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BY TIN BARTOLOME: PLUNDER, DESAPARECIDOS, AND THE LIBINGAN NG MGA BAYANI


AUGUST 8 -I had hoped decision makers would have enough sense—or at least be cautious about burying fake heroes at the Libingan ng Mga Bayani. I was supposed to write about food and family when I came across this post: “AT THE MOMENT, talks are reportedly being held at the Defense Department to decide on the Marcos burial at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. Remember, a person who siphoned off billions of dollars from our country, who violated human rights, who circumvented our laws, who enriched his family whose members are still wallowing in money until now, who authorized the torture, killing, and disappearance of thousands -- IS NOT A HERO! Never was, never will be. NEVER AGAIN. (Please share hanggang marinig nung nasa Palasyo)” I had also hoped I would not have to write about my indignation. But now I think I do. Let me start by telling my father’s story.My father was the youngest boy, the sixth in a brood of 8. My aunts used to tell me how bratty he was as a toddler. He was barely out of his teens when the Japanese invaded the Philippines. A member of the guerilla propaganda team, he seemed to have matured so fast—from a brat to a brave young soldier.He was a young lieutenant of the 41st Infantry Division under the command of Brigadier General Vicente Lim. He was shot by a sniper and was at the hospital when Bataan fell. Forced to join the Death March while still recovering from that gunshot wound, he miraculously survived to tell me about encounters, his bout with malaria and other adventures as a soldier. This is why bedtime stories during my childhood were not fairy tales but first-hand accounts of my father. He used to say that his men were brave but had a soft spot for those in need as they were very kind. Their feet bare and heads protected only by coconut husks, these men were always on the frontlines. He also said he would not have survived if his men hadn’t taken care of him. While they were marching, the Japanese soldiers would throw rice balls at their captives and those who were unable to catch their rations would have to find other sources of food. The bullet that hit my father entered his left upper arm and exited through his back, hitting his lung. He was no longer able to raise his left arm even after the wound had healed.READ MORE...

ALSO: By Ellen Tordesillas - Do we take President Duterte seriously?


AUGUST 12 -I take him seriously because the President of the Republic of the Philippines is so powerful that with a stroke of a pen, he can save a life or send the nation to war.Last Tuesday, President Duterte threatened to declare martial law. “Please, 'wag mo akong... hindi ako gago. If this continues, pigilan mo ako eh 'di sige. 'Pag nagwala na...or would you rather that I will declare martial law?," he said before the Philippine Army's 4th Infantry Division in Camp Evangelista in Cagayan de Oro. Duterte was lashing out on Chief Justice Lourdes Sereno who stood up to him by reminding him of the separation of powers and other provisions in the Constitution which he could have violated when he read a list of alleged illegal drugs protector including seven judges. Others in more than 150 names in the list were congressmen, military officials, police officers, mayors, and vice mayors.He said the list “has undergone a process" which many thought meant the involvement of those named had been validated. Within 24 hours, errors in the list were pointed out. Sereno said one of the judges named had long been dead and the other was dismissed from the judiciary nine years ago. Three others are presiding in courts not handling drug cases.This was the statement of Sereno that made Duterte ballistic: “To safeguard the role of the judges as the protector of constitutional rights, I would caution them very strongly against ‘surrendering’ or making themselves physically accountable to any police officer in the absence of any duly-issued warrant of arrest that is pending.” Duterte, a former prosecutor bristled at Sereno’s advice to observe due process: "Manghingi ka ng warrant? Madam Chief Justice, you must be joking. You must be joking. Dalawa tayo abogado. Kayong lahat sa Supreme Court...do you know how long it would take to secure a warrant of arrest? "One single case in the Republic of the Philippines, the warrant to issue is a minimum of two months, three months. Pagdating sa Korte, Madam Justice, it will take forever. 'Pag natalo, aakayat yan sa Court of Appeals. It would sit there for about two years." The President issued a counter warning to the Chief Justice: "So, ikaw ang winarningan ko, hindi ako.”Do not create a crisis because I will order everybody in the executive department not to honor you.”  READ MORE...

