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EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full news commentary)


FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

BY FRED LOBO: OPLAN VETO; FULFILL THY PROMISE
[As a compromise, Belmonte backs SSS’s suggestion of a P1,000 hike in pension to be approved by its board as majority leader and Mandaluyong City Rep. Neptali Gonzales predicts that “an override will never happen.” Pray for Solomonic wisdom and make old pensioners happy, Your Honors!.]


JANUARY 20 -Pensioners and workers marched to Mendiola to assert their demand for a P2,000 SSS pension hike. MARIANNE BERMUDEZ INQUIRER PHOTO The conntroverisal vetoeing by President Aquino of the proposed P2,000 hike for Social Security System (SSS) pensioners triggers more protests and a move in Congress to override the presidential veto. “Killed” pension hike bill and patrons fight for resurrection. *** Militant groups like the Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) condemn the veto of the pension hike bill and the proposal of administration allies in Congress for a “compromise” increase of only P1,000. Translation: No to veto, no to diminution of expected benefits. *** House Speaker Feliciano Belmonte hints at working on a “compromise” P1,000 pension increase despite Malacanang’s warning on an impending fiscal problem. Let’s try to appease the pensioners, he suggests. *** But Minority Leader Nery Colmenares discloses that a bid to gather the support of 192 of the 281 congressmen to overcome the president’s veto will be launched by the House opposition. Oplan Veto Override shaping up. *** “We will do our best to override the veto,” says Colmenares. House militants turning hot. *** Senior administration Reps. Alfredo Benitez (Independent, Negros Occidental), Alfred Vargas (LP, Quezon City), and Rodel Batocabe (Ako Bicol Partylis) note that another option is for the incoming 17th Congress to instead make another bid to hike SSS pension. All options open, they say. *** But Buhay Party-list Rep. Lito Atienza, a stalwart of the House independent minority bloc, says that President Aquino could have just adjusted the bill and imposed a compromise acceptable to all parties.” Why be insensitive to the needs of the poor and old pensioners?, he asks. *** Solons note that SSS finances could be further improved as per Commission on Audit (COA) report by running after unremitted employer contributions and penalties reaching R8.168 billion; aging unpaid members’ loans estimated at R61.226 billion; foregone rental income of R198.11 million, and R71 million in unauthorized allowances and cash benefits . Find a way to boost SSS financial capability, they say. READ MORE...

ALSO: Editorial - Filling up vacancies and drawing up a nat’l job program
[If a country as advanced as the US sees and values the need for an employment program for its people, a nation like the Philippines should see how much more it needs such a program. On top of filling vacancies that we now have, as Senator Recto recommends, the government should study and look into all possibilities to create jobs and, if necessary, train Filipinos for them.]


JANUARY 21 -In the remaining months of the Aquino administration, it would do well to consider Sen. Ralph Recto’s call on it to substantially fill up the hundreds of thousands of vacancies in the government service.
Of the 1,513,695 permanent positions in the national government, he said, only 1,295,056 are occupied today. This leaves 218,639 vacant positions in the various departments, bureaus, and commissions of the national government. There are, in addition, many positions – the number yet undetermined — in local governments and in government corporations The greatest personnel needs are in the Department of Education, which needs 62,320 new teachers; and the Department of Health which needs 21,118 health workers. The Philippine National Police needs to fill 22,685 slots. The Judiciary has 9,914 vacancies; the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, 9,675; the Commission on Audit, 7,752; the Department of Agriculture, 4,633; and the Department of Public Works and Highways, 1,396. And these are only the ones with the biggest number of open positions. At a time when so many Filipinos need employment, so much so that 5,000 of them leave every day to work in various countries abroad, all possible efforts must be exerted to provide jobs for them. The vacancies in government need not all be filled but making a substantial number of appointments to these vacancies will help. READ MORE...

