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FROM THE MANILA TIMES

By FRANCISCO TATAD: 'POE-QUINO' SECRET PACT SEALED SC PRO-POE RULING
[According to sources, the meeting took place at the Bahay Pangarap. Mrs. Llamanzares was allegedly accompanied by Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, and her Chief of Staff Nelson Victorino. Two solemn commitments were exchanged. She would protect him from all possible legal harm, should she become the President. And he would work now on the Justices to qualify her as a bona fide presidential candidate.]


APRIL 10 -by FRANCISCO S. TATAD
Deeply concerned about the developments in the Grace Poe Llamanzares case, highly reputable Malacañang sources have revealed that a private meeting between President B. S. Aquino 3rd and Mrs. Llamanzares a week before the Supreme Court met in Baguio City on April 5 had paved the way for the pro “Poe-quino” Justices to declare the former American citizen of no known biological parentage “qualified” to run for President of the Philippines. This may have plunged the country into a constitutional crisis. SC decision Last Saturday, the Supreme Court En Banc released from Baguio a minute resolution denying the Motions for Reconsideration filed by the Commission on Elections and private respondents Estrella Elamparo, Francisco S. Tatad, Antonio Contreras and Amado Valdez on the Court’s March 8 decision voiding the Comelec’s disqualification of Mrs. Llamanzares, for falsely misrepresenting herself as a natural-born citizen and a resident of the country for 10 years and 11 months immediately preceding the May 9 elections. A one and one-half page Notice, signed by Clerk of Court Felipa B. Anama, said all the issues raised in the MRs “had already been passed” upon by the Court in its March 8 ruling, and that “no substantial arguments were presented to warrant the reversal of the questioned Decision.” Thus, the Court denied the Motions by the same vote of 9-6, with which it had earlier declared Mrs. Llamanzares “qualified” to run for President. As to why the Court issued a minute resolution rather than a full-blown decision, Chief Justice Ma. Lourdes Sereno, in her concurring opinion, explained that under the Internal Rules of the Supreme Court, a minute resolution may be used to deny a motion for reconsideration “in the absence of a compelling or cogent reason to grant the motion, or the failure to raise any substantial argument to support such motion.” Not compelling enough It appears that as far as Sereno is concerned, the respondents’ argument that the majority has turned the Constitution upside down when they decided that Mrs. Llamanzares is a natural-born citizen by statistical probability and disputable presumption, is not compelling enough to merit a reversal of the decision. The MRs had forcefully argued that in declaring Mrs. Llamanzares “qualified” to run for President, the nine Justices had in fact sought to amend the 1935 and 1978 Constitutions without any authority to do so. The Justices refused to engage the respondents on the difficult issues they could not refute. But while saying that “the motions do not raise any new substantial arguments,” the Justices were prepared to consider foundlings as natural-born citizens just because a 1934 constitutional delegate had proposed their inclusion in the enumeration of citizens, even though the proposal was ultimately rejected. In any case, the Court’s statement is contradicted by the fact the MRs have pointed out all the errors in the ponencia written by Justice Jose Perez. In fact, the MRs may have exceeded their zeal in exposing the folly of the theory of statistical probability and disputable presumption, which Solicitor General Florin Hilbay advanced to argue the alleged natural-born status of one foundling named Mary Grace. Still no majority READ MORE...RELATED,
Palace denies Aquino-Poe meeting: President committed to Roxas’ bid...

ALSO: EDITORIAL - The Philippines, Pope Francis and the moral economy


APRIL 11 -FROM THE PHILIPPINE COLLEGIAN (UP) For various reasons , we found the vice-presidential debate held last Sunday at the University of Santo Tomas more interesting and focused on issues, than the earlier two presidential debates held in Cagayan de oro City and Cebu City. We found it striking that without being prodded by the moderators, the candidates, in their respective ways, addressed the issue of income inequality that underpins so much of mass poverty in the country. No inclusive growth under Aquino Some said that the record growth under President Aquino is not being shared by the great masses of our people despite all the government propaganda. Trickle-down economics does not work. There is no inclusive growth. It’s only the rich who get richer, while many of the poor sink in greater deprivation and misery. The Filipino middle class is not expanding noticeably. That the vice-presidential candidates discussed the subject at all is significant. With the election campaign already in the homestretch, none of the presidential candidates, with the possible exception of VP Jejomar Binay, has bothered to address the issue at all. That is not from lack of awareness of the problem, since we can see poverty everywhere around us. More likely, it is because of a  lack of a coherent idea or program to address the challenge. If the president-wannabes are truly serious, each of them should have by now an economic team advising them and outlining ideas for a workable economic program. Nearly all the candidates have fallen into saying that they will just continue the Pantawid Pamilya program (4Ps) of the Aquino administration as their poverty measure. But it is essentially only a welfare program, and it is hardly an economic strategy for economic advancement and change. Poverty and income inequality  The candidates’ perspectives will change if they learn to yoke together the challenge of poverty and income inequality, and work out a program for eradicating both. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Ben Kritz -RCBC HEARING AT SENATE: A Parade of ineptitude


APRIL 11 -Ben D. Kritz  TUESDAY’S Senate hearing on the RCBC money-laundering scandal, the fifth installment in what is proving to be one of the more memorable teleserye ever aired in the Philippines, was a fascinating display of the sheer ineptitude of at least some of this country’s most important institutions. In a way, what was divulged in the hearing could be taken as evidence that the Philippines really does enjoy God’s favor, because with these sorts of people minding the store, the only thing that could possibly be preventing even bigger financial scams from happening every day is divine intervention.There were two points in particular that stood out in Tuesday’s discussions. First, the admission from RCBC, whose chief legal counsel Ma. Celia Estavillo seems to be finally coming around to the realization that she is the lawyer for the entire bank and not just its CEO-on-leave Lorenzo “Five Levels” Tan, that it did not consider the messages received from Bangladesh Bank on February 9 “urgent” because they were not marked as such. Estavillo’s explanation, essentially, was that the bank’s settlement department doesn’t actually bother to read all the messages it receives through the worldwide SWIFT messaging system, but just glances at the subject lines. Furthermore, no one in RCBC seems to have recognized that Bangladesh Bank is a central bank; to whoever in the settlements department was looking at the incoming messages, it was just an unfamiliar sender. (Its SWIFT code, incidentally, is BBHOBDDH, which translates to “Bangladesh Bank” [BB] “head office” [HO] “Bangladesh” [BD] “Dhaka” [DH]. Someone at RCBC might want to write that down.) I asked an acquaintance who until recently worked in settlements for a bank that doesn’t seem to run into these sorts of difficulties, “Do you receive many spam messages through the SWIFT system?” “Ha-ha, no,” she replied. “Okay, to be fair to the, um, other bank, many of the messages are about things that are maybe not really critical. For example, a bank might just be letting its correspondents know it’s doing some maintenance on its computer system at a certain time, or there might be an update on some contact information, things of that nature. Regardless, there’s a reason for every message. They’re all important one way or another.” Especially, she noted, if the message was from an unfamiliar source; anything that diverges from what would be considered a normal pattern should attract immediate attention. READ MORE...

ALSO: To the politicians - The promise


APRIL 14 -By Che Javier
Election Day is closing in fast and for many of us, the certainty of who possesses a good heart and can be trusted to pave the way for the Philippines to become a developed nation remains elusive. Much has been written about all the presidential candidates and two debates that were supposed to showcase their skills in defending their positions on certain issues had passed, but many are still likely to make up their minds down to the wire. During the campaign period, promises are a politician’s best friend, but we know for a fact that promises can be left as that: mere promises. As history has shown, campaign promises are normally left half-fulfilled, if not broken. Campaign platforms are supposed to be based on the candidate’s good intentions to uplift the lives and well being of the people they seek to serve, but as the saying goes, it takes two to tango. Thus, if the general public does not bother to cooperate in bringing those promises to fruition, they should take part of the blame. If we like the sound of the promises we hear from a particular presidential wannabe, it would not hurt to first examine those promises to see if they are realistic. Promises, likewise, exist in accounting. Several promises are made whenever a member of the management team signs contracts or financial statements—like a promise to deliver goods, to perform services, to pay, even to take care of one’s career. The difference between politics and accounting is that in politics, promises do not require an accounting entry and the person pronouncing the promise can simply get away with breaking it. In accounting, promises are sealed with accounting entries or disclosures and the companies, whether by law, contractual or moral obligation, are duty-bound to fulfill their promises. Audited financial statements help a reader identify promises embedded therein. There can also be promises that are not evident or not reckoned with on the financial statements but may exist nonetheless. Using easy to understand terms, I am briefly tackling two promises which are often overlooked: (1) the promise to an employee of a retirement pay; and (2) the promise to the general public, landlord or supplier of remediation, more commonly done by way of a clean-up, restoration, rehabilitation or preservation. The promise of retirement pay The Philippines has a Retirement Law (Republic Act No. 7641) that provides minimum retirement pay for qualified private sector employees. A qualified employee is one who, at the age of at least 60 (up to 65) years, is retiring after having completed service of at least five years with the same employer during the period. As applied in the Philippines, International Accounting Standard (IAS) 19, Accounting for Employee Benefits, mandates recognition of expense on a yearly basis over the estimated service life of an employee. READ MORE...

ALSO by H. Adaza: The Duterte candidacy- An imminent danger to our country?


