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EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full news commentary)

FROM THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL: POLL-RELATED SAVAGERY


APRIL 27 -The beheading of Canadian John Ridsdel again brought to the fore a recurring nightmare of the nation which is the state of anarchy in the southern end of the country. The Abu Sayyaf Group has been engaged in its business of kidnap for ransom for so long, spanning several administrations which make many wonder if a government structure exists in southern Mindanao where the bandits operate. Also, the Abu Sayyaf ransom operations become more expensive and brutal near an election period. Four hostages, including two Canadians, were abducted last September by the Abu Sayyaf Group, which is considered a terrorist organization by both the Philippines and the United States, among other countries. The recent beheading which expectedly drew wide condemnation has become a stigma of lawlessness that has been afflicting the whole country for more than two decades, despite assurances from the government that the Abu Sayyaf is a mere bandit group whose activities can be contained by the police. The estimate of the membership of the bandit group was always only in the hundreds at most, so much so, government always says, that in 20 years, this group would not be possible to still exist. Yet there are always the incessant military operations on their turf. Vice President Jejomar Binay said extreme poverty in many areas in Mindanao is the root cause of lawlessness in what is considered as the country’s wild west, mostly situated in Basilan, Sulu and many of the islands in the southern tip of the region. Others who are seeking the presidency in May 9 have offered the Bangsamoro Basic Law as a solution to the Abu Sayyaf problem which is off tangent due to the Abu Sayyaf’s supposed unyielding pursuit of an Islamic state and that the Moro Islamic Liberation Front which is the target of the BBL, has members who morph between MILF idealism and the practicality of the Abu Sayyaf extortion operations. READ MORE...

ALSO: EDITORIAL - Release hacker, sue Comelec


APRIL 24 -The hacking of the Commission on Elections (Comelec) voters’ database of private information of 55 million Filipinos is the virtual opening of Pandora’s box as it compromised not only this election but elections within a generation and at the same time opened the door for identity theft and extortion for the unfortunate citizens in the Comelec list. Thus far, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) and Globe Telecom had issued alerts on the possible misuse of the information stolen from the Comelec database. According to Japanese data security vendor Trend Micro, the hack covered a huge amount of very sensitive personal data, including the fingerprints of 15.8 million individuals and passport numbers and expiry dates of 1.3 million overseas voters. The Web site of the Comelec was initially hacked on March 27, Easter Sunday, by a group identifying itself as Anonymous Philippines. The online attack was well-coordinated with another hack group calling itself Lulzsec Pilipinas announcing that it had leaked the Comelec database on the same day. The other day, BSP issued a memorandum to local banks ordering a stricter enforcement of the know-your-customer (KYC) practices. The memorandum was issued “in view of the reported unauthorized disclosure of voters’ registration records.” “All BSP-supervised financial institutions are enjoined to strengthen their KYC practices and exercise extra vigilance against possible misuse of said information for financial transactions,” BSP Deputy Governor Nestor Espenilla Jr. said. “Customer identification procedures of BSP-supervised financial institutions that rely on static information which may be obtained from the disclosed Comelec records should be supplemented by requests for additional proof or secondary information to establish the true identity of new and existing clients,” it added. Globe also cautioned its agents and customers on the use of the data from the Comelec leak for fraud. READ MORE...

ALSO: EDITORIAL - And the Palace gets into act


APRIL 25 -The voters database hacking mystery seems to have taken a life of its own and has taken interesting twists that reportedly involved even the desperate lot residing in Malacañang. After the Easter day breach of the Comelec system last March 27, which initially the poll body had downplayed as a mischievous act of vandalism and nothing much more, the Internet community checked the hacking that occurred and found the biggest ever leak of government data involving private information on 54.3 million Filipinos who had registered as voters. The breach was bigger than anything done previously and included 228,605 email addresses; 1.3 million passport numbers and expiry dates of overseas Filipino voters; and 15.8 million fingerprint records. “If you lose a password you can change it, but you can’t change a fingerprint,” a computer expert said of the severity of the data leak. The experts talk about five fields in the main 338 gigabytes database extracted by hackers relate to fingerprint data which are PRINT_FLAG, FINGER_INFO, FINGER_TOPO_COORD, QUALITY, MATCHING_FINGER. The third field contains a series of codes that likely correlates to individual fingerprint records. Other data contained within the breach, which computer security researchers believe to be authentic, included physical address, place of birth, height, weight, gender, marital status and parents’ names which were all unencrypted, only some data, such as first and last names and dates of birth, were encrypted. “Once you start combining these attributes, your ability to impersonate someone is greatly enhanced,” an expert said. Last April 22, a Web site appeared containing all the hacked Comelec data which was immediately taken down. The site was put up after the National Bureau of Investigation captured Paul Biteng, a fresh graduate, who dabbles in hacking computers when boredom strikes. READ MORE...