ALSO: By Teddy Locsin - A Constitution is not city charter


AUGUST 8 -Teddy Locsin, Jr.
It is not a city charter but a constitution of which we speak, and yet city charters have not been changed to address the evils of city government. There is worse corruption and bigger stupidity in local governments than in the national government with the singular exception of Davao under Duterte. Local governments have been more resistant to reform than the national government. And not just here but in the United States where states’ rights advocates still demand a subordinate place for the Negro. And yet the charter and control of local governments are within the power of congress to improve. I sat in the LEDAC under GMA discussing corrupt practices in the national government that were far worse in local governments. I proposed a reform of local governments by legislation and executive action. The entire table erupted in laughter. The president remarked: “Somebody here is not interested in getting re-elected.” And yet the issue is not a change in the charters of local governments. The issue is not a change of the general law governing them; law that strongly empowers them to abuse and only weakly holds them to account. No. The issue is the constitution of a unitary state in which alone can reside the power to correct local abuses. Local governments cannot decide the propriety of their own abuses. The first principle of government, said John Locke, is that no man can be judge in his own case. The present Constitution reposes in a central government an adequate power to correct local abuses. The same Constitution is now to be substituted with a federal constitution that will immensely empower local governments by making them the indispensable, indestructible and “unreformable” components of a federal, worse yet a parliamentary government. Thereafter, no other power will co-exist with the local states to discipline them and to stop them.READ MORE...

ALSO: By Tomas Gomez - Mr. President, please behave like one!


AUGUST 12 -Even for Duterte idolaters, this week’s Presidential theatrics may have been difficult to masticate, swallow and digest. Could this most recent display of the President’s performance, temper and demeanor possibly coax a game changer in the vaunted esteem of his blinded, unquestioning and protectively boisterous fanatics? The instance we speak of has certainly hit a sore spot in the vast majority who did not vote for him (60.09%) but until lately were still quite prepared to render unto him elbow room, respect and critical collaboration. PDuts’ slip was indeed showing and the potential humility-inducing slide in his popularity and trust may now have become discernible. As posited many weeks ago in this space, is Mr. Duterte out to prove that he is indeed his worst enemy? The people will wait as answers unfold.The flavor of the week is of course none other than his list of drug suspects and the undue umbrage at being gently reminded that there are limits to Presidential powers. Let me get to that in a bit. 'THE ROAD TO HELL IS FULL OF GOOD INTENTIONS' The President’s personal war against illegal drugs and all entities related and/or affected by it is unquestionably commendable. It is for the good of society! That is as motherhood as motherhood statements can go. On the other hand, his methods and manners are breaking hearts and turning heads. They are not nodding in approval but shaking, and quaking at the unabated blood lust and blood bath! Both the Supreme Court (SC) and the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) have repeatedly expressed support and oneness with his objectives but with cautionary concerns for prudence and respect for due process and the rule of law, after all a judicious reiteration of their respective constitutionally mandated roles in society. Neither dissent nor opposition, the President stays deaf and regards the SC and CHR as hindrances to his imagined omnipotence. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Plunder, desaparecidos, and the Libingan ng mga Bayani



MANILA, AUGUST 15, 2016
(ABS-CBN)
Tin Bartolome Posted at Aug 08 2016 11:56 PM - I had hoped decision makers would have enough sense—or at least be cautious about burying fake heroes at the Libingan ng Mga Bayani. I was supposed to write about food and family when I came across this post:

“AT THE MOMENT, talks are reportedly being held at the Defense Department to decide on the Marcos burial at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. Remember, a person who siphoned off billions of dollars from our country, who violated human rights, who circumvented our laws, who enriched his family whose members are still wallowing in money until now, who authorized the torture, killing, and disappearance of thousands -- IS NOT A HERO! Never was, never will be. NEVER AGAIN. (Please share hanggang marinig nung nasa Palasyo)”

I had also hoped I would not have to write about my indignation. But now I think I do. Let me start by telling my father’s story.

My father was the youngest boy, the sixth in a brood of 8. My aunts used to tell me how bratty he was as a toddler. He was barely out of his teens when the Japanese invaded the Philippines. A member of the guerilla propaganda team, he seemed to have matured so fast—from a brat to a brave young soldier.

