PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full news commentary)

FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

EDITORIAL: DRUGS, NOW A MAJOR PROBLEM


MARCH 8 -The Bureau of Corrections carried out its 21st raid inside the maximum security compound of the New Bilibid Prisons in Muntinglupa City last week. One would expect that after so many raids, the national prison would have been cleared of all illegal items such as firearms and other weapons. But on this 21st sweep, the raiding prison officials found several more pistols and a kilo of shabu — methamphetamine — the largest haul of the illegal drug in the series of raids that began in November last year. During the 21 raids on the dormitories occupied by the convicts, a considerable number of television sets, cellphones, and appliances of all kinds were seized from the prisoners along with firearms. It seems the prison cells had been transformed into comfortable living quarters. There was even a swimmng pool in one prison building. Administrative charges were filed last month against four prison guards for alleged collusion with inmates in smuggling the contraband into the prison. Considering the volume of illegal items found inside the prison, the collusion probably reaches way above the four prison guards. The correctional system is one of the pillars of justice which, anti-crime party-list Rep. Samuel Pagdilao said the other day, need to be strengthened. The 21 raids that yielded so much contraband at the New Bilibid Prison showed how this pillar has been weakened to the point where it is believed to be harboring and protecting drug lords instead of restraining them. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Manny Villar - A floating solution to flooding


MARCH 9 -A World Meteorological Organization study provides a worrisome scenario for the Philippines. It reported that water levels around the Philippines are rising almost three times more than the global average of 3.1 centimeters every ten years. It is not as if we need more bad news given the fact that we are already hit by an average of 20 typhoons annually and that the United Nations (UN) has identified us as the third most at-risk country from climate change. I am not sure how much urgency there is among government agencies or the general public about the need to address this potentially cataclysmic problem. In particular, we need to seriously come up with climate change adaptation strategies. Beyond the jargon, what this simply means is that we need to prepare ourselves in order to prevent or minimize the damage climate change can cause. One strategy that can potentially address our problems with flooding and can become an important climate change adaptation strategy for the country is something that we have seen in our family travels to The Netherlands. Actually, it was my son Paolo who looked at the Dutch experience and transformed it into a powerful idea for the Philippines. I am proud to say that he was able to carefully guide the process that made this idea a reality. I am referring to “floating houses” or as Paolo called it, “Vintahanan.” During one of our trips to The Netherlands, we came across houses that are floating in the river. Later on, we would find out that these houses are not just experimental or trivial but they reflect a new strategy in city planning in The Netherlands: “leven met water” or “living with water.”  The idea is so brilliant in its simplicity. Do not fight back against rising water instead find ways to work with it. And I think we can trust the Dutch on this because they are widely acknowledged as having the best flood management technologies in the world. Much of it is born out of the fact that two thirds of its area is vulnerable to flooding. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Leandro DD Coronel - Why we have a Marcos problem


