A DOUBLE STANDARD

For years, the business community has been abuzz with rumors that a large corporation owned by one of President Aquino’s relatives has been massively under-declaring its profits. What’s even more interesting is the way that the company pays out secret dividends to its shareholders, most likely in the form of “ang pao.” The mind-boggling figures of this large and diversified corporation may be enough to cause a headache for the Bureau of Internal Revenue. To round out the operation, the presidential relative and his cousins formed three separate corporations which do nothing but invest millions—perhaps even billions—of pesos into topnotch companies. A little digging will reveal, however, that these three corporations are barely capitalized, and the value of their investments are not reflected in their respective financial statements. My gulay, it’s some kind of laundry laboratory! There’s a term for converting untaxed and under declared profits into legitimate investments, right? I wonder whether the Anti-Money Laundering Council smells it, too. READ MORE...

ALSO: Why ER Ejercito was disqualified

The Commission on Elections' (Comelec) decision to disqualify Laguna Governor Emilio Ramon "ER" Ejercito was based on concrete evidence, the poll body's top official said Thursday. In an interview on dzMM, Comelec Chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. said it is the commission's duty to look into election violations, whoever the candidate may be. He also said Ejercito's disqualification case was already decided last September, and they needed time to review the case. Brillantes said the evidence from the complainant who filed the case against Ejercito made it easier for the commission to investigate and decide on the case. "Yung kay ER, bumilis lang yan kasi may complainant, nagprisinta siya ng ebidensya. Ayoko lang po 'yung sinasabi na may politika. Wala po kaming pinipiling partido," he said, dismissing claims that the administration is removing members of the Ejercito clan from power. This, after Senator JV Ejercito claimed that recent events involving members of his clan seem to be part of a "concerted effort from the administration probably to remove the Ejercitos or Estradas." Brillantes said it took the Comelec en banc 8 months to review the decision on Ejercito's case, but it was not because of lack of evidence. He said Comelec commissioners debated on who would be governor of Laguna once Ejercito steps down. "Matagal ang debate on who to succeed, kung yung vice-governor, o yung complainant," he said. Brillantes also explained that even without a complainant, the Comelec has the power to disqualify any candidate or politician who commits an election violation.

ALSO: Laguna governor to fight disqualification in SC

Laguna Governor Emilio Ramon "ER" Ejercito will take the fight against his disqualification by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) the the Supreme Court. The governor posted the following statement on Thursday (May 22) in his official Facebook page: "I am prepared to take legal action against the disqualification order of the Comelec once we receive the documents. "I will bring this matter to the Supreme Court and I am confident that the SC will uphold the rule of law and the voice of 550 thousand voters of the Province of Laguna who voted for me. I am also confident that the SC will uphold the mandate of the people of Laguna that they have so overwhelmingly entrusted to me during the last 2010 and 2013 gubernatorial elections. "Thank you very much to all my supporters and all the Laguneños who continue to believe in my Good GovERnance and Public Service program and the good cause for which I stand for. Lalaban po tayo legally! Jesus Christ and Our Lady of Guadalupe will protect us Laguneños from harm." A day before (May 21), the Comelec reaffirmed its resolution to disqualify Ejercito from office for overspending in the 2013 elections. Ejercito is a nephew of former president and now Manila Mayor Joseph Estrada. The Comelec issued the order on a basis of a resolution of its First Division issued in September 2013 granting the petition for disqualification filed by Edgar San Luis, who was Ejercito's rival in the May 13, 2013 gubernatorial race in Laguna. Ejercito filed a motion for reconsideration of the original resolution. The Comelec first made an announcement of its resolution to disqualify Ejercito in a post on the Comelec website on Sept. 26, 2013. In that announcement, Comelec Chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. said Ejercito spent over P6 million in television advertising alone.

ALSO: Hypocrisy in claimed sensationalism

Senators and congressmen whose names have been listed as having participated in the pork barrel scam from both the list of Janet Lim-Napoles and the claimed digital files of Benhur Luy published and aired over the media have been threatening the print media with either libel suits or class suits. Isabela Rep. Rodolfo Albano III was quoted as saying in reports that he and his colleagues been unfairly dragged into the pork barrel scam controversy and are innocent of the accusations leveled against them adding that these media entities would be facing libel suits, if not class suits.
“We will start with libel cases. We will take them to court in our respective districts. After that, if we find out that we have the same grievances, we will consider filing a class suit,” Albano said. That is clearly harassment from these public figures. And not to forget, even those same legislators from the Senate and the House were joining in and feasting on the trial by publicity against the three senators. But now that it is also they who have been named by Luy and Napoles in their lists, they are raising hell, and slamming media for their “sensational