APRIL 13 -by HOMOBONO A. ADAZA “We need complete, truthful information. And the truth should not depend on whom it is to serve.” –Vladimir Ilyich Lenin I am writing this piece from Cagayan de Oro City – the capital of Misamis Oriental, the province I served as an elected Opposition Provincial Governor in 1980, during martial law. I keep on remembering the years of struggle for restoration of formal democracy in the Philippines. I remembered the slogans I coined which propelled me to the halls of the Batasang Pambansa (Parliament) in 1984 – “Misamis Oriental Where Ideas Moved Mountains” and “Today Mindanao, Tomorrow the Philippines.” Contrary to the erroneous interpretation of my detractors and some of my admirers that the slogans were an articulation of my ambition to be leader of the country, they had really nothing to do with that. Everybody who has academic and extra-curricular excellence in the University of the Philippines is always viewed as gifted with that ambition. But I have always thought of myself as an exception because I believe in the French maxim of carpe diem – seize the day and the moment– and Bobby Kennedy’s fatalistic view that it is needless to expect many things for tomorrow because destiny is determined by Providence or the Fates. The boy-man Duterte In the course of my dalliance with the elusive meanderings down memory lane, I remember Reuben Canoy and I visited the residence of Governor Duterte, the father of the boy Rodrigo who later became mayor of Davao City during martial law. The picture was that of a nondescript young man sitting with crossed legs on a wooden and rattan chair who looked very much older than his age. If my memory has not eluded me, it was Reuben who told me that the nondescript character was the son of Governor Duterte of Davao which was then one huge province, now split into four provinces. The next time I saw Mayor Duterte was on the TV screen in Davao City with his usual bluster telling then Councilor Jun Pala of Davao City that Jun escaped the first two ambushes but he could not escape the third. I was shocked by his bravado and braggadocio. I thought the moment I saw the TV threat that it was just a lot of bluster not meant to be taken seriously. But I learned later when I was back in Manila that Jun Pala was assassinated in an ambush. I began to examine that image of the nondescript boy on a chair with crossed legs and the man in television who I thought threatened Jun Pala. Everything else after that was the information in the grape vine that the boy man Duterte as mayor of Davao City was the terror feared by criminals; that he and his death squads killed criminals and drug addicts without due process; that he and his boys bragged that he has cleaned Davao City of criminals by unfettered killings; and that he is the bravest man in town but always followed and escorted by a bunch of bodyguards. An imminent danger to our country? Characters like Duterte do not disturb me for as long as they limit the exercise of their power and influence in their cities or towns, as long as I am not a resident of there. With my democratic bias, I always hew to the line that the people get the government they deserve. But I get agitated when characters like those run for President of the Philippines because of my love and commitment to this country. As a citizen, like the rest of the crazy crowds in this country, I am as much entitled to exercise my right to free speech as they are. READE MORE...Still questions for Duterte...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

'Poe-quino’ secret pact sealed SC pro-Poe ruling


by FRANCISCO S. TATAD

MANILA, APRIL 18, 2016 (MANILA TIMES) April 10, 2016 10:11 pm FRANCISCO S. TATAD -Deeply concerned about the developments in the Grace Poe Llamanzares case, highly reputable Malacañang sources have revealed that a private meeting between President B. S. Aquino 3rd and Mrs. Llamanzares a week before the Supreme Court met in Baguio City on April 5 had paved the way for the pro “Poe-quino” Justices to declare the former American citizen of no known biological parentage “qualified” to run for President of the Philippines.

This may have plunged the country into a constitutional crisis.

SC decision

Last Saturday, the Supreme Court En Banc released from Baguio a minute resolution denying the Motions for Reconsideration filed by the Commission on Elections and private respondents Estrella Elamparo, Francisco S. Tatad, Antonio Contreras and Amado Valdez on the Court’s March 8 decision voiding the Comelec’s disqualification of Mrs. Llamanzares, for falsely misrepresenting herself as a natural-born citizen and a resident of the country for 10 years and 11 months immediately preceding the May 9 elections.

A one and one-half page Notice, signed by Clerk of Court Felipa B. Anama, said all the issues raised in the MRs “had already been passed” upon by the Court in its March 8 ruling, and that “no substantial arguments were presented to warrant the reversal of the questioned Decision.” Thus, the Court denied the Motions by the same vote of 9-6, with which it had earlier declared Mrs. Llamanzares “qualified” to run for President.

As to why the Court issued a minute resolution rather than a full-blown decision, Chief Justice Ma. Lourdes Sereno, in her concurring opinion, explained that under the Internal Rules of the Supreme Court, a minute resolution may be used to deny a motion for reconsideration “in the absence of a compelling or cogent reason to grant the motion, or the failure to raise any substantial argument to support such motion.”

Not compelling enough



It appears that as far as Sereno is concerned, the respondents’ argument that the majority has turned the Constitution upside down when they decided that Mrs. Llamanzares is a natural-born citizen by statistical probability and disputable presumption, is not compelling enough to merit a reversal of the decision.

The MRs had forcefully argued that in declaring Mrs. Llamanzares “qualified” to run for President, the nine Justices had in fact sought to amend the 1935 and 1978 Constitutions without any authority to do so.

The Justices refused to engage the respondents on the difficult issues they could not refute. But while saying that “the motions do not raise any new substantial arguments,” the Justices were prepared to consider foundlings as natural-born citizens just because a 1934 constitutional delegate had proposed their inclusion in the enumeration of citizens, even though the proposal was ultimately rejected. In any case, the Court’s statement is contradicted by the fact the MRs have pointed out all the errors in the ponencia written by Justice Jose Perez.

In fact, the MRs may have exceeded their zeal in exposing the folly of the theory of statistical probability and disputable presumption, which Solicitor General Florin Hilbay advanced to argue the alleged natural-born status of one foundling named Mary Grace.

Still no majority

READ MORE...

There was no showing in the March 8 decision – as Senior Associate Justice Antonio Carpio has revealed in his dissent – that a majority of eight Justices had voted in support of Mrs. Llamanzares’s claim that she is a natural-born citizen and a resident of the country for at least 10 years immediately preceding the May 9 elections. On the citizenship issue, seven supported her claim, five opposed, and three did not vote; on the residency issue, seven supported her claim, six opposed and two did not vote.

There is still no showing that this lack of a majority vote was cured during the En Banc session in Baguio. But the Court has warned the parties that “no further pleadings or motions will be entertained.”

What happens then to the rights of the respondents? Under Rule 15, Section 3 of the Internal Rules of the Supreme Court, the parties may file a second or even a third MR, as has happened in several cases, when the court ruling is patently unjust, and potentially capable of causing serious damage or injury to the parties – in this case, the entire Filipino people.

Expecting attack

Are the parties simply going to be gagged, even if they do not accept the justness and fairness of the ruling? Sereno says she expects the dissenting minority to attack the decision. But worse than that, the people themselves may not accept it. This is what we mean by constitutional crisis.

Some legal luminaries had earlier suggested that the Court might have to reverse itself, as it has done in the cases involving Ang Bagong Bayani, Imelda Romualdez Marcos, Cebu Shipyard, and the League of Cities, in the face of error so patent and so gross. But this did not happen. Why? Sereno lends us her own special insight.

“Had the Decision dated 8 March 2016 been reversed,” she writes, “this Court would have authorized the Comelec to continue to play politics. The Decision and the concurring opinions were strong indictments of the grave abuse of discretion that infested the Comelec’s actions ‘from roots to fruits.’ The ponente characterized the acts of Comelec as bordering on bigotry, and similarly strong language was used by the concurring opinions on the unfairness and prejudice displayed by the Comelec toward petitioner. This Court thus rightly issued strong words of disapproval of the Comelec’s actions.”

Who’s playing politics?

This was completely unexpected.

Having followed all the proceedings and read all the opinions from the Comelec, I have to ask what is the factual basis of this offensive paragraph? At the Oral Arguments before the Supreme Court en banc, one had the distinct impression that when CJ Sereno delivered her long harangue to the Court, she was in fact already openly ‘lawyering’ for Mrs. Llamanzares and, yes, “playing politics.”

In fact, a columnist for another paper speculated that Sereno’s motive was strictly personal: she reportedly feared that if any other candidate should win the presidency, she might be impeached and removed, just like then-Chief Justice Renato Corona was removed at Aquino’s behest.

Now she says the Comelec had to be stopped from playing politics by making Mrs. Llamanzares a bona fide candidate, despite her constitutional disabilities? It just doesn’t wash.

Undiscussed

During the interpellations of Commissioner Arthur Lim, who spoke for the Comelec, no question was ever asked about any alleged unfairness or prejudice displayed by the Comelec against Mrs. Llamanzares. Almost all of the questions from the Justices were on Mrs. Llamanzares’s citizenship and residency; Justice Francis Jardeleza was about the only one who suggested that the Comelec “might have crossed the line” when it disqualified her without first proving that she was born of foreign parents.

To which Lim replied that there was no need to prove anything because she was the one who had declared at the very beginning that she was born a foundling, of no known parentage, found inside the parish church of Jaro, Iloilo on Sept. 3, 1968. The rest of her personal circumstances were then stipulated.