He was a young lieutenant of the 41st Infantry Division under the command of Brigadier General Vicente Lim. He was shot by a sniper and was at the hospital when Bataan fell. Forced to join the Death March while still recovering from that gunshot wound, he miraculously survived to tell me about encounters, his bout with malaria and other adventures as a soldier.

This is why bedtime stories during my childhood were not fairy tales but first-hand accounts of my father. He used to say that his men were brave but had a soft spot for those in need as they were very kind. Their feet bare and heads protected only by coconut husks, these men were always on the frontlines. He also said he would not have survived if his men hadn’t taken care of him. While they were marching, the Japanese soldiers would throw rice balls at their captives and those who were unable to catch their rations would have to find other sources of food. The bullet that hit my father entered his left upper arm and exited through his back, hitting his lung. He was no longer able to raise his left arm even after the wound had healed.

READ MORE...

But that injured arm was not the worst he went through. Just before the Japanese surrendered, he was one of those arrested and imprisoned in Fort Santiago. He said a number of times that he never saw any of his cellmates after the war.

At dusk, he would sit at his favorite chair, look out the window and say, ”They’d take me from my cell around this time each afternoon. Then they’d put me in a sack, hang it up and hit me indiscriminately with bamboo poles. But I never admitted that I was a guerilla. I insisted that I went to Col. Baja as a researcher for his book ‘How to Display the Philippine Flag’.” My father said they were fed porridge or lugaw—piping hot, but in bowls that had holes. He said it was either he burned his fingers (to cover the holes) or starve.

My father said the Japanese had become desperate at that time and so was he, but he kept calm. He tore off the hem of his shirt and made a rosary to calm himself. When I asked why he did not hide from the Japanese who came to arrest him, he said that one big reason was that he was afraid for his five sisters—the older ones as well as the two who came after him.

When the war was over, he retired from the military and worked for a private company. Today, we have his Purple Heart medal, his old uniforms, some pictures and records of his military service. When my father passed away a little over ten years ago, I was told by the daughter of Brig. Gen. Lim that he deserved to be given an honorable burial at the Libingan ng Mga Bayani. His ashes were accorded the standard procession, gun salute and my mother received the folded Philippine flag in a solemn ritual. I had not doubt he deserved it.

This is why I have to write this today and say this: no man whose claims to heroism and fantastic exploits have been proven false and is believed to have caused the disappearance of thousands, plundered the country’s coffers and twisted the law to suit his needs should be given the same honor. This fake hero does not deserve a place among the past presidents. He does not deserve a place even among the soldiers who really fought for the country. To bury this fake hero there is to desecrate the memory of real heroes.


OPINION: Do we take President Duterte seriously? Ellen T. Tordesillas Posted at Aug 12 2016 05:20 AM | Updated as of Aug 12 2016 05:30 AM

I take him seriously because the President of the Republic of the Philippines is so powerful that with a stroke of a pen, he can save a life or send the nation to war.

Last Tuesday, President Duterte threatened to declare martial law.

“Please, 'wag mo akong... hindi ako gago. If this continues, pigilan mo ako eh 'di sige. 'Pag nagwala na...or would you rather that I will declare martial law?," he said before the Philippine Army's 4th Infantry Division in Camp Evangelista in Cagayan de Oro.

Duterte was lashing out on Chief Justice Lourdes Sereno who stood up to him by reminding him of the separation of powers and other provisions in the Constitution which he could have violated when he read a list of alleged illegal drugs protector including seven judges. Others in more than 150 names in the list were congressmen, military officials, police officers, mayors, and vice mayors.

He said the list “has undergone a process" which many thought meant the involvement of those named had been validated.
Within 24 hours, errors in the list were pointed out.

Sereno said one of the judges named had long been dead and the other was dismissed from the judiciary nine years ago. Three others are presiding in courts not handling drug cases.

This was the statement of Sereno that made Duterte ballistic: “To safeguard the role of the judges as the protector of constitutional rights, I would caution them very strongly against ‘surrendering’ or making themselves physically accountable to any police officer in the absence of any duly-issued warrant of arrest that is pending.”

Duterte, a former prosecutor bristled at Sereno’s advice to observe due process: "Manghingi ka ng warrant? Madam Chief Justice, you must be joking. You must be joking. Dalawa tayo abogado. Kayong lahat sa Supreme Court...do you know how long it would take to secure a warrant of arrest?