MARCH 9 -Leandro DD Coronel Leandro DD Coronel was educated in the Philippines and the United States, where he was based from 1969 to 1997. Coronel's commentary has appeared in Philippine News (San Francisco, California), the largest Fil-American newspaper; Filipino Express (New York/New Jersey); Manila Mail (Washington, DC); and Balita (Toronto, Canada). In Manila, his opinion pieces have been published in the Daily Inquirer, Manila Times, Manila Meteor, and BusinessMirror.  During the martial law years in the Philippines, Coronel was active not only in writing commentary against the dictatorship but also in street protests in the United States, landing him on the Marcos government's blacklist.
Like lookouts at the edge of a valley, concerned Filipinos are rushing to rouse the village: “The Marcoses are rising to power, the Marcoses are rising to power!” To take over again as they did in the 1970s and 80s. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s attempt to rise from senator to vice president is just the start. Imelda Marcos is seeking reelection as congresswoman from Ilocos Norte. And Imee Marcos wants to keep her gubernatorial seat in the same province. Sundry relatives, not as flamboyant and newsworthy as the aforementioned troika, are also placing themselves strategically. The alarms should be heeded. The Marcoses represent a mentality that doesn’t jibe with Filipino culture that is basically humble, simple, and down-to-earth. (Filipinos were basically honest in the past but succeeding popular culture and trends somehow have dissipated that virtue. But this is for another discussion.) The Marcoses had, and probably still do, a mentality that excess, extravagance, and glitter were the measure of the advance of man. When they were in Malacanang they lived as the Romans of old. Their habits, possessions, and diversions mimicked those of the profligate in the wealthy countries. Sadly, many Filipinos of the Marcoses’ time bought into that kind of thinking, that form was preferable to substance. Many Filipinos preferred the showy ways of Ferdinand and Imelda to the simple habits of, say, Presidents Ramon Magsaysay and Diosdado Macapagal. Ferdinand Marcos the strongman impressed normally humble people like Cesar Virata and he, plus a cadre of technocrats, helped to prop up the dictator. Naive people like Virata and Company helped to prolong Marcos’ martial rule. Bongbong Marcos refuses to apologize for his father’s ruthless dictatorship and his mother’s insatiable extravagance. The Marcoses have reinserted themselves into mainstream society, as if nothing dark and diabolical had happened in the past. Actually, today’s collective anxiety over a possible return to power of the Marcoses would have been impossible but for a simple act. The act that emanated from the Malacanang of then President Cory Aquino allowing the Marcoses to return to the country. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Erik Espina - My president? (Part 1 & 2)


MARCH 9 -(1&2) ERIK ESPINA - FROM FACEBOOK -AFFILIATION: Manila Bulletin, Tempo, Balita, Global News Network. SHORT DESCRIPTION: "Self-Determinism" must be all about preserving National Unity. The highest Filipino value next to Freedom - Erik R Espina
For those acquainted with my father (former Cebu governor and senator Rene Espina), it becomes reactionary and for my part an inescapable hurdle when the question is popped, “Are you running?” I used to demur, citing offers in the past of two congressmen who flew to Manila convincing me to aspire for the provincial executive post. And others, e.g., a highly visible religious leader with huge following, humbling me for higher office after exchanging ideas and proposals, and given the family’s modest walk with politics and history. Of late, when egged to run, I navigate with food for thought, “I do not mourn for my unfulfilled dreams for country, but for the people who do not know they have to mourn. The only real hope, is hope itself.” There is the eternal optimism of the Filipino spirit readily given in their smiles in a cycle of unchangeable conditions. Truth be told, the vetting system for picking our national leaders is broken. I have written about this in the past regarding the two-party system with bi-partisan “precinct Inspectors” as civil servants, being the most ideal set-up, with a validated national harvest of the best and the brightest elected. Today, we are consoling ourselves with ignominious choices due to a faulty process initiated in 1972 and secured in 1987. Blame must be attached, to both regimes. It is the language of history. The next query often asked is — who is my president? I can only speak for myself, and what is required. The standards compelling, serious, and specific. 1. A president must have the water service contracts reviewed and validated as onerous to the public interest and therefore renegotiated to bring down fees. 2. Same with power contracts. The EPIRA Law must be reviewed and amended. If need be, government must take over to bring down the costs and make the country an investment jewel. A plebiscite on the use of Nuclear Power is a must. 3. A government petrol corporation to ease domestic price monopolies with Oil De-regulation Law, amended. 4. MRT and LRT, preferably under a Japanese or German maintenance company. CONTINUE READBG

ALSO: Further assurance of clean polls


MARCH 10 -Half of Filipinos expect May 2016 polls to be credible -survey MB FILE The Commission on Elections (Comelec) faces a formidable task with the decision of the Supreme Court ordering it to activate in all of its voting machines the issuance of voting receipts to all voters on May 9, 2016. It will now have to hold a bidding for the paper needed for the receipts. It will have to look for funds for the purpose. It will have to train its thousands of election inspectors on the process of issuing the receipts, with the additional task of resupplying the machines with paper when the initial supply runs out. But the biggest problem – which made the Comelec do away with the voting receipt feature in the first place – is the time consumed by the process. There may not be enough time for all the voters in a precinct to go through the process of inserting the ballot, then waiting for the voting receipt to come out – within the usual nine hours from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on election day. For this reason, some Comelec officials had thought about the possibility of holding elections over two days. The Comelec will be filing a motion for reconsideration of the Supreme Court decision. But even as it files its motion, it must prepare for the likely possibility that the decision – a unanimous one by the 14 justices present at Tuesday’s en banc session – will stand. The Comelec, we are confident, will be up to the task, with the help of other agencies of the government. We can see the decision as a further strengthening of the security surrounding automated voting which had been questioned in some areas of the country in the last two elections. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Drugs, now a major problem