ALSO: EDITORIAL - 2016 bets rest their case


APRIL 27 -Poll tailender Noynoy-anointed Liberal Party (LP) candidate Mar Roxas has sealed his fate in the final debate by insisting on clinging to the discredited ways of Noynoy or “Daang Matuwid” while his rivals were putting the toppings on their 90-day campaigns. Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago was very evident in suppressing pain in many points of the debate, PDP-Laban bet Mayor Rodrigo Duterte found an increase in confidence in making his pitch before the public while independent candidate Sen. Grace Poe continued with her memorized scripts. Opposition United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) standard bearer Vice President Jejomar Binay remained forceful in his push for decisive leadership and poverty. The last in the Commission on Elections (Comelec)-backed debate was bereft of the sparks featured in the previous edition but it did bring out what each of candidates wanted to impart in courting the votes for May 9. Roxas’ failure to establish his own identity as a candidate was a total political disaster since it would have been a matter of a repackaging. Despite the “Yolanda” and the mass transit debacles that faced him, Roxas has not had a mediocre record in government service starting from his stint as Trade and Industry secretary. It was also interesting that Roxas was once the darling of voters during his Mr. Palengke days when he topped the Senate race in 2004 with 20 million votes which was then the biggest vote ever obtained by a senator. The curse on Mar started when he “gave way” to Noynoy in 2010 for the LP presidential bid. Since then Mar was known more as an apologist and alter-ego of Noynoy. His platform of continuity did not resonate with the public that is yearning for change from the insensitivity and incompetence of the current administration that cost lives and the economic deprivation of many.READ MORE...


ALSO: EDITORIAL - Bank waivers and Corona


APRIL 29 -The death of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Renato Corona relives memory of the 2012 impeachment trial that resulted in his ouster as head of the Supreme Court. The proceeding was initiated by Noynoy as he, from the start of his term, had indicated his dislike for Corona and initially sought his resignation and eventually, Noynoy spearheaded a campaign using his allies in Congress to impeach the then sitting Chief Justice. Corona was removed from office after a vote of 20-3 on his guilt in the second impeachment article which was his failure to truthfully declare his Statement of Assets, Liabilities and net worth (SALn). The Senate vote was later proven to have been influenced by the Palace after Sen. Jinggoy Estrada revealed in a privilege speech that senator-judges of the impeachment court who voted to convict Corona were given P50 million or more in “incentives” in the form of projects. Estrada said they were informed of the allocation through a confidential letter from then Senate President Franklin Drilon, the chief ally of Noynoy and key Liberal Party (LP) official who was Senate finance committee chairman when the letters were issued. Drilon confirmed the release of the funds saying it was part of the yearly Priority Development Assistance Fund allocations for senators but Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad later confirmed that some P1.07 billion was distributed to senators who had voted to convict Corona and that two senators who voted to acquit him, Senators Bongbong Marcos and Miriam Defensor-Santiago, did not receive anything. Abad conceded that the amount came from the Palace through the Disbursement Acceleration Program which was supposedly Noynoy’s economic stimulus fund. One of the more pivotal moment in the impeachment trial was Corona’s signing of a waiver on the secrecy of his bank accounts while at the same time challenging 189 officials who are mainly members of the LP to follow suit. Corona’s waiver then started a call for government officials to sign a waiver. The waiver was even one of the requirements asked of those vying to replace him as Chief Justice. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Poll-related savagery

MANILA, MAY 2, 2016 (TRIBUNE) Written by Tribune Editorial Wednesday, 27 April 2016 00:00 - The beheading of Canadian John Ridsdel again brought to the fore a recurring nightmare of the nation which is the state of anarchy in the southern end of the country.

The Abu Sayyaf Group has been engaged in its business of kidnap for ransom for so long, spanning several administrations which make many wonder if a government structure exists in southern Mindanao where the bandits operate.

Also, the Abu Sayyaf ransom operations become more expensive and brutal near an election period.

