EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK:
(Mini Reads followed by Full Commentary below)

FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

EDITORIAL:  INFORMATION --QUIT SMOKING, IT'S NEVER TO LATE!


June is National No-Smoking Month, pursuant to Republic Act (RA) 9211, the Tobacco Regulations Act of 2003, and Presidential Proclamation No. 183, which was issued to raise awareness on the ill effects of smoking, to encourage smokers to kick the habit, and to promote healthy smoke-free living. RA 9211 makes it unlawful for any person under the age of 18 to purchase, sell, or smoke tobacco products.
The Department of Health (DOH) has reported that 10 persons die every hour – 240 deaths per day – in the country due to cigarette smoking. There are 17.3 million Filipino smokers, — 48% male and 9% female. In Southeast Asia, 600,000 people die every year due to exposure to second-hand smoke, which causes cancer and chronic diseases. Around 64% of youth are exposed to second-hand smoke in public places, while almost half of all children breathe air polluted by tobacco smoke. Globally, six million tobacco users die annually, and according to the World Health Organization, 80% of tobacco-related deaths will occur in developing countries by 2030. Tobacco control is one of three major components of the DOH Healthy Lifestyle Program, together with regular exercise and proper diet. To dissuade the youth from smoking, parents themselves must quit smoking and serve as role models for their children, the DOH said. DOH supports the Departments of Trade and Industry, Education, and Interior and Local Government as well as the Philippine National Police and Commission on Higher Education in implementing “Balik Eskwela” to push for 100% smoke-free schools – prohibiting smoking in all enclosed or partially enclosed public places, workplaces, public outdoor spaces, and public conveyances; there should be “no” designated smoking areas in these places. READ MORE...

ALSO: Malacańang supports ‘World No Tobacco Day,’ but mum on PNoy’s smoking


The government has joined the world in marking the “World No Tobacco Day” today but was silent on President Aquino’s smoking habit. Presidential Communications Operations Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. instead affirmed the country’s support to global efforts to stop the illegal trade of tobacco. “Nakikiisa ang buong pamahalaan sa buong mundo at sa World Health Organization sa paggunita ngayong araw ng ‘World No Tobacco Day’ sa ilalim ng temang ‘Stop Illicit Trade of Tobacco Products’
(The government joins the world and the World Health Organization in commemorating ‘World No Tobacco Day’ with the theme ‘Stop Illicit Trade of Tobacco Products’),” Coloma said in an interview with state-owned DZRB. “Sa pagdiriwang ngayong taon, nananawagan ang WHO sa lahat ng mga bansa sa buong mundo na magkaisa upang wakasan ang iligal na kalakalan ng tobacco products na siyang itinuturong sanhi ng pagkamatay ng mahigit sa anim na milyong katao bawat taon sa buong mundo, kabilang na ang 600,000 non-smokers na apektado ng paglanghap ng secondhand smoke (This year, WHO appeals to all countries to unite in ending the illegal trade of tobacco products that caused the death of six million persons around the world, including 600,000 non-smokers affected by second hand smoke),” he added. READ MORE...

ALSO: Intramuros’ special place in our history


Intramuros occupies a special place in the history of our country. Before the arrival of the Spaniards, it was where Tagalog and Capampangan tribes gathered to trade with merchants from nearby Borneo and Indonesia, and from as far away as China and India. Spanish explorers led by Martin de Goiti and Juan de Salcedo came in 1570 and after a short-lived war with the natives set up the capital of the new Spanish colony in 1571. Work on the great wall, for which Intramuros later came to be known, was begun in 1590, continuing until the end of the 18th century. Today, Intramuros is visited by thousands of tourists from all over the world. While we have beaches and other natural attractions – among them now world-famous Boracay – we also have centuries-old churches all over the Philippines. There used to be several standing inside Intramuros, built by the Augustinians, the Recollects, the Franciscans, the Dominicans, the Capuchins, and the Jesuits. After earthquakes, wars, and other plagues, only San Agustin Church among the old churches survived  in Intramuros.  READ MORE...

