TRIBUNE EDITORIAL/ OPINION

EDITORIAL: HEAD BASHING HABIT  

What is Noynoy’s beef on Kabayan? Kabayan is the monicker of former Vice President Noli de Castro who is now back as a news anchor at ABS-CBN. De Castro is used to coming up with candid remarks about news stories he reads which seems to have come out to Noynoy, who has an allergy on criticisms, as attacks on his presidency. During his Mindoro swing to inaugurate road projects, Noynoy took a jab at De Castro placing him among those “who persevere to impute doubt on reforms.” That was after the National Heroes Day speech where he lumped all of his detractors as those who merely pretend at reforms just when rallyists were denouncing his insistence on the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) and Noynoy’s creeping dictatorial tendencies seen in his attacks on the Supreme Court and the support he gave to the charter change (cha-cha) efforts including revising the one-term of six years limit for the presidency.

Without referring to De Castro’s name, Noynoy said Kabayan was among those who tirelessly give negative comments, even though they are among the leaders of the country. Noynoy added some public officials should prioritize the needs of their constituents, not worsen them. Being in the presidency for just four years, Noynoy appeared to have acquired a perfectly warped mind about the nation being composed entirely of politicians who are either against or for him. De Castro had reassumed his former job in the broadcast industry and while he goes an extra step in his news casting, his habit of commenting on stories was derived from De Castro starting as a radio commentator. It is apparent that the low turnout during the anniversary of the Million People March at the Luneta had emboldened Noynoy to pursue his constant assaults on his perceived enemies. His delusion is that all those against him are trying to push back the country to what he termed as the crooked road of the past as opposed to his straight path or “daang matuwid” which ironically almost everybody knows is pretty crooked. The straight path, four years after it was uttered serves no purpose, however, except for being a ready catchphrase during Noynoy’s jabs at his opponents of which make up the main contents of nearly all his speeches. * READ MORE...

ALSO: Entreaties from a lameduck  

Noynoy called on his allies to close ranks against those who sow “doubt and lies” during his National Heroes Day’s address that participants of the Million People March yesterday would not likely have wanted to hear. Noynoy appeared to have lumped in the speech all those opposing his moves toward dictatorship as those who only pretend at reform but are determined to bring back the old and abusive political systems. Somebody should shake Noynoy into reality that it is he and his scheming circle that have maintained the abusive political system and are even adding new elements to enhance their capability to abuse.

The effort to marginalize the Supreme Court (SC) is an extreme exercise of abuse of power never seen since the martial law years. Then President Ferdinand Marcos even avoided direct confrontation with the SC even when he had declared military rule. The swipes that Noynoy made in his speech placed alongside his recent bitter attacks on the SC regarding its decision declaring Palace acts in creating the Disbursement Acceleration Program as unconstitutional, appear to be intended for the magistrates. Noynoy had earlier accused the entire SC of judicial overreach or abuse of its power in voiding the Palace money pool. The speech did not mention, however, his earlier statements about his preference for charter change and his musings about amending the presidential term limit provisions in the Constitution. The supposed rationale of the term extension campaigning was that six years are not enough for one administration to make reforms endure and that could have rung true if Noynoy had started anything worth crediting. The past four years, however, saw mainly an all-out campaign to decimate political opponents.*READ MORE...

ALSO: Your gov’t is not in  

The economy in the second quarter, which grew 6.4 percent, got the momentum from the usual sources, including mainly the remittances from Filipinos working abroad, private consumption and a modest recovery in the manufacturing and agriculture sectors. While the figure is not at all disappointing since it remains the highest growth numbers in Asia for the period, the figures, however, showed growth could have been a bit more if Noynoy and his cohorts had been doing their individual jobs. Absent again in the economic equation is government contribution which based on the quarter figures, was in a state of lethargy, posting a flat performance. The Palace is expected to capitalize again on the figures to say that the controversy over the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) would have a bearing on the health of the economy yet that is not entirely the case based on the explanation of Socio-economic Planning Secretary Arsenio Balisacan.

Even in giving an excuse on the disappearance of government involvement in the economy, which reflects the habit of the current Palace tenant to become invisible during crucial situations, Noynoy’s economic officials can’t get their acts together. Balisacan said flat government spending during the period was the result of a slowdown in disbursements in personal services and maintenance and other operating expenditures (MOOE) among agencies. He cited an explanation of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) which stated the slower spending was partly due to administrative bottlenecks. The lower public spending was also attributed to the influx of donations for the victims of killer typhoon “Yolanda” which hit much of the Visayas region last year. “Government agencies also needed to revise their work programs to increase service delivery in the Yolanda-affected areas. For instance, the Department of Health had to prioritize deployment of its personnel to render primary health care in the Yolanda-affected areas. The availability of donated supply reduced the need for MOOE even as the service was being delivered,” according to Balisacan. *READ MORE...

ALSO: Noy, a camel, a horse and FoI  

This current President we have is becoming adept at trying to fool Filipinos.During an interview with Bombo Radyo, he asked: what do we need the Freedom of Information (FoI) law for since his administration has been forthright in providing information to the public. Noynoy also said questions about the FoI should be pursued and not with him since the Palace already had sent its version of the bill to the House. The reality, however, is that the FoI has been stuck perenially at the House because his allies, obviously under Palace directives, won’t allow its passage. He made use of a camel and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus as a case against the FoI bill, saying that most people would not want to learn the minute details of how the disease could have spread in the country had it not been for his instructions to track the suspected carriers of the disease who is a Filipino working in the Middle East.

“In one farm, a farmer contracted MERS, there was one camel that had died and the other camels in the barn were tested and they were found positive. So it was assumed that the virus had gone airborne,” Noynoy said. Not satisfied with the camel defense, he went to a horse saying that he had received reports of six people who died from eating horse meat, that was found to have been from an Ebola virus which came from bats’ refuse that the horse accidentally ingested from the grass it ate. “Now the question I want to pose about the FoI: Would you want to know all the details about what happened? Like in the case of the MERS when the possibility already exists that it is already airborne... it seems that it came from a camel,” Noynoy said. Duh. That statement was flat out dumb and has no bearing at all on the reasons an FoI law is essential in a democracy. But as his logic is shot, it may be because he was probably asking the camel (?!!) from which the disease had originated, and it could not have replied to him since it was already dead, just as he wants the FoI dead during his term. Any other Filipino, however, would say that knowing the details is what really is expected from the government for them to take stock of the situation. Noynoy is using the argument that the government is making use of its secrecy to prevent panic from erupting. The fear, however, among most Filipinos is the complete inability of the government to do anything in response to calamities like what is happening to the Visayan communities devastated by typhoon “Yolanda” last year which seems to have been left to fend on their own.*READ MORE...


ALSO Opinion by Herman Tiu Laurel: ‘The Cycle’ we need to break   

Last week a call for President BS Aquino’s resignation was made by a group led by ranking Catholic bishops. It was followed by a surprise New York Times (known to represent the US Establishment) editorial critical of BS Aquino. This situation reminded me of Gloria Arroyo’s administration in 2005 when the Hyatt 10 and ranking clergy leaders called for Arroyo to step down. The calls to step down come just about the fifth year of every administration in the past 27 years. Every administration is ushered in with euphoria, but the descent into collapse was also predictable.

On Cory Aquino’s fifth year, 1990, rolling power blackouts hit the country due to power privatization policies she had started; it was Cory’s “Age of Darkness.” Fidel V. Ramos signed exorbitant IPP contracts to surmount the power crisis, but the crisis came with the rice “pila” (queuing due to shortage) of 1995 and the Asian Financial of 1997 — both brought on by adherence to globalization policies; after that FVR’s cha-cha flopped. Erap, bucking the pattern, dilly-dallied on power privatization, wiped out the MILF and delayed utility rate hikes — he was ousted only two-and-a-half years into his term.
The mood was jubilant when Gloria Arroyo won power in 2001, power privatization was fast-tracked — but by 2004 high power raised poverty levels so high the euphoria evaporated and Fernando Poe Jr. seriously challenged Arroyo who then had to cheat to win. By 2005 the ties among US, Cory Aquino, civil society’s Hyatt 10 soured and the Catholic clergy joined united to call for Arroyo to step down.

In 2010 BS Aquino brought dizzying hope which carried him on a cushion of political until 2014 when Mindanao, Luzon and wholesale electricity spot market, or Wesm power crises and their economic toll burst Aquino’s bubble; the Disbursement Acceleration Program crisis came later.
Philippine presidential turnovers are greeted with celebrations but they end in a whimper — two ended in imprisonments. Each government left the country worse than the one previous it had done. What accounts for all these presidential fiascos of the past five administrations? All of these past five governments pursued the same basic economic policies of globalization, called the Washington Consensus, of the economy consisting of privatization of public utilities, particularly power, and financial and trade liberalization — and poverty rises. This is The Cycle, and it is nevitable under the present system.

ALSO by Ninez Cacho Olivares: osing his marbles    

Noynoy is being hit left and right, and knows he has lost even his once devoted yellows. But worse for him, he who thought he was the US’ darling in Asia, has been badly hit by the influential New York Times (NYT) editorial. What’s even making it worst, is that his “miscommunicators” in the Palace claimed, of all things, that the NYT staff that wrote the editorial, were clueless about what Noynoy had been explaining on the Disbursement Acceleration Program. Funny, but everybody — including the NYT and the international community knows exactly what Noynoy has been talking about all this time, such as his continuous threats to the Supreme Court (SC) with a charter change to clip its powers of judicial review, as well as his, and his Liberal Party (LP)’s, desire for political longevity. And he has been criticized left, right and center, mainly because of his stupidity.

Everyone and his uncle know that he wants the high court to bow to him and in a final ruling, eliminate that portion in the ruling saying that he and his architect, along with the other proponents and implementors have to prove good faith in the courts. And that, Noynoy, has nothing to do with the presumption of innocence as everybody facing cases should always be presumed innocent until proven guilty by the courts. But then again, Noynoy thinks this way because when it comes to his political foes, such as the three opposition senators, he and his allies mount their demonization program and declare them guilty. But it is the questionable good faith that really riles him, knowing that he and his gang may very likely end up in jail. And so he goes on with his harangues, directed at the SC, which will not likely alter its ruling on good faith — unless of course, it wants to lose the respect of the Filipino people — and even the world. It is certain that Noynoy is plenty mad not only at his local critics, but more so at the NYT for its editorial, which merely echoes that which the Filipinos have been saying for weeks on end. *READ  MORE...


READ FULL REPORTS HERE:

Head bashing as a habit

MANILA, SEPTEMBER 1, 2014 (TRIBUNE) Written by Tribune Editorial - What is Noynoy’s beef on Kabayan?

Kabayan is the monicker of former Vice President Noli de Castro who is now back as a news anchor at ABS-CBN.

De Castro is used to coming up with candid remarks about news stories he reads which seems to have come out to Noynoy, who has an allergy on criticisms, as attacks on his presidency.

During his Mindoro swing to inaugurate road projects, Noynoy took a jab at De Castro placing him among those “who persevere to impute doubt on reforms.”

That was after the National Heroes Day speech where he lumped all of his detractors as those who merely pretend at reforms just when rallyists were denouncing his insistence on the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) and Noynoy’s creeping dictatorial tendencies seen in his attacks on the Supreme Court and the support he gave to the charter change (cha-cha) efforts including revising the one-term of six years limit for the presidency.

Without referring to De Castro’s name, Noynoy said Kabayan was among those who tirelessly give negative comments, even though they are among the leaders of the country.

Noynoy added some public officials should prioritize the needs of their constituents, not worsen them.

Being in the presidency for just four years, Noynoy appeared to have acquired a perfectly warped mind about the nation being composed entirely of politicians who are either against or for him.

De Castro had reassumed his former job in the broadcast industry and while he goes an extra step in his news casting, his habit of commenting on stories was derived from De Castro starting as a radio commentator.

It is apparent that the low turnout during the anniversary of the Million People March at the Luneta had emboldened Noynoy to pursue his constant assaults on his perceived enemies.

His delusion is that all those against him are trying to push back the country to what he termed as the crooked road of the past as opposed to his straight path or “daang matuwid” which ironically almost everybody knows is pretty crooked.

The straight path, four years after it was uttered serves no purpose, however, except for being a ready catchphrase during Noynoy’s jabs at his opponents of which make up the main contents of nearly all his speeches.

* The goal has been for those who are gullible enough to take in hook, line and sinker at whatever Noynoy says, to redirect their anger from the absence of any perceivable achievements under his administration to his “persistent” detractors.

The stock line is that his enemies are supposedly intent in weakening the reforms undertaken by his administration.

Noynoy, however, would make himself more believable if he can enumerate at least two “reforms” he started from which majority of Filipinos have benefited.

The conditional cash transfer program which has grown multiple times in terms of budget allocation was adapted from the previous administration and so were the many reform measures including those for the business process outsourcing industry.

There is no economic blueprint, particularly on domestic industries, that has been crafted during his administration which contributed to the country, having the highest unemployment rate in Asia.

Had Noynoy been more focused on actions rather than coining soundbites, more Filipinos definitely would have jobs and less families would be poor.

Had he been more receptive to the criticisms that come his way, Noynoy would not be all occupied with the itch of bashing the heads of his opponents including the now newscaster De Castro.

The difference, however, is that Kabayan in making his commentaries on Noynoy and he is doing his job while Noynoy is hiding his inability in doing his job by hitting at De Castro.

Entreaties from a lameduck
Written by Tribune Editorial Tuesday, 26 August 2014

Noynoy called on his allies to close ranks against those who sow “doubt and lies” during his National Heroes Day’s address that participants of the Million People March yesterday would not likely have wanted to hear.

Noynoy appeared to have lumped in the speech all those opposing his moves toward dictatorship as those who only pretend at reform but are determined to bring back the old and abusive political systems.

Somebody should shake Noynoy into reality that it is he and his scheming circle that have maintained the abusive political system and are even adding new elements to enhance their capability to abuse.

The effort to marginalize the Supreme Court (SC) is an extreme exercise of abuse of power never seen since the martial law years. Then President Ferdinand Marcos even avoided direct confrontation with the SC even when he had declared military rule.

The swipes that Noynoy made in his speech placed alongside his recent bitter attacks on the SC regarding its decision declaring Palace acts in creating the Disbursement Acceleration Program as unconstitutional, appear to be intended for the magistrates.

Noynoy had earlier accused the entire SC of judicial overreach or abuse of its power in voiding the Palace money pool.

The speech did not mention, however, his earlier statements about his preference for charter change and his musings about amending the presidential term limit provisions in the Constitution.

The supposed rationale of the term extension campaigning was that six years are not enough for one administration to make reforms endure and that could have rung true if Noynoy had started anything worth crediting. The past four years, however, saw mainly an all-out campaign to decimate political opponents.

* A movement to generate six million signatures for the People’s Initiative Against Pork (PIAP) started during the Luneta rally yesterday but it appears that the Palace had already given its marching order to the Commission on Elections to thwart the effort citing the requirement on the minimum number of voters to be included in it, per district.

That would certainly kill the initiative since those who started would not have the resources to assure that each community in the country would have something like 12 percent of their residents supporting it.

Compare that, however, with the number of civil socialites and now partners in crime of Noynoy such as Akbayan who staged the supposed Edsa II that ousted former President Joseph Estrada and installed Gloria Arroyo which was not even half of the six million Filipinos if the PIAP signature campaign becomes successful.

Noynoy talks of his opponents becoming increasingly desperate to bring back the old abusive political order.

That seems to be the campaign back at the Luneta who had groups demanding that those in government, including Noynoy, respect the Constitution as they vowed to defend the Charter through concerted action against Noynoy and his allies’ attempt to tamper with it.

Abuse of power comes from those who have it and Noynoy seems to be in a state of delusion about who wields the power and those who seek that this be exercised within the bounds of law.

By warning the public about “those who only pretend at reform and the crooked,” it seems Noynoy was talking about himself, his Palace minions, schemers at his Liberal Party and the yellow mob.

The effort now seems to have shifted in thwarting democratic elections because of the absence of any personality within their ranks acceptable to voters.

As Noynoy enters his lameduck years, he now sounds more like his predecessor and worse, like his role model, Ferdinand Marcos.

Your gov’t is not in  Written by Tribune Editorial Friday, 29 August 2014 00:00

The economy in the second quarter, which grew 6.4 percent, got the momentum from the usual sources, including mainly the remittances from Filipinos working abroad, private consumption and a modest recovery in the manufacturing and agriculture sectors.

While the figure is not at all disappointing since it remains the highest growth numbers in Asia for the period, the figures, however, showed growth could have been a bit more if Noynoy and his cohorts had been doing their individual jobs.

Absent again in the economic equation is government contribution which based on the quarter figures, was in a state of lethargy, posting a flat performance.

The Palace is expected to capitalize again on the figures to say that the controversy over the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) would have a bearing on the health of the economy yet that is not entirely the case based on the explanation of Socio-economic Planning Secretary Arsenio Balisacan.

Even in giving an excuse on the disappearance of government involvement in the economy, which reflects the habit of the current Palace tenant to become invisible during crucial situations, Noynoy’s economic officials can’t get their acts together.

Balisacan said flat government spending during the period was the result of a slowdown in disbursements in personal services and maintenance and other operating expenditures (MOOE) among agencies.

He cited an explanation of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) which stated the slower spending was partly due to administrative bottlenecks.

The lower public spending was also attributed to the influx of donations for the victims of killer typhoon “Yolanda” which hit much of the Visayas region last year.

“Government agencies also needed to revise their work programs to increase service delivery in the Yolanda-affected areas. For instance, the Department of Health had to prioritize deployment of its personnel to render primary health care in the Yolanda-affected areas. The availability of donated supply reduced the need for MOOE even as the service was being delivered,” according to Balisacan.

* Balisacan added that lower spending in infrastructure and other capital outlays particularly in the months of April and May 2014 was recorded as major government agencies posted lower-than-programmed disbursements. He claimed the government had identified the reasons for its under-performance.

He cited as examples the delayed submission of new requirements indicated in the General Appropriations Act, ongoing validation of proposed programs under the Grassroots Participatory Budgeting, and the revision of work programs to respond to the reconstruction needs in the Yolanda-affected areas.

Budget Seecretary Butch Abad, however, has a different take on the government performance during the period. The DBM in a June press statement even claimed that government spending for infrastructure and capital outlay rose to P93.7 billion as of April or a 24.5-percent growth from last year’s P75.2 billion “as the Aquino administration extends its cumulative double-digit expansion for infrastructure disbursements year-on-year.”

Abad said notable infrastructure disbursements in April were channeled mostly to ongoing reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts in communities devastated by supertyphoon Yolanda.

He claimed infrastructure spending is still going at a faster clip year-on-year with the upsurge “also on account of the Aquino administration’s stronger focus on strengthening the economy through infrastructure and capital outlay investments.

Abad and the whole administration were scrambling then to prove that the DAP contributed in a big way to economic growth. The Supreme Court (SC) ruled that Palace acts creating the DAP were unconstitutional on July 1.
Now the line of the Palace is that the SC ruling had obstructed economic growth.

It seems that it would be Abad’s word against Balisacan’s even when both are presumably on the same side of the fence.

Noy, a camel, a horse and FoI Written by Tribune Editorial Saturday, 30 August 2014 00:00

This current President we have is becoming adept at trying to fool Filipinos.

During an interview with Bombo Radyo, he asked: what do we need the Freedom of Information (FoI) law for since his administration has been forthright in providing information to the public.

Noynoy also said questions about the FoI should be pursued and not with him since the Palace already had sent its version of the bill to the House.

The reality, however, is that the FoI has been stuck perenially at the House because his allies, obviously under Palace directives, won’t allow its passage.

He made use of a camel and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus as a case against the FoI bill, saying that most people would not want to learn the minute details of how the disease could have spread in the country had it not been for his instructions to track the suspected carriers of the disease who is a Filipino working in the Middle East.

“In one farm, a farmer contracted MERS, there was one camel that had died and the other camels in the barn were tested and they were found positive. So it was assumed that the virus had gone airborne,” Noynoy said.

Not satisfied with the camel defense, he went to a horse saying that he had received reports of six people who died from eating horse meat, that was found to have been from an Ebola virus which came from bats’ refuse that the horse accidentally ingested from the grass it ate.

“Now the question I want to pose about the FoI: Would you want to know all the details about what happened? Like in the case of the MERS when the possibility already exists that it is already airborne... it seems that it came from a camel,” Noynoy said.

Duh. That statement was flat out dumb and has no bearing at all on the reasons an FoI law is essential in a democracy.

But as his logic is shot, it may be because he was probably asking the camel (?!!) from which the disease had originated, and it could not have replied to him since it was already dead, just as he wants the FoI dead during his term.

Any other Filipino, however, would say that knowing the details is what really is expected from the government for them to take stock of the situation.

Noynoy is using the argument that the government is making use of its secrecy to prevent panic from erupting. The fear, however, among most Filipinos is the complete inability of the government to do anything in response to calamities like what is happening to the Visayan communities devastated by typhoon “Yolanda” last year which seems to have been left to fend on their own.

* The FoI, even in its diluted form, courtesy of Noynoy, would compel government agencies to tell the public what is being unnecessarily hidden, which mostly relates to stopping the theft of public funds.

Noynoy again is acting as the all-knowing deity which he wants to be in assuming that Filipinos want to be spared from knowing what concerns their health.

That was the case in the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) when he and his Liberal Party cohorts believed that being in Malacañang makes them omnipotent beings who can guide the fate of men even to the point of setting aside the Constitution.

The Palace actions in creating the DAP were already ruled unconstitutional but Noynoy continues to rail against the Supreme Court saying he wants to limit judicial power.

Nobody knew about the breadth of the DAP until after Sen. Jinggoy Estrada revealed the distribution of an apparent bribe in the Senate during the impeachment trial of former Chief Justice Renato Corona that led to his ouster.

The FoI is an equalizing measure for the public against a secretive and scheming government such as what Noynoy has.
He even sideswiped media saying that a good reporter does not need an FoI.

Really, Noynoy.

The riposte to that is a good president need not fear an FoI.

‘The Cycle’ we need to break Written by Herman Tiu Laurel Monday, 01 September 2014 00:00



Last week a call for President BS Aquino’s resignation was made by a group led by ranking Catholic bishops. It was followed by a surprise New York Times (known to represent the US Establishment) editorial critical of BS Aquino.

This situation reminded me of Gloria Arroyo’s administration in 2005 when the Hyatt 10 and ranking clergy leaders called for Arroyo to step down. The calls to step down come just about the fifth year of every administration in the past 27 years. Every administration is ushered in with euphoria, but the descent into collapse was also predictable.

On Cory Aquino’s fifth year, 1990, rolling power blackouts hit the country due to power privatization policies she had started; it was Cory’s “Age of Darkness.” Fidel V. Ramos signed exorbitant IPP contracts to surmount the power crisis, but the crisis came with the rice “pila” (queuing due to shortage) of 1995 and the Asian Financial of 1997 — both brought on by adherence to globalization policies; after that FVR’s cha-cha flopped. Erap, bucking the pattern, dilly-dallied on power privatization, wiped out the MILF and delayed utility rate hikes — he was ousted only two-and-a-half years into his term.

The mood was jubilant when Gloria Arroyo won power in 2001, power privatization was fast-tracked — but by 2004 high power raised poverty levels so high the euphoria evaporated and Fernando Poe Jr. seriously challenged Arroyo who then had to cheat to win.

By 2005 the ties among US, Cory Aquino, civil society’s Hyatt 10 soured and the Catholic clergy joined united to call for Arroyo to step down. In 2010 BS Aquino brought dizzying hope which carried him on a cushion of political until 2014 when Mindanao, Luzon and wholesale electricity spot market, or Wesm power crises and their economic toll burst Aquino’s bubble; the Disbursement Acceleration Program crisis came later.

Philippine presidential turnovers are greeted with celebrations but they end in a whimper — two ended in imprisonments.

Each government left the country worse than the one previous it had done. What accounts for all these presidential fiascos of the past five administrations? All of these past five governments pursued the same basic economic policies of globalization, called the Washington Consensus, of the economy consisting of privatization of public utilities, particularly power, and financial and trade liberalization — and poverty rises. This is The Cycle, and it is nevitable under the present system.

* Countries following these policies all collapse eventually, like the EU’s PIIGS and the US itself where only banking interest profit while unemployment and decay rage. Countries with firm government or State guidance like China, Vietnam, Singapore among others take advantage of opportunities in global liberalization while keeping the commanding heights of their economies — and keeping private enterprise subordinate.

The Philippines stupidly boasted of being ahead in acceding and obeying globalization rules — the process that has ruined it completely in just 27 years.

I explained The Cycle to a group of young activist-politicians aiming to lead the land. I told them how they must prepare to take the devil, behind these policies of economic abuse and exploitation, by the horns by wrestling it down. Who’s the devil — private financial-corporate imperialism in the Washington consensus that would take down the State.

What to do?

The primacy of the State (or government as Filipinos witlessly call it) must be restored — the only true instrument of the People’s to keep in check powerful centrifugal parochial foreign and local forces in society. The group understood.

The National Transformation Council’s (NTC) Lipa Declaration issued many general statements we have heard countless times before: crisis of unprecedented proportions, unbridled corruption and promises; restore damaged institutions, federal/parliamentary system, independent judiciary, merit-driven professional civil and military service; a “dependable electoral system,” “NO” (a la Pope Francis) to economics of exclusion and inequality, and amusingly the only specific “call upon the Armed Forces of the Philippines… to extend its protective shield to the council.”

Specifics to break The Cycle people need: non-profit publicly owned power and water rates cut by half, fuel price regulation, manual voting/electronic transmission; election ads ban, media ownership limits, NFA grains import monopoly with tariff to support agriculture, among many more. One imperative : enhance secular society against Dr. Kahli Unda and NTC’s sectarianism (see Tatad column, Aug. 28, 2014 “the scourge of secularism”). Sectarianism spurs primitive religious violence — in Ireland, Yugoslavia, Iraq, Syria, Somalia, Yemen, Protestant vs Catholic, Christian vs Muslim, Sunni vs Shiite, Buddhist vs Muslim vs Hindi, ad nausea.

(Listen - 1098AM, DWAD 5 to 6 p.m. Tuesday to Friday; GNN Talk New TV with HTL, Saturday 8:15 p.m. and Sunday 8:15 a.m. on Destiny Cable channel 8 and SkyCable channel 213 or www.gnntv-asia.com or YouTube “Talk News TV” and add — Saturday date)

Losing his marbles Written by Ninez Cacho-Olivares Sunday, 31 August 2014 00:00

Noynoy is being hit left and right, and knows he has lost even his once devoted yellows. But worse for him, he who thought he was the US’ darling in Asia, has been badly hit by the influential New York Times (NYT) editorial.

What’s even making it worst, is that his “miscommunicators” in the Palace claimed, of all things, that the NYT staff that wrote the editorial, were clueless about what Noynoy had been explaining on the Disbursement Acceleration Program.

Funny, but everybody — including the NYT and the international community knows exactly what Noynoy has been talking about all this time, such as his continuous threats to the Supreme Court (SC) with a charter change to clip its powers of judicial review, as well as his, and his Liberal Party (LP)’s, desire for political longevity. And he has been criticized left, right and center, mainly because of his stupidity.

Everyone and his uncle know that he wants the high court to bow to him and in a final ruling, eliminate that portion in the ruling saying that he and his architect, along with the other proponents and implementors have to prove good faith in the courts.

And that, Noynoy, has nothing to do with the presumption of innocence as everybody facing cases should always be presumed innocent until proven guilty by the courts.

But then again, Noynoy thinks this way because when it comes to his political foes, such as the three opposition senators, he and his allies mount their demonization program and declare them guilty.

But it is the questionable good faith that really riles him, knowing that he and his gang may very likely end up in jail.

And so he goes on with his harangues, directed at the SC, which will not likely alter its ruling on good faith — unless of course, it wants to lose the respect of the Filipino people — and even the world.

It is certain that Noynoy is plenty mad not only at his local critics, but more so at the NYT for its editorial, which merely echoes that which the Filipinos have been saying for weeks on end.

* But as he cannot strike back at the NYT, considering its influence with the powers in Washington and the White House, he instead blasted former Vice President Noli de Castro, now a popular anchorman in a yellow TV channel. This he did during his sortie in Mindoro, the hometown of De Castro.

Noynoy publicly bashed Noli — the second time around for being critical of him and his administration, accusing De Castro of worsening the suffering of the people.

Noynoy certainly is losing his marbles, for how on earth could De Castro worsen the suffering of the people when he is not in power and position today?

Said Noynoy: “There is someone who is enthusiastic in coming up with negative comments when in fact he was a former leader of the country. Instead of helping ease the suffering of our people, this person is even making it worse,” Aquino said.

“And while we are now addressing problems handed down to us, this person who calls himself your Kabayan has not let up in the criticisms, ” Aquino added.

For crying out loud, Noynoy has been in the presidential seat for the past four years, and he still lays the blame on the previous administration, instead of facing the reality that it is his incompetence, vindictiveness and his do-nothing style of governance that have exacerbated the problems.

Since he has been in Malacañang for that length of time, surely Noynoy knows that a Vice President has little, if no say at all in the Malacañang scheme of things. It is always the president and his chosen Cabinet that make all the decisions. And more often than not, the Vice President who is from the opposition, is usually excluded, even if he is a member of the Cabinet.

If Noynoy still had his marbles, he would know that he is pretty stupid coming up with such remarks.

But what he does not seem to realize is the fact that he may have lost more votes for himself and his LP by blasting Noli, who is more popular with the masses through his radio show.

But then again, how can he realize this when he has lost all his marbles.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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