Four hostages, including two Canadians, were abducted last September by the Abu Sayyaf Group, which is considered a terrorist organization by both the Philippines and the United States, among other countries.

The recent beheading which expectedly drew wide condemnation has become a stigma of lawlessness that has been afflicting the whole country for more than two decades, despite assurances from the government that the Abu Sayyaf is a mere bandit group whose activities can be contained by the police.

The estimate of the membership of the bandit group was always only in the hundreds at most, so much so, government always says, that in 20 years, this group would not be possible to still exist. Yet there are always the incessant military operations on their turf.

Vice President Jejomar Binay said extreme poverty in many areas in Mindanao is the root cause of lawlessness in what is considered as the country’s wild west, mostly situated in Basilan, Sulu and many of the islands in the southern tip of the region.

Others who are seeking the presidency in May 9 have offered the Bangsamoro Basic Law as a solution to the Abu Sayyaf problem which is off tangent due to the Abu Sayyaf’s supposed unyielding pursuit of an Islamic state and that the Moro Islamic Liberation Front which is the target of the BBL, has members who morph between MILF idealism and the practicality of the Abu Sayyaf extortion operations.

READ MORE...

Also past investigations on the group point to the intricate links with the military and local government officials who either act as go between or negotiators when it is said that in reality they share in the loot and some suggest that the bandits act at their behest.

In a 2001 hearing, the Senate looked into suspicions that military officials helped Abu Sayyaf kidnappers holding 20 hostages slip through a military cordon after a three-month hostage crisis that had embarrassed the government and affected investor confidence in the economy.

The hearings held were spurred by revelations of Catholic priest and former Abu Sayyaf hostage Fr. Cirilo Nacorda, who said military commanders leading search and rescue operations shared ransom money to help the kidnappers escape.

Even Basilan Gov. Wahab Akbar was then implicated in the alleged pay-off.

It was then Abu Sayyaf spokesman Abu Sabaya who said he handed part of the ransom money to an emissary of Akbar who would supposedly split the loot with the military.

One of the Abu Sayyaf hostages, Gracia Burnham, then wrote a book and released it in 2003 which also accused the military of colluding with th bandits, saying a general demanded 50 percent cut of the ransom.

In the book “In the Presence of My Enemies,” Gracia Burnham described her 377-day ordeal at the hands of the Abu Sayyaf group. It ended with a bloody army rescue on June 7, that left her husband, Martin, and Philippine nurse Ediborah Yap, dead.

She said members of the Philippine military provided rice, sugar and other food for the Muslim guerrillas holding her captive. She said she was told it was because Abu Sayyaf was “wheeling and dealing” with the general in the region, who wanted a cut of the ransom.

The Abu Sayyaf’s existence is the country’s international embarrassment and that its lethal operations happen almost always near elections, which makes it a total black mark for the government.


Release hacker, sue Comelec Written by Tribune Editorial Sunday, 24 April 2016 00:00

The hacking of the Commission on Elections (Comelec) voters’ database of private information of 55 million Filipinos is the virtual opening of Pandora’s box as it compromised not only this election but elections within a generation and at the same time opened the door for identity theft and extortion for the unfortunate citizens in the Comelec list.

Thus far, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) and Globe Telecom had issued alerts on the possible misuse of the information stolen from the Comelec database.
According to Japanese data security vendor Trend Micro, the hack covered a huge amount of very sensitive personal data, including the fingerprints of 15.8 million individuals and passport numbers and expiry dates of 1.3 million overseas voters.

The Web site of the Comelec was initially hacked on March 27, Easter Sunday, by a group identifying itself as Anonymous Philippines.

The online attack was well-coordinated with another hack group calling itself Lulzsec Pilipinas announcing that it had leaked the Comelec database on the same day.

The other day, BSP issued a memorandum to local banks ordering a stricter enforcement of the know-your-customer (KYC) practices.

The memorandum was issued “in view of the reported unauthorized disclosure of voters’ registration records.”

“All BSP-supervised financial institutions are enjoined to strengthen their KYC practices and exercise extra vigilance against possible misuse of said information for financial transactions,” BSP Deputy Governor Nestor Espenilla Jr. said.

“Customer identification procedures of BSP-supervised financial institutions that rely on static information which may be obtained from the disclosed Comelec records should be supplemented by requests for additional proof or secondary information to establish the true identity of new and existing clients,” it added.

Globe also cautioned its agents and customers on the use of the data from the Comelec leak for fraud.

READ MORE...