ALSO Editorial: Appointment of new PNP chief awaited


Department of Health (DOH), the Commission on Audit, (COA), the Commission on Elections (Comelec). the Civil Service Commission (CSC), and the Philippine National Police (PNP) – he has responded by naming Secretary Janette Garin to the DOH, Chairman Michael Aguinaldo to the COA, and Chairman Andres Bautista to the Comelec. The CSC and the PNP continue to be headed by officers-in-charge. The President can probably take his time about naming a CSC chief. But the PNP is a different matter. This is the government agency at the center of peace and order concerns in the country. And it will be assuming a critical role in the coming national elections. Just as it was important for the Comelec to be at full strength with a chairman and a complete membership of seven, so is it important for the PNP to be ready to maintain peace and order in the coming elections which are traditionally marked by partisan violence in this country. Director General Alan Purisima resigned as PNP chief at the height of the Mamasapano investigation last February, after he was found to have continued issuing orders despite his suspension by the Ombudsman in connection with graft and plunder cases involving gun licenses and missing rifles. His suspension ended the other day and he immediately applied for leave of absence. He intends to stay on leave for the rest of his term in the PNP, which ends on his 56th birth anniversary on November 23. READ MORE...

ALSO: 6 things I love about PH


by TONYO CRUZ ---Blogger, advocate and social media strategist, newspaper columnist.
Why do I love and have faith in our country? Let me count the ways: 1. Our land and seas. Our 7,107 big and small islands provide a lifetime-worth of wonders and possibilities: Mountains and hills, forests, beaches of different colors, rich farm lands, caves and rivers, falls and rock formations, volcanoes and hot springs. Being surrounded and crisscrossed by seas and other bodies of water is like nature’s best gift. And that’s just what we can readily see. The beauty of our land and seas isn’t “skin-deep.” Rich natural resources can be found underground: gold, nickel, and other metals, steam that could power us well into the future, and the biggest number of aquatic and marine wealth ever gathered by nature in a particular place.  2. Our location. Our country is strategically located in Southeast and East Asia. It is the Pacific’s gateway to Asia. Our neighbors are only a few hours away by plane. Our coastlines are longer than most countries. We have islands close to Brunei, Malaysia, and Indonesia, as well as to Taiwan. Perfect for trade, commerce, and travel. READ MORE, TO NO 3.....

ALSO: Great things boosting Sen. Bongbong Marcos’ presidential plan


by Elinando B. Cinco The best gauge that Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. is training his sights on the presidency is the way he is “making his presence felt.” It is providential that the young Marcos is chairman of Committee on Local Government in the Upper House which is now looking into the draft provisions of the hottest public issue of the day – the Bangsamoro Basic Law. It being the much-talked about controversy these days from Aparri to Jolo, Senator Bongbong, as a result, is being catapulted to nationwide prominence. And without him asking for it! He knows this beneficial advantage and is making full use of the polemic to a hilt. His present work of fine-tuning the BBL, if adopted in the final form of the law, will give him bigger credit in the eyes of the public at large.This is also what first-time voters are looking for in a leader of the land. Many neutral observers are of the opinion that the manner by which Senator Bongbong presides in the series of hearings clearly highlights his wide knowledge of the proposed law, including his explanation on why many BBL provisions are patently unconstitutional. In short, he is doing his home work. READ MORE...

ALSO: Read, read, and read


by Ignacio Bunye
The recent “expose” of Antonio Calipjo Go regarding a supposedly error-filled book for Grade 10 students has generated a lot of attention. But I believe DepEd Secretary Armin Luistro came up with a credible explanation. What Go examined, according to Luistro, was a draft of the book. And anybody who has published a book knows the whale of a difference between the first draft, the second draft, and the final published copy. If anything, the hullaballoo did serve to emphasize the importance of good books in molding the minds of the young. And even more important, the value of developing the reading habit. Reading is so essential in one’s development that to acquire it early – and to sustain it – gives an individual a tremendous advantage. My first boss when I joined the Ayala group in 1976 was Tomas “Buddy” Gomez III. He was concurrently head of public relations and executive director of Filipinas Foundation (now Ayala Foundation). Buddy later served as press secretary and cabinet officer for regional development for Metro Manila during the time of President Cory Aquino. Without his knowing it, Buddy became one of my role models. Buddy was about one of the most articulate guys I have ever met. He could discuss any subject under the sun. His secret: he read and read and read. If my reckoning was correct, Buddy was devouring one book a week. Other guys who were also known as voracious readers were the late Ninoy Aquino and the late Labor Minister and Foreign Affairs Secretary Blas Ople. Because of his huge stock of knowledge, Ninoy could hold audiences spell-bound with his speeches. Ople could dazzle with the wide vocabulary at his command. Not known to many is the fact that Andres Bonifacio was another wide reader. Bonifacio attended the private school of Guillermo Osmena and attained the present-day equivalent of second year high school or Grade 8 under the K-12 curriculum. But Bonifacio more than made up for his incomplete formal education by reading a lot. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA EDITORIALS & OPINIONS  HERE:

EDITORIAL: Information: Quit smoking; it’s never too late!

MANILA, JUNE 15, 2015 (MANILA BULLETIN) June 8, 2015 -- June is National No-Smoking Month, pursuant to Republic Act (RA) 9211, the Tobacco Regulations Act of 2003, and Presidential Proclamation No. 183, which was issued to raise awareness on the ill effects of smoking, to encourage smokers to kick the habit, and to promote healthy smoke-free living.

RA 9211 makes it unlawful for any person under the age of 18 to purchase, sell, or smoke tobacco products.

The Department of Health (DOH) has reported that 10 persons die every hour – 240 deaths per day – in the country due to cigarette smoking.

There are 17.3 million Filipino smokers, — 48% male and 9% female. In Southeast Asia, 600,000 people die every year due to exposure to second-hand smoke, which causes cancer and chronic diseases.

Around 64% of youth are exposed to second-hand smoke in public places, while almost half of all children breathe air polluted by tobacco smoke.

Globally, six million tobacco users die annually, and according to the World Health Organization, 80% of tobacco-related deaths will occur in developing countries by 2030.

Tobacco control is one of three major components of the DOH Healthy Lifestyle Program, together with regular exercise and proper diet.

To dissuade the youth from smoking, parents themselves must quit smoking and serve as role models for their children, the DOH said. DOH supports the Departments of Trade and Industry, Education, and Interior and Local Government as well as the Philippine National Police and Commission on Higher Education in implementing “Balik Eskwela” to push for 100% smoke-free schools – prohibiting smoking in all enclosed or partially enclosed public places, workplaces, public outdoor spaces, and public conveyances; there should be “no” designated smoking areas in these places.

“Balik Eskwela” carries three messages – an absolute smoking ban inside and outside school premise; prohibition of sale of cigarette and other tobacco products within 100 meters from any point of the perimeter of a school, playground, or other facility frequented by minors; and advocacy to parents and family members so they will not instructing children to buy or light tobacco products for them.

Smokers face high risk of development heart diseases like hypertension and are likely to suffer from heart attack, stroke, lung cancer, and chronic respiratory disorder.

The DOH offers its services for free, as part of proactive policy to curb the habit through health interventions. Cessation is the only intervention with the potential to reduce tobacco-related deaths. It should be part of overall comprehensive tobacco control policy of any country, the DOH suggested.

Support for smoking cessation ranges from techniques including motivation, advice and guidance, counseling, telephone and Internet support, to pharmaceuticals aids, to encourage smokers to stop using tobacco and avoid a relapse. DOH cessation clinics are found in most public hospitals.


Malacańang supports ‘World No Tobacco Day,’ but mum on PNoy’s smoking by Genalyn Kabiling June 1, 2015 MANILA DAILY BULLETIN

The government has joined the world in marking the “World No Tobacco Day” today but was silent on President Aquino’s smoking habit.

Presidential Communications Operations Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. instead affirmed the country’s support to global efforts to stop the illegal trade of tobacco.

“Nakikiisa ang buong pamahalaan sa buong mundo at sa World Health Organization sa paggunita ngayong araw ng ‘World No Tobacco Day’ sa ilalim ng temang ‘Stop Illicit Trade of Tobacco Products’
(The government joins the world and the World Health Organization in commemorating ‘World No Tobacco Day’ with the theme ‘Stop Illicit Trade of Tobacco Products’),” Coloma said in an interview with state-owned DZRB.

“Sa pagdiriwang ngayong taon, nananawagan ang WHO sa lahat ng mga bansa sa buong mundo na magkaisa upang wakasan ang iligal na kalakalan ng tobacco products na siyang itinuturong sanhi ng pagkamatay ng mahigit sa anim na milyong katao bawat taon sa buong mundo, kabilang na ang 600,000 non-smokers na apektado ng paglanghap ng secondhand smoke
(This year, WHO appeals to all countries to unite in ending the illegal trade of tobacco products that caused the death of six million persons around the world, including 600,000 non-smokers affected by second hand smoke),” he added.

READ MORE...
Coloma said WHO estimates that more than 8 million people may die by 2030. He assured that the government will continue to push for the health and wellness campaign against the negative effects of tobacco use.

The Palace official, meantime, did not respond to media queries if the President intend to abstain from smoking on “No Tobacco Day.”

The President has refused to quit smoking despite appeals from anti-tobacco groups, insisting that it helps him deal with the pressure of his work. He had a number of coughing fits in the middle of previous speeches which some groups believe was connected with his smoking habit.


Intramuros’ special place in our history June 12, 2015

Intramuros occupies a special place in the history of our country.

Before the arrival of the Spaniards, it was where Tagalog and Capampangan tribes gathered to trade with merchants from nearby Borneo and Indonesia, and from as far away as China and India.

Spanish explorers led by Martin de Goiti and Juan de Salcedo came in 1570 and after a short-lived war with the natives set up the capital of the new Spanish colony in 1571. Work on the great wall, for which Intramuros later came to be known, was begun in 1590, continuing until the end of the 18th century.

Today, Intramuros is visited by thousands of tourists from all over the world. While we have beaches and other natural attractions – among them now world-famous Boracay – we also have centuries-old churches all over the Philippines.

There used to be several standing inside Intramuros, built by the Augustinians, the Recollects, the Franciscans, the Dominicans, the Capuchins, and the Jesuits. After earthquakes, wars, and other plagues, only San Agustin Church among the old churches survived in Intramuros.

READ MORE...
The other day, the Intramuros Administration announced plans to rehabilitate parts of the wall which have deteriorated over the centuries.

It will set up a new museum to house some 8,500 historical pieces — paintings and other artworks made of ivory and precious stones.

The project includes Fort Santiago, where the national hero Jose Rizal was imprisoned before his execution at nearby Bagumbayan in 1896.

Streets in the project site will be repaved with granite and travertine. Narra, ilang-ilang, tsampaka, and other native trees and plants will be planted around the area.

Electrical cables will all be placed underground. The project is expected to be completed by October in time for the holding of the Leaders Summit of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) in Manila in November.

The Intramuros project will be a great boost to our tourism program, but more than showing a great and colorful part of our history to foreign visitors, it will help our own people, especially our students, appreciate even more the richness of our culture.

After this undertaking, a major effort should be undertaken to look for other historic sites in Metro Manila and elsewhere in the country, restore them as far as possible, and make them part of a program to inspire our youth with our glorious heritage.


