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EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full news commentary)

FROM THE MANILA STANDARD

EDITORIAL: FREEING INFORMATION


MAY 12 -When then-candidate Benigno Aquino III was courting the support of voters in 2010, one of the things he promised was the passage of a freedom of information law that would compel government officials to make information available to the public. FOI has been on a long and frustrating journey. Its first version was filed in 1987. Over the years and across various congresses, the bill has been filed numerous times. Advocacy groups have been organized. On various occasions, the bill passed one house of Congress—but failed in the other house. Lawmakers claim they recognize the merits of making information accessible to the public but have been stalled by the details of implementing such a law. It was desirable in principle but the fine print occasioned debates and disagreement.This was the same excuse that Mr. Aquino, who in the past six years has shown us he could get Congress to do his bidding, gave when the House of Representatives failed to pass its version of FOI even after the Senate had passed its own. The failure to pass an FOI law under an administration that claimed to tread the straight and narrow path exasperated transparency advocates. To be sure, the Aquino administration attempted to compensate for this inability. It has opened up to participation by civil society organizations and mandated local government units to publish their budgets online. These efforts, however, appear half-baked. LGUs tend to dump all their data, not necessarily to enlighten their constituents but to comply with the reporting requirements. The information, while published online, are not uniform in format. Many are unintelligible or do not make sense at all. READ MORE...

ALSO: Editorial -What we expect of Duterte


MAY 13 -The Aquino administration has highlighted the solid economic growth of the Philippines during the recent campaign period. Many in the business circle and the academe agreed with the record, but for many of the Filipinos who trooped to the polls, the economic gains did little to improve their lot. The millions of voters who elected Rodrigo Duterte to the presidency ignored the statistical gains posted by the Philippine economy during the term of President Benigno Aquino III. Poverty rates remain high, with majority of the Filipinos still unable to get jobs. Duterte exploited the rising discontent among the voters, who felt they did not benefit from the economic growth in the last six years.Aquino’s economic growth record simply did not resonate with many Filipinos, as shown by the results of the presidential elections. The economic expansion failed to create a trickle-down effect on majority of the Filipinos, who have also to contend with the nightmarish traffic in metropolitan areas, inefficient mass transportation system and rising crime incidents. Many Filipinos were disenchanted and did not want the status quo to continue. They called for a more substantive and inclusive economic growth, which Duterte hopefully would deliver. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Dean Tony Laviña - Post-election, comes the Paraclete


MAY 14 -We can now all sigh with relief. Despite a few kinks and curls, the general elections were generally regarded as peaceful, orderly and credible. For sure, the electoral process allows for some more room for improvement but we can all agree that there is a marked progress in the conduct of this year’s automated elections since the time automation was first introduced in 2010 and later in the 2013 elections. From the record voter turn-out of an estimated 81 percent of registered voters, the record-setting pace in the transmission of election returns, and even the early concession by some of the candidates, the 2016 elections is propitious and a good indication of what is to come. Arguably, cheating remains. Vote buying is still rampant. But the possibility of pulling off dagdag-bawas and other techniques to manipulate election results has been reduced to minimum, if not nil. Thanks to automation which made sure that human intervention in the election process is limited to a bare minimum. In the not-so-distant past when votes were still manually counted and canvassed, every election was a tinderbox, a powder keg of sort that could explode anytime, fueled as it was by a seriously flawed system which the candidates themselves and their supporters take advantage of. Fraud, violence and allegations of cheating flying thick in the air were the norm and seen by a resigned and callous public as part and parcel of democracy, Philippine-style. The public then, always cynical and suspicious of the whole process, albeit for good reason, would easily fall prey to the antics of unscrupulous agitators. As for the vice presidential race, I will keep my peace for now. All claims of victory by one side and cheating by the other are premature. As this is a close fight, we should all just stand down and wait for the canvassing by Congress to begin and to be completed. This Sunday we will be celebrating Pentecost. I can just imagine the same relief that the Apostles felt when the Holy Spirit descended upon them to reenergize and reinvigorate their sagging spirits after the Lord ascends into heaven. Jesus’ disciples must have felt like abandoned orphans when he told them that he is going away, that he is about to return to the Father READ MORE...