MANILA, MARCH 14, 2016 (BULLETIN) March 8, 2016 - The Bureau of Corrections carried out its 21st raid inside the maximum security compound of the New Bilibid Prisons in Muntinglupa City last week. One would expect that after so many raids, the national prison would have been cleared of all illegal items such as firearms and other weapons.

But on this 21st sweep, the raiding prison officials found several more pistols and a kilo of shabu — methamphetamine — the largest haul of the illegal drug in the series of raids that began in November last year.

During the 21 raids on the dormitories occupied by the convicts, a considerable number of television sets, cellphones, and appliances of all kinds were seized from the prisoners along with firearms. It seems the prison cells had been transformed into comfortable living quarters. There was even a swimmng pool in one prison building.

Administrative charges were filed last month against four prison guards for alleged collusion with inmates in smuggling the contraband into the prison. Considering the volume of illegal items found inside the prison, the collusion probably reaches way above the four prison guards.

The correctional system is one of the pillars of justice which, anti-crime party-list Rep. Samuel Pagdilao said the other day, need to be strengthened. The 21 raids that yielded so much contraband at the New Bilibid Prison showed how this pillar has been weakened to the point where it is believed to be harboring and protecting drug lords instead of restraining them.

READ MORE...

The other pillars of justice – the commnity, law enforcement, and the courts with the prosecution —need to be similarly strengthened, he said, if the country is to properly confront the big problem of drugs in the country. Most of the shabu is produced in hidden labs in Central Luzon and West Visayas. Where the Philippines used to be known mostly as a transshipment point for drugs, it has become notorious as manufacturer, packager, marketer, user, and exporter of drugs to other countries, Pagdilao said. But our greatest concern is for our own people, mostly youths, who have fallen victim to drugs.

Several proposals have been made to solve the drug problem, including strengthening and modernizing the capabilities of the Philippine National Police and the Philippine Drug Enforcement Authority, creating more courts for drug cases, and strengthening the Witness Protection Program to encourage greater support from the community. Congresman Pagdilao has proposed reviving the death penalty for foreigners found involved in shabu manufacturing.

The drug problem, he said, has become a major problem for the country, second only to the perennial problem of poverty. It seems it has not received as much attention as it should. It should be a major part of the platforms of government of those who are now actively seeking our support in the coming election.

2 Comments Manila Bulletin Login 1 Recommend Share Sort by Best Avatar Join the discussion…

Avatar Potyong • 19 hours ago
Sa lahat na tumatakbo ng pagka pangulo sa 2016 si DUTERTE lang ang may malinaw na sinasabi kong paano sugpoin ang kreminalidad corruption at lalo nasa druga. Ang iba halatang pamomolitika at sarili lang ang iniisip lalo nasi BINAY...Kaya mga kababayan ko Kong gusto natin na matapos ang problema sa druga at mabalik sa tamang daan na tinatahak ang bansa natin. Piliin atin sa darating na halalan ang totoong tao namay prinsepyo at ginagawa kong ano ang sinasabi. Si DUTERTE po ang tao nayon. Sya po ang ating huling baraha. 1 • Reply•Share ›

Avatar Jimmy N Ruby Deloso Potyong • 15 hours ago
Isa ito sa ikinagagalit ni DUTERTE na imbes nakakulong ang mga lawless na drugheads dun na nagluluto ng mga illegalities sa loob ng Munti... binabantayan pa ng mga korap ding bantay salakays.. Tyak meron ito kakalagyan.... Pupulutin ito sa kangkungan kung magmamatigas at di sumangayon at susunod sa batas...DUTERTECAYETANO2016 • Reply•Share ›


A floating solution to flooding by Senator Manny Villar March 8, 2016 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share2


Senator Manny Villar Of Trees And Forest- He is a Filipino businessman and politician. He was ranked as the fifth richest Filipino by Forbes Asia in their October 2007 issue. He is the President of Nacionalista Party and member of the Senate of the Philippines. He assumed the senate presidency at the start of the Third Regular Session of the 13th Congress along with Senator Franklin Drilon but was forced to resign from the post on 17 November 2008.