ALSO: By Eric Tipan - Decongesting cities


JANUARY 20 -SOURCE; Counterurbanisation www.coolgeography.co.uk Search by image (APPENDED BY PHNO) There are two common fallacies crassly employed by some government functionaries and businessmen. 1) Traffic is the problem. 2) You cannot stop progress. The spin to this is traffic is a sign of progress and development. It is, to be candid, an apologist approach, if not an attempt at misdirection, indeed, a patronizing commentary. The real issue is ill-administration in enforcing strict land use, zoning, government reservations, easements, set-backs, etc., and, instead, for the right price, caving in to the unbridled impetus of business to recoup investments ASAP, purposely constructing in areas where urban flow is detected, resulting in progressive obstruction, inconvenience, gridlock, and deteriorating collaterals of social and health risks. Urban congestion is actually the starting point of stand-still vehicular movement in Philippine cities and the staggering loss in opportunity cost. The new phenomenon of pocket urban communities is also born — areas transformed into convenient community enclave, since people no longer wish to venture outside areas of immediate residence unless extremely necessary. This is due to the horrendous travel time. As long as a place of leisure, physical activity, school, and a medical facility exist, likely, people will no longer chance out of their comfort zones. Traffic is not the problem, but the result of government bias, nurturing economic, administrative, cultural, etc., activity in the mega capital and favoring Luzon. Plus, the LGU modus of coddling captured constituency among “informal settlers” occupying valuable public/private real estate, and empowering them with socal benefits. Word spreads fast to the provinces. Sum up all the values. You have encouraged unmitigated urban migration, resulting in inhospitable levels of congestion. READ MORE...

ALSO: Editorial - Prepare for effects of falling world oil prices


JANUARY 22 -The continuing fall in world oil prices has been described as manna from heaven to our oil-importing country. From $120 per barrel between 2011 and 2014, the price fell to $52 in 2015. With reduced world demand and growth in unconventional production, notably shale oil in the United States, prices continued to drop, falling below $28 last Monday as Western sanctions on Iran were lifted allowing it to resume oil exports for the first time in years. The prices of gasoline, diesel, and other oil products in the Philippines have correspondingly gone down. These in turn have led jeepney operators to ask for a reduction of fares. With lower transport costs, we can expect the lowering of prices of prime commodities coming from the provinces. We can also expect reductions in the prices of power, services, and manufactured goods. But the drop in world oil prices is not all that good for us, largely because of its effect on our Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs), about 2.5 million of whom are based in Saudi Arabia and other oil-producing nations in the Middle East. As these nations’ oil income falls, they have to cut down on their infrastructure and other programs, thus laying off thousands of OFW construction workers. Filipino health care workers face reductions in net pay. READ MORE...

ALSO: BY TONYO CRUZ - Edsa Dos: 15 years later
[But the important lesson is that, uprisings can only do so much. Yes, an EDSA can oust unwanted leaders, but we now know more is needed to bring about real, radical, and lasting change. An EDSA cannot change the most rotten system we have long wanted to replace.]