ALSO: By Rod Kapunan - Inciting to war with China


MAY 14 -After six years of hypocrisy and deceit, this shameless stooge has brought us right into the doorstep of possible armed conflict with China all because it has chosen to pursue the US-designed policy of inciting hostility with our neighbor. The confrontational approach chosen by outgoing President Noynoy Aquino has pushed us to a situation where we practically stand just one step closer to a “state of war” with China. Such is most lamentable because our current relation with China is not of our own making. Rather, our dispute with China over the Spratly islands appears to have been intentionally locked to justify US presence in the country and extend to it the pre-eminent right to conduct regular naval patrol in the South China Sea. The decision to bring our claim to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague has made our position irrevocable, that even the succeeding administration would have difficulty modifying it without being accused of being a traitor. The decision by the PNoy administration to bring our case to the PCA effectively deprived us of the leverage to resolve our dispute through direct and peaceful negotiations. There was initial optimism when the PCA declared its jurisdiction to hear the case. Paradoxically, though, it meant that we could no longer pull out our case in favor of direct negotiations. It was a lose-lose proposition. Even if the PCA decides the case in our favor, we have known beforehand that China would not submit to its jurisdiction or accept its decision. Neither do we have the capacity to enforce a favorable decision. Some say that the policy we adopted is malignant such that a decision, favorable or otherwise, is bound to deteriorate. We did not consider that for as long as the channel for communication remains open, there is still the possibility to narrow the gap that separates the parties the same way that China and Vietnam were able to thresh out some of their differences in the Gulf of Tonkin. Bringing our case to the PCA implies that we would respect whatever decision that the arbitration court will render. We can no longer turn our back much that it was this government that took the initiative to bring the case for arbitration. On the part of the Chinese, they may not demand that we withdraw our case, but certainly they would not accede to negotiate while a case remains pending against them before the international arbitration tribunal. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Elizabeth Angsioco - President Digong


MAY 14 -by Elizabeth Angsioco The Filipino people gave Davao Mayor Rodrigo Duterte a huge vote of confidence. Being elected into office by almost 40 percent of the voting population is a feat that so far, only he has done. The people decided in a big way that this unconventional guy is the one who, in the next six years, would hold the rein of government—hopefully, in a way that will be good for the country and its more than a hundred million people, more than ten million of which are scattered all over the world. Thus, one can say that Digong’s administration will have to go beyond our lands if government is to also look into the welfare of overseas Filipinos. I did not go for Duterte, as I have said before. But since the people chose him, I am bowing to the will of the voters. I choose to be as supportive as possible without letting my guard down. I will praise when something is praiseworthy, but I will also criticize when needed. We are in a democracy, after all. Mayor Duterte made big promises during the campaign. He vowed to significantly curb corruption and criminality, two of the most serious problems plaguing our land. He said he would go after drug lords, and other criminal elements roaming our streets. He promised a safe, secure, orderly environment where citizens can have peace of mind and not feel threatened or at risk. Like all the other candidates, Duterte said that he would deal with poverty, that his government would fix the problems with our public transportation system especially in Metro Manila. Infrastructure will be improved, agriculture and industrialization will receive the much needed attention. He said his administration would prioritize education and health. Perhaps his biggest promises are the ones dealing with systems change. Duterte is the only candidate who openly said that he will pursue a federal form of government, and shift to the parliamentary system. I have written in the past that in my view, systems change can be good for us. These are big, radical changes that will be most challenging to take on. I am looking forward to how President Duterte will lead the nation towards these. Certainly, these need to be done within the confines of the law. Tinkering with the Constitution is always difficult and changing the form and system of government will necessarily go beyond amendments, we will need to change our Constitution. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Freeing information

MANILA, MAY 16, 2016 (MANILA STANDARD) posted May 12, 2016 at 12:01 am - When then-candidate Benigno Aquino III was courting the support of voters in 2010, one of the things he promised was the passage of a freedom of information law that would compel government officials to make information available to the public.

FOI has been on a long and frustrating journey. Its first version was filed in 1987. Over the years and across various congresses, the bill has been filed numerous times. Advocacy groups have been organized. On various occasions, the bill passed one house of Congress—but failed in the other house.

Lawmakers claim they recognize the merits of making information accessible to the public but have been stalled by the details of implementing such a law. It was desirable in principle but the fine print occasioned debates and disagreement.