In 1974, she was adopted by the movie actors couple Fernando Poe, Jr. and Susan Roces. In 1991, she traveled to Boston to study; got married to an American citizen of Filipino descent; in 2001 became an American citizen herself. She visited the Philippines after her adoptive father died in Dec. 2004, and later decided to repatriate herself and renounce her American citizenship. In 2010, she was named chairman of the Movies Television Review and Classification Board, while still an American citizen. In 2013, she ran for the Senate after having resided in the country for six years and six months immediately preceding the May 13, 2013 election.

Straightforward cases

To any neutral observer, it seemed a completely straightforward case of applying the 1935 Constitution, which was in force when she was born, and the 1987 Constitution, which is now in force. The first provides that one should have a Filipino father in order to be a Filipino from birth; the second provides that no person may be elected President unless he is a natural-born citizen, which means a citizen from birth without having to perform any act to acquire or perfect one’s citizenship.

Under either Constitution, she cannot run for President.

As far as her 10-year residency is concerned, it’s a simple case of computing backwards from May 9, 2016 to May 13, 2013, when she was elected to the Senate, and adding six years and six months, which according to her was her period of residency in the country when she ran for senator. This does not add up to 10 years, so she cannot run for President.

But the Sereno Court has ruled that the Comelec committed a grave abuse of discretion when it disqualified her, and cancelled her Certificate of Candidacy, on the basis of the Constitution and the relevant facts. How did this happen? There were earlier suggestions of extraneous influences upon the Court. But the latest allegation speaks of Aquino intervening following his secret meeting with Mrs. Llamanzares.

‘Poe-quino’ at Pangarap

According to sources, the meeting took place at the Bahay Pangarap. Mrs. Llamanzares was allegedly accompanied by Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, and her Chief of Staff Nelson Victorino. Two solemn commitments were exchanged. She would protect him from all possible legal harm, should she become the President. And he would work now on the Justices to qualify her as a bona fide presidential candidate.

The immediate impact of this would be on the candidacy of LP standard-bearer Mar Roxas. He is Aquino’s publicly anointed candidate. But he has not been rating well in the propaganda surveys, compared to Mayor Rodrigo Duterte and Mrs. Llamanzares. Aquino has given Roxas until April 25 to improve his ratings, the sources said. If nothing changes, Aquino’s support shifts to Mrs. Llamanzares.

The new Villaroyo?

However, should there be a groundswell in favor of Roxas, Mrs. Llamanzares is likely to be undressed as PNoy’s failed candidate. She could end up like the once extremely popular Manny Villar in the 2010 campaign, who ultimately ended on the ocean floor after he was exposed as “Villaroyo,” meaning President Arroyo’s candidate.

Aquino and his Justices would like to impose upon our politics a former American citizen whose claimed natural-born status our people need not recognize or respect. We cannot risk our national dignity and national security interests; they are paramount. Without a higher forum where we could appeal our case, we have nowhere and no one to turn to but ourselves. Sovereignty resides in us, the people; from us emanates the full authority of the State. We must now learn to do things by ourselves. As we prepare to get rid of Aquino, we must expose the wiles of Mrs. Llamanzares, and prepare to throw out all our unworthy Justices.

fstatad@gmail.com

Justice, says the philosopher, prophet and Nobel Prize laureate Frederich Hayek, is the indispensable foundation and limitation of all law. But if our faith in justice and in the majesty of our Constitution and the law is extinguished by the very forces whose sole reason for being (raison d’etre) is to keep that faith burning in our hearts, how can that faith ever stand and why should we ever allow those forces to subsist?
A positive evil has been introduced in our midst, and passive resistance alone may not suffice; active resistance, which is legitimate under moral law, may have become necessary.

14 Responses to ‘Poe-quino’ secret pact sealed SC pro-Poe ruling
ABNOY 69 says:
April 11, 2016 at 6:26 am
This should be exposed to the public through a massive information drive. This is very insulting to us as voters. Mr. Aquino is making all Filipino a fool. Ms. Sereno should be impeached of her malicious intent to support Ms. Poe. Justices should not be involved in politics.
Reply
Ramon Barredo says:
April 11, 2016 at 5:00 am
Mr. Tatad (Kit): It will be interesting to know what you think the SC”s rulling or stand would be if, all circumstances being similar, the surname of the concerned candidate were Binay or Duterte instead of Poe. Will this Court still rule the same?
Reply
Josie says:
April 11, 2016 at 4:27 am
Our only recourse now is to NOT VOTE FOR GRACE POE. However, she will continue to be a senator. How can we get rid of her?
Why doesn’t she just disappear from the scene? What ambition is driving her! – a kindergarten assistant teacher and a clerical clerk aspiring to be President of this republic? Shame on her.
Reply
Mariano Patalinjug says:
April 11, 2016 at 4:19 am
Yonkers, New York
10 April 2016
From this latest Narrative of former Senator and now Manila Times columnist FRANCISCO S. TATAD, there is a very good possibility that a Machiavellian plot is afoot between President Aquino and presidential candidate Grace Llamanzares on one hand, and between President Aquino and his Supreme Court nominees led by Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno, on the other hand, who, intriguingly and unexpectedly, assumed the role of Lead Counsel for Grace Llamanzares in the “oral arguments” on her disqualification case, relegating Alex Poblador, her counsel of record, to a minor role.
This case is thus far from over and done with because “it stinks to high heaven!” The time will come, with the Integrated Bar of the Philippines and the Bar Association of the Philippines criticizing the Supreme Court for its patently faulty decision “on the merit,” plus the other infirmity that in FACT only 7 Justices were “sold” as the Majority in a Supreme Court of 15 justices, that the TRUTH, the unadulterated and unvarnished TRUTH, will finally surface.
When the time comes–and hopefully soon!–a case could be made for the House of Representatives seriously considering drawing up Impeachment Charges against the 7 justices who clearly “acted with grave abuse of discretion,” not to mention anomalously “legislating from the bench,”in the process shredding the very Constitution the people have the perfect right to expect the Supreme Court to obey,protect, and defend.
MARIANO PATALINJUG
patalinjugmar@gmail.com
Reply
erlee says:
April 11, 2016 at 3:43 am
The Country is doomed! The Gang of Nine SC Justices have just destroyed the Philippine Constitution. Due to their action, they are no longer fit to serve as justices. The process to purge and impeach them should be initiated as soon as it is feasible to do so.
Mayor R. Duterte is the only presidential candidate who voiced his disagreement with the original decision when it was announced. For this alone, he deserves a second and third look, in spite of his “dirty Harry” reputation, propensity for cursing, and public fondling of young women. He is the candidate who would most likely be willing and not hesitate to restoring the Constitution and impeaching the Gang of Nine. Although VP J. Binay has criticized Lying Grace Poe-Llamanzares during the second presidential debate for giving up or abjuring her Filipino citizenship, and it was his spokesmen who first brought her citizenship and residency problems into question, still he has not yet commented on the SC decision. Does he agree or disagree? Someone should ask him this question. As for Mar Roxas, he has been noticeably silent on this matter presumably because he is the designated heir of PNoy. One of the best ways that he can prove his independence from PNoy and mark his own pathway is to voice his disagreement with this SC decision which is clearly a betrayal of the Constitution – a document that reflects the will of the people, and which the Justices, as well as the President, have sworn to protect and defend.
I read somewhere that there was a US president who, upon winning and assumption of office, declared that he accepts the resignations of all of the Justices of the US Supreme Court, even though no such resignations had been offered. Of the presidential candidates, I suspect that it would only be Mayor Duterte who would be capable of this kind of action to force the resignations of the Gang of Nine. This way, there would be no need for a long and protracted impeachment process.
COMELEC and the petitioners and all concerned citizens must prepare to fight back and reestablish the Constitution. Would that the COMELEC Commissioners be capable of carrying on the unfinished without fear, have courage and balls to ignore the Gang’s non-constitutional decision and remove Lying Grace Poe-Llamanzares’ name from the list of presidential candidates! Let us then see what enforcement powers this Gang of Nine can exert to implement their unconstitutional, preplanned and conspiratorial decision.
At this point in time, a second Motion for Reconsideration must be filed by COMELEC and the petitioners. The issued SC decision states that no further reconsideration will be entertained. However, whether the SC Gang of Nine wants to or not, the second Motion must, nevertheless, be filed in order to generate a formal refusal and denial. This denial can then be used during any impeachment process as further evidence of the Gang’s grave abuse of power and discretion. There is a current or pending constitutional crises; and yet this Gang refuses to reconsider their decision a second time? Talk about indifference, lack of due process, bias, slant and prejudice! They should be reminded of the Philippine Airlines’ case which they reconsidered twice, and each time, they changed their decision!
The plan of the Gang of Nine is easy to discern and must be thwarted. For them, the end justifies the means. They have declared Lying Grace to be eligible to run, in the hope that she will win and they can then claim that the people have spoken. Filing a “quo warranto” before PET may prove to be useless as it will take forever for the hearing to take place. The Gang of Nine plans to allow Lying Grace to serve her term and the case to then be declared “moot and academic”. That is: “too late na; tapos na”. That is why it is imperative that if Lying Grace wins, an injunction or temporary restraining order should be filed immediately against her proclamation. This has been done several times in the past for other candidates, and should be done in her case. Of course, even before all this happens, all concerned citizens must exert every effort to make sure that Lying Grace will be defeated in the election. Spread her lies to friends, relatives, acquaintances and even strangers. She is not eligible to run and should not be considered as a legitimate candidate.
The Filipino people will take the country back from this illegitimate and unelected Gang of Nine Justices. The insanity will be stopped, and the Constitution will be restored. Just wait and see….. ….
Reply
James Mcpherson says:
April 11, 2016 at 1:31 am
We get what we tolerate and we tolerate politics. A true democracy will eventually crumble from within. Until we demand accountability and eliminate politics from the judiciary, we will continue the inevitable slide to anarchy.
Reply
Orientgnome says:
April 11, 2016 at 1:19 am
Ever since I been seeing this scenario. Grace is out there to thwart Binay.and other candidates hoping her popularity would prevail.
The scenario would supposed to be Grace Poe wins and Roxas runner up. Poe will be disqualified so Roxas takes over.
The problem is Duterte is making wave.
This creates a dilemma among the justices.
Reply
MartinGee says:
April 11, 2016 at 12:47 am
Poe abandoned being a Filipino once — that is a strong reason for thinking, patriotic Filpinos not to vote for her. PNoy supporting Poe? It is not an aberration, it is in the blood, remember his grandfather was a Japanese collaborator! Now he wants to save himself by collaborating with someone who denounced her country. Birds of a feather!
Reply
noel salaysay says:
April 11, 2016 at 12:36 am
The best way to rebuke the 9 Supreme Court Justice’s decision is for the people to vote for either Binay or Duterte for the Presidency of the Philippines. Grace Poe can return to serve her 4 years unexpired term of office as a Senator.
Reply
Guadalupe says:
April 11, 2016 at 12:32 am
Our Constitution is our only defense against the State and its abuses. We must not allow it to be trampled upon and violated. People of this country UNITE!. We have nothing to lose but our chains!.
Reply
Abby says:
April 10, 2016 at 11:35 pm
Poelelat is so called puppet of cojuangco. Tuta ng cojuangco at aquino.
Reply
fred villaragosa says:
April 10, 2016 at 11:27 pm
This fckr will not stop his shit against Poe…. he likes Marcos and Binay so he can corrupt this nation once again
Reply
Ateng says:
April 10, 2016 at 11:20 pm
Kawawang Mar Roxas inilaglag na naman for the nth time. This Ochoa who is a drinking buddy of Llamanzares seems to be very influential since 2010. First, there was NoyBi..Now Poequino…
Reply
Anon123 says:
April 10, 2016 at 10:56 pm
What’s important right now is that Senator Poe is qualified to run without any hindrances. These SC justices who voted in favor of Senator Poe are more knowledgeable than us. Let’s just accept the fact that she is qualified!
Reply