A World Meteorological Organization study provides a worrisome scenario for the Philippines. It reported that water levels around the Philippines are rising almost three times more than the global average of 3.1 centimeters every ten years.

It is not as if we need more bad news given the fact that we are already hit by an average of 20 typhoons annually and that the United Nations (UN) has identified us as the third most at-risk country from climate change.

I am not sure how much urgency there is among government agencies or the general public about the need to address this potentially cataclysmic problem. In particular, we need to seriously come up with climate change adaptation strategies.

Beyond the jargon, what this simply means is that we need to prepare ourselves in order to prevent or minimize the damage climate change can cause.

One strategy that can potentially address our problems with flooding and can become an important climate change adaptation strategy for the country is something that we have seen in our family travels to The Netherlands.

Actually, it was my son Paolo who looked at the Dutch experience and transformed it into a powerful idea for the Philippines. I am proud to say that he was able to carefully guide the process that made this idea a reality. I am referring to “floating houses” or as Paolo called it, “Vintahanan.”

During one of our trips to The Netherlands, we came across houses that are floating in the river. Later on, we would find out that these houses are not just experimental or trivial but they reflect a new strategy in city planning in The Netherlands: “leven met water” or “living with water.”

The idea is so brilliant in its simplicity. Do not fight back against rising water instead find ways to work with it. And I think we can trust the Dutch on this because they are widely acknowledged as having the best flood management technologies in the world. Much of it is born out of the fact that two thirds of its area is vulnerable to flooding.

READ MORE...

So Paolo had this idea, “Why can’t we adopt the same strategy in the Philippines since we basically face the same problem with flooding?”

It was brilliant. The idea simply calls for the building of what would amount to an amphibious house that is designed to rise with the water level.

As explained to us by the Dutch construction company Dura Vermeer, “the houses float on hollow platforms made of concrete and timber.” All pipes and ducts for water, gas, electricity, and sewage disposal are flexible and keep functioning even when a house rises several meters. Sturdy posts set deep into the ground prevent the houses from drifting away.

The BBC News has reported that the United Kingdom and other countries have started to work with the same idea in their respective countries.

Here in the Philippines, Paolo, who is the president and chief executive officer of Vista Land, has created a floating village project called ‘Vintahanan’ in Laguna Lake.

Let me quote Paolo here on. “The floating village and the pioneering technology utilized in construction are perfect for an archipelagic country like the Philippines, a country vulnerable to climate change. It is an effective way of mitigating the damaging effects of climate change, particularly massive flooding and rising sea levels.”

Vista Land partnered with the Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA), the Department of Works and Public Highways (DPWH), and Dutch construction company Dura Vermeer to build a prototype that is available for anyone to view or even replicate.

I told Paolo that given the urgency of the climate change issue and the persistent vulnerability of our people to flooding, we need to make this project as our CSR or corporate social responsibility project.

Businesses, especially we at Vista Land, are not just about the bottom line. We are part of efforts towards nation building and should therefore help in providing solutions to social problems.

It makes me proud as a father and as a businessman to see how our company has taken on the challenge to innovate in order to provide new solutions to old problems in the country.

I invite everyone to visit our Vintahanan project located in Laguna Lake, Lakefront, Barangay Sucat, Muntinlupa, and see if you can use the technology in your community.


Editorials » Why we have a Marcos problem by Leandro DD Coronel March 9, 2016 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share6


Leandro DD Coronel Leandro DD Coronel was educated in the Philippines and the United States, where he was based from 1969 to 1997. Coronel's commentary has appeared in Philippine News (San Francisco, California), the largest Fil-American newspaper; Filipino Express (New York/New Jersey); Manila Mail (Washington, DC); and Balita (Toronto, Canada). In Manila, his opinion pieces have been published in the Daily Inquirer, Manila Times, Manila Meteor, and BusinessMirror.  During the martial law years in the Philippines, Coronel was active not only in writing commentary against the dictatorship but also in street protests in the United States, landing him on the Marcos government's blacklist.