"One single case in the Republic of the Philippines, the warrant to issue is a minimum of two months, three months. Pagdating sa Korte, Madam Justice, it will take forever. 'Pag natalo, aakayat yan sa Court of Appeals. It would sit there for about two years."

The President issued a counter warning to the Chief Justice:

"So, ikaw ang winarningan ko, hindi ako.”Do not create a crisis because I will order everybody in the executive department not to honor you.”

READ MORE...

The threat of declaring martial law sent alarm bells ringing especially to human rights advocates and those who had experienced martial law under the late Ferdinand Marcos.

Immediately, Malacanang went into damage control. Press Secretary Martin Andanar said in a statement said, “The President merely asked a rhetorical question and said it under the context that his anti-drug campaign cannot wait for the slow wheels of justice – [Philippines] style. We have an action man for a President who believes justice delayed is justice denied. He is the type, who at the onset of his presidency, simply wants to hit the ground running and rid society of drugs, crime, and corruption with urgency."

It did not help, however, that Presidential legal counsel Salvador Panelo underscored that “The Constitution says the President can declare martial law not only in cases of invasion or rebellion, but when public safety requires it. Right now, the safety of the public is in imminent danger.”

He then backtracked with,“I don’t think the President will do that.”

Senate Minority Leader Ralph G. Recto advised the public to “learn to auto-delete the colorful parts of Digong's statements.
For those who are outraged, Recto said, “the best coping mechanism is not to let his curses get in the way of studying the causes he is fighting for.”

Recto is being kind. Many can only turn to prayers like artist-activist Mae Paner who articulated the distress of many in her Facebook post:

“Napapa-isip Ako
“Lord, anong klaseng anghel ang ibinigay mo sa amin? Parang halimaw ang iniregalo mo sa amin. Mali ba ako?

“Yung pagmumura kayang sikmurain. Pero yung pumapatay para sa katahimikan namin? Thank you? Yung maglilibing kay Marcos sa Libingan ng mga Bayani? Whew! Yung magde-declare ng unilateral ceasefire tapos babawiin? Game show? Yung sasabihing baliw ang sarili niyang anak on national tv? Wow! Yung bumabastos sa bangkay at kababaihan? Arayko! Yung nagbabanta sa Supreme Court justice? Pak! Yung nagbabanta ulit ng martial law? Wagas! Yung ang extra judicial killings ginawang bisyo? Nakakaloka!

“Bangungot ba ito? Pagsubok? O nang-iinis ka Lord? Pikon talo?

“Actually...

“Gusto kong manahimik dahil may takot pa din ako. Gusto kong umayon dahil baka ma-bully ako ng mga bilib sa kanya. Gusto ko siyang bigyan ng pagkakataon dahil bagong upo lang siya. Gusto kong pumalakpak dahil itataas daw niya sahod ng kapatid kong sundalo. Gusto kong magduda pero binigyan niya ng puwesto ang ilang progresibo. Gusto kong isiping di hamak naman siyang mas magaling kesa kay Aquino.

“Sa wakas may FOI at tuloy na ang RH. May pag-asa ang divorce.

“Gusto ko pang ngumiti pero bakit ang sakit ng panga ko? Gusto ko pang umasa na tunay ang ginagawa niyang pagbabago. O sadyang tanga lang ba ako?

“Masasanay rin ako sa style niya? Hanggang mamanhid?

“Sino ba ang nilalaro nino Lord? Sirit na.

“Isa't kalahating buwan pa lang ang nabawas sa anim na taon. Lamang kalsada pa rin ba ako hanggang mag edad 59?
“Lord, bakit ang sakit mong magmahal!?!

***
Blog: www.ellentordesillas.com
E-mail: ellentordesillas@gmail.com
Disclaimer: The views in this blog are those of the blogger and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABS-CBN Corp.


OPINION: A Constitution is not city charter Teddy Locsin, Jr. Posted at Aug 08 2016 11:27 PM | Updated as of Aug 08 2016 11:28 PM


Teddy Locsin, Jr.