The leak is considered the biggest worldwide involving government data sending shivers among those who volunteered their biometric information to the Comelec.
“It really is unfortunate that the database had to be freed in the wild by the hackers. It’s even more important now for everybody, especially our customers, to be vigilant toward identity theft and social engineering attacks. We are also reinforcing changes we have made in our customer verification process to make sure nobody can abuse even further this dire situation,” a Globe Telecom official said.

The immediate consequence of the Comeleak is that the integrity of the elections is now compromised as all the authenticating information needed to be placed on a ballot is now out in the open and the best technology hacks can use it to manipulate the vote.

The problem was actually the poor data security system that the Comelec employs which a fresh information technology graduate was able to penetrate because he was bored and had nothing else to do, based on the statement given to the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) of the captured hacker.

If a confessed slacker can easily slip through the Comelec system, it takes little imagination to consider what a group determined to cheat in the elections can do.
The first thing that should be done is to sue the Comelec and its officials to make known to all that incompetents are not tolerated in the country, particularly those tasked to guard the sanctity of the ballot.

Second let that hacker boy go or the NBI can employ him since he did the public a good deed by showing how poorly secured was the information that public surrenders to the Comelec and the government as a whole.

3 comments
Anton
@Jessnazario,@Mario seriously? A crimen was committed and your solution is to hire the hacker?? So you might as well hire all those involved in the Maguindanao massacres as they were so good in killing innocent media people. Unbelievable.

Anton
Tuesday, 26 April 2016 17:37 Comment Link
jess nazario
Yes, hire the hacker but fire all Comelec officials NOW ! The Comelec officials by sheer incompetence, stupidity and misplaced cost scrimping set the stage for such a technically simple act of hacking because no amount of "decent" security protection is guarding this very very sensitive database. The hacking was bound to happen. The system is like an accident ripe for happening. The hacker got board last March 27, tweaked his computer and in pure fun hacked the voters database. Even weeks after Comelec officials do not have an inkling of what really hit them and the entire country. Fools !

The country CAN NEVER recover from such utter stupidity ! We cannot erase our fingerprints and replace them with another off-the-shelf set. Maybe by swtiching the database into a DNA-based registration system pueded. But a DNA-based system is horribly expensive. At U.S. dollars 100 per DNA-based PII record the cost will be a whopping 550 billion U.S. dollars or more than 25,300,000,000,000 or 25 trillion 300 billion Philippine pesos at a 46+ peso to dollar parity An equiv of an 8-year Philippine budget if this budget is channeled JUST for this project and nothing else for other things. This is one for the "Believe It or Not" records of extremes ! The highest costing cyber crime ever ! Sikat nba naman tayo ! Sa maling bagay !

jess nazario Monday, 25 April 2016 23:53
Agree. Since he is that good, as claimed, NBI must hire him.
Marlo Sunday, 24 April 2016 01:37


Palace gets into act Written by Tribune Editorial Monday, 25 April 2016 00:00

The voters database hacking mystery seems to have taken a life of its own and has taken interesting twists that reportedly involved even the desperate lot residing in Malacañang.

After the Easter day breach of the Comelec system last March 27, which initially the poll body had downplayed as a mischievous act of vandalism and nothing much more, the Internet community checked the hacking that occurred and found the biggest ever leak of government data involving private information on 54.3 million Filipinos who had registered as voters.

The breach was bigger than anything done previously and included 228,605 email addresses; 1.3 million passport numbers and expiry dates of overseas Filipino voters; and 15.8 million fingerprint records.

“If you lose a password you can change it, but you can’t change a fingerprint,” a computer expert said of the severity of the data leak.

The experts talk about five fields in the main 338 gigabytes database extracted by hackers relate to fingerprint data which are PRINT_FLAG, FINGER_INFO, FINGER_TOPO_COORD, QUALITY, MATCHING_FINGER.

The third field contains a series of codes that likely correlates to individual fingerprint records.

Other data contained within the breach, which computer security researchers believe to be authentic, included physical address, place of birth, height, weight, gender, marital status and parents’ names which were all unencrypted, only some data, such as first and last names and dates of birth, were encrypted.

“Once you start combining these attributes, your ability to impersonate someone is greatly enhanced,” an expert said.

Last April 22, a Web site appeared containing all the hacked Comelec data which was immediately taken down. The site was put up after the National Bureau of Investigation captured Paul Biteng, a fresh graduate, who dabbles in hacking computers when boredom strikes.

READ MORE...

Biteng related how his only intention was to deface the Comelec website and give “voice to the voiceless” but somehow some other hackers he was in contact with during the breach used the codes he hacked to download the Comelec database.

When the website “wehaveyourdata.com” was put up, netizens noticed the busy activity in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks in sharing the hacked Comelec data.
Among those active in the downloading and sharing of the leaked data was the web address of Malacañang which was supposedly transmitting the Comelec data to other parties or seeding the files as how the Internet jargon would put it.

After netizens detected it in the P2P network, Malacañang, not in character, immediately responded through Noynoy spokesman Manuel Quezon III saying that Noynoy’s IT experts were investigating “whether there is a breach in the Palace’s security protocols and if hackers were able to use the Malacañang Internet domain.”

The intention obviously was to throw off any suspicion that the Palace was involved in the hacking of the Comelec data or the distribution of it, which if true, adds another dimension to the hacking problem in that not only was the Comelec system poorly protected but also that of the Office of the President.

Quezon said Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr. was informed on the evening of April 21 at 9:55 p.m. of social media screen shots that purportedly showed the Office of the President’s mail server being used to torrent and seed the Comelec data.

Quezon said that as of the morning of April 22, there were continuing screen shots that the torrent was still being downloaded or seeded using the address.

Quezon’s explanation was that Malacañang’s server could have been used to download and seed the torrent or that the server was compromised in which a remote client was using the mail server to access the Internet.

He offered another explanation in that hackers intentionally forged the host name being used to appear as “mail.malacañang.gov.ph” with malicious intention.
Of course, the simplest explanation of the incident was that Malacañang was downloading the hacked voters’ database and transmitting these to another party.

For a motive, say, Noynoy faces the stark reality of his anointed and secret bets losing in the elections within two weeks.


2016 bets rest their case Written by Tribune Editorial Tuesday, 26 April 2016 00:00



Poll tailender Noynoy-anointed Liberal Party (LP) candidate Mar Roxas has sealed his fate in the final debate by insisting on clinging to the discredited ways of Noynoy or “Daang Matuwid” while his rivals were putting the toppings on their 90-day campaigns.

Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago was very evident in suppressing pain in many points of the debate, PDP-Laban bet Mayor Rodrigo Duterte found an increase in confidence in making his pitch before the public while independent candidate Sen. Grace Poe continued with her memorized scripts.

Opposition United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) standard bearer Vice President Jejomar Binay remained forceful in his push for decisive leadership and poverty.

The last in the Commission on Elections (Comelec)-backed debate was bereft of the sparks featured in the previous edition but it did bring out what each of candidates wanted to impart in courting the votes for May 9.

Roxas’ failure to establish his own identity as a candidate was a total political disaster since it would have been a matter of a repackaging.

Despite the “Yolanda” and the mass transit debacles that faced him, Roxas has not had a mediocre record in government service starting from his stint as Trade and Industry secretary.

It was also interesting that Roxas was once the darling of voters during his Mr. Palengke days when he topped the Senate race in 2004 with 20 million votes which was then the biggest vote ever obtained by a senator.

The curse on Mar started when he “gave way” to Noynoy in 2010 for the LP presidential bid. Since then Mar was known more as an apologist and alter-ego of Noynoy.

His platform of continuity did not resonate with the public that is yearning for change from the insensitivity and incompetence of the current administration that cost lives and the economic deprivation of many.

READ MORE...

Duterte may have found his bearing and mellowed down in his usual coarse statements as a result of survey results lately showing him in the lead but his message remained the same which is that of an administration based on instilling fear not only on criminals but the populace as a whole through his tough guy image.

In the previous debates, Duterte mostly chose not to debate with his rivals and agreed on what they bring on the table.

This time he merely agreed with copying most of the programs of Santiago saying that is what he is good at since his elementary days which is the copying of test paper answers.

What was glaring in the last debate is that his experience was confined to leading the local government in Davao City. He even failed to clarify his party’s campaign for Federalism even in applying the proposal to solving the problem of armed conflict in Mindanao.

Poe focused on the delivery of speech careful on projecting a motherly voice and is becoming as monotonous as her runningmate, Chiz Escudero, in having a mechanical cadence on their voice.

Poe, nonetheless, remained as vague as the administration that she seeks to replace on the type of government she would like to install except for saying that under her it would be a government of performance and heart on which no one can latch.

