard of human rights, it’s doubtful that the money would be released.

Agot hit the nail on the head with her third comment: “May kilala along psychiatrist. Patingin ka. Hindi ka bipolar. You are a psychopath. “

A subsequent post by Agot was a link to a Sept. 29, 2012 issue of Psychology Today with an article, “Who Are You Calling a Psychopath?” by Susan Krauss Whitbourne Ph.D.

The article said. “… an essential component of psychopathy is the quality they call fearless dominance, a tendency toward boldness that includes such traits as a desire to dominate social situations, charm, willingness to take physical risks, and an immunity to feelings of anxiety.”

The particular issue of Psychology Today had for its cover article, “The Narcissist.”

It’s worth recalling that one of the pieces of evidence submitted to the court in the annulment case filed by Duterte’s former wife, Elizabeth Zimmerman, was psychological assessment report prepared by Dr. Natividad Dayan, former president of the International Council of Psychologists, published by ABS-CBN last April during the campaign.

Dayan concluded that Duterte “was suffering from ‘Antisocial Narcissistic Personality Disorder,’ with aggressive features with his gross indifference, insensitivity and self-centeredness, his grandiose sense of self-entitlement, his manipulative behaviors, his lies and his deceits as well as his pervasive tendency to demean, humiliate others and violate their rights and feelings.”


Challenge to COMP By Jose Bayani Baylon October 10, 2016


By Jose Bayani Baylon

TO most Filipinos, COMP - or the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines - is an alien entity. Since the average citizen has no reason to interact with mining organizations, much less a chamber, COMP could very well disappear from the face of the earth and we will be none the wiser.

But COMP has an important role to play in the lives of Filipinos. By being the association of practitioners of responsible mining, it should effectively serve as the “seal of good housekeeping” for any company that is a part of it. And responsible mining practices are what we should be consistently implementing in the country if we are to reap the benefits of the riches that God has endowed our islands with - in a manner that leaves mining communities better off once the mining operations have been concluded than they were before responsible mining started. Which means when they were remote communities that were unserved by Government and its subsidiaries.

How many otherwise remote communities now benefit from modern day amenities - utilities such as electricity and water, infrastructures such as roads and bridges and schools and hospitals, all-weather dwelling units and more -- because responsible mining firms came calling? How, for example, could Baguio have ever become Baguio if not for gold and copper mining?

READ MORE...

For decades hardly anyone cared about mining. And it showed. Prior to 1995 mining was like a Wild Wild West operation in he Philippines which allowed men with capital to come in, take out the resource, and leave the area without caring for rehabilitation. It took a number of mining related environmental disasters to wake us up to the need for a proper law, which came in the form of Republic Act 7942, also known as the Mining Act of 1995. When passed it was hailed - with reason - as one of the most progressive mining laws in the world.

But 1995 is many eons ago, and 2016 brings a unique challenge to the mining industry in the Philippines in the form of a double-barreled shotgun. One barrel I consider to be the collapsed global demand for minerals, which has plunged the global mining industry from its lofty heights of two to three years ago to a business equivalent of being at the bottom of the Philippine Trench; while the other comes in a human form, one who has consistently denied the existence of “responsible mining” (like there are people who deny that the Holocaust happened), who insist that mining should not be allowed in an “island ecosystem” (which means no mining in the Philippines which is a country of 7,100+ islands!!) and who now happens to sit atop the government department that oversees both the environment and natural resources (and who bemoans the inability of angels to descend on Manila due to air pollution!)

There is not much the industry can do about the first barrel. But there are things it can do about the second – if it is willing to be bold enough to go toe to toe with its harshest critics – even if that happens to be the Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources.

Years of anti-mining propaganda, fueled by real and undeniable examples of irresponsible mining, have created a mindset among Filipinos that feed into the zealotry at the highest levels of the DENR. The only way to counter that is a consistent and coherent campaign that informs the public of the difference between the “legacy mining practices” - those before the 1995 Mining Act - and practices under the law. And the difference between a totally irresponsible and illegal operation and a legitimate one with issues that can be rectified. It requires addressing the millenials by harmonizing their concern with their environment to their attachment to gadgets. It needs sharing the stores of real and undeniable examples of responsible mining and trotting out ten beneficiaries for every alleged victim of irresponsible practices.

And yes it also requires that the Chamber strictly police its membership-- because one bad egg in a basket can turn the whole basket bad.

When this challenge is finally and successfully met, we will have a much more responsible mining industry in the country.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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