Editorial: Appointment of new PNP chief awaited June 13, 2015

Since the President’s attention was called to vacancies in several key government positions – the Department of Health (DOH), the Commission on Audit, (COA), the Commission on Elections (Comelec). the Civil Service Commission (CSC), and the Philippine National Police (PNP) – he has responded by naming Secretary Janette Garin to the DOH, Chairman Michael Aguinaldo to the COA, and Chairman Andres Bautista to the Comelec. The CSC and the PNP continue to be headed by officers-in-charge.

The President can probably take his time about naming a CSC chief. But the PNP is a different matter.

This is the government agency at the center of peace and order concerns in the country. And it will be assuming a critical role in the coming national elections.

Just as it was important for the Comelec to be at full strength with a chairman and a complete membership of seven, so is it important for the PNP to be ready to maintain peace and order in the coming elections which are traditionally marked by partisan violence in this country.

Director General Alan Purisima resigned as PNP chief at the height of the Mamasapano investigation last February, after he was found to have continued issuing orders despite his suspension by the Ombudsman in connection with graft and plunder cases involving gun licenses and missing rifles.

His suspension ended the other day and he immediately applied for leave of absence. He intends to stay on leave for the rest of his term in the PNP, which ends on his 56th birth anniversary on November 23.

READ MORE...
All the while, the PNP has been headed by an officer-in-charge – Deputy Director General Leonardo Espina. It was Espina who was nominally leading the PNP as OIC when the Mamasapano operation was carried out, but it was Purisima who was meeting with the President and the Special Action Force commander in planning the action.

To this day, Espina is the OIC, with all the limitations of that temporary office.

Is the PNP doomed to remain in this state until Purisima reaches his mandated resignation date on November 23? Senators Ferdinand Marcos Jr.and Grace Poe have both called on the President to file charges against Purisima of usurpation of authority and negligence that cost 44 lives, and to fire him. “But it appears,” Marcos said, “that he has a strong hold on the President.”

Meanwhile, Deputy Director General Espina will be retiring on July 19 – that’s only 36 days away.

Will he be followed by another OIC?

Or will the President take truly decisive action on this matter and – sooner than later – appoint a permanent PNP chief who can assume command of the situation, move to enhance peace and order in the country, and start preparing for the coming election?


6 things I love about PH by Tonyo Cruz June 12, 2015


TONYO CRUZ ---Blogger, advocate and social media strategist, newspaper columnist.

Why do I love and have faith in our country? Let me count the ways:

1. Our land and seas. Our 7,107 big and small islands provide a lifetime-worth of wonders and possibilities: Mountains and hills, forests, beaches of different colors, rich farm lands, caves and rivers, falls and rock formations, volcanoes and hot springs. Being surrounded and crisscrossed by seas and other bodies of water is like nature’s best gift.

And that’s just what we can readily see. The beauty of our land and seas isn’t “skin-deep.” Rich natural resources can be found underground: gold, nickel, and other metals, steam that could power us well into the future, and the biggest number of aquatic and marine wealth ever gathered by nature in a particular place.

2. Our location. Our country is strategically located in Southeast and East Asia. It is the Pacific’s gateway to Asia. Our neighbors are only a few hours away by plane. Our coastlines are longer than most countries. We have islands close to Brunei, Malaysia, and Indonesia, as well as to Taiwan. Perfect for trade, commerce, and travel.

READ MORE...
3. Our history. Before Western powers “discovered” us, inhabitants of what is now known as the Philippines already had their own governments, culture, arts, languages, alphabets, literature, forms of writing, wood work, metal and iron crafts. They had already mastered the seas for trade, exchange of goods, and defense. They had no separate warrior class; entire villages and kingdoms went to war to defend themselves from invaders. In many areas, Islam had taken root, leading to more advanced societies.