Binay, in contrast, was clear in saying that he’s a man of action and will do what he promises.

Binay was focused on offering a conciliating and resolute leadership which will be a complete reversal of the failed and callous administration of Noynoy.

He said decisiveness and effective leadership will be the key in solving the country’s problem including poverty and criminality.

Binay said most of the problem facing the government boils down to leadership, particularly in the implementation of the law.

To help solve the worsening incident of poverty, Binay said the agriculture industry should be modernized with ample assistance from the government for support infrastructure including assistance for fertilizers and post-harvest requirements. Binay proposed to abolish the irrigation fees being charged to the farmers.

The four candidates have made their case and the verdict will be up to the May 9 jury.


Bank waivers and Corona Written by Tribune Editorial Saturday, 30 April 2016 00:00 font size decrease font size increase font size Print 1 comment

The death of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Renato Corona relives memory of the 2012 impeachment trial that resulted in his ouster as head of the Supreme Court.

The proceeding was initiated by Noynoy as he, from the start of his term, had indicated his dislike for Corona and initially sought his resignation and eventually, Noynoy spearheaded a campaign using his allies in Congress to impeach the then sitting Chief Justice.

Corona was removed from office after a vote of 20-3 on his guilt in the second impeachment article which was his failure to truthfully declare his Statement of Assets, Liabilities and net worth (SALn).

The Senate vote was later proven to have been influenced by the Palace after Sen. Jinggoy Estrada revealed in a privilege speech that senator-judges of the impeachment court who voted to convict Corona were given P50 million or more in “incentives” in the form of projects.

Estrada said they were informed of the allocation through a confidential letter from then Senate President Franklin Drilon, the chief ally of Noynoy and key Liberal Party (LP) official who was Senate finance committee chairman when the letters were issued.

Drilon confirmed the release of the funds saying it was part of the yearly Priority Development Assistance Fund allocations for senators but Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad later confirmed that some P1.07 billion was distributed to senators who had voted to convict Corona and that two senators who voted to acquit him, Senators Bongbong Marcos and Miriam Defensor-Santiago, did not receive anything.

Abad conceded that the amount came from the Palace through the Disbursement Acceleration Program which was supposedly Noynoy’s economic stimulus fund.
One of the more pivotal moment in the impeachment trial was Corona’s signing of a waiver on the secrecy of his bank accounts while at the same time challenging 189 officials who are mainly members of the LP to follow suit.

Corona’s waiver then started a call for government officials to sign a waiver. The waiver was even one of the requirements asked of those vying to replace him as Chief Justice.

READ MORE...

On his May 22, 2012 impeachment trial Corona said “I will submit my waiver to authorities until all 189 have submitted waivers. If they don’t, I will ask my lawyers to rest my defense since nothing has been proven against me ... I am no thief, I am no criminal, I have done no wrong. But dear senators, I am also no fool.”
Later on, he relented to give the Senate an unconditional waiver.

“I will not wait for the waiver of the 189. I’m submitting this without any conditions whatsoever,” Corona said in a May 25 hearing.

The issue again is very much in the news because four years after the Corona challenge, only a few, United Nationalist Alliance presidential candidate Vice President Jojo Binay being one of them, accepted it and the statement of his waiver is addressed to the AMLC, giving it full permission to also have the bank accounts of spouses and children. Not one of the presidential candidates signed it, save for Binay.

The bill seeking mandatory disclosure of bank accounts among public officials and government employees never made it past the committee level in both chambers of Congress.

There are now even pledges for disclosure, which was the version of the tandem of Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte and Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano, after it was revealed that Duterte has P211 million in undisclosed funds stashed in a Makati City bank account.

Corona for all the tribulations handed him by Noynoy was the first top-ranking public official to sign a bank secrecy waiver and to issue the transparency challenge to Noynoy and other officials.

The SALn disclosure should be accompanied by a bank waiver among public officials for real transparency.
Published in Editorial

1 comment
kris may tulo
Corona is one of the best Supreme Court Justices Philippines ever had! Mabuhay Ka Corona! The people who had hurt you and Injusticed done to you by other people, they will pay for it maybe not today but later. lalo na si INUTIL AQUINO! Your one Chief justice na hindi corrupt tulad ng 9Justices na headed by Sir ang ulo SERENO. Mga mukhang pera ang mga hayup at demonyong INUTIL AQUINO, SERONO AT 9 justices!

kris may tulo Friday, 29 April 2016 15:19


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