It is not a city charter but a constitution of which we speak, and yet city charters have not been changed to address the evils of city government. There is worse corruption and bigger stupidity in local governments than in the national government with the singular exception of Davao under Duterte.

Local governments have been more resistant to reform than the national government. And not just here but in the United States where states’ rights advocates still demand a subordinate place for the Negro. And yet the charter and control of local governments are within the power of congress to improve.

I sat in the LEDAC under GMA discussing corrupt practices in the national government that were far worse in local governments. I proposed a reform of local governments by legislation and executive action. The entire table erupted in laughter. The president remarked: “Somebody here is not interested in getting re-elected.”

And yet the issue is not a change in the charters of local governments.

The issue is not a change of the general law governing them; law that strongly empowers them to abuse and only weakly holds them to account.

No.

The issue is the constitution of a unitary state in which alone can reside the power to correct local abuses. Local governments cannot decide the propriety of their own abuses. The first principle of government, said John Locke, is that no man can be judge in his own case.

The present Constitution reposes in a central government an adequate power to correct local abuses. The same Constitution is now to be substituted with a federal constitution that will immensely empower local governments by making them the indispensable, indestructible and “unreformable” components of a federal, worse yet a parliamentary government. Thereafter, no other power will co-exist with the local states to discipline them and to stop them.

READ MORE...

A national parliament cannot do it. The localities will decide electorally the composition of the national parliament.

I myself am inclined to the shift for only one reason: it is the lifelong dream of the last living hero of the democratic struggle—Nene Pimentel whose democratic credentials outweigh that of anyone else living except possibly…well…the one you are reading now. I will help by every means within reason.

However, President Duterte himself is the best argument for the current constitution.

It is under this constitution that he was elected president possibly in the teeth of electronic fraud.

It was under this constitution that Duterte made a Wild West city in the south the model of a well-run city.

Nothing in this constitution stopped Duterte from becoming the best mayor in our history. On the contrary, it was this constitution mandating greater local autonomy that empowered him to be that greatest mayor.

Starting with these facts let us now approach the proposition to change the devil we know with a devil we don’t. But keep in mind that parliaments and federalist governments abound in darkest Africa.

So let the debate begin.

But let us approach the task with the respect and circumspection that the task demands, given the unmatchable courage, intelligence and integrity of the people who wrote this Constitution—and of the revolutionary nation that threw out a corrupt dictatorship to adopt it.

It is of a constitution that we speak—and not a city charter.


OPINION: Mr. President, please behave like one! Buddy Gomez Posted at Aug 12 2016 12:29 AM

Even for Duterte idolaters, this week’s Presidential theatrics may have been difficult to masticate, swallow and digest. Could this most recent display of the President’s performance, temper and demeanor possibly coax a game changer in the vaunted esteem of his blinded, unquestioning and protectively boisterous fanatics?

The instance we speak of has certainly hit a sore spot in the vast majority who did not vote for him (60.09%) but until lately were still quite prepared to render unto him elbow room, respect and critical collaboration.

PDuts’ slip was indeed showing and the potential humility-inducing slide in his popularity and trust may now have become discernible. As posited many weeks ago in this space, is Mr. Duterte out to prove that he is indeed his worst enemy? The people will wait as answers unfold.

The flavor of the week is of course none other than his list of drug suspects and the undue umbrage at being gently reminded that there are limits to Presidential powers. Let me get to that in a bit.

'THE ROAD TO HELL IS FULL OF GOOD INTENTIONS'

The President’s personal war against illegal drugs and all entities related and/or affected by it is unquestionably commendable. It is for the good of society! That is as motherhood as motherhood statements can go. On the other hand, his methods and manners are breaking hearts and turning heads. They are not nodding in approval but shaking, and quaking at the unabated blood lust and blood bath!

Both the Supreme Court (SC) and the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) have repeatedly expressed support and oneness with his objectives but with cautionary concerns for prudence and respect for due process and the rule of law, after all a judicious reiteration of their respective constitutionally mandated roles in society. Neither dissent nor opposition, the President stays deaf and regards the SC and CHR as hindrances to his imagined omnipotence.

READ MORE...