Fast-forward to the colonial era, these separate villages and kingdoms would be united by force and under the cross – with the exception of the courageous and freedom-loving Bangsamoro. Their common problem of colonial subjugation, and the common desire to be free led thousands to offer their lives for our national freedom. The first anti-colonial revolution in Asia gave birth to the Philippine Republic. Unfortunately, traitors and a new colonialism – imperialism – aborted the newborn republic.

Faced with new colonizers in the 1940s, our great-grandfathers and grandfathers stepped up to the challenge. Despite limitations, their widely supported guerrilla movement effectively pushed back and wiped out many of the invaders.

Martial law and dictatorship could only last a maximum of 20 years in the Philippines, before a grassroots-based mass movement morphed into another world-first: a people’s uprising capable of toppling a most brutal, corrupt, and foreign-backed tyranny.

4. Our culture. That Philippine culture is diverse is perhaps an understatement. Everywhere in our country, there’s an endless array of surprises: Different languages, works of art, literature, games, clothing, mannerisms, rituals, cuisine, and fiestas. How our people adapted to the land and seas, the elements, the pre-colonial tradition and the ensuing colonization, and never forgetting about the future — these produced a rich culture that could only come from places we call home.

Our national minorities from the Cordilerras and other mountain folk (many pushed there by ravenous colonial powers and local traitors) and the proud Bangsamoro preserved their unique identities and culture. Among others, think tattoos, jungle survival, seafaring, and trading.

Both our history and culture value courage as the highest virtue. The courage to win and defend freedom, being the most glorious. There is no part of this country that prides itself as a bulwark of surrender, cynicism, indifference, apathy. We are a people reflexively and perhaps even genetically averse to these awful traits. The truth is katapangan, bayanihan, and diskarte trump kaduwagan, kasakiman and kapalpakan, among our people.

5. Our diaspora. Today, a symptom of the problem of lack of fairness and opportunity. Tomorrow, a motive force for a self-reliant, modern, and globally-assertive future.

Our kababayans who dared or were compelled by circumstances to leave home are a class of builders and thinkers ready to be called to rebuild and rethink the country they call home.

6. Our people. 100 million and growing, we are heirs to a glorious history of struggle and resistance. We have a rich heritage of land and seas all waiting to be taken advantage of for national progress and prosperity.

Our workers and farmers are not just “sanay sa hirap” but also ready to build a better, fairer society. We have intellectuals and educated people whose imagination and brain power could be put in the service of the majority. Our entrepreneurs are eager to lead the charge towards industrialization and modernization. Together with the patriotic diaspora, they are ready to pursue what we might call our national destiny: build a truly free, independent, self-reliant, progressive, and peaceful country.

There are many other things and aspects about the Philippines and our people that we could all be proud of. I’m sure you could add more to this list.

But the point is, we have every reason to be proud and happy that we are Filipinos. Not only that, we have what it takes to be a better and great country.

Yes, we can transform this country. It starts with our outlook and by rocking that system that spreads lies about us, our past, what we can do and our destiny. It requires us to tear down structures and institutions that prevent us from maximizing our strengths, stop our people from doing great things, and allow only a treacherous and corrupt few (together with their foreign partners and masters) to enjoy an abundant life in this country. To get to the future we want and deserve, we must confront foreign domination, landlordism, and corruption – the main ills that keep our country backward and our people hopeless.

We don’t need false prophets and saviors. We ourselves are the prophets and saviors we have long been waiting for. Let us muster the courage to question, challenge, and change the system that pushes us back and takes us down.

Let our patriotism and Pinoy pride give us courage. Courage to smash the awful present and build a new and better country worthy of our past, present, and future.

Follow me on Twitter @tonyocruz and check out my blog tonyocruz.com


Great things boosting Sen. Bongbong Marcos’ presidential plan by Elinando B. Cinco June 14, 2015 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share0


by Elinando B. Cinco

The best gauge that Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. is training his sights on the presidency is the way he is “making his presence felt.”