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FROM THE INQUIRER

Palace denies Aquino-Poe meeting: President committed to Roxas’ bid SHARES: 31 VIEW COMMENTS By: Yuji Vincent Gonzales @YGonzalesINQ INQUIRER.net 04:57 PM April 12th, 2016 Poe Aquino


Senator Grace Poe and President Benigno Aquino III. INQUIRER and AP FILE PHOTO

Malacañang on Tuesday denied claims that President Benigno Aquino III privately met with presidential aspirant Sen. Grace Poe allegedly to explore how to “help each other” in the upcoming May polls.

Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma said Aquino was “fully committed” to the candidacy of Liberal Party standard-bearer Mar Roxas, whom the President had endorsed as his preferred successor.

“President Aquino is fully committed to the candidacy of Sec. Roxas. The allegation is untrue,” Coloma said.

Coloma was reacting to the statement of former Sen. Francisco “Kit” Tatad, who claimed that Poe met with Aquino at Bahay Pangarap, the President’s official residence in Malacañang, about a week before the Supreme Court denied with finality all motions for reconsideration seeking to reverse its March 8 ruling allowing Poe’s presidential bid.

READ: Tatad bares Poe-Aquino meeting at Palace

Tatad, one of the petitioners against Poe’s candidacy, said he received information that Aquino had given Roxas until April 25 to improve his numbers, or the administration machinery will rally behind the first-term senator.

Presidential spokesperson Edwin Lacierda earlier said he wished Tatad a “long career in fiction writing.”

Roxas was trailing Poe in preference surveys at third to fourth place.

The administration had wooed Poe to be Roxas’ running mate in the elections, but Poe declared her own presidential bid and decided to run against the President’s candidate.

Aquino appointed Poe as chair of the Movie and Television Review and Classification Board in 2010. JE


The Philippines, Pope Francis and the moral economy April 11, 2016 11:18 pm


FROM THE PHILIPPINE COLLEGIAN (UP)

For various reasons , we found the vice-presidential debate held last Sunday at the University of Santo Tomas more interesting and focused on issues, than the earlier two presidential debates held in Cagayan de oro City and Cebu City.

We found it striking that without being prodded by the moderators, the candidates, in their respective ways, addressed the issue of income inequality that underpins so much of mass poverty in the country.

No inclusive growth under Aquino

Some said that the record growth under President Aquino is not being shared by the great masses of our people despite all the government propaganda. Trickle-down economics does not work. There is no inclusive growth. It’s only the rich who get richer, while many of the poor sink in greater deprivation and misery. The Filipino middle class is not expanding noticeably.

That the vice-presidential candidates discussed the subject at all is significant. With the election campaign already in the homestretch, none of the presidential candidates, with the possible exception of VP Jejomar Binay, has bothered to address the issue at all.

That is not from lack of awareness of the problem, since we can see poverty everywhere around us. More likely, it is because of a lack of a coherent idea or program to address the challenge.

If the president-wannabes are truly serious, each of them should have by now an economic team advising them and outlining ideas for a workable economic program.

Nearly all the candidates have fallen into saying that they will just continue the Pantawid Pamilya program (4Ps) of the Aquino administration as their poverty measure. But it is essentially only a welfare program, and it is hardly an economic strategy for economic advancement and change.

Poverty and income inequality

The candidates’ perspectives will change if they learn to yoke together the challenge of poverty and income inequality, and work out a program for eradicating both.

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We think for a Catholic country like ours, it will be a start if government and the people directed more of their attention to what Pope Francis has called the need for nations and the world to move into “a moral economy.”

By that, the Holy Father meant to say that there is something very wrong in a society, where so few have so much and so many have so little, and the income of, say, 5 percent of the population exceed or even dwarf the income of the other 90 percent.



It’s no cause for pride for the nation to say that we now have over 10 or 15 Filipino dollar billionaires in the Forbes annual list of the very, very rich. For the very poor that has no meaning.

Pope Francis is surely correct when he called for “the legitimate redistribution of economic benefits by the state, as well as indispensable cooperation between the private sector and civil society.”

He admonished world leaders to “seek a new economic model to help the poor and to shun policies that sacrifice human lives on the altar of money and profit.”
Political dynasts and economic oligarchs

The problem in our case is that the nation’s political leadership still do not have the vision to uproot poverty and inequality in our country. The economic elite and oligarchs are still concerned mainly about protecting their niches and rent-seeking enterprises in the economy.

One foreign observer has remarked that political dynasties and economic oligarchs have effectively combined to become the real government in the country. Holding both oligarchs and dynasts in check will be the key to change in the Philippines.

There are no quick or easy solutions to this challenge so far as we can see. But we think and we believe that by moving the nation into a moral economy, we could jumpstart the change toward a time of reform and dynamism in our country.


RCBC HEARING: Parade of ineptitude April 13, 2016 8:28 pm Ben D. Kritz


Ben D. Kritz

TUESDAY’S Senate hearing on the RCBC money-laundering scandal, the fifth installment in what is proving to be one of the more memorable teleserye ever aired in the Philippines, was a fascinating display of the sheer ineptitude of at least some of this country’s most important institutions.

In a way, what was divulged in the hearing could be taken as evidence that the Philippines really does enjoy God’s favor, because with these sorts of people minding the store, the only thing that could possibly be preventing even bigger financial scams from happening every day is divine intervention.

There were two points in particular that stood out in Tuesday’s discussions. First, the admission from RCBC, whose chief legal counsel Ma. Celia Estavillo seems to be finally coming around to the realization that she is the lawyer for the entire bank and not just its CEO-on-leave Lorenzo “Five Levels” Tan, that it did not consider the messages received from Bangladesh Bank on February 9 “urgent” because they were not marked as such. Estavillo’s explanation, essentially, was that the bank’s settlement department doesn’t actually bother to read all the messages it receives through the worldwide SWIFT messaging system, but just glances at the subject lines. Furthermore, no one in RCBC seems to have recognized that Bangladesh Bank is a central bank; to whoever in the settlements department was looking at the incoming messages, it was just an unfamiliar sender. (Its SWIFT code, incidentally, is BBHOBDDH, which translates to “Bangladesh Bank” [BB] “head office” [HO] “Bangladesh” [BD] “Dhaka” [DH]. Someone at RCBC might want to write that down.)

I asked an acquaintance who until recently worked in settlements for a bank that doesn’t seem to run into these sorts of difficulties, “Do you receive many spam messages through the SWIFT system?”

“Ha-ha, no,” she replied. “Okay, to be fair to the, um, other bank, many of the messages are about things that are maybe not really critical. For example, a bank might just be letting its correspondents know it’s doing some maintenance on its computer system at a certain time, or there might be an update on some contact information, things of that nature. Regardless, there’s a reason for every message. They’re all important one way or another.” Especially, she noted, if the message was from an unfamiliar source; anything that diverges from what would be considered a normal pattern should attract immediate attention.

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While RCBC was making the private sector look foolish, BIR commissioner Kim Henares was on hand to make sure the government side wasn’t left behind, disclosing that remittance and foreign exchange dealer Philrem, which handled about $60 million of the $81 million that passed through RCBC, is not properly registered with the tax authority in terms of the nature of business in which it is engaged. Philrem, Henares explained, is only listed as a firm conducting “other land transportation transactions” with the BIR, despite the business having changed its articles of incorporation to reflect its financial services activities in 2005.


BIR HENARES

Henares also pointed out that Philrem’s receipts are not registered with the BIR, either, in violation of a 2013 provision of the internal revenue code, something which seemed to bother Henares much more than the fact that for nearly 11 years the firm was doing millions of dollars of remittance and foreign exchange business behind a tax registration more appropriate for a bus company.

The great irony is that Henares’ receipt registration idea, which is generally regarded as a pointless pain in the ass by most businesses, has a certain logic to it in that it is intended to prevent exactly the sort of tax avoidance through misrepresentation that Philrem seems to have engaged in. Presumably, the BIR would just have to compare two databases—registered businesses and registered receipts—to spot any discrepancies that might indicate violations. It would be a relatively simple and effective monitoring practice, if anyone at the BIR was actually doing it—which they are apparently not, or not nearly as diligently as they should, if a company handling as much money as Philrem could fly under the bureau’s radar for as long as it did.

Henares’ BIR was not the only one to drop the ball, however. Completing Tuesday’s trifecta of failures was the BSP, or more specifically, the Anti-Money Laundering Council. Any business in the Philippines whose activities involve handling other peoples’ money, whether a bank, an investment broker, an insurance company, a remittance processor, a money changer, or even a pawn shop, must be licensed by the BSP. But just as at the BIR, Philrem is misrepresented in the central bank’s records, registered as just a remittance company and not a foreign exchange dealer.

Where the AMLC blew it is in evidently not conducting any sort of oversight regarding Philrem prior to the scandal—which it should have, if for no other reason than it is virtually impossible for a remittance business here to not be involved in foreign exchange in some fashion, unless it strictly limits itself to domestic remittances, or only outbound remittances. From the point of view of the anti-money laundering watchdog, a registration as a remittance business should be considered circumstantially suspect, and subject to at least a little extra scrutiny.

Once again it appears that the Philippines has left itself with the unpalatable choice of whether it would prefer to give the rest of the world the impression that this is a very stupid country, or a very careless one; the mitigating fact that the vast majority of businesses and transactions that take place here are properly monitored doesn’t do much to ease the blow for the victim—the government of Bangladesh, in this case—if it is subject to the one that “slipped through the cracks”—cracks that are seemingly growing wider with each new revelation in the money-laundering case.
ben.kritz@manilatimes.net

2 Responses to Parade of ineptitude
Bienvenido C. Gonzalez says:
April 14, 2016 at 6:55 am
Murphy’s Law is simply exposing all the levels of incompetence reached by those appointed within the ambit of the Peter Principle. This vicious cycle of course starts with a clueless chief executive in Malacanang. I am afraid that another six year cycle is about to begin by July this year given the list of presidential candidates. Solve this conundrum and you have a good shot at alleviating poverty, graft & corruption, criminality and drugs. Otherwise, everything else is just rhetoric and hysterics.
Reply
fyi says:
April 14, 2016 at 12:54 am
Once again it appears that the Philippines has left itself with the unpalatable choice of whether it would prefer to give the rest of the world the impression that this is a very stupid country, or a very careless one.
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I’m going to go with both stupid and careless.


The promise April 14, 2016 8:27 pm


By Che Javier

Election Day is closing in fast and for many of us, the certainty of who possesses a good heart and can be trusted to pave the way for the Philippines to become a developed nation remains elusive. Much has been written about all the presidential candidates and two debates that were supposed to showcase their skills in defending their positions on certain issues had passed, but many are still likely to make up their minds down to the wire.

During the campaign period, promises are a politician’s best friend, but we know for a fact that promises can be left as that: mere promises. As history has shown, campaign promises are normally left half-fulfilled, if not broken. Campaign platforms are supposed to be based on the candidate’s good intentions to uplift the lives and well being of the people they seek to serve, but as the saying goes, it takes two to tango. Thus, if the general public does not bother to cooperate in bringing those promises to fruition, they should take part of the blame. If we like the sound of the promises we hear from a particular presidential wannabe, it would not hurt to first examine those promises to see if they are realistic.

Promises, likewise, exist in accounting. Several promises are made whenever a member of the management team signs contracts or financial statements—like a promise to deliver goods, to perform services, to pay, even to take care of one’s career.

The difference between politics and accounting is that in politics, promises do not require an accounting entry and the person pronouncing the promise can simply get away with breaking it. In accounting, promises are sealed with accounting entries or disclosures and the companies, whether by law, contractual or moral obligation, are duty-bound to fulfill their promises.

Audited financial statements help a reader identify promises embedded therein. There can also be promises that are not evident or not reckoned with on the financial statements but may exist nonetheless. Using easy to understand terms, I am briefly tackling two promises which are often overlooked: (1) the promise to an employee of a retirement pay; and (2) the promise to the general public, landlord or supplier of remediation, more commonly done by way of a clean-up, restoration, rehabilitation or preservation.

The promise of retirement pay

The Philippines has a Retirement Law (Republic Act No. 7641) that provides minimum retirement pay for qualified private sector employees. A qualified employee is one who, at the age of at least 60 (up to 65) years, is retiring after having completed service of at least five years with the same employer during the period. As applied in the Philippines, International Accounting Standard (IAS) 19, Accounting for Employee Benefits, mandates recognition of expense on a yearly basis over the estimated service life of an employee.

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Hence, even if a company does not have a formal retirement plan, pension expense and pension obligation are supposed fixtures in the company’s financial statements.

While there are certain exemptions under the Retirement Law, a quick test to determine such exemptions is the test of 10—if your company has at least 10 employees and your financial statements do not contain any retirement-related account or disclosure, it is possible that there has been an oversight somewhere, or that someone may have been remiss.

As what happens with many employers sometimes, they wait until vesting happens—someone in their employ reaches the retirement age—before they start accruing payments for retirement.

Some other employers do that only on the sixth year of operations, mainly because any retirement-related item can only amount to something insignificant during the first five years. These two scenarios are clearly flawed: the first because technically under IAS 19, an employee starts earning his retirement pay on day one of his employment—the only question is how much?

The second—ignoring employees’ demographics—could also create last-minute problems: what if a newly formed company hires a number of middle-aged employees on day one, or employs a couple of highly paid members of a management team? Such “excuses” mainly delay the company’s recognition of expense. If a company has less than 10 employees but expects to breach that magic number, it would also be good to start recognizing retirement expenses early on.

As you may have guessed, pension calculation is complex and hinges on a multitude of assumptions—employee demographics, compensation increases, mortality rates, service life, discount rate, etc. Accordingly, companies should ideally seek an actuarial valuation report from an independent actuary to determine amounts that need to be recognized in their financial statements.

Lastly, it is important for employers to take note that funding a retirement plan is different from accounting for retirement benefits.

The promise of remediation

Remediation obligation, more commonly termed by accountants as asset retirement obligation (ARO), is a liability attached to retirement of an asset or vacating a property. It is important to understand that it is applicable across many industries and not only to extractive, energy, power and utility companies.

First and foremost, the obligation is triggered either legally or constructively—that is required by regulatory agencies such as the DENR, Bureau of Mines, lessors, the company’s very own health, security, environment, and safety policy, or its previously demonstrated but informal approach on cleaning up, or a similar obligatory responsibility.

As energy and utility companies are already well versed on this topic, my examples include others who may be affected, especially ordinary lessees whose contracts contain a specific clause that says “bring back to original condition” or “surrender the property at clean state” or other statements pointing out to “extra efforts” than simply vacating the leased property. Suffice it to say that extra efforts mean extra costs as well.

ARO is accounted for at the net present value of the liability or obligation under IAS 37, Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets, with a corresponding debit to an asset account. The asset is then amortized over the life of the lease or the asset itself, while the obligation is accreted on a yearly basis to recognize the time value of money until such time that the obligation is settled.

Common examples where ARO must be recognized are: (1) an oil and gas depot, which should be returned without any trace of environmental hazards on and underneath it; (2) a leased office space where the lessee is required to dismantle all improvements and return the property to the lessor in its original state; and (3) a pipeline which should be locked or sealed at the end of its life. An even more specific example is reconstructing a single office into several individual units; in this particular case, the lessee has to rebuild the partitions including soundproofing, reroute electric lines, and close portions of the integrated vents as a result of the partitions.

Similar to the retirement expense, ARO estimation may require work from experts who are likely to be engineers, geologists, architects and similar professions.

Next steps

Today is a good day to revisit your promises if your business or company is in any of the industries mentioned above, or one that is engaged in environmentally “unfriendly” materials, or one that simply utilizes huge office space, or is labor-intensive. While it may seem simple from this article, there are complexities in accounting for retirement pay and ARO. Indeed, the promises do not come cheap and I won’t be surprised if some companies, after considering associated costs, end up adjusting product prices or service fees just to maintain the desired margin.

Promise means hope, love, and sometimes involves deception . . . but one thing is for sure, an accounting promise goes straight to the books, or at least gets disclosed through the notes to financial statements.

Vote wisely and good cheers for fulfilled promises.

* * *

Che M. Javier is the Assurance Lead Partner for the Consumer and Industrial Products and Services Industry of Isla Lipana & Co./PwC Philippines. Email your comments and questions to markets@ph.pwc.com  This content is for general information purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional advisors.


The Duterte candidacy: An imminent danger to our country? April 13, 2016 8:27 pm  HOMOBONO-A.-ADAZA


by HOMOBONO A. ADAZA
“We need complete, truthful information. And the truth should not depend on whom it is to serve.”
–Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

I am writing this piece from Cagayan de Oro City – the capital of Misamis Oriental, the province I served as an elected Opposition Provincial Governor in 1980, during martial law. I keep on remembering the years of struggle for restoration of formal democracy in the Philippines. I remembered the slogans I coined which propelled me to the halls of the Batasang Pambansa (Parliament) in 1984 – “Misamis Oriental Where Ideas Moved Mountains” and “Today Mindanao, Tomorrow the Philippines.”

Contrary to the erroneous interpretation of my detractors and some of my admirers that the slogans were an articulation of my ambition to be leader of the country, they had really nothing to do with that. Everybody who has academic and extra-curricular excellence in the University of the Philippines is always viewed as gifted with that ambition. But I have always thought of myself as an exception because I believe in the French maxim of carpe diem – seize the day and the moment– and Bobby Kennedy’s fatalistic view that it is needless to expect many things for tomorrow because destiny is determined by Providence or the Fates.
The boy-man Duterte

In the course of my dalliance with the elusive meanderings down memory lane, I remember Reuben Canoy and I visited the residence of Governor Duterte, the father of the boy Rodrigo who later became mayor of Davao City during martial law. The picture was that of a nondescript young man sitting with crossed legs on a wooden and rattan chair who looked very much older than his age. If my memory has not eluded me, it was Reuben who told me that the nondescript character was the son of Governor Duterte of Davao which was then one huge province, now split into four provinces.

The next time I saw Mayor Duterte was on the TV screen in Davao City with his usual bluster telling then Councilor Jun Pala of Davao City that Jun escaped the first two ambushes but he could not escape the third. I was shocked by his bravado and braggadocio. I thought the moment I saw the TV threat that it was just a lot of bluster not meant to be taken seriously.

But I learned later when I was back in Manila that Jun Pala was assassinated in an ambush. I began to examine that image of the nondescript boy on a chair with crossed legs and the man in television who I thought threatened Jun Pala. Everything else after that was the information in the grape vine that the boy man Duterte as mayor of Davao City was the terror feared by criminals; that he and his death squads killed criminals and drug addicts without due process; that he and his boys bragged that he has cleaned Davao City of criminals by unfettered killings; and that he is the bravest man in town but always followed and escorted by a bunch of bodyguards.

An imminent danger to our country?

Characters like Duterte do not disturb me for as long as they limit the exercise of their power and influence in their cities or towns, as long as I am not a resident of there. With my democratic bias, I always hew to the line that the people get the government they deserve. But I get agitated when characters like those run for President of the Philippines because of my love and commitment to this country. As a citizen, like the rest of the crazy crowds in this country, I am as much entitled to exercise my right to free speech as they are.

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The first time I heard Duterte might run for President of the Philippines was that evening when Reuben Canoy, Nene Pimentel and I were honored by the Cagayan de Oro City Press and Radio Club two years ago as freedom fighters. Out of the blue Reuben said that it was about time the country elected a Mindanaoan as President of the Philippines. He mentioned Duterte’s name as his nominee. I was appalled by the suggestion considering Duterte’s obvious lack of qualifications – admitted killer, admitted adulterer, admitted bigamist, lack of intellectual depth, flaunting his courage and defiance of the due process of law. I thought Reuben’s suggestion was a joke but it was greeted by a thunderous applause by a relatively intelligent Cagayan de Oro City crowd. I thought to myself, the suggestion may not be a joke after all.

I am still in Cagayan de Oro as of this writing and in my cursory survey of people I met in the Northern Mindanao provinces and in NAIA 3 and Laguindingan Airport, this boy man Duterte has mesmerized the ordinary citizens and even some significant members of the middle class and the upper class. His banners and posters are visible everywhere not to speak of stickers in upper class vehicles. If this were not the Philippines, the Duterte phenomenon would be considered a weird and insane development in human affairs. Why? Because based on his well publicized admissions and information circulated about this boy man Duterte, he is obviously unfit to be President of the Philippines.



Questions for Duterte

But public adulation of this boy man cannot just be ignored. If he were running for the Senate, he could be dismissed as one of those things considering the current composition of the Senate. But he is running for President and the fate of a hundred million Filipinos today and millions of Filipinos of tomorrow would be in his hands for the longest six years of our lives should he be elected President. So everybody should be intelligently involved in the fateful choice of the next President.

Despite my assessment of this boy man Duterte, I maintain an open mind in entertaining the idea I could possibly be mistaken in my perception of him, though the possibility is a stellar parallax away. So here are some questions for Duterte, hoping that with his answers he could clear the air of the overwhelming negatives about him.

1. Since you have publicly admitted several times that you have killed criminals without due process of law, how many criminals have you and your death squads killed in Davao City in that fashion during your incumbency as mayor of your city?

2. Of the many that you killed, how many of them were poor and defenseless?

3. Have you killed any rich and powerful person in your city who was a criminal – like a land grabber, a drug lord, a rice smuggler, a tax evader, a gun runner, a crooked politician, to mention a few?

4. You claim that Davao City is the safest city in the country, why does it hold one of the top five highest records of criminality in the whole country?

5. If Davao City is the safest city in our country, why is it considered the murder capital of the Philippines?

6. If Davao City has a record of many unsolved crimes, what then were you doing as mayor of your city?

7. One of the most colorful figures of your City was Councilor Jun Pala. Was his murderer ever caught?

8. Is it true, as suspected by many in your city, that you were the mastermind in the murder of Jun Pala?

9. Is it true that you were behind the killing of two media persons who were critical of you in your city, as some people in your city suspect?

10. Is it true that the Ampatuans of Maguindanao who are facing murder charges are your friends?

11. If they are, is this the reason why they have mansions in your city which were found to have cache of arms and ammunitions as well as stocks of money, as reported by media?

12. As a lawyer you should know that holding unlicensed firearms and ammunitions are criminal offenses, why did you not help in prosecuting the Ampatuans in your city?

13. As a lawyer why do you insist on killing people without due process?

14. Why don’t you surrender your diploma and license as a lawyer since you do not believe in due process?

15. If you could not clean Davao City of criminality in your 15 years stint as mayor, how could you get rid of criminality in our country in six months as you keep on proclaiming?

16. Many policemen in the country are abusing their powers today and will you have a criminal police force in every town in our country since you will allow them to kill criminals at will?

17. In the course of your campaign speech in the North, you told your audience that you will allow them to kill criminals without criminal liability, so is it your aim to have a population of criminals in the country since killing is prohibited by law?

18. The military men are killing Lumads and rebels at will in Mindanao, so you will have more killers in the military since you free them from any criminal liability?

There are more questions for Duterte in my next column since every time he opens his mouth it’s a miracle if he does not commit a mistake.

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Still questions for Duterte April 16, 2016 12:52 am HOMOBONO-A.-ADAZA


by WITH HOMOBONO ADAZA

“Achieving a greater awareness of the past, we clarify the present; digging deeper into the meaning of what has gone before, we discover the meaning of the future; looking backward, we move forward.”  –A.I. HERZEN

The past of Duterte in Davao City is at best gruesome. To be poor and defenseless in Duterte’s city is unimaginable. It could compare with the worst of times in Russia during Stalin, in so far as killing is concerned. It could compare with Hitler’s Germany, in so far as killing of millions of Germans. Within our neighboring countries, it could compare with Pol Pot’s killing fields in Kampuchea where even to wear eyeglasses was a crime.

How duterte differs from Hitler, stalin and pol pot

That in effect is Duterte in a capsule. There are differences however between him and the leaders of those countries are concerned. First, the thinking of Duterte as shown in his statements appears to be that of a low level human with an ideological philosophy of an American gangster. In the case of Stalin, his ideological underpinning is that of great intellectuals like Marx, Engels and Lenin. In the case of Hitler, his theory of a great master race had Friedrich Nietzsche for support, a Third Reich that could last for a thousand years and the dream of the German people to recover their national honor from the debacle of the First World War. In the case of Pol Pot, his ideological foundation was a dream for the restoration of a great empire that produced engineering, architectural and artistic wonders like Angkor Wat.

Second, the area Duterte rules is as small as a soup bowl if you are to compare it with Russia or the Soviet Union of Stalin; Germany of Hitler and his conquered countries during the Second World War; and Kampuchea of Pol Pot with his Khmer Rouge. It takes a pygmy to control Davao City; it takes political giants to rule Russia and the Soviet Union, Germany and Kampuchea.

Third, the language Duterte uses to convince his audiences is the lingo of the street corner gangster and the bluster of the barangay toughie. The language and style of Hitler, Stalin and Pol Pot were charismatic with an intellectual ring making their respective country march behind them – reminiscent of the rhetoric of Cicero and the oratorical tidal wave of a Demosthenes.

Fourth, there is no taint of moral tone and civility in the Duterte language; it is vulgar and visibly pedestrian, an insult and embarrassment to an educated and civilized audience. The three national leaders had moral moorings in their language; were civilized and intellectual.

