EDITORIALS & OPINIONS OF THE WEEK
(Mini Reads folowed by Full Commentary below)

FROM MANILA BULLETIN

BULLETIN EDITORIAL:  THE SAF IN THE MAKATI DISPUTE


The media last Tuesday carried reports and photos of what was happening at the Makati City Hall – Vice Mayor Romulo Peña Jr. taking his oath as acting mayor of the city and Mayor Jejomar Erwin Binay holding on to his office as he waved a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) from the Court of Appeals, stopping his suspension by the Ombudsman. 
It was rather unfortunate that among all photos of officials and their followers was a photo of hundreds of Special Action Force (SAF) police commandos barricading the premises of the Makati Ciy Hall. They had been sent there by the Department of Interior and Local Government which has supervision and control over the Philippine National Police, according to the Binay camp. For several weeks now, the nation has been reading about the heroism of 44 SAF men who died in battle in Mamasapano, Maguindanao. They have variously been called “Fallen 44,” “Gallant 44,” and “SAF 44.” They have been hailed as heroes, and their death has been blamed on the actions of certain officials accused of such failures as poor operational planning, lack of coordination, violation of chains of command or lines of authority. ........Now we find them enforcing a suspension order favoring one side of a political dispute. Not coincidentally, they are representing the DILG, whose head, Secretary Mar Roxas, is seen as a political rival of Mayor Binay’s father, Vice President Jejomar Binay, for the presidency in the 2016 elections. READ EDITORIAL IN FULL....

ALSO: The Binays’ risky gambit


..........The city hall stalemate is over for now. But questions remain. First, how will the people at large react to the Binays’ defiant and inflammatory rhetoric?  Second, how will the public read the Binays’ accusation against the Ombuds(wo)man herself? Does their act of defiance and disrespect for the law give us an indication of how the Binays would behave if Veep Jojo does become president?  And, finally, when they accuse Ombuds(wo)man Carpio-Morales of being a tool of their perceived political enemies, do they really believe someone who painstakingly built an illustrious career with integrity and dedication to the law would now suddenly throw all of that away just to please a bunch of politicians? It’s a thought worth pondering with deep introspection.  Before the TRO came down, the Binays were playing a risky game. If the Court of Appeals decides after 60 days to let the Ombuds(wo)man’s case against them proceed, would they again be defiant?  READ FROM THE BEGINNING...

ALSO: ‘War of the Presidentiables’ is on


by Fred M. Lobo 
The ‘war’ among “presidentiables” for 2016 quietly rages amidst the Mamasapano controversy and related political noise. There they go, ready to rise or fall. Arangkada na sila!  ***  Pulse Asia survey says that several names are making it to the ”presidentiables’ list,” adding excitement as the October filing of candidacy comes closer. Big names and early birds are emerging. Expect the Racuyals Atbp to follow. ***   Vice President Jejomar C. Binay, despite the corruption charges filed against him and members of his family, remains the strongest presidential candidate for 2016, says Pulse Asia. Pulse says Rambotito is No. 1 political survivor. READ ON...

ALSO Editorial: ‘Betty,’ ‘Pam,’ and climate change


.........Here in the Philippines, we have learned our lessons from super-typhoon “Yolanda.” Where our people used to take typhoons more or less for granted, typhoon reports are now avidly followed. Orders for mandatory evacuation of endangered areas are not resisted as they used to. And PAGASA, coordinating with other international weather agencies, has faithfully tracked all weather disturbances. So that by the time they reach our shores, our people have been sufficiently warned.  Thus when storm “Betty” starts bringing rains to Northern and Central Luzon today, our people will be on the alert – just in case. PAGASA said “Betty” is not likely to strengthen into a super-typhoon. But there has been so much unpredictable weather in recent years, we have learned not to be complacent about typhoons and other weather disturbances. When the UN conference takes place in Paris this December, the Philippines will be playing a key role as the site of the world’s most powerful typhoon ever to hit land. It is one of the nations French President Francoise Hollande has visited in his campaign to gather support for a world agreement on climate change. READ FULL REPORT FROM BEGINNING...

ALSO Editorial: Pacquiao at the center of the great debate
(Pacquiao's May 2 welterweight fight with Floyd Mayweather has raised him and the Philippines to even higher levels of world attention.)


BULLETIN EDITORIAL CARTOON MARCH 22, 2015 ........Oddsmakers in the US have installed Mayweather as a slight favorite. Undefeated in 47 fights, he is known for his superb defense. But Pacquiao, a southpaw with a record of 57 wins, five losses, and two draws, is known for the speed of his punches. It will thus be a fight between two different boxing styles – superb defense versus perpetual motion. Between stamina and hand speed. The world’s boxing greats will be debating on these two styles in the next six weeks and then the great day will finally come – Saturday night , May 2, in Las Vegas, which is Sunday morning, May 3, in the Philippines. On that day, the nation will set aside all its concerns – forget all about pork barrel, and rival Makati mayors, and Mamasapano, to watch the “Pambansang Kamao” fight as much for national honor as for his richest purse ever. The great debate on boxing styles will be settled and the world will hail the undisputed champion. Whoever wins or loses, it will be the “biggest fight in history.”  READ EDITORIAL FROM BEGINNING...

ALSO: The power of the apology


by Dr. Jun A. Ynares, MD 
“No, you’re not forgiven.”  Those were the words I heard from my wife after I had said sorry. I had promised to be home early so we could eat together as a family. I arrived two hours late. She had already eaten with our two daughters and had tucked them in bed when I finally made it home. “Why not?” I asked. “I already said I am sorry,” I added. “Wrong words, wrong process,” she answered, taking a firm stand not to dispense forgiveness at that time. I smiled as I understood what she meant. Early on in our relationship, we had agreed that asking for forgiveness must follow a correct pattern. The process, we said, will ensure that a request to be forgiven is done sincerely. We followed that process strictly. CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: The vanishing confessional box


by Fr. Rolando V. De La Rosa, OP   There had been a time when people had regularly gone to confession to atone and ask for forgiveness for their sins. Today, during ordinary days, a priest can stay for hours inside the confessional box without having a single penitent to absolve. Many Catholics have developed the habit of accumulating first their sins, then dumping them inside the confessional box during Holy Week. The late Karl Menninger, MD, the erstwhile leading American psychiatrist, had deplored the fact that in the US the confessional box had been replaced by the psychiatrist’s couch or the judicial courts; that mental health practitioners, evolutionary scientists, and legal experts had equated sin with criminal offense or psychological aberration. He had foreseen what is happening today: people professing to be religious but with no sense of sin; and lawyers, judges, and psychiatrists taking over the role of the clergy. Claiming to have explored the individual’s subconscious drives and submerged feelings of remorse and guilt, many psychiatrists consider sin as mere expressions of deviancy, pathological prudishness, exaggerated piety, and external conditioning. The sinner is mentally sick, and through medication and counseling, he can overcome his depression, phobias, anxieties, hysteria, or panic attacks. But, as Dr. Menninger had discovered, such psychological maladies were but the effects of unconfessed sins. He wrote: “The best solution to many of our psychological woes is absolution. And it is free.” READ MORE....


READ FULL MEDIA EDITORIALS & OPINIONS  HERE:

Editorial: The SAF in the Makati dispute

MANILA, MARCH 23, 2015 (BULLETIN) EDITORIAL March 19, 2015 - The media last Tuesday carried reports and photos of what was happening at the Makati City Hall – Vice Mayor Romulo Peña Jr. taking his oath as acting mayor of the city and Mayor Jejomar Erwin Binay holding on to his office as he waved a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) from the Court of Appeals, stopping his suspension by the Ombudsman.

It was rather unfortunate that among all photos of officials and their followers was a photo of hundreds of Special Action Force (SAF) police commandos barricading the premises of the Makati Ciy Hall.

They had been sent there by the Department of Interior and Local Government which has supervision and control over the Philippine National Police, according to the Binay camp.

For several weeks now, the nation has been reading about the heroism of 44 SAF men who died in battle in Mamasapano, Maguindanao. They have variously been called “Fallen 44,” “Gallant 44,” and “SAF 44.”

They have been hailed as heroes, and their death has been blamed on the actions of certain officials accused of such failures as poor operational planning, lack of coordination, violation of chains of command or lines of authority. They have been recommended for medals and other distinctions.

And their organization, the SAF, is held in the highest esteem as an elite force of heroes fighting for the highest national interests.

Now we find them enforcing a suspension order favoring one side of a political dispute. Not coincidentally, they are representing the DILG, whose head, Secretary Mar Roxas, is seen as a political rival of Mayor Binay’s father, Vice President Jejomar Binay, for the presidency in the 2016 elections.

There are legal issues involved in the Makati controversy and these will be settled by the courts.

Meanwhile there are also political issues which, at the moment, appear to be dominating the scene. And neither side is backing down.

If indeed police presence is needed to maintain order, if the DILG cannot trust the Makati police to do it, might not the DILG and PNP send in men without flaunting nightsticks and displaying shields with the words “SAF” prominently painted on them?


MANILA BULLETIN

The Binays’ risky gambit by Leandro DD Coronel March 18, 2015

Mayor Junjun Binay of Makati City got his temporary restraining order from the Court of Appeals and thus escaped suspension for six months.

But by their defiance of the Ombuds(wo)man, the Binays (yes, including his father, Veep Jojo, who slept with him at city hall during the wait for the TRO) not only played a dangerous game but also showed their disrespect for the law.

They also openly accused DILG Sec. Mar Roxas of orchestrating the young Binay’s suspension and Ombuds(wo)man Conchita Carpio-Morales of playing politics. That’s inflammatory talk and uncivil speech.

That kind of in-your-face demagoguery has no place in high-level politics. It doesn’t enhance the quality and dignity of political discourse.

Besides taunting Roxas and baiting him to dish out the same inappropriate language or behavior, the Binays were playing to the emotions of voters who may still prefer Veep Jojo as the next president.

They were trying to salvage whatever is left of the base of support the vice president had before the bombshell of alleged corruption exploded last year. And they were trying to inflame their supporters into potentially explosive street action.

They were hoping that the people would rally behind them as oppositionists being persecuted by the Aquino government. But it’s doubtful whether the general public would buy that gambit of defiance.

The Binays, with Veep Jojo in the forefront, have succeeded in entrenching themselves as Makati’s keepers of power. They’ve allegedly amassed wealth and power over the years through corrupt means. Their political enemies allege that they’re rich way beyond their legal capacity to accumulate wealth.

Recent surveys indicate that the Filipino people believe the charges against the Binays are credible, as evidenced by the steady decline in the vice president’s popularity numbers.

Were the Binays using the standoff at city hall as their make-or-break exit from their continuing dilemma over the corruption allegations? Would the drama over barricading themselves inside city hall have elicited the Filipinos’ natural sympathy for the underdog?

Veep Jojo has pursued a successful career out of playing the underdog since he came onto the political scene in the precursor events leading to the 1986 Edsa People Power Revolution. He has projected himself as a David bold enough to challenge the political Goliaths.

Later, as a long-serving mayor of Makati, he continued to play the role of a Robin Hood out to protect the welfare of Makati’s poor. But his political enemies picture him as a robbing hood who pockets as much money as he gives away, or even much, much more.

The city hall stalemate is over for now. But questions remain. First, how will the people at large react to the Binays’ defiant and inflammatory rhetoric?

Second, how will the public read the Binays’ accusation against the Ombuds(wo)man herself? Does their act of defiance and disrespect for the law give us an indication of how the Binays would behave if Veep Jojo does become president?

And, finally, when they accuse Ombuds(wo)man Carpio-Morales of being a tool of their perceived political enemies, do they really believe someone who painstakingly built an illustrious career with integrity and dedication to the law would now suddenly throw all of that away just to please a bunch of politicians? It’s a thought worth pondering with deep introspection.

Before the TRO came down, the Binays were playing a risky game. If the Court of Appeals decides after 60 days to let the Ombuds(wo)man’s case against them proceed, would they again be defiant?


‘War of the Presidentiables’ is on by Fred M. Lobo March 19, 2015


by Fred M. Lobo

The ‘war’ among “presidentiables” for 2016 quietly rages amidst the Mamasapano controversy and related political noise.

There they go, ready to rise or fall. Arangkada na sila!

***

Pulse Asia survey says that several names are making it to the ”presidentiables’ list,” adding excitement as the October filing of candidacy comes closer.

Big names and early birds are emerging. Expect the Racuyals Atbp to follow.

***

Vice President Jejomar C. Binay, despite the corruption charges filed against him and members of his family, remains the strongest presidential candidate for 2016, says Pulse Asia.

Pulse says Rambotito is No. 1 political survivor.

***

Pulse survey conducted March 1-7, 2015, shows that Binay stands with 29 percent, up by 3 percent from his 26 percent rating last November.

VPNay is climbing up despite the weight of the sink and “ uling” thrown at him.

***

Sen. Grace Poe retains the No. 2 spot, although her voter preference rating dropped from 18 percent to 14 percent.

Poe maintains her grace. Let’s watch how her Mamasa-panaw inquiry and “massacre” findings would sink in.

***

Former President and now Manila Mayor Joseph Estrada inches higher with 12 percent, from 10 percent last quarter.

Durable Erap could still climb up– despite an earlier political arthritis.

***

Likewise, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, who was included in the survey for the first time, also has 12 percent.

The Tough Rudy Experiment seems to be working. “Tabi-tabi kayo!” he could be saying.

***

Also in the list of “presidentiables” are Senators Miriam Defensor Santiago, 9 percent; and Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., 6 percent.

Miriam has Wind and Fire vs “stupids” while Bongbong has Solid North as base.

***

Interior Secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas II, Liberal Party’s sentimental choice, only has 4 percent.

Ruling party’s fair-haired boy looks marred? His supporters could be asking “Mama, papano?”

***

Sen. Francis “Chiz” Escudero also enjoys a 4 percent rating, Pulse says.

Chiz doesn’t look hurt. He has a new Heart.

***

Other “presidentiables” have the following ranking: Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano, 3 percent; Antonio “Sonny” Trillanes IV, 2 percent; former senator and rehab czar Panfilo “Ping” Lacson, 1 percent; and Philippine Red Cross Chairman Richard “Dick” Gordon, 1 percent.

Expect more interesting names to join the 2016 presidential bandwagon.

***

Meanwhile, Malacañang says it is not worried that President Aquino’s approval rating of 59 percent last November plummeted to 38 percent in March while his trust rating plunged from 56 percent to 36 percent .

Pulse Asia survey serves as wake- up call for Palace Boys.

***

Presidential Communications Operations Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. says Malacañang will continue to make people understand the events related to the ill-fated Mamasapano operation that got international bomber Marwan but killed 44 SAF soldiers.

Explain better or… just move on.

***

“We are determined to work even harder to continually earn our people’s trust and confidence,” Coloma adds in a press briefing.

Yes, better reconcile with the” bosses,” drive away detractors, and campaign for your boys.


Editorial: ‘Betty,’ ‘Pam,’ and climate change March 20, 2015

Tropical storm “Betty” is expected to bring rains this weekend to Northern and Central Luzon, after moving west-southwest across the Pacific with 75-kilometer-per-hour winds. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has been tracking the storm since it started developing in the Pacific last Thursday. These last seven days, PAGASA has been informing the public of the movement of “Betty,” the second tropical cyclone to hit the Philippines this year, after storm “Amang” during Pope Francis’ visit last January.

At the same time that “Betty” was moving towards the Philippines in the western Pacific, another Pacific cyclone “Pam” was wreaking havoc on the archipelago of Vanuatu in the South Pacific northeast of Australia. Last Friday, “Pam,” a super-cyclone with winds up to 320 kph, blew entire communities away in much the same way super-typhoon “Yolanda” devastated Leyte and Samar in 2013. Initial reports said 90 percent of the houses in the capital Port Vila were damaged.

The Vanuatu disaster came as the United Nations Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction was being held in Sendai, Japan. This is one of the preparatory meetings to the UN Climate Change Conference to be held this December in Paris, France. It is hoped the nations of the world, especially China and the United States, will agree this December to reduce their industrial emissions that are believed causing much of the climate change that is in turn causing the powerful storms.

Here in the Philippines, we have learned our lessons from super-typhoon “Yolanda.” Where our people used to take typhoons more or less for granted, typhoon reports are now avidly followed. Orders for mandatory evacuation of endangered areas are not resisted as they used to. And PAGASA, coordinating with other international weather agencies, has faithfully tracked all weather disturbances. So that by the time they reach our shores, our people have been sufficiently warned.

Thus when storm “Betty” starts bringing rains to Northern and Central Luzon today, our people will be on the alert – just in case. PAGASA said “Betty” is not likely to strengthen into a super-typhoon. But there has been so much unpredictable weather in recent years, we have learned not to be complacent about typhoons and other weather disturbances.

When the UN conference takes place in Paris this December, the Philippines will be playing a key role as the site of the world’s most powerful typhoon ever to hit land. It is one of the nations French President Francoise Hollande has visited in his campaign to gather support for a world agreement on climate change.

Like Vanuatu, the Philippines is a prime exhibit on the destruction caused by climate change. And if agreement is finally reached this year after so many years of unsuccessful efforts, it will be due in great part to our harrowing experience which, with continued inaction from the nations of the world, could well become theirs as well.


Editorial: Pacquiao at the center of the great debate March 22, 2015

Manny Pacquiao may well be the best-known Filipino in the world today, more than any public official, more than any business or community leader. He has come to be known for his exploits in the boxing ring, having beaten such world-renowned champions as Oscar de la Hoya of the United States, Juan Manuel Marquez of Mexico, and Ricky Hatton of Great Britain. His May 2 welterweight fight with Floyd Mayweather has raised him and the Philippines to even higher levels of world attention.

Their fight on May 2 seems to have captured such widespread attention that even famous athletes in other sports are weighing in with their opinions on who is likely to win. Andy Murray, former Wimbledon tennis champion, predicted a Mayweather win, citing the American boxer’s superb defense and his home-crowd advantage. Earlier, famed American heavyweight champion Mike Tyson said Pacquiao will win: “This guy is perpetual motion. He comes from every angle… always throwing punches, never stops.”

The “biggest in fight in history so far” was a middleweight bout between Marvelous Marvin Hagler and Sugar Ray Leonard in 1987, but the “massively anticipated” Floyd-Manny showdown will eclipse that superfight, Hagler said. Thomas Hearns, who fought both Hagler and Leonard in their time, said it will be an “awesome fight” but he thinks Floyd will win. Roberto Duran, who also rose to boxing fame fighting Hagler, Leonard, and Hearns, said, “I have always thought Pacquiao would win.”

More recent sports heroes are equally divided. Former heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield and middleweight champion Miguel Cotto said they are for Manny. Oscar dela Hoya said both have great punching power, but Floyd has perfect timing.

Oddsmakers in the US have installed Mayweather as a slight favorite. Undefeated in 47 fights, he is known for his superb defense. But Pacquiao, a southpaw with a record of 57 wins, five losses, and two draws, is known for the speed of his punches.

It will thus be a fight between two different boxing styles – superb defense versus perpetual motion. Between stamina and hand speed. The world’s boxing greats will be debating on these two styles in the next six weeks and then the great day will finally come – Saturday night , May 2, in Las Vegas, which is Sunday morning, May 3, in the Philippines.

On that day, the nation will set aside all its concerns – forget all about pork barrel, and rival Makati mayors, and Mamasapano, to watch the “Pambansang Kamao” fight as much for national honor as for his richest purse ever. The great debate on boxing styles will be settled and the world will hail the undisputed champion. Whoever wins or loses, it will be the “biggest fight in history.”


The power of the apology by Dr. Jun A. Ynares, MD March 21, 2015


 by Dr. Jun A. Ynares, MD

“No, you’re not forgiven.”

Those were the words I heard from my wife after I had said sorry. I had promised to be home early so we could eat together as a family. I arrived two hours late. She had already eaten with our two daughters and had tucked them in bed when I finally made it home.

“Why not?” I asked. “I already said I am sorry,” I added.

“Wrong words, wrong process,” she answered, taking a firm stand not to dispense forgiveness at that time.

I smiled as I understood what she meant. Early on in our relationship, we had agreed that asking for forgiveness must follow a correct pattern. The process, we said, will ensure that a request to be forgiven is done sincerely.

We followed that process strictly.

CONTINUE READING...
First, the offending party must acknowledge the mistake or the failure.

Then, the offending party must acknowledge that he or she is aware of the consequences of such a mistake or a failure.

Next, the offending party asks to be forgiven. The word to be used must be “asking for forgiveness”. “I am sorry” is not a substitute for the plea to be forgiven although it can be added – but only after the plea has been made.

We also agreed that the phrase “I am sorry if…” is invalid. We considered that kind of “conditional sorry” seriously wanting in sincerity and authenticity. It was also an illogical statement. We agreed that one cannot be genuinely sorry if one had not made a full admission of a mistake or a failure and taken responsibility for it.

Only at that point when the offended party had asked for forgiveness can such forgiveness be dispensed.

Once the forgiveness is given, we agreed that there shall be no more further discussion on the issue which led to the offense – unless it is a sober discussion of ways to prevent the offense from being repeated in the future.

We also agreed that once forgiveness is given, the offended party may no longer bring the matter up in the future.

The process worked for us most of the time. We also discovered that the process was both rational and productive. It always led to a peaceful resolution of a dispute.

It also helped keep our relationship strong.

Yes, there is power in the apology – but only when it is properly done.

I must admit asking for forgiveness had not always been easy. There were times when I entertained the thought that a mistake or a failure was not my fault.

For example, on the night that I failed to make it to our family dinner as promised, my personal driver lost his way and was unable to pick me up at the City Hall on time. It was my driver’s fault, I thought. My wife should, therefore, hold my driver accountable for the botched family evening.

But then, I realized that it was I who hired that driver. I was the one who sent him on an errand that day. It was I who failed to underscore for him the need to be back at the office early.

True, it was my driver who made a wrong turn which landed him on a route where traffic was moving snail-pace.

But, he is my driver. He is answerable to me. But I am answerable to my wife for the promise I gave.

There was a strong temptation to put the blame on my driver for the sad ending for what could have been a great family evening.

However, passing the blame would have only aggravated the hurt that my wife felt that evening.

There is power in a genuine apology.

It has always helped us move on. It has always been a key to putting the past behind us and keeping our eyes focused on the present and the future.

There is power in a genuine apology.

It is not easy to see that power. Usually, it is hidden from our view. Sadly, when we miss to tap that power, we end up mired in the misery of unnecessary guilt.

*For feedback, please email it to antipolocitygov@gmail.com or send it to #4 Horse Shoe Drive, Beverly Hills Subdivision, Bgy. Beverly Hills, Antipolo City, Rizal.


The vanishing confessional box by Fr. Rolando V. De La Rosa, OP March 21, 2015


by Fr. Rolando V. De La Rosa, OP

There had been a time when people had regularly gone to confession to atone and ask for forgiveness for their sins.

Today, during ordinary days, a priest can stay for hours inside the confessional box without having a single penitent to absolve. Many Catholics have developed the habit of accumulating first their sins, then dumping them inside the confessional box during Holy Week.

The late Karl Menninger, MD, the erstwhile leading American psychiatrist, had deplored the fact that in the US the confessional box had been replaced by the psychiatrist’s couch or the judicial courts; that mental health practitioners, evolutionary scientists, and legal experts had equated sin with criminal offense or psychological aberration.

He had foreseen what is happening today: people professing to be religious but with no sense of sin; and lawyers, judges, and psychiatrists taking over the role of the clergy.

Claiming to have explored the individual’s subconscious drives and submerged feelings of remorse and guilt, many psychiatrists consider sin as mere expressions of deviancy, pathological prudishness, exaggerated piety, and external conditioning.

The sinner is mentally sick, and through medication and counseling, he can overcome his depression, phobias, anxieties, hysteria, or panic attacks. But, as Dr. Menninger had discovered, such psychological maladies were but the effects of unconfessed sins. He wrote: “The best solution to many of our psychological woes is absolution. And it is free.”

READ MORE...
Judicial courts, propped up by the ever growing number of lawyers and judges, and the media’s obsessive interests in crimes have also gradually replaced the confessional box. The voice of the judge has usurped the voice of conscience. Notorious criminals would thus declare: “I am innocent and sinless.

Let’s just wait for the court to decide.” But it can happen that because of their highly paid lawyers, criminals are exonerated by the courts. We have seen it too often. The rich and influential are seldom convicted. In fact, many rich convicts live in personally designed prison cells that look more like five-star hotels, complete with expensive amenities.

After many years of medical practice, Dr. Menninger had concluded that the courts and the psychiatrist’s couch are poor substitutes for the confessional box. Sins should not be equated with crimes or mere deviancy.

When we no longer listen to our conscience, we lose our moral compass that warns us if we are going in the wrong direction. If we throw sin overboard, we also rid ourselves of the need to atone and be accountable for the evil that we have done.

Without our sense of sin, we don’t feel the need to apologize and seek forgiveness. We resort to rationalization and self-deception.

Paul Tillich once wrote: “There is no substitute for words like sin and grace. We should find a way to rediscover their meaning. These words were conceived in the depth of our human existence and there they gathered power for all ages; there they must be found again by each generation.”


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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