JANUARY 22 -by Tonyo Cruz
This week, the state and conveniently and cynically forgot.
And so let’s remember and never forget EDSA Dos (Jan. 16-20, 2001) We were too young when EDSA 1 happened, and my mother sent us packing to Bulacan during those days in 1986 for fear that the dictator might do something awful in Metro Manila. And so when in January, 2001, a Senate vote to block evidence in President Estrada’s historic impeachment trial finally ignited the second people’s uprising, I was there. I was there not just as a participant. Together with Laarni, Gerry, Ina, Jang, and other fellow activist propagandists, we helped dub the indignation rally at the EDSA Shrine EDSA Dos. Our team helped mount the Bayan program in the late afternoon, and had the honor of being an emcee every day. When Nora Aunor decided to come out during one of those fateful days and call on Estrada to resign, we helped organize a press conference at the Bayan office in Quezon City. Later that day, the superstar made a grand entrance at EDSA, flanked not by traditional politicians but by peasant leader Rafael Mariano and trade unionist (and her fellow Bicolano) Crispin Beltran. The crowds erupted in jubilation. When the march from EDSA Shrine to Mendiola pushed thru despite pleas to just remain and witness Gloria Macapagal Arroyo’s oath-taking, I was on board a jeep carrying freshly made “Resign!” flaglettes and back-up Bayan flags – en route from the Bayan office to anywhere where we could catch up with the march. We almost didn’t make it. The march was already approaching Nagtahan when we caught up with the huge march. Knowing that a handful of Estrada loyalists were positioned on Mendiola Bridge, the marchers led by Bayan and Kangkong Brigade split into two. One would approach Mendiola from Legarda, while the other would go through a longer route, through sidestreets until it reached Claro M. Recto. People came out of their houses to cheer us, and to give water and food. The streets shook as marchers repeatedly thundered: “Ayan na, ayan na, ayan na ang sambayanan!” I was aboard the main truck that had the sound system, helping lead marchers in the chanting. The small number of Estrada loyalists pelted stones at the marchers when they saw the two front lines of the march at Recto and Legarda. It took only a few minutes to realize that they couldn’t fight tens of thousands of people approaching Mendiola. It was unforgetable: The merging of the two front lines, the entry into Mendiola and the setting aside of barbed wires. We proclaimed victory as we reached the historic and symbolic bridge that separated the presidency and the people. It was a preview of how our people could, in the future, encircle and lay siege at the palace and win a full-scale revolution. At around noon, Estrada Resign Movement’s Fr. Joe Dizon announced to cheers that Estrada had fled the palace. He also announced that Arroyo had taken her oath as the new president. Bayan Muna’s Satur Ocampo would soon speak and urge the people that the battle wasn’t over because Estrada had to be prosecuted for the crimes that agitated people into launching EDSA Dos. Fast forward to 2016 or 15 years later: No national celebration and no sense of jubilation. Why? Estrada has made a political comeback as mayor of Manila and one of the country’s political kingpins. Yes, he was convicted for plunder but he was soon pardoned by his successor Arroyo. The pardon allowed his political rehabilitation. Arroyo is on “hospital arrest.” And her own successor BS Aquino has failed to propel the trials against her, even after leading the impeachment of the Supreme Court chief justice for allegedly being a stumbling block to the litigations. The scion of the dictator ousted in EDSA 1 is running for vice president, while his mother is back in Congress and his sister holds fort as a provincial governor. The failure to prosecute and punish them – even under two President Aquinos – has allowed the Marcoses to shamelessly mount their own daring comeback. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Oplan Veto Override; fulfill thy promise


by Fred M. Lobo

MANILA, JANUARY 18, 2016 (BULLETIN)  by Fred M. Lobo January 20, 2016 - The conntroverisal vetoeing by President Aquino of the proposed P2,000 hike for Social Security System (SSS) pensioners triggers more protests and a move in Congress to override the presidential veto.

“Killed” pension hike bill and patrons fight for resurrection.

***

Militant groups like the Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) condemn the veto of the pension hike bill and the proposal of administration allies in Congress for a “compromise” increase of only P1,000.

Translation: No to veto, no to diminution of expected benefits.

***

House Speaker Feliciano Belmonte hints at working on a “compromise” P1,000 pension increase despite Malacanang’s warning on an impending fiscal problem.

Let’s try to appease the pensioners, he suggests.

***

But Minority Leader Nery Colmenares discloses that a bid to gather the support of 192 of the 281 congressmen to overcome the president’s veto will be launched by the House opposition.

Oplan Veto Override shaping up.

***

“We will do our best to override the veto,” says Colmenares.

House militants turning hot.

***

Senior administration Reps. Alfredo Benitez (Independent, Negros Occidental), Alfred Vargas (LP, Quezon City), and Rodel Batocabe (Ako Bicol Partylis) note that another option is for the incoming 17th Congress to instead make another bid to hike SSS pension.

All options open, they say.

***

But Buhay Party-list Rep. Lito Atienza, a stalwart of the House independent minority bloc, says that President Aquino could have just adjusted the bill and imposed a compromise acceptable to all parties.”

Why be insensitive to the needs of the poor and old pensioners?, he asks.

***

Solons note that SSS finances could be further improved as per Commission on Audit (COA) report by running after unremitted employer contributions and penalties reaching R8.168 billion; aging unpaid members’ loans estimated at R61.226 billion; foregone rental income of R198.11 million, and R71 million in unauthorized allowances and cash benefits .

Find a way to boost SSS financial capability, they say.

READ MORE...

***

SSS officials say the the pension agency has a surplus of P10 billion but it is not enough to cover for the proposed pension hike which would require about P28 billion.

Review finances and options, solons ask Palace.