Duterte’s similarities With other serial killers

Duterte has similarities with the other compared serial killers. They used serial killing as a methodical instrument of eliminating their enemies. They had no qualms about killing as an instrument of effective governance and subjugation.

And now back to questions for duterte

The large number of questions is a tribute to the myth created by him and his idolaters about the boy man Duterte. But many of the questions are rhetorical; they need no answers since the replies are obvious. Nevertheless, these are questions Duterte must answer, if he wants to be President.

In our last Thursday’s column, we ended with question 18, now we resume with question 19.

19. Since you authorize the police, the military and even the citizen to kill criminals, is this not authorizing them to kill you because by then you would have become the country’s Number One Criminal?

20. Will your presidency, God forbid that it comes, not make our country the Number One Criminal country in the world – worse than Syria, Yemen, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya and what have you?

21. Will not institutionalized killing make the tourist industry a thing of the past except for visiting thrill killers?

22. In other countries like Japan, any hint of criminal misbehavior, which is a part of your system, of a public official, would compel him to commit hara-kiri or seppuku or both. Will you commit hara-kiri or seppuku or both?

23. A leader should lead by example, especially for the young, how can you be a good example when you are telling them to kill criminals, without due process, which is against the law?

24. How you can we have good lawyers in the country when you do not believe in due process, which is the heart of our constitutional system?
25. You refused to finish the Davao City Convention Center on your claim that it was attended by graft and corruption. Were you able to catch and convict the grafters and the corrupt?

On your claim of a simple life:
26. When you were still pretending to be undecided to run for President because you had no money to mount a presidential run, you were traveling around in style in the jet of your religious leader, Quiboloy, with the support of your businessmen cronies of Davao City.

Why did you claim in your speech at Bonbon, Catarman, Camiguin, that you have BARS OF GOLD WORTH FIFTEEN BILLION PESOS?
27. With your salary as city mayor, what did you do to acquire BILLIONS OF PESOS?

28. Is it true that you have a criminal case involving graft and corruption? If so, what is it all about and what is the status of the case?

29. Is it true that you have cornered the gold produced from Mount Diwalwal and you export it to China?

30. How much money have you have made out of this activity and how much taxes did you pay?

On your campaign contributors:

31. Who are your rich Davao campaign contributors other than Quiboloy and Paul Dominguez? How much as of today have they contributed to your campaign?

32. You went to Hong Kong in the early stage of the campaign. Is it true you went there to meet your big Chinese contributors? How much did they contribute? Who are they?

33. It is reported that you went to Saudi Arabia several days ago. Is it true you went there to meet your rich Arab contributors? If so, how much did they contribute and who are they?

34. Do you know it is prohibited by law to solicit elections funds from foreigners?

35. Do you know it is prohibited by law to receive election funds foreigners?

36. How do you expect to be a good President when you violate so many laws as your whims dictate?

On your morals

36. You admit to having two wives, a number of girl friends, kissing and fondling women in public to satisfy your libidinous desire because this is part of biology. Do you realize that these admissions indicate a low respect for women and high degree of immorality?

37. How can you expect citizens, especially the young, to respect our laws when you are an immoral law violator – an admitted bigamist, an admitted adulterer, an admitted molester of women?

38. You claim to be a Roman Catholic. What kind of a Roman Catholic are you when just for a traffic jam you had the effrontery to curse Pope Francis? And are a bigamist, an adulterer and a molester of women?

39. Why did you make a stupid declaration that you will destroy the Catholic Church? Didn’t you know that kings and potentates of empires could not do it even in two thousand years?

On your rebel connections:

40. You claim to be friends of the CPP-NPA rebels and there is unconfirmed information that you contribute to them, is this true?

41. If this is true, do you know that under Article 114 of the Revised Penal Code, giving aid and comfort to the enemy of the Republic is treason and your action makes you a traitor to the country?

42. Similarly, Muslim rebels, specifically the Mindanao National Liberation Front,(MNLF) endorsed you for President and threaten that if you do not elected, they will intensify their campaign to topple the government. Did you accept such endorsement?

43. If you did accept the support of the Muslim rebels, do you know that this violates Article 114 of the Revised Penal Code and that it makes you a traitor to the country? Can you ever imagine a traitor as President of our country?

On your inconsistencies

You have many inconsistencies but the most glaring are the following:

44. In the course of your campaign and in your usual bragging moment, you said the moment you get to be President you will immediately send Jojo Binay to jail, yet in the recent Cebu City presidential debate, you endorsed Binay for President as an alternative to you, how can you explain this inconsistency?

45. Early on you said you will declare a revolutionary government when you become President. Why did you change your mind?

* * *

It’s just a few days between now and May 9, 2016.

Listening to Duterte talk gives you the feeling that you are in an insane asylum. Considering his popularity, it is not impossible that he can be President. If that happens, we will be living in an insane country with a National Psychiatrist as a member of the Cabinet.

----------------------------

14 Responses to Still questions for Duterte
Frodo Godofredo says:
April 16, 2016 at 10:07 am
If Duterte could lead with iron fists and KO the 100 or so ruling families in the country then he’s my president as long as he can keep his fists closed and out of the masses’ pockets.
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To the Max says:
April 16, 2016 at 10:02 am
The question is why is he so popular? Because the majority of the Filipino voters have a very low perception of a good leader. The majority have very low I.Q. And mostly coming from poor families. They think Duterte and Clint Eastwood is one and the same person. Thanks to the head of PNP Marquez that there is a down trend of criminality in Metro Manila. Checkpoints all over the city. MMDA no contact/apprehension policy ends the Kotong System of the MMDA thanks to the new commissioner. We are on the right direction after the worst police general, General Alan Purisima. It will just take a few more months and every thing will be alright after changing the DOTC secretary Emilio Abaya.
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clive pardoe says:
April 16, 2016 at 9:12 am
It seems from your post that you pose more questions than answers. Indeed the contents of your article are just one long diatribe of accusation and inuendo so the reader is drawn to the conclusion that you are at best misguided and at worst a paid hatchet man. But in regard to the latter, of course as we get nearer election day and Dutertes popularity stays high, one would expect nothing less from the opposition would we? I read once that it is a sure sign of a great persons success when people smear and try to drag them down so Duterte supporters should take great heart when weavels like Adaza come out of their cloistered woodwork.Last but not least the accusations herein remind me of a very clever man who once proved by logic that Napoleon never existed. indeed he made an unasailable case but where he failed was that he started with one false premise.By contrast your article is full of false premeses and therefore lacks any relavance whatsoever !!
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Kotimoy says:
April 16, 2016 at 9:02 am
Characteristics of a popular politician: a horrible voice, bad breeding, and a vulgar manner. _ _ Aristophanes
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freddie says:
April 16, 2016 at 8:57 am
Very timely and informative for any investigative journalist out there. Any one?
Election (formality only, because our votes will not be counted. It will be summed up by VCM) is very near. Duterte is a color yellow. Why? he was pushed to run by koko of pdp-laban, creation of nene. Who is nene? creation of cory including binay, also formerly pdp-laban. The four entries are marked yellow who will not dare to say they will put pnoy behind bars. Pls ask this question during the last debate. ” Who among you will dare to say ‘i will put bsaquino behind bars?”
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Maria Taffer says:
April 16, 2016 at 8:22 am
A comment from Giancarlo Reyes Saulo puts it well when he said:
People say we need to elect a good “Model” as our Perfect leader…It shouldn’t come as a surprise.However did we ever look on the standards of God when it comes to choosing leaders?..Jacob was a cheater, Peter had a temper, David had an affair,Solomon had 700 wives, Noah got drunk, Jonah ran from God, Paul was a murderer of Christians, Gideon was insecure, Miriam was a gossip, Martha was a worrier, Thomas was a doubter, Sara was impatient, Elijah was moody, Moses stuttered, Abraham was old, and Lazarus was dead. Did it matter? God doesn’t call the qualified, He qualifies the CALLED!
#Duterte
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clive pardoe says:
April 16, 2016 at 9:14 am
Great post Maria, keep whacking them in !!
Maria Taffer says:
April 16, 2016 at 8:22 am
END OLIGARCHY.
NO to another Yellow Oligarch Minion/Puppet.
NO to an AMERICAN FIRST FAMILY in Malacanang & another puppet of the Yellow Oligarchs.
NO to the biggest kickbacker&pickpocketer of people’s hard-earned money.
YES to CHANGE.
YES to FEDERALISM.
CHANGE IS COMING.
If you have lived all your life in Metro Manila, I would understand if in love na in love ka sa present UNITARY form of govt., kasi 60% of the national annual budget lovingly goes to Imperial Manila and the rest of the country outside Imperial Manila will have to make-do with the remaining 40%.
Wag naman tayo sobrang maramot.This is one major reason why economic growth outside your beloved Manila is S-L-O-W.
https://youtu.be/wcYpc-aDhYY
Like, share and repost if you believe that change is possible and change is coming….
Reply
Durara says:
April 16, 2016 at 4:49 am
I shat my pants reading this. The sheer ignorance and arrogance in this article is unbearable. Talk about political bias. Not much to expect from old sh*t journalists.
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Samuel Santos says:
April 16, 2016 at 4:10 am
This article will surely (a)waken Duterte to his senses. Sa kabilang dako, nawa’y hwag na sana namang magtulogtulogan pa ang mga botante.
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Entong says:
April 16, 2016 at 4:01 am
Nagsalita naman itong magaling. Ikaw anong nagawa mo nung nasa gobyerno ka, maliban sa dakdak ng dakdak?
Kung saang tsismis ma nasagap ang mga yan, doon mo hanapan ng sagot.
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Keem Wong says:
April 16, 2016 at 2:34 am
The biggest mistake of the STUPID Filipino voters will be voting for either Duterte or Binay. Duterte is too fresh and thinks that nobody on earth is right except him. It will be very dangerous for him to get elected because his children will become abusive. In the case of Binay, his greed for money has no end. He will continue stealing government’s money as long as he lives.
The solution for this; Pray to save the Philippines from Duterte and the Binays. May their lawyers and followers suffer the WRATH of the Almighty God.
Reply
clive pardoe says:
April 16, 2016 at 9:18 am
Yes Keem and may you suffer the wrath of common sense. Rest assured its a healing balm…try it !!
Roger Sy says:
April 16, 2016 at 10:00 am
And what if once again you were Wong? I would rather pray to save the Philippines from a Poe presidency!

PART 1's responses

28 Responses to The Duterte candidacy: An imminent danger to our country?
Alberto Maliwat Jr. says:
April 14, 2016 at 3:34 pm
Duterte is pro-communism that’s why he want “Kangaroo court” killing without due process. He is a lawyer but don’t believe in it so he should be disbar.
Reply
beng says:
April 14, 2016 at 3:19 pm
Give Filipinos the chance to experience a safe haven, it’s time. 50 years of agony in the hands of corrupt politicians and high criminality rate due to poverty which remained unchanged. Give the man a chance to prove to the country his worth, afterall what is 6 years compared to 50…
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Harush Nandwani says:
April 14, 2016 at 1:18 pm
In a very rare instance the common man has united against vested and powerful interests ….Duterte is their overwhelping choice .. just as Fernando Po was … shall we again tart the people voice …. poverty. .. crime …abuse in government …is all we have received after Marcos ….is itnot an abuse of our human rights that our country cannot provide the great majority education ..opportunity for advancement .. a decent job… our leaders have failed us …..abused us .. oppressed us …let the people’s voice be heard and followed …Duterte is their call
Reply
Pacita says:
April 14, 2016 at 1:01 pm
Ang daming bobotante sa pilipinas. Pati komunista suportado at niyayakap. Hindi na inaalintana ang kapahamakang hinaharap. Mga bobo at tanga. Hindi alam ang mabuti at masama. Dahil sa iniyong katangahan at kamangmangan, you will get what you deserve. Buti na lang at nasa ibang bansa na ako. Hindi ako masiyadong damay sa kamalasan at kabuwisitan dahil sa kabobohan at kamangmangan ng mga kababayan. Pag si Duterte ang nanalo, pasok na sa malacanang ang mga komunistang suportado niyo dahil sa kabobohan at katangahan niyo. Lol
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qjxf2CrIvw
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Contis says:
April 14, 2016 at 12:48 pm
Ur correct kawawa ung mhihirap un lng ang mamatay how about the politicos and the influential persons kaya niya bng papatay un not to mention the likes of ampatuan na kaibigan niya. Huwag taung padala sa false promises sa pelikula lng mngyayari un not in reality.
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Anton says:
April 14, 2016 at 12:34 pm
>>>HOMOBONO A. ADAZA, lol pakawala ni Roxas to o kaya Binay o Grace Poe, what a desperate move, thanks for the effort in posting your wtf article.
FYI Carpe diem is latin do your homework before posting here
Reply
Mario Sulit says:
April 14, 2016 at 11:55 am
Well said Bono. Thank you for your ideas.Never again to a killer and a dictator.
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Jul-z says:
April 14, 2016 at 11:36 am
Did you rIse the same argument when PNoy ran as president? Clear and imminent danger to the Republic?
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Jul-z says:
April 14, 2016 at 11:35 am
Did you raise the same argument when PNoy ran as president- clear and imminent danger?
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Ely Gemina says:
April 14, 2016 at 11:12 am
I think Duterte endanger to our country
which already recovring slowly. I dont know where is the heart of this kind of indivedual. Killing human being w/o a due process of law.
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Omie says:
April 14, 2016 at 11:02 am
Duterte said he is against corruption, can the media take a look of his children’s assets/wealth, particularly his vice mayor son who reportedly has a mansion and fleet of cars/SUV. Is he a plain politician or a successful businessman that he can afford this luxurious life? Why dont you dare Duterte to have his children as well sign a waiver and open their bank accounts to the public.
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paul says:
April 14, 2016 at 10:53 am
All good leaders kill..with the stroke of their pen, to protect the majority of their people.
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Filomer Lin says:
April 14, 2016 at 10:49 am
As a possible president of the country, Mayor Duterte should not sow terror and killings as the solution for cleaning up the country of “undesirable” citizens since a good example of death squads is El Salvador in the 1980’s where over 23,000 were killed by government sanctioned death squads but it did not eradicate criminality in that country until now. Rather an intelligent president should follow the due process of low crime rate countries the likes of Japan, South Korea, Hongkong and Singapore. No dead bodies and low crime rate should be the goal of a progressive country. When the killing starts in Mayor Duterte’s possible presidency then all the Catholics and Christians who voted for him cannot complain that it may be too severe since they accept it as their absolute solution for the country’s progress.
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Charles Chim says:
April 14, 2016 at 10:47 am
Mayor Dutente, if he ran, would be President of the United States.
Criminals: violent, corrupt, drug, or otherwise need to be treated with tough love, gloves off, no fooling around, give them some Manny Paquiao, keep lowering their numbers until they are so afraid of the law and justice they go straight and are no longer criminals.
Governments tend to tolerate criminals for too many reasons.
Elect Rodrigo Dutente; he’ll straighten out the Philippines and bring in more investments, good jobs, and prosperity to the Philippines.
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Jerry De Jesus says:
April 14, 2016 at 10:44 am
Bono, Bono, Bono. Who did you expect Reuben Canoy would like to be president? You? Ride into the sunset Bono. You had you chance and you squandered it.
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kirikiri togo says:
April 14, 2016 at 9:52 am
Good questions that need answers!! Paging Digong!!!!
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kirikiri togo says:
April 14, 2016 at 9:50 am
A good questions that need answers. Paging Digong!!!!
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Freeman Freeman says:
April 14, 2016 at 9:47 am
Duterte is a fraud. Only the dumb and stupid will vote for Duterte. The sad truth is that there are more dumb and stupid in this country that the thinking ones so the Philippines is in danger of having Duterte as the next dictator. Poor Filipinos, you dumb people, you deserve what you deserve.
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M C says:
April 14, 2016 at 9:08 am
But Bono, if I remember right, an earlier column of yours ranted a preference for a Mindanaoan to become a president of this county. So how do you reconcile this seeming diametrically opposed views?
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Mike says:
April 14, 2016 at 7:58 am
Mr. Adaza, where’s my post earlier? Are you filtering them?
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Nestor Baylan says:
April 14, 2016 at 6:46 am
Duterte’s winning the presidency is not an imminent danger to the country. I see it differently. Criminals and other white collar scoundrels will end up as ENDANGERED SPECIES.
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Rudi Miranda says:
April 14, 2016 at 5:20 am
The talks of Duterte are just the opposite of ‘understatements.’ Hyperbole, ika nga ni Sen. M.D. Santiago. But, bulls eye re Ampatuan, iyon ang kelangan ng matino na sagot. Ano kaya, imminent danger? Ngunit, hindi po ba ang buong Pilipinas ay nasa kalagayan na ng danger? Nalinis rin ni Mayor Lacson noon ang Manila, hindi po ba? Nawawala rin ang mga criminal? Nalinis rin ni Lee Kuan Yew ang ‘Triad’ sa Singapore?
Ike Eisenhower: ‘A president much have balls.’
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Pacita says:
April 14, 2016 at 1:17 pm
Tatlo tatlo pa nga daw ang balls niya. Kaya sobrang sobra. Ang isa ay para sa mga chicks. Ang isa ay para sa mga komunista.
Ano kamo? Mawawala ang mga kriminals? Mawawala ba ang mga komunistang salot sa ating lipunan na pumapatay sa ating mga sundalo, pulis at mamamayan? Nope. I truly do not think so. Pag si Duterte ang nanalo, pasok na sila sa malacanang. Sigaw ni Duterte “Mabuhay ang NPA.” Mabuhay ang mga bobotante. Malamang ay patay ang bansang Pilipinas at mamamayang Filipinos pag nagkataon.
kokis says:
April 14, 2016 at 4:25 am
‘carpe diem” is Latin, i believe.
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Bongets says:
April 14, 2016 at 7:56 am
Hahaha. Siguro tulog ka lagi sa Latin class mo before, if u had any. Carpe is the second-person singular present active imperative of carpo (pick or pluck). Diem is the accusative case of the noun “dies” (day). Carpie diem is tranlated “sieze the day”
Roberta says:
April 14, 2016 at 2:15 am
I may not always agree with you-but in this article-Your analysis is crystal clear. Telling it simply as it is. We might be go from the frying pan into the fire
Reply
Keem Wong says:
April 14, 2016 at 12:40 am
Duterte is also the financier of the NPAs and MNLF.
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