Instead, the President is rankled at paranoid perceptions of meddling and interference instead of responding with a perfunctory polite thankful recognition of proffered cooperation. As good manners and right conduct (GMRC) would normally require. But going off the handle? Does his hair-trigger irritability quotient require psychiatric evaluation? I do not have the answer.

I sense a still prevailing prudence on the part of national media. However, the President’s periodic fits may just be stoking to unleash duly warranted commentary upon the Presidential persona and performance that will be far from gentle and respectful. Suspenseful! Right? I also sense that the “honeymoon” will be over. Soon. There are still veteran journalists who remember the fun and may be itching to relive the days of the Manila Chronicle’s colorful Ernie Granada’s encounters with President Marcos, touted as a contributor to eventually muzzling press freedom.

President Duterte’s expressed distaste and an apparent disregard for the “rule of law,” “due process,” “presumption of innocence” and considerations of human rights were well reported by media. As eloquently extemporized in his characteristic “in your face” style, he defends his questionable methods of implementing his war against illegal drugs, unmindful of the reality that such methods have been documented failures for the past 40 years in other countries were the same were attempted.

Respectfully reminded by Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Maria Lourdes Sereno of the desirable “sense of constitutional order,” and the need for “appropriate preventive measures without the complications of a premature public announcement,” that ”it is the High Court that possesses the authority to discipline members of the judiciary,” and that government functions upon the collective strength of three coequal branches, the President loses his cool!

In now signature tirade, Duterte threatened to declare Martial Law if the Supreme Court would dare hinder his war against illegal drugs!

His rant at the Chief Justice was harsh, rude, condescending and utterly bullying. Simply uncalled for. Unpresidential. Ms. Sereno chose not to prolong the argument. She has made her point. Her silence now resounds! You want sobriety? They serve it with grace at the Supreme Court.

'IGNORANCE OF THE LAW EXCUSES NO ONE'

“Ignorance of the law excuses no one from compliance therewith.”

That is a quotation from the Philippine Civil Code which every Law School froshie commits to memory and there to remain through life!

This President’s brash and bluster prove inadequate to mask the truth that he is not too bright! A classroom dunce, is he? It is indeed very possible that he may not have read thoroughly, much less understood the letter and spirit of the Constitution under which he was elected! (And yet he has the unabashed gumption to maneuver a constitutional change!)

There is absolutely no social situation nor political condition currently existing anywhere in the country that allows the President to call upon any imagined power to declare martial law under the 1987 Constitution. In fact, let us humor the man and ask him: What provision of the Constitution does he think empowers him to lock up Congress, as he has so often bragged? (Unless he is intent on manufacturing what he may miscalculate as justification, a la Marcos. Remember?) Was that Martial Law threat, then, a “Freudian Slip?”

His Palace apologists, sensitive to the progressing damage were quick to suppress it. They were evidently aware and conscious of the impact of their boss’ behavior upon the thinking citizenry. They issued statements to the effect that the President recognizes the separation of powers among the three branches of government and that the President was merely engaging in rhetoric.

Furthermore, they stated as an afterthought that the Supreme Court misunderstood the President. These defensive apologetic remarks belie the hurtful import of the President’s spoken and recorded words. They have been spoken and they will be remembered. But not to be outdone, a Palace legal imbecile jumps in and opines that the drug menace confronting Philippine society today is such a menace that it can justify a declaration of martial law! Realizing the pickle he was in, he concludes: “But the President will not do it.”

It is obvious to this naughty observer that the President was either ignorant of the law, has not quite understood that the President under the 1987 Constitution does not have the same powers as those available under the 1935 Constitution (and thus ignorant of his official limitations) or that he is simply unable to brush off the dust of the Davao Death Squads upon his managerial psyche and style.

FOR SURE!

There is one certitude in all this. It is that President Rodrigo R. Duterte is rude, boneheaded and a dunce! Let me put it in picturesque Sampaloc sidewalk patois: Bastos, Barumbado at Bobo pa!

While some senators tend to regard him as a joke, the effective antidote is to always take him seriously. With Duterte at the helm, the country cannot afford to take him for granted. He is volatile and himself a potential menace. Not to oppose any hint of misrule is the beginning of the nation’s ruination. Vigilance is the price of Freedom!

Disclaimer: The views in this blog are those of the blogger and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABS-CBN Corp.


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