***

As a compromise, Belmonte backs SSS’s suggestion of a P1,000 hike in pension to be approved by its board as majority leader and Mandaluyong City Rep. Neptali Gonzales predicts that “an override will never happen.”

Pray for Solomonic wisdom and make old pensioners happy, Your Honors!

***

Congress vow to prioritize the approval of the proposed P226-billion four-year Salary Standardization Law IV, the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), and 32 other measures, as Congress resumes its sessions.

Hurry, Gentlemen, work is piling up and time is running out.

***

“We intend to make good on our promise to the Filipino people on the start of the 16th Congress that we will help the poor, widen the delivery of education and other social services, and improve the economy,” Senate Pres. Franklin Drilon says.

Yes, to thy promise be true. Election time is fast-approaching, too.


Editorial: Filling up vacancies and drawing up a nat’l job program January 21, 2016 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share4

In the remaining months of the Aquino administration, it would do well to consider Sen. Ralph Recto’s call on it to substantially fill up the hundreds of thousands of vacancies in the government service.

Of the 1,513,695 permanent positions in the national government, he said, only 1,295,056 are occupied today. This leaves 218,639 vacant positions in the various departments, bureaus, and commissions of the national government. There are, in addition, many positions – the number yet undetermined — in local governments and in government corporations

The greatest personnel needs are in the Department of Education, which needs 62,320 new teachers; and the Department of Health which needs 21,118 health workers.

The Philippine National Police needs to fill 22,685 slots. The Judiciary has 9,914 vacancies; the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, 9,675; the Commission on Audit, 7,752; the Department of Agriculture, 4,633; and the Department of Public Works and Highways, 1,396. And these are only the ones with the biggest number of open positions.

At a time when so many Filipinos need employment, so much so that 5,000 of them leave every day to work in various countries abroad, all possible efforts must be exerted to provide jobs for them. The vacancies in government need not all be filled but making a substantial number of appointments to these vacancies will help.

READ MORE...

Ultimately, private commercial and industrial firms should be the principal providers of jobs, but they need government assistance in the form of incentives and a business climate that encourages private investment.

In March, 2015, President Obama of the United States announced a job creation program called TechHire Initiative. With $100 million in new federal investments, the government connected with 20 communities working with each other and with national employers to recruit and train workers in technology and other in-demand fields. The administration then announced a competition for innovative approaches to connect Americans to paths to good jobs in technology and other in-demand fields.

If a country as advanced as the US sees and values the need for an employment program for its people, a nation like the Philippines should see how much more it needs such a program. On top of filling vacancies that we now have, as Senator Recto recommends, the government should study and look into all possibilities to create jobs and, if necessary, train Filipinos for them.


Decongesting cities by Eric Tipan January 20, 2016 Share1 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share2


SOURCE; Counterurbanisation www.coolgeography.co.uk Search by image APPENDED BY PHNO

There are two common fallacies crassly employed by some government functionaries and businessmen. 1) Traffic is the problem. 2) You cannot stop progress.

The spin to this is traffic is a sign of progress and development.

It is, to be candid, an apologist approach, if not an attempt at misdirection, indeed, a patronizing commentary.

The real issue is ill-administration in enforcing strict land use, zoning, government reservations, easements, set-backs, etc., and, instead, for the right price, caving in to the unbridled impetus of business to recoup investments ASAP, purposely constructing in areas where urban flow is detected, resulting in progressive obstruction, inconvenience, gridlock, and deteriorating collaterals of social and health risks.

Urban congestion is actually the starting point of stand-still vehicular movement in Philippine cities and the staggering loss in opportunity cost.

The new phenomenon of pocket urban communities is also born — areas transformed into convenient community enclave, since people no longer wish to venture outside areas of immediate residence unless extremely necessary. This is due to the horrendous travel time. As long as a place of leisure, physical activity, school, and a medical facility exist, likely, people will no longer chance out of their comfort zones.

Traffic is not the problem, but the result of government bias, nurturing economic, administrative, cultural, etc., activity in the mega capital and favoring Luzon. Plus, the LGU modus of coddling captured constituency among “informal settlers” occupying valuable public/private real estate, and empowering them with socal benefits. Word spreads fast to the provinces. Sum up all the values. You have encouraged unmitigated urban migration, resulting in inhospitable levels of congestion.

READ MORE...

John Chambers, Philipine American Chamber of Commerce senior advisor, was quoted as saying Metro Manila’s at risk of becoming uninhabitable by 2020 due to expected annual car growth of 500,000 by 2020. Talk of congestion, Boo Chanco adds, in Calbayog, Samar, the population density per sq. km. is 181. In MM, 42,857!

Would you then vote for a politician who will permit (to exaggerate) a 50-story building on all the main streetcorners?
Adjacent to a school or a village? Only two public parks as open space in the city? Allow 10 malls at arms length on a 2-lane road beside the municipal hall? A monument or capitol, obliterated from sight and significance by sky-scrapers?

In a word, “run-away development,” because the businessman is empowered to pick and choose over mayors, his vested concept of land use, zoning, and urban planning.

Transferring the capital, as suggested, is traumatic with governance and history genuflecting to disorder and greed. Avoiding the problem by relocation only leads to recycling the problem. In advanced cities, real estate taxes were increased to decongest. Factories and business incentivized to relocate. While informal settlers in the capital, are a “no-no.”

THE WRITER'S PROFILE & AVATAR FROM MB COLUMNISTS ARCHIVE

By Eric Tipan


Editorial: Prepare for effects of falling world oil prices January 22, 2016 Share1 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share58

The continuing fall in world oil prices has been described as manna from heaven to our oil-importing country. From $120 per barrel between 2011 and 2014, the price fell to $52 in 2015.

With reduced world demand and growth in unconventional production, notably shale oil in the United States, prices continued to drop, falling below $28 last Monday as Western sanctions on Iran were lifted allowing it to resume oil exports for the first time in years.

The prices of gasoline, diesel, and other oil products in the Philippines have correspondingly gone down. These in turn have led jeepney operators to ask for a reduction of fares.

With lower transport costs, we can expect the lowering of prices of prime commodities coming from the provinces. We can also expect reductions in the prices of power, services, and manufactured goods.

But the drop in world oil prices is not all that good for us, largely because of its effect on our Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs), about 2.5 million of whom are based in Saudi Arabia and other oil-producing nations in the Middle East. As these nations’ oil income falls, they have to cut down on their infrastructure and other programs, thus laying off thousands of OFW construction workers. Filipino health care workers face reductions in net pay.

READ MORE...

The Middle East accounts for 20 to 25 percent of OFW remittances. These remittances, which play a big role in maintaining the Philippine economy, are bound to fall. They make up a significant part of the country’s Gross National Product (GNP) whose rise has been cited by the Aquino administration as one of its outstanding accomplishments.

There is also one other ill effect of falling world oil prices on the Philippine economy. Lower prices all around will mean lower tax and Customs collections, particularly the Value-Added Tax (VAT). It is said that VAT collections have already gone down by some P30 billion.

The ongoing world oil price movements are thus affecting our country in a very significant way. It is said that if the world price stays between $40 and $50 per barrel, the benefits would outweigh the losses to the Philippines. But if the price falls below $20, the loss in remittances would impact heavily on the national economy.

We have no control over these world oil prices, but we should now start drawing up plans in case they continue their fall. As the principal ill effect is on our OFWs, we must focus on planning for the possible return of millions of these workers who will be needing new means of livelihood.

Actually, we should have been doing this much earlier – with a job program not just in the tourist and other service programs, as we have today, but also in manufacturing and in agriculture, which hold the greatest potentials in our country.


BY TONYO CRUZ: Edsa Dos: 15 years later by Tonyo Cruz January 22, 2016 Share1 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share6


by Tonyo Cruz

This week, the state and conveniently and cynically forgot.

And so let’s remember and never forget EDSA Dos (Jan. 16-20, 2001)

We were too young when EDSA 1 happened, and my mother sent us packing to Bulacan during those days in 1986 for fear that the dictator might do something awful in Metro Manila. And so when in January, 2001, a Senate vote to block evidence in President Estrada’s historic impeachment trial finally ignited the second people’s uprising, I was there.

I was there not just as a participant. Together with Laarni, Gerry, Ina, Jang, and other fellow activist propagandists, we helped dub the indignation rally at the EDSA Shrine EDSA Dos. Our team helped mount the Bayan program in the late afternoon, and had the honor of being an emcee every day.

When Nora Aunor decided to come out during one of those fateful days and call on Estrada to resign, we helped organize a press conference at the Bayan office in Quezon City. Later that day, the superstar made a grand entrance at EDSA, flanked not by traditional politicians but by peasant leader Rafael Mariano and trade unionist (and her fellow Bicolano) Crispin Beltran. The crowds erupted in jubilation.

When the march from EDSA Shrine to Mendiola pushed thru despite pleas to just remain and witness Gloria Macapagal Arroyo’s oath-taking, I was on board a jeep carrying freshly made “Resign!” flaglettes and back-up Bayan flags – en route from the Bayan office to anywhere where we could catch up with the march. We almost didn’t make it. The march was already approaching Nagtahan when we caught up with the huge march.

Knowing that a handful of Estrada loyalists were positioned on Mendiola Bridge, the marchers led by Bayan and Kangkong Brigade split into two. One would approach Mendiola from Legarda, while the other would go through a longer route, through sidestreets until it reached Claro M. Recto. People came out of their houses to cheer us, and to give water and food. The streets shook as marchers repeatedly thundered: “Ayan na, ayan na, ayan na ang sambayanan!” I was aboard the main truck that had the sound system, helping lead marchers in the chanting.

The small number of Estrada loyalists pelted stones at the marchers when they saw the two front lines of the march at Recto and Legarda. It took only a few minutes to realize that they couldn’t fight tens of thousands of people approaching Mendiola.

It was unforgetable: The merging of the two front lines, the entry into Mendiola and the setting aside of barbed wires. We proclaimed victory as we reached the historic and symbolic bridge that separated the presidency and the people. It was a preview of how our people could, in the future, encircle and lay siege at the palace and win a full-scale revolution.

At around noon, Estrada Resign Movement’s Fr. Joe Dizon announced to cheers that Estrada had fled the palace. He also announced that Arroyo had taken her oath as the new president. Bayan Muna’s Satur Ocampo would soon speak and urge the people that the battle wasn’t over because Estrada had to be prosecuted for the crimes that agitated people into launching EDSA Dos.

Fast forward to 2016 or 15 years later: No national celebration and no sense of jubilation. Why?

Estrada has made a political comeback as mayor of Manila and one of the country’s political kingpins. Yes, he was convicted for plunder but he was soon pardoned by his successor Arroyo. The pardon allowed his political rehabilitation.

Arroyo is on “hospital arrest.” And her own successor BS Aquino has failed to propel the trials against her, even after leading the impeachment of the Supreme Court chief justice for allegedly being a stumbling block to the litigations.

The scion of the dictator ousted in EDSA 1 is running for vice president, while his mother is back in Congress and his sister holds fort as a provincial governor. The failure to prosecute and punish them – even under two President Aquinos – has allowed the Marcoses to shamelessly mount their own daring comeback.

READ MORE...

I am as disappointed as many others that the promises and potentials of EDSA 1 and EDSA Dos were largely foiled and failed by the new leaders that replaced those Filipinos threw out.

But the important lesson is that, uprisings can only do so much. Yes, an EDSA can oust unwanted leaders, but we now know more is needed to bring about real, radical, and lasting change. An EDSA cannot change the most rotten system we have long wanted to replace.

Just imagine: 15 years, two presidential elections, and three midterm polls have passed since EDSA Dos. Maybe the heroes we are waiting for are not in the candidates for 18,000 positions or the tried and tired political dynasties.

Those heroes may just be waiting to awaken from the fantasy-cum-nightmare of trusting, quick-fix solutions, fake and made-up saviors, and deceptive slogans.

I’m disappointed but not cynical. My realization and my source of hope? We the people are the heroes we are waiting for so we can bring about national freedom and democracy to our land: agrarian reform, industrialization, the abolition of political dynasties and private armies, social services, and safety nets, and more.

But first, we must remember and never forget.

(Note: This piece is lovingly dedicated to the memory of Fr. Joe Dizon, a mainstay, leader and chaplain of the Parliament of the Streets. I’m humbled to have known him and worked with and for him, until his last campaign – the fight against pork barrel in 2012-2013.)

Follow me on Twitter @tonyocruz and check out my blog tonyocruz.com  


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