This was the same excuse that Mr. Aquino, who in the past six years has shown us he could get Congress to do his bidding, gave when the House of Representatives failed to pass its version of FOI even after the Senate had passed its own.

The failure to pass an FOI law under an administration that claimed to tread the straight and narrow path exasperated transparency advocates. To be sure, the Aquino administration attempted to compensate for this inability. It has opened up to participation by civil society organizations and mandated local government units to publish their budgets online.

These efforts, however, appear half-baked. LGUs tend to dump all their data, not necessarily to enlighten their constituents but to comply with the reporting requirements. The information, while published online, are not uniform in format. Many are unintelligible or do not make sense at all.

READ MORE...

Needless to say, the agencies are likely not able to respond to constituents’ further questions and requests for further documents.

Now comes the apparent winner of Monday’s presidential election, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, saying that one of his first acts as chief executive would be to issue an order mandating access to information, at least in the Executive branch of government.

The other branches—the Legislature and the Judiciary—are not his territory, he was quick to add.

We welcome this pronouncement even as we remain cautious against getting our hopes up. If it serves any purpose, an executive order establishing freedom of information will send the right signal to the government in general. If an environment of genuine openness is created, other branches of government will soon follow suit.

Mayor Duterte is known for making bold, grand promises. We will be vigilant that freedom of information is one he is bent on keeping.


What we expect of Duterte posted May 13, 2016 at 12:01 am



The Aquino administration has highlighted the solid economic growth of the Philippines during the recent campaign period. Many in the business circle and the academe agreed with the record, but for many of the Filipinos who trooped to the polls, the economic gains did little to improve their lot.

The millions of voters who elected Rodrigo Duterte to the presidency ignored the statistical gains posted by the Philippine economy during the term of President Benigno Aquino III. Poverty rates remain high, with majority of the Filipinos still unable to get jobs. Duterte exploited the rising discontent among the voters, who felt they did not benefit from the economic growth in the last six years.

Aquino’s economic growth record simply did not resonate with many Filipinos, as shown by the results of the presidential elections. The economic expansion failed to create a trickle-down effect on majority of the Filipinos, who have also to contend with the nightmarish traffic in metropolitan areas, inefficient mass transportation system and rising crime incidents.

Many Filipinos were disenchanted and did not want the status quo to continue. They called for a more substantive and inclusive economic growth, which Duterte hopefully would deliver.

READ MORE...

With a mandate, Duterte must now draw up an economic plan that can produce faster results and ease the dissatisfaction of the population. He can start with the construction of long-delayed infrastructure projects, especially roads, that will provide access to the countryside and rural folks.

The rural sector, or the areas hardly reached by decent roads, has contributed little to the gross domestic product. Farmers and fishermen, for one, do not have clear access to the market of their produce due to bad roads and poor port facilities. They easily succumb to the middlemen or traders, who purchase their goods at cheap prices.

Economic growth will become inclusive once those in the countryside improve their income and purchasing power. It is the challenge that Duterte must address to avoid the failures of past administrations.


Post-election, comes the Paraclete posted May 14, 2016 at 12:01 am by Dean Tony La Viña



We can now all sigh with relief. Despite a few kinks and curls, the general elections were generally regarded as peaceful, orderly and credible. For sure, the electoral process allows for some more room for improvement but we can all agree that there is a marked progress in the conduct of this year’s automated elections since the time automation was first introduced in 2010 and later in the 2013 elections.

From the record voter turn-out of an estimated 81 percent of registered voters, the record-setting pace in the transmission of election returns, and even the early concession by some of the candidates, the 2016 elections is propitious and a good indication of what is to come. Arguably, cheating remains. Vote buying is still rampant. But the possibility of pulling off dagdag-bawas and other techniques to manipulate election results has been reduced to minimum, if not nil. Thanks to automation which made sure that human intervention in the election process is limited to a bare minimum.

In the not-so-distant past when votes were still manually counted and canvassed, every election was a tinderbox, a powder keg of sort that could explode anytime, fueled as it was by a seriously flawed system which the candidates themselves and their supporters take advantage of. Fraud, violence and allegations of cheating flying thick in the air were the norm and seen by a resigned and callous public as part and parcel of democracy, Philippine-style. The public then, always cynical and suspicious of the whole process, albeit for good reason, would easily fall prey to the antics of unscrupulous agitators.

As for the vice presidential race, I will keep my peace for now. All claims of victory by one side and cheating by the other are premature. As this is a close fight, we should all just stand down and wait for the canvassing by Congress to begin and to be completed.

This Sunday we will be celebrating Pentecost. I can just imagine the same relief that the Apostles felt when the Holy Spirit descended upon them to reenergize and reinvigorate their sagging spirits after the Lord ascends into heaven. Jesus’ disciples must have felt like abandoned orphans when he told them that he is going away, that he is about to return to the Father.

READ MORE...

This causes some distress among the disciples, hearing that their Master is about to leave them. Without the reassuring presence of our Lord, the future is uncertain for his followers. Who will protect them from the vengeful and hostile Jews? What violence and persecution will they suffer in the hands of their enemies? This is why on the day of the Pentecost, the disciples, locking the windows and doors, huddle in prayerful silence, perhaps contemplating and discussing among themselves what the future holds.

Before the May 9 polls there must have been a collective foreboding about the outcome of the elections. Months leading to E-day, political analysts were saying that the elections would be hotly contested. And so it would seem since the poll surveys showed voting preference, particularly in the presidential race, shifting from one candidate to another. In the months leading to the elections, we would see VP Binay taking the early lead, then Senator Grace Poe and finally Mayor Duterte taking driver’s seat at the tail end of the campaign period that would eventually lead him to a landslide victory. That candidates were trading accusations and counter-accusations did not help.

Much like the disciples who acquired newfound courage from the Paraclete, giving them the zeal to proclaim the risen Lord among the Jews and gentiles, and ultimately face their worst fears, we can also say that the success of the recently concluded elections, sort of, emboldens us to confront the future and gain confidence in ourselves, knowing fully well that with the help and guidance of the Holy Spirit, we have the capacity to overcome the most serious of challenges.

Of course, the Holy Spirit does not promise a bed of roses and easy life to his followers. The apostles continued to suffer persecution and to bear all forms of crosses as they proclaim the Kyregma to the gentiles. In fact, with the exception of St. John the Beloved, all the apostles suffered martyrdom. What the Spirit of God offers is hope, courage, strength and wisdom.

In like manner, the success of the elections and the coming of a new administration do not guarantee that all the ails of our society will disappear. The promise of change by the incoming Duterte administration is not a panacea. It is but a reason to hope and face the dawning of a new day with renewed courage and hope. I am interested to know how Mayor Duterte, with his colorful personality, will approach the challenges of governance. Will he inspire the courage and zeal of a Pentecost or will it be pain of the Passion all over again? The next six years surely will be interesting.

Let us all keep the faith for Christ has sent us the gift of the Holy Spirit, our helper and guide. And to this we say: “To You, O Paraclete, we raise / Unending songs of thanks and praise.” Yes, Holy Spirit, come and guide us.


Inciting to war with China posted May 14, 2016 at 12:01 am by Rod Kapunan



After six years of hypocrisy and deceit, this shameless stooge has brought us right into the doorstep of possible armed conflict with China all because it has chosen to pursue the US-designed policy of inciting hostility with our neighbor. The confrontational approach chosen by outgoing President Noynoy Aquino has pushed us to a situation where we practically stand just one step closer to a “state of war” with China.

Such is most lamentable because our current relation with China is not of our own making. Rather, our dispute with China over the Spratly islands appears to have been intentionally locked to justify US presence in the country and extend to it the pre-eminent right to conduct regular naval patrol in the South China Sea. The decision to bring our claim to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague has made our position irrevocable, that even the succeeding administration would have difficulty modifying it without being accused of being a traitor.

The decision by the PNoy administration to bring our case to the PCA effectively deprived us of the leverage to resolve our dispute through direct and peaceful negotiations. There was initial optimism when the PCA declared its jurisdiction to hear the case. Paradoxically, though, it meant that we could no longer pull out our case in favor of direct negotiations.