It is providential that the young Marcos is chairman of Committee on Local Government in the Upper House which is now looking into the draft provisions of the hottest public issue of the day – the Bangsamoro Basic Law.

It being the much-talked about controversy these days from Aparri to Jolo, Senator Bongbong, as a result, is being catapulted to nationwide prominence. And without him asking for it!

He knows this beneficial advantage and is making full use of the polemic to a hilt.

His present work of fine-tuning the BBL, if adopted in the final form of the law, will give him bigger credit in the eyes of the public at large.This is also what first-time voters are looking for in a leader of the land.

Many neutral observers are of the opinion that the manner by which Senator Bongbong presides in the series of hearings clearly highlights his wide knowledge of the proposed law, including his explanation on why many BBL provisions are patently unconstitutional. In short, he is doing his home work.

READ MORE...
Many of those watching the proceedings on TV, as well as those in the gallery of the Senate plenary hall are impressed by the senator’s capability in overseeing the probe.

“He acts with authority and proper decorum. He is comfortably in command, so to speak,” said radio reporter covering the hearing.

Right now, his committee is crafting its own version of the BBL, after all the amendments and revisions are considered as enunciated by other senators.

Meanwhile, Senator Bongbongcan be candid and casual in media interviews. DZMM’s late-afternoon Dos-Por-Dos talk show last Tuesday bore this out.

During the long interview, the senator was bubbly and enthusiastic in his answers and pronouncements, the kind of stance that radio listeners appreciate.

For example, when asked by his hosts if he ever “broke loose” from his security escorts, one time or another, when the Marcos family was in Malacańang, said, “yes.” Those happened when he was growing up as a young bachelor, and went a-courting.

Did he have a big advantage when wooing a girl?

The answer – No, he did not bank on the Marcos name nor did he create an insinuation of superiority, being the son of the sitting president.

An important comment of his that made headlines the following day was when he asked PNoy not to take back his old friend Gen. Alan Purisima, after finishing his six-month suspension, as PNP chief. A clamor voiced and made known to him by SAF 44 families.

Already feedback from various media audiences are coming in. Many are in praise of the young lawmaker’s astute management in those precious hours of the Senate hearings. They look at him as already demonstrating unmistakable leadership traits.

Significantly, before the BBL, Senator Bongbong was only relegated to a second-fiddle role in overall Senate work.

Taking cognizance of the invigorating public opinion in favor of the young legislator, some former – (KBL) political stalwarts and present (UNA) leaders from the Ilocandia and Manila converged at La Vista subdivision in Quezon City over the weekend.

The immediate goal of those who gathered was to muster a nationwide organization and harness logistical support for the presidential candidacy of the young Marcos.

Make no mistake about it, he has a formidable vote support base – the so-called Solid North. It is composed of four regions of 18 provinces whose natives are Ilocano-speaking.

It is said that Ilocanos are clannish and consider themselves blood-brothers wherever they may be. And come election time they write the name of a fellow Ilocano who is running for a national position.

And what about Region-8, the Waray region of his mother? Insiders believe Senator Bongbong has not much to rely on there. Many of the present political leaders and incumbentLGUs are no longer beholden to the Marcoses.

It is only in Tacloban whose City Mayor Alfred Romualdez and Rep. Ferdinand Martin Romualdez of the First District of Leyte province, the senator’s first cousins, that the Marcos vote will emerge.

But Mindanao holds a big promise. Thousands of Ilocanos settled there in the 1950s. Their descendants are in every province of the region. Marcos is a well-loved name there.

So, by and large, Senator Bongbong will have to thank the ruckus that attended the BBL controversy for catapulting him to new heights. And with the blessings of the Almighty, to Malacańang.


Elinando B. Cinco Page Eleven He currently serves as a contributor for the Manila Bulletin, tackling a broad range of issues concerning the Philippine society. In 2005, during the centennial celebrations of the Christ the King (CKC) College in Calbayog City, Samar, he was named as an Outstanding CKC Alumnus, for his dedication in the field of journalism and public relations. He was raised in the same town. BULLETIN FILE


Read, read, and read by Ignacio Bunye June 14, 2015 Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share0


by Ignacio Bunye

The recent “expose” of Antonio Calipjo Go regarding a supposedly error-filled book for Grade 10 students has generated a lot of attention. But I believe DepEd Secretary Armin Luistro came up with a credible explanation. What Go examined, according to Luistro, was a draft of the book. And anybody who has published a book knows the whale of a difference between the first draft, the second draft, and the final published copy.

If anything, the hullaballoo did serve to emphasize the importance of good books in molding the minds of the young. And even more important, the value of developing the reading habit.

Reading is so essential in one’s development that to acquire it early – and to sustain it – gives an individual a tremendous advantage.

My first boss when I joined the Ayala group in 1976 was Tomas “Buddy” Gomez III. He was concurrently head of public relations and executive director of Filipinas Foundation (now Ayala Foundation). Buddy later served as press secretary and cabinet officer for regional development for Metro Manila during the time of President Cory Aquino.

Without his knowing it, Buddy became one of my role models. Buddy was about one of the most articulate guys I have ever met. He could discuss any subject under the sun. His secret: he read and read and read. If my reckoning was correct, Buddy was devouring one book a week.

Other guys who were also known as voracious readers were Ninoy Aquino and the late Labor Minister and Foreign Affairs Secretary Blas Ople. Because of his huge stock of knowledge, Ninoy could hold audiences spell-bound with his speeches. Ople could dazzle with the wide vocabulary at his command.

Not known to many is the fact that Andres Bonifacio was another wide reader. Bonifacio attended the private school of Guillermo Osmena and attained the present-day equivalent of second year high school or Grade 8 under the K-12 curriculum. But Bonifacio more than made up for his incomplete formal education by reading a lot.

READ MORE...
Dona Elvira Preysler, proprietor of a mosaic tile factory where Bonifacio used to work as a warehouse keeper, recalled that during lunch breaks, she would often see Bonifacio reading a book.

When the revolution broke out, the Spanish authorities raided the German firm Carlos Fressel and Co. This was where Bonfacio last worked as warehouseman and later as sales agent.

The raiding authorities seized the following books – a number of them considered as subversive – among Bonifacio’s personal effects.

On top of the list were the two novels of Jose Rizal – Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. During that time, mere possession of these “subversive” books was enough to land anybody in jail.

Also among the “subversive books” were “History of the French Revolution” and “The Ruins of Palmyra: Meditations of the Revolution of the Empire.”

Also probably considered “subversive” was “Lives of the Presidents of the United States” because of the role of George Washington in the American Revolution.

Other books in the Bonifacio mini-library were the Holy Bible, Religion Within the Reach of All, Les Miserables, The Wandering Jew, and assorted books and pamphlets on international law, civil code, penal code and medicine.

Of course, the better known wide-reader among our heroes was Dr. Jose Rizal. Rizal got hooked into the reading habit after his mother Teodora Alonzo read to him when he was a child the story about the Moth and the Flame.

Inspired by this experience, Rizal later wrote for the Filipino youth a version of the Filipino folk tale “The Monkey and The Turtle.”


Ignacio Bunye Speaking Out He is a Filipino politician who is currently serving as the Monetary Board Member of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas since July 3, 2008. Prior to his appointment as monetary board member, he previously served as the Press Secretary, acting Executive Secretary under Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, Congressman, and Mayor of Muntinlupa City. Bunye writes weekly columns for the Manila Bulletin, Tempo, People’s Tonight, Sun Star and Filipino Reporter. BULLETIN FILE

Thoughts on the peace process



Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/85271/thoughts-on-the-peace-process#ixzz3bN6kWGYJ
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook
 


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE