© Copyright, 2015 (PHNO) http://newsflash.org


EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full news commentary)

FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

EDITORIAL:
COMELEC NOW FACES BIG TASK OF TRIMMNG LIST OF CANDIDATES


OCTOBER 29 -HE IS SAYING: "YOU WILL NEED A GOOD CLEANER"  BULLETIN EDITORIAL CARTOON As part of its preparations for the elections on May 9, 2016, the Commission on Elections (Comelec) is now studyng all the Certificates of Candidacy filed on October 12-16, 2015, with a view to trimming the list of candidates. One reason is the limited space on the ballots. There cannot possibly be 130 names in the space set aside for presidential candidates, not to mention the many others running for senator, governor, mayor, and other local officials. In the old days, before automation, a voter would just write out the name of his candidate. Today, the voter fills in a box opposite the printed name of the candidate. Hence the need to keep the list down.But the limited space is the least of the reasons to prune down the lists of candidates. The more important reason is that elections must be rational, objective, and orderly. A disorderly election would be “a rot that erodes faith in our democratic institutions,” to quote a Supreme Court decision. The Comelec accepted the certificates of candidacy of 130 presidential aspirants as a matter of ministerial duty, in accordance with the constitutional provision that “The State shall guarantee equal access to opportunities for public service….” (Section 26, Article II, Declaration of Principles and State Policies). A bare minimum of requirements was laid out for presidential candidates – natural-born citizen, registered voter, ability to read and write, 40 years of age, and 10 years of residence by the time of the election. There are no requirements for civil service eligibility as for appointments to government positions or for academic degrees as in the judiciary. But because it must keep the elections rational, objective, and orderly, the Comelec must weed out over a hundred presidential aspirants, using its authority under the Omnibus Election Code to cancel the COCs of those who put the election process in mockery, cause confusion because of similarity of names, and have no bonafide intention to run for office. In the next few weeks, there will be considerable maneuvering, negotiating, planning, and operating on so many levels among the parties and the political leaders. As for the Comelec, it has the huge task of preparing thousands of precincts and hundreds of thousands of personnel. Possibly its most critical task will be finalization of the lists of candidates in all towns, cities, and provinces of the country. By December 10, 2015, the final list of candidates must be ready. And by May 9, 2016, the nation will once again go to the polls, secure in the thought that all is well and our democratic system of elections is at work. THE FULL EDITORIAL

ALSO EDITORIAL: Hotdog makers, meat sellers shake off WHO cancer report


OCTOBER 28 -FILE - In this July 4, 2015 file photo, Joey Chestnut, left, and Matt Stonie compete in Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest men's competition in the Coney Island section of the Brooklyn borough of New York. On the eve of the World Series, where hot dogs are a staple in the stands, the World Health Organization on Monday, Oct. 26, 2015 labeled the all-American wiener, bacon and other processed meats as being "carcinogenic to humans." (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg, File)
Hot dog makers and meat sellers say a report from the World Health Organization labeling wieners, bacon, and other processed meats as cancer-causers is baloney. WHO said Monday that processed meats raised the risk of colon, stomach, and other cancers. It also said red meat probably contributes to the disease, too. Meat eaters at a New York food court mostly shrugged off the report Monday. And Wall Street investors seemed to do the same, with shares of meat producers little changed. The North American Meat Institute, which represents meat producers, said the report was “alarmist.’’ “Classifying red and processed meat as cancer `hazards’ defies both common sense and numerous studies showing no correlation between meat and cancer,’’ the association said in a statement. Hormel Foods, which sells Spam, sliced bacon, and canned chili, said the report “did not look at the benefits of meat consumption,’’ which it cited as including “important nutrients’’ and “high-quality proteins.’’ But Hormel may also be preparing for a shift in consumers eating less processed foods. Earlier this year it paid $775 million to buy Applegate Farms, which sells organic deli meats, hot dogs ,and bacon, and doesn’t use antibiotics, hormones, artificial ingredients, or chemical preservatives. Shares of Hormel Foods Corp. fell 1 percent Monday, as did shares of Kraft Heinz Co., which makes Oscar Mayer hot dogs. Shares of Tyson Foods Inc., the maker of Ball Park hot dogs, Jimmy Dean sausage and Hillshire Farm ham, fell nearly 5 percent, but that was attributed more to a research report from a JPMorgan Chase analyst that said Tyson is losing market share to competitors. Whether Americans will stay away from hot dogs, bacon, and other meaty treats remains to be seen. Visitors at a food court in New York’s Penn Station, which houses a Nathan’s Famous hot dog restaurant, mostly said the WHO report won’t change what they eat. “People nowadays, they say `I’m going to change my eating habits,’ but when you’re hungry and you have to grab something close by, you’re going to eat there,’’ said Randy Duran of New York. THE FULL EDITORIAL

ALSO by Leandro DD Coronel: Why Pacquiao is our nightmare


OCTOBER 28 -By Leandro Coronel - We all love Manny Pacquiao. But he’s the Filipinos’ political nightmare all over again. There’s only one Manny Pacquiao. There will never be another Manny Pacquiao in Philippine – maybe world – boxing history. Whenever he fights, he stops everything in the Philippines. Even crime takes a break whenever he fights. So why is Pacquiao the Filipinos’ political nightmare all over again? Because he wants to stay in politics. This time he wants to be a senator. His story is a repeat of the tale of many young Filipinos who made a name for themselves in their respective fields of endeavor. And who then went into politics. And the problem, as we all know, is that they’re not fit to be in politics. We put them in office because they are famous. But they’re not qualified as public servants. Especially in higher elective office. We did it with Joseph Estrada. He was a movie star, he was popular. He used his popularity to become mayor of his hometown, San Juan. And then he went for the Senate, then the vice presidency, and then the presidency. But we all know what happened. Erap thought the presidency was like running a small city like San Juan. He didn’t expand his mind to cope with the demands, burdens, and magnitude of the presidency. He didn’t broaden his outlook to realize that accepting jueteng money was not presidential, or legal. We did the same with Jojo Binay. From an idealistic young lawyer and enemy of the dictatorship, Binay evolved from a city mayor to vice president and now a candidate for president. Along the way he seemed to have lost his fierce idealism and is today alleged to have committed graft while mayor of Makati City. READ MORE...

ALSO by Jullie Yap Daza: 'DQ' (Disqualification of candidates)


OCTOBER 28 -by Jullie Yap Daza  What is it about print journalists’ need to talk about the news they write and then talk some more with their colleagues and rivals at so-called news forums? Club 365’s daily breakfasts at Intercon which started the trend will come to an end soon, Neal Cruz has gone but his Kapihan just got resurrected last Monday. There’s not a single day of the week that’s not been claimed by one or another media forum, with one or another group hosting for the cause of finding out what the others may have found out already though inadequately, or are still trying to find out. Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista and election lawyer Romy Macalintal were the first guests at Kapihan’s revival, where the talk was mostly about “dq” or disqualification of candidates. I liked it that the Comelec reporters, who occupied one round table at Manila Hotel’s Roma room, tried to trap the chairman into revealing the name of the “fifth presidential candidate” who did not receive a letter asking why he/she should not be classified as a nuisance. Comelec sent out 125 letters, but there are 130 bets, the presumption being that Binay, Roxas, Poe, and Santiago did not get any. So who’s the fifth? Like the chairman, the reporters didn’t name names because, wasn’t it obvious already, it could only be Martin Diño standing in for Duterte? The mystery deepened with the chairman’s mysterious smile deepening his dimples. Election 2016 appears headed for the cliff – two presidential candidates are facing the dq threat. The quote of the day came from Atty. Macalintal, on what happens when a candidate wins the race but is disqualified eventually, and could the new president win his/her case by invoking the “vox populi, vox Dei” principle of letting the people’s will prevail. His reply: “The voice of the people cannot amend the Constitution.” Only the voice of the Supreme Court justices will prevail, he said. Then again, the justices are lawyers, and as jurists they explain the law according to their own individual judgment. Lawyers write the law, they interpret the law, and those whom they confuse are called clients. THE FULL EDITORIAL

ALSO By Tonyo Cruz: Remember this November
[November is almost here. Remember our heroes and those who died due to state negligence or state terrorism. Remember how many times we said “no more” and “never again.” Remember the false promises and the lies. Remember that we deserve better. Because only by remembering and by not forgetting would we be able to say: No to another six years of the past five years. No to continuing the disastrous and elitist Daang Matuwid. Yes to change. Yes to something better.]


OCTOBER 30 -President BS Aquino November is a month to remember. Who could forget super-typhoon Yolanda which struck Eastern Visayas and cut through other regions in November, 2013? Who could forget the man-made calamity that was the Aquino government’s response to the killer storm – a response personally headed by yellow polo shirt-wearing Mar Roxas? It was also a November day, when President BS Aquino rushed back to Manila when word got out that the Supreme Court outlawed PDAF and also threatened DAP. The Pork Barrel King hurriedly fled just hours after he promised the good people of Tacloban that he wouldn’t leave until great strides were made to fix his government’s awful response to the disaster. We must remember because Daang Matuwid’s ineptitude and politicking transformed Yolanda into a man-made calamity. Remember: The tens of thousands deprived of immediate relief; the number of casualties ordered to be brought down; billions of taxpayer funds unaccounted for; warehouses full of relief goods left to rot; rival politicos deprived of government aid; promises not kept; incompetents shielded from accountability; Eastern Visayas excluded in employment/unemployment figures; and the fact that many still live in temporary shelters two years after disaster struck. We must remember because Daang Matuwid used PDAF and later DAP to corrupt Congress. Remember: the PDAF scam and how selective the prosecution has been; the refusal to obey the high court’s ruling against DAP; the pork barrel defense by President Aquino and Abad; the deliberate underspending of the budget just so President Aquino would have lots of DAP and similar pork barrel funds; the meeting of Sec. Garin assuring lawmakers that there will still be pork barrel despite the court’s rulings; and the billions in lump-sum appropriations (new pork!) in the 2016 budget. We must remember because 44 SAF lives were offered by President Aquino in a US-inspired suicide operation. Remember that a suspended police chief “advised” the president/BFF and the acting police chief; that Aquino deprived the arriving caskets of a proper presidential welcome; that he made relatives and the nation wait for him at a public tribute; that up to now, justice is elusive. Remember too how Roxas allowed himself to be humiliated by being excluded in the operation and not raising hell about it. We must remember because the victims of the Zamboanga siege continue to suffer. Remember the false promise of permanent housing supposedly ready a month after the 2014 SONA, the spread of prostitution and the absence of justice. Remember Roxas’ “happy anniversary” greetings. We must remember the high tax rates and other evidence of limited, elitist, and overstated economic growth. Remember the refusal to lower taxes by both Aquino and Roxas; the doctored statistics about employment and unemployment; the refusal to raise the minimum wage and the salaries of state workers; the hikes in government fees; the unchecked increases of oil prices and rates for water and electricity; the publicly funded partnerships for private gain; the refusal to raise pensions; the hikes in premiums; the hikes too in tuition fees even for state schools; and the attempt to tamper with balikbayan boxes in search of new sources of taxes. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Editorial: Comelec now faces big task of trimming the list of candidates


HE IS SAYING: "YOU WILL NEED A GOOD CLEANER" BULLETIN EDITORIAL CARTOON

MANILA, NOVEMBER 2, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) October 29, 2015 - As part of its preparations for the elections on May 9, 2016, the Commission on Elections (Comelec) is now studyng all the Certificates of Candidacy filed on October 12-16, 2015, with a view to trimming the list of candidates.

One reason is the limited space on the ballots. There cannot possibly be 130 names in the space set aside for presidential candidates, not to mention the many others running for senator, governor, mayor, and other local officials. In the old days, before automation, a voter would just write out the name of his candidate. Today, the voter fills in a box opposite the printed name of the candidate. Hence the need to keep the list down.

But the limited space is the least of the reasons to prune down the lists of candidates. The more important reason is that elections must be rational, objective, and orderly. A disorderly election would be “a rot that erodes faith in our democratic institutions,” to quote a Supreme Court decision.

The Comelec accepted the certificates of candidacy of 130 presidential aspirants as a matter of ministerial duty, in accordance with the constitutional provision that “The State shall guarantee equal access to opportunities for public service….” (Section 26, Article II, Declaration of Principles and State Policies). A bare minimum of requirements was laid out for presidential candidates – natural-born citizen, registered voter, ability to read and write, 40 years of age, and 10 years of residence by the time of the election. There are no requirements for civil service eligibility as for appointments to government positions or for academic degrees as in the judiciary.

But because it must keep the elections rational, objective, and orderly, the Comelec must weed out over a hundred presidential aspirants, using its authority under the Omnibus Election Code to cancel the COCs of those who put the election process in mockery, cause confusion because of similarity of names, and have no bonafide intention to run for office.

In the next few weeks, there will be considerable maneuvering, negotiating, planning, and operating on so many levels among the parties and the political leaders. As for the Comelec, it has the huge task of preparing thousands of precincts and hundreds of thousands of personnel. Possibly its most critical task will be finalization of the lists of candidates in all towns, cities, and provinces of the country.

By December 10, 2015, the final list of candidates must be ready. And by May 9, 2016, the nation will once again go to the polls, secure in the thought that all is well and our democratic system of elections is at work.


EDITORIAL: Hotdog makers, meat sellers shake off WHO cancer report by AP October 28, 2015 Share0 Tweet1 Share0 Email0 Share1


FILE - In this July 4, 2015 file photo, Joey Chestnut, left, and Matt Stonie compete in Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest men's competition in the Coney Island section of the Brooklyn borough of New York. On the eve of the World Series, where hot dogs are a staple in the stands, the World Health Organization on Monday, Oct. 26, 2015 labeled the all-American wiener, bacon and other processed meats as being "carcinogenic to humans." (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg, File)

New York, New York, United States — Hot dog makers and meat sellers say a report from the World Health Organization labeling wieners, bacon, and other processed meats as cancer-causers is baloney.

WHO said Monday that processed meats raised the risk of colon, stomach, and other cancers. It also said red meat probably contributes to the disease, too.

Meat eaters at a New York food court mostly shrugged off the report Monday. And Wall Street investors seemed to do the same, with shares of meat producers little changed.

The North American Meat Institute, which represents meat producers, said the report was “alarmist.’’

“Classifying red and processed meat as cancer `hazards’ defies both common sense and numerous studies showing no correlation between meat and cancer,’’ the association said in a statement.

Hormel Foods, which sells Spam, sliced bacon, and canned chili, said the report “did not look at the benefits of meat consumption,’’ which it cited as including “important nutrients’’ and “high-quality proteins.’’

But Hormel may also be preparing for a shift in consumers eating less processed foods. Earlier this year it paid $775 million to buy Applegate Farms, which sells organic deli meats, hot dogs ,and bacon, and doesn’t use antibiotics, hormones, artificial ingredients, or chemical preservatives.

Shares of Hormel Foods Corp. fell 1 percent Monday, as did shares of Kraft Heinz Co., which makes Oscar Mayer hot dogs. Shares of Tyson Foods Inc., the maker of Ball Park hot dogs, Jimmy Dean sausage and Hillshire Farm ham, fell nearly 5 percent, but that was attributed more to a research report from a JPMorgan Chase analyst that said Tyson is losing market share to competitors.

Whether Americans will stay away from hot dogs, bacon, and other meaty treats remains to be seen. Visitors at a food court in New York’s Penn Station, which houses a Nathan’s Famous hot dog restaurant, mostly said the WHO report won’t change what they eat.

“People nowadays, they say `I’m going to change my eating habits,’ but when you’re hungry and you have to grab something close by, you’re going to eat there,’’ said Randy Duran of New York.


Why Pacquiao is our nightmare by Leandro DD Coronel October 28, 2015 Share0 Tweet0 Share1 Email0 Share16

We all love Manny Pacquiao. But he’s the Filipinos’ political nightmare all over again.

There’s only one Manny Pacquiao. There will never be another Manny Pacquiao in Philippine – maybe world – boxing history. Whenever he fights, he stops everything in the Philippines. Even crime takes a break whenever he fights.

So why is Pacquiao the Filipinos’ political nightmare all over again? Because he wants to stay in politics. This time he wants to be a senator.

His story is a repeat of the tale of many young Filipinos who made a name for themselves in their respective fields of endeavor. And who then went into politics.

And the problem, as we all know, is that they’re not fit to be in politics. We put them in office because they are famous. But they’re not qualified as public servants. Especially in higher elective office.

We did it with Joseph Estrada. He was a movie star, he was popular. He used his popularity to become mayor of his hometown, San Juan. And then he went for the Senate, then the vice presidency, and then the presidency.

But we all know what happened. Erap thought the presidency was like running a small city like San Juan. He didn’t expand his mind to cope with the demands, burdens, and magnitude of the presidency. He didn’t broaden his outlook to realize that accepting jueteng money was not presidential, or legal.

We did the same with Jojo Binay.

From an idealistic young lawyer and enemy of the dictatorship, Binay evolved from a city mayor to vice president and now a candidate for president. Along the way he seemed to have lost his fierce idealism and is today alleged to have committed graft while mayor of Makati City.

READ MORE...

It’s the same story repeated hundreds of times around the country. Poor but idealistic young men and women who started out as champions of the poor. But once they get to the corridors of government and get a sniff of power, they get intoxicated or dizzy from it. As they learn the ropes of stealing from the public coffers they soon lose their idealism and succumb to the lure of corruption.

Manny Pacquiao has made himself very rich from his boxing profession. So maybe he will no longer steal from the people. Let’s give him the benefit of the doubt, maybe he won’t steal.

But will he be a serious, diligent, and hard-working senator? We can’t tell that from his record in the House of Representatives. He holds the distinction of being the worst absentee congressman during his term. That alone tells us about his disrespect for the nation.

And now, members of his family have reportedly filed to run for various positions in government. His wife Jinkee has been vice governor of their province.

We all love Jinkee for how she has carried herself through their fabled life, even during trying times for her when Manny was rumored to have indulged his roving eye. But what has she to offer to deserve to be vice governor of a province?

Manny Pacquiao has done much to boost our national pride. But a seat in the Senate would not benefit the country. He may not steal or be corrupt as he pursues a political career. But what would he contribute to the national discourse?

It’s enough that the likes of Bong Revilla and Lito Lapid have embarrassed the nation. Or Tito Sotto who still works as a comedian despite being a senator. Isn’t that a sign of disrespect? The question is: which of the two is his part-time job?

After retiring from boxing, Pacquiao should instead help poor Filipinos by being a philanthropist. And the government can appoint him goodwill ambassador at large and represent the country around the globe.


DQ’ by Jullie Yap Daza October 28, 2015 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share1


by Jullie Yap Daza

What is it about print journalists’ need to talk about the news they write and then talk some more with their colleagues and rivals at so-called news forums? Club 365’s daily breakfasts at Intercon which started the trend will come to an end soon, Neal Cruz has gone but his Kapihan just got resurrected last Monday.

There’s not a single day of the week that’s not been claimed by one or another media forum, with one or another group hosting for the cause of finding out what the others may have found out already though inadequately, or are still trying to find out.

Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista and election lawyer Romy Macalintal were the first guests at Kapihan’s revival, where the talk was mostly about “dq” or disqualification of candidates.

I liked it that the Comelec reporters, who occupied one round table at Manila Hotel’s Roma room, tried to trap the chairman into revealing the name of the “fifth presidential candidate” who did not receive a letter asking why he/she should not be classified as a nuisance.

Comelec sent out 125 letters, but there are 130 bets, the presumption being that Binay, Roxas, Poe, and Santiago did not get any. So who’s the fifth? Like the chairman, the reporters didn’t name names because, wasn’t it obvious already, it could only be Martin Diño standing in for Duterte? The mystery deepened with the chairman’s mysterious smile deepening his dimples.

Election 2016 appears headed for the cliff – two presidential candidates are facing the dq threat. The quote of the day came from Atty. Macalintal, on what happens when a candidate wins the race but is disqualified eventually, and could the new president win his/her case by invoking the “vox populi, vox Dei” principle of letting the people’s will prevail. His reply: “The voice of the people cannot amend the Constitution.”

Only the voice of the Supreme Court justices will prevail, he said. Then again, the justices are lawyers, and as jurists they explain the law according to their own individual judgment.

Lawyers write the law, they interpret the law, and those whom they confuse are called clients.


Remember this November by Tonyo Cruz October 30, 2015 Share1 Tweet1 Share0 Email0 Share4


by Tonyo Cruz

November is a month to remember.

Who could forget super-typhoon Yolanda which struck Eastern Visayas and cut through other regions in November, 2013?

Who could forget the man-made calamity that was the Aquino government’s response to the killer storm – a response personally headed by yellow polo shirt-wearing Mar Roxas?

It was also a November day, when President BS Aquino rushed back to Manila when word got out that the Supreme Court outlawed PDAF and also threatened DAP. The Pork Barrel King hurriedly fled just hours after he promised the good people of Tacloban that he wouldn’t leave until great strides were made to fix his government’s awful response to the disaster.

We must remember because Daang Matuwid’s ineptitude and politicking transformed Yolanda into a man-made calamity. Remember: The tens of thousands deprived of immediate relief; the number of casualties ordered to be brought down; billions of taxpayer funds unaccounted for; warehouses full of relief goods left to rot; rival politicos deprived of government aid; promises not kept; incompetents shielded from accountability; Eastern Visayas excluded in employment/unemployment figures; and the fact that many still live in temporary shelters two years after disaster struck.

We must remember because Daang Matuwid used PDAF and later DAP to corrupt Congress. Remember: the PDAF scam and how selective the prosecution has been; the refusal to obey the high court’s ruling against DAP; the pork barrel defense by President Aquino and Abad; the deliberate underspending of the budget just so President Aquino would have lots of DAP and similar pork barrel funds; the meeting of Sec. Garin assuring lawmakers that there will still be pork barrel despite the court’s rulings; and the billions in lump-sum appropriations (new pork!) in the 2016 budget.

We must remember because 44 SAF lives were offered by President Aquino in a US-inspired suicide operation. Remember that a suspended police chief “advised” the president/BFF and the acting police chief; that Aquino deprived the arriving caskets of a proper presidential welcome; that he made relatives and the nation wait for him at a public tribute; that up to now, justice is elusive. Remember too how Roxas allowed himself to be humiliated by being excluded in the operation and not raising hell about it.

We must remember because the victims of the Zamboanga siege continue to suffer. Remember the false promise of permanent housing supposedly ready a month after the 2014 SONA, the spread of prostitution and the absence of justice. Remember Roxas’ “happy anniversary” greetings.

We must remember the high tax rates and other evidence of limited, elitist, and overstated economic growth. Remember the refusal to lower taxes by both Aquino and Roxas; the doctored statistics about employment and unemployment; the refusal to raise the minimum wage and the salaries of state workers; the hikes in government fees; the unchecked increases of oil prices and rates for water and electricity; the publicly funded partnerships for private gain; the refusal to raise pensions; the hikes in premiums; the hikes too in tuition fees even for state schools; and the attempt to tamper with balikbayan boxes in search of new sources of taxes.

READ MORE...

We must remember the breakdown of public transportation, especially in Metro Manila. Remember how, from Mar Roxas to Jun Abaya, the DOTC pampered the private MRT owners and the private maintenance provider; how the government allowed the steady decline of the MRT; the big MRT-LRT rate hikes; and the handsome deal with yet another private consortium for the LRT, LRT extension and the new ticketing system; the worsening traffic in Metro Manila; the atrocious conditions of airports (even as government continue to raise terminal fees); the absence of plans to alleviate the plight of commuters; the insensitivity during repeated Carmageddons; and more.

We must remember Daang Matuwid’s culture of impunity that protect malefactors, murderers, the corrupt, or the incompetent. Remember the more than 100 lumads and other indigenous peoples killed at the altars of counterinsurgency, foreign mining, and foreign plantations; the over 200 activists, defenders, lawyers, and journalists; the failure or refusal to go after the killers; the pampering and protection of the likes of Abad, Abaya, and allies linked to the PDAF and DAP scams; the failed prosecution of former President Arroyo; the defense of Jennifer Laude’s rapist/killer Pemberton; and the refusal to pass the Freedom of Information Law.

We must remember Daang Matuwid’s penchant for “blame game”: Always Arroyo’s fault – or the media, or the opposition, or the communists, or the weather. Remember the absence of accountability.

We must remember because some say the 2016 elections would be a “Great Referendum.” Those who say this expect to win if we forget. Thus, we need to remember so that we would not forget why we have repeatedly risen up against Aquino and why Roxas could only muster a maximum of 20 percent support in surveys – or why 80 percent are looking at other candidates.

November is almost here. Remember our heroes and those who died due to state negligence or state terrorism. Remember how many times we said “no more” and “never again.” Remember the false promises and the lies. Remember that we deserve better.

Because only by remembering and by not forgetting would we be able to say: No to another six years of the past five years. No to continuing the disastrous and elitist Daang Matuwid. Yes to change. Yes to something better.

Follow me on Twitter @tonyocruz and check out my blog tonyocruz.com 


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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