It was a lose-lose proposition. Even if the PCA decides the case in our favor, we have known beforehand that China would not submit to its jurisdiction or accept its decision. Neither do we have the capacity to enforce a favorable decision. Some say that the policy we adopted is malignant such that a decision, favorable or otherwise, is bound to deteriorate. We did not consider that for as long as the channel for communication remains open, there is still the possibility to narrow the gap that separates the parties the same way that China and Vietnam were able to thresh out some of their differences in the Gulf of Tonkin.

Bringing our case to the PCA implies that we would respect whatever decision that the arbitration court will render. We can no longer turn our back much that it was this government that took the initiative to bring the case for arbitration. On the part of the Chinese, they may not demand that we withdraw our case, but certainly they would not accede to negotiate while a case remains pending against them before the international arbitration tribunal.

READ MORE...

By locking up our position with the devil, we perpetually remain under the so-called protective umbrella of the US. The case we filed is like a ticking time bomb working against us. Whatever the decision is, it would always be disadvantageous to us. If the outcome would not be in our favor, technically we would be forced to give up the islands we presently occupy without China even using its might to eject us. If we win, either we go to war to enforce the decision or suffer national humiliation because there is no way we can enforce the decision.

The US is unlikely to engage China to enforce the decision for us without taking into account the possibility of nuclear confrontation. One thing sure, any decision of the PCA could only justify the permanent presence of US forces in our territory, possibly demanding a higher price using the pretext that we need them more than they need us.

As we anxiously await the decision, China has carried out reclamation in the area, has built military structures—an airfield, for instance, and has installed communications and other facilities designed to remind us that they are there to stay. We are now stranded in isolation that we cannot even make any improvements in the Spratlys to back up our loud mouth. The proponents of this chauvinistic but misguided policy could not even request the US to show its determination that whatever happens, it would stand by our side.

We completely deprived ourselves of the opportunity once offered to us by China, like a joint cooperation to explore, harness and develop the area. Rather, we opted to initiate our version of the Cold War, which effectively denied us to share in the economic prosperity that China could offer through economic development assistance. In fact, some members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations have already taken the approach of building stronger ties with China, consistent with the view that neighbors should cultivate friendship rather than heighten instability and insecurity. This could only open the door for the US to divide the countries of Southeast Asia.

A decision of the PCA in our favor is not even something for us to rejoice because the country would by then be teetering on the edge of possible armed conflict with China. Even PNoy’s successors would have difficulty in changing our foreign policy direction. There would be hysteria of blind jingoism and misguided patriotism, ignoring the horrendous consequence that could be brought about in our attempt to enforce that decision. We needlessly pushed ourselves to the precipice of going to war which we could not even hope to win.

In fact, our filing of a case invariably justified the continued US military presence in our territory and in the China Sea. Notably, this administration’s signing of the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement allowing the conversion of the country to become a big US military base was timed when the Filipinos were already agitated by propaganda that China is an aggressor. China’s response was equally calibrated as if to remind us that it could also heighten its belligerence towards this country.

Knowing that our approach to resolve our dispute with China could ripen to armed conflict, President Noynoy Aquino, Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario, Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin and all those who advocated the idea of engaging China in a possible bloody war over those islands could be held liable for violating Article 118 of the Revised Penal Code for inciting the country to war or in giving motive for reprisals. The offense they committed is serious. It means that the lives of the Filipinos would be sacrificed to enforce a decision that if examined closely is a US proxy war which the Philippines would serve as cannon fodder in securing its interest in this part of the globe.

PNoy, et al. committed an unlawful and unauthorized act because they purposely did not secure the consent of Congress. Congress alone has the authority to declare the existence of a state of war (Section 23[1], Article VI, Constitution). The deceit planned by the Aquino administration is for Congress to automatically approve its initiated war against China, not as a defensive declaration consistent to our policy of renouncing war as an instrument of national policy (Section 2, Article II, Constitution).

Many Filipinos failed to see this looming possibility because this shameless and stupid stooge exploited the weakness of patriotism that allegedly China is bullying us. We have not even officially or equivocally claimed it as part of our national territory to say that aggression was committed by China, vis-à-vis compelling us to fight a just and defensive war. These people could be held criminally liable because they adopted a war-mongering policy not in defense of our territorial integrity but part of the US’ pivot-to-Asia policy to contain China where our people will pay the terrible price of having to go to war without comprehending why, and with the hope of winning.


President Digong posted May 14, 2016 at 12:01 am by Elizabeth Angsioco


by Elizabeth Angsioco

The Filipino people gave Davao Mayor Rodrigo Duterte a huge vote of confidence. Being elected into office by almost 40 percent of the voting population is a feat that so far, only he has done. The people decided in a big way that this unconventional guy is the one who, in the next six years, would hold the rein of government—hopefully, in a way that will be good for the country and its more than a hundred million people, more than ten million of which are scattered all over the world. Thus, one can say that Digong’s administration will have to go beyond our lands if government is to also look into the welfare of overseas Filipinos.

I did not go for Duterte, as I have said before. But since the people chose him, I am bowing to the will of the voters. I choose to be as supportive as possible without letting my guard down. I will praise when something is praiseworthy, but I will also criticize when needed. We are in a democracy, after all.

Mayor Duterte made big promises during the campaign. He vowed to significantly curb corruption and criminality, two of the most serious problems plaguing our land. He said he would go after drug lords, and other criminal elements roaming our streets. He promised a safe, secure, orderly environment where citizens can have peace of mind and not feel threatened or at risk.

Like all the other candidates, Duterte said that he would deal with poverty, that his government would fix the problems with our public transportation system especially in Metro Manila. Infrastructure will be improved, agriculture and industrialization will receive the much needed attention. He said his administration would prioritize education and health.

Perhaps his biggest promises are the ones dealing with systems change. Duterte is the only candidate who openly said that he will pursue a federal form of government, and shift to the parliamentary system. I have written in the past that in my view, systems change can be good for us. These are big, radical changes that will be most challenging to take on. I am looking forward to how President Duterte will lead the nation towards these. Certainly, these need to be done within the confines of the law. Tinkering with the Constitution is always difficult and changing the form and system of government will necessarily go beyond amendments, we will need to change our Constitution.

READ MORE...

My major objections against Duterte have to do with human and women’s rights. I will continue to oppose words and actions that demean people, particularly women. I am with those who will oppose vigilante, and extra-judicial killings. I will go against the reinstatement of the death penalty. On this respect I will keep a close watch on our incoming president. The change that he said is coming should be done without violating and disrespecting the people’s rights.

I want to be proven wrong in my perception of Duterte as having low regard for women’s and human rights. I hope that the people who told me that what Duterte repeatedly said were mere campaign posturing is correct.

So far, I am liking most of what I am hearing and seeing in Duterte post-elections. I liked the offer of peace to his opponents in the race. That was a very welcome gesture from him. After all the harshness, viciousness, and divisions during the campaign, we need a unifying president. We have had enough of the blame game practiced by outgoing president Noynoy Aquino throughout his yellow government. People want a fresh, positive start, and Duterte’s offer of friendship to the other candidates is a welcome start.

The names being floated around as possible members of the incoming president’s Cabinet seem to be acceptable especially to those in the know. I also like the pronouncement made by Senator Pia Cayetano that there will be a significant number of women in the Duterte administration. Senator Pia knows how angry the people were over the rape ‘joke’, so I hope she will facilitate the entry of capable women in Digong’s government. So far, the selection and vetting process that’s being put together for key government posts is commendable. Hopefully, this will not be ‘ningas cogon’.

Duterte’s FOI pronouncement is a very welcome one. Yes, start with the Executive and show the other branches of government how it should be done while waiting for the passage of the bill into law. How nice if the FOI law becomes the first output of the 17th Congress!

The list of do’s and don’ts that the incoming president, the no-smoking policy in all public places, videoke ban after 10:00 p.m., liquor sales ban after 1:00 a.m., curfew for minors who are not accompanied by an adult, etc. are understandable. It’s like a parent telling children what rules to follow. However, let us also be cautioned that regulations such as these, cannot go beyond people’s rights. What I’m saying is, yes, let’s put order in our house but we cannot be restrictive to the point of being unreasonable.

Obviously, Digong has hit the ground and is starting to work. He knows that there is no time for a honeymoon.

Again, we all want change, and hopefully, we will have this with President Duterte, the people’s choice, at the helm. We all should give this a chance but still remain vigilant. The work of fixing our country is work for everyone, us, included. No president, no matter how good, can do it alone.

Congratulations, incoming President Duterte!


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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