Like lookouts at the edge of a valley, concerned Filipinos are rushing to rouse the village: “The Marcoses are rising to power, the Marcoses are rising to power!”

To take over again as they did in the 1970s and 80s. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s attempt to rise from senator to vice president is just the start.

Imelda Marcos is seeking reelection as congresswoman from Ilocos Norte. And Imee Marcos wants to keep her gubernatorial seat in the same province. Sundry relatives, not as flamboyant and newsworthy as the aforementioned troika, are also placing themselves strategically.

The alarms should be heeded.

The Marcoses represent a mentality that doesn’t jibe with Filipino culture that is basically humble, simple, and down-to-earth. (Filipinos were basically honest in the past but succeeding popular culture and trends somehow have dissipated that virtue. But this is for another discussion.)

The Marcoses had, and probably still do, a mentality that excess, extravagance, and glitter were the measure of the advance of man. When they were in Malacanang they lived as the Romans of old. Their habits, possessions, and diversions mimicked those of the profligate in the wealthy countries.

Sadly, many Filipinos of the Marcoses’ time bought into that kind of thinking, that form was preferable to substance. Many Filipinos preferred the showy ways of Ferdinand and Imelda to the simple habits of, say, Presidents Ramon Magsaysay and Diosdado Macapagal.

Ferdinand Marcos the strongman impressed normally humble people like Cesar Virata and he, plus a cadre of technocrats, helped to prop up the dictator. Naive people like Virata and Company helped to prolong Marcos’ martial rule.

Bongbong Marcos refuses to apologize for his father’s ruthless dictatorship and his mother’s insatiable extravagance. The Marcoses have reinserted themselves into mainstream society, as if nothing dark and diabolical had happened in the past.

Actually, today’s collective anxiety over a possible return to power of the Marcoses would have been impossible but for a simple act. The act that emanated from the Malacanang of then President Cory Aquino allowing the Marcoses to return to the country.

READ MORE...

Exile should always be permanent so those who had done grievous wrong against their home countries won’t ever have the opportunity to again impose themselves upon the people. Despots like Uganda’s Idi Amin and the Shah of Iran were never allowed back home, the former eventually dying in Saudi Arabia and the latter in Egypt.

Ferdinand and Imelda fled the country under threat of lynching by furious Filipinos fed up with martial rule in 1986. The Grim Reaper took mercy on Marcos and took him away in 1989. In 1991 Imelda was allowed back into the country. The embalmed body of Ferdinand followed in 1993.

Since then the Marcoses have been inching their way back to power. Today the triad of Imelda, Imee, and Bongbong hold powerful government positions.

For that reason a group of concerned Filipinos have banded together under the name “Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacańang,” or CARMMA, to fight primarily Bongbong Marcos’ election to the vice presidency. Will more people join the ranks of CARMMA, either formally or on their own work against Bongbong’s election?

One hopes that critical mass develops to stop Bongbong from being elected vice president. (But would that open the door for Chiz Escudero, another objectionable VP candidate? This, too, is a topic for another day.).

The country wouldn’t be having this Marcos problem had Cory Aquino not unlocked the gate for the Marcoses in 1991. Worse, the Marcos “problem” has for now become a conundrum, an issue without a solution. Until possibly May. Or frighteningly worse, beyond.


My president? (Part 1) by Erik Espina March 3, 2016 Share5 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share20


ERIK ESPINA - FROM FACEBOOK -AFFILIATION: Manila Bulletin, Tempo, Balita, Global News Network. SHORT DESCRIPTION: "Self-Determinism" must be all about preserving National Unity. The highest Filipino value next to Freedom - Erik R Espina

For those acquainted with my father (former Cebu governor and senator Rene Espina), it becomes reactionary and for my part an inescapable hurdle when the question is popped, “Are you running?”

I used to demur, citing offers in the past of two congressmen who flew to Manila convincing me to aspire for the provincial executive post. And others, e.g., a highly visible religious leader with huge following, humbling me for higher office after exchanging ideas and proposals, and given the family’s modest walk with politics and history.

Of late, when egged to run, I navigate with food for thought, “I do not mourn for my unfulfilled dreams for country, but for the people who do not know they have to mourn. The only real hope, is hope itself.”

There is the eternal optimism of the Filipino spirit readily given in their smiles in a cycle of unchangeable conditions. Truth be told, the vetting system for picking our national leaders is broken.

I have written about this in the past regarding the two-party system with bi-partisan “precinct Inspectors” as civil servants, being the most ideal set-up, with a validated national harvest of the best and the brightest elected.

Today, we are consoling ourselves with ignominious choices due to a faulty process initiated in 1972 and secured in 1987. Blame must be attached, to both regimes. It is the language of history.

The next query often asked is — who is my president? I can only speak for myself, and what is required. The standards compelling, serious, and specific.

1. A president must have the water service contracts reviewed and validated as onerous to the public interest and therefore renegotiated to bring down fees.

2. Same with power contracts. The EPIRA Law must be reviewed and amended. If need be, government must take over to bring down the costs and make the country an investment jewel. A plebiscite on the use of Nuclear Power is a must.

3. A government petrol corporation to ease domestic price monopolies with Oil De-regulation Law, amended.

4. MRT and LRT, preferably under a Japanese or German maintenance company.

CONTINUE READING...

5. Laguna de Bay cleared of fish pens and a government water system to provide potable water to service Metro Manila; a circular expressway will be expedited etc.

6. Pass FOI and end contractualization

7. Death penalty restored for suspects arrested inside and “cooking” in shabu laboratories.

8. WPS and Sabah all Philippine territory. Runways and lighthouses built and part of the area will be opened for tourism.

9. Joint agreement with an American petrol company to explore Bentham Reef for oil and gas to include WPS.

10. With the decommissioning of Philippine Navy ships BRPs Rajah Humabon, Rizal, Malvar, Quezon, and Laguna after the arrival of two missile armed frigates, three missile-equipped multi-purpose assault craft, etc., the former ships will be beached in Ayungin Shoal as added settlement for Marine contingent on BRP Sierra Madre.

11. A permanent Department on Original and Muslim Filipino Affairs by law attached to the Office of the President headed by a Kiram family member who shall also represent the president in the ARMM openings; a State yearly endowment shall be granted the clan for Sabah as part of Philippine territory.

PERSONAL: Condolences to the family of Mandaue Mayor and Cebu Provincial Board Member Thadeo ‘Teddy’ Ouano.


"Bagaman hindi pa lubos na lumalabas sa mga survey, alam na sa dulo kung sino ang pinaka-katunggali nila. Siya ang may pinaka-may “K”: may kakayahan, may karanasan, may konsensya, may katapatan, may kalinga’t pagmamahal sa kapwa, at ang pinakahuli, may Korina,” Aquino said. (Loosely translated: Roxas  has the best 'K' -Kakayahan (Ability); Karanasan (Experience); Katapatan (Honesty); kalinga/pagmamahal sa Kapwa (Care and Love for others and last but not least he has 'Korina'.) MB FILE

My president? (2) by Erik Espina March 9, 2016

When a leader has the conscience of history behind him to enkindle his vision for the country, the impoverished faces of his people constant in his heart, not his pocket; when the rule of law is standard caveat applied above family and friends, and when the Constitution is supreme over all government action, particularly, pursuing those who break the law and rebel – peace under the Constitution contemplates effective law enforcement and national defense by PNP and AFP, not surrender of sovereignty – then, there you have a president and a commander-in-chief.

Continuing from last week’s bill of particulars:

1) Peace talks resumed only by directly dealing with the CPP, no longer the NDF.

2) Missiles stationed in Palawan, etc.

3) An amended law on the ARMM with Indonesia or Thailand as third party intermediator.

4) Domestic and international debt reduction program and “balance budgeting.”

5) Executive departments merged and right-sized, e.g., Public works, Transportation and Communication, Agriculture, and Agrarian Reform, with single undersecretaries.

6) Declaring drugs as a “national security threat” and increasing the penalties for large-scale smuggling. In 6 month, results and cases will be filed.

7) Amnesty on undeclared dollar deposits abroad and incentivizing Filipino business to relocate to help the Philippine economy.

8) Government will beef-up gold deposits by buying into local mining companies.

9) Additional telecom companies to spur better services and pricing. Government will set up a GOCC telecom for faster internal and confidential communication.

10) On the first year, executive and congressional pork barrel, discretionary and intel funds plus lump sums will be openly appropriated to end the lack of new schools, classrooms, and the hiring of teachers. On the second year, appropriated for national defense.

11) Issue on “jueteng” subjected to a plebiscite. Managed by PCSO in partnership with LGUs and a sharing scheme for local social amelioration, e.g., new hospitals, equipment, free medicine.

12) Funding for educational state institutions on science and technology, with Foreign Scientist Visitor-Residency Program for knowledge transfer.

13) Micro, small-medium enterprises will be supported and further strengthened.

14) Full backward integration for a leap into full industrialization, e.g. ,integrated steel mills, copper smelter plants, oil refineries.

15) Amending Road User’s Tax Law to funnel funding into actual pubic works maintenance, new construction – road/bridge projects, pavements, lighting, etc.

16) Economic zones in Mindano and mini-Pagcor cities in impoverished provinces.

17) Reviving Pasig, lost esteros, and national/provincial rivers, clearing them of polluting businesses.

18) Free parking in malls so long reciepts are presented to the guard.

19) Housing will be reconfigured to human settlements with vertical structures.

20) Inaugurating Mindanao Railway System.

21) Empowering a national agency on stricter land use, zoning, and urbanization.

22) Contracting UP College of Public Administration where/how to cut red tape and simplify tax filing.

23) LGUs empowered by DOLE/POEA as contracting agencies to deal with foreign employers.

24) Purchasing an $80-M plastic recycling plant.


Further assurance of clean polls March 10, 2016 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share1


Half of Filipinos expect May 2016 polls to be credible -survey MB FILE

The Commission on Elections (Comelec) faces a formidable task with the decision of the Supreme Court ordering it to activate in all of its voting machines the issuance of voting receipts to all voters on May 9, 2016.

It will now have to hold a bidding for the paper needed for the receipts. It will have to look for funds for the purpose. It will have to train its thousands of election inspectors on the process of issuing the receipts, with the additional task of resupplying the machines with paper when the initial supply runs out.

But the biggest problem – which made the Comelec do away with the voting receipt feature in the first place – is the time consumed by the process. There may not be enough time for all the voters in a precinct to go through the process of inserting the ballot, then waiting for the voting receipt to come out – within the usual nine hours from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on election day. For this reason, some Comelec officials had thought about the possibility of holding elections over two days.

The Comelec will be filing a motion for reconsideration of the Supreme Court decision. But even as it files its motion, it must prepare for the likely possibility that the decision – a unanimous one by the 14 justices present at Tuesday’s en banc session – will stand. The Comelec, we are confident, will be up to the task, with the help of other agencies of the government.

We can see the decision as a further strengthening of the security surrounding automated voting which had been questioned in some areas of the country in the last two elections.

READ MORE...

There were repeated calls for a return to manual elections because some of the security provisions provided by law were allegedly not followed.

The Comelec appears determined this time to ensure that all possible security features are in place. The old Precinct Count Optical Scanners (PCOS) – derided for alleged “hocus-PCOS results – have been replaced by new Vote Counting Machines (VCMs). Source codes are in place and are open to local examination. The Comelec is open to posting the election results per precinct so these may be added up and checked against the totals canvassed by the municipal voting center. Digital signatures from each voting machine should eliminate the threat of the municipal voting center accepting results from unauthorized machines.

We are confident that the Comelec will be able to weather this problem of voting receipts. It has done well all these months and should be able to accept this Supreme Court ruling as further assurance to the nation that the May 9 election will be a clean and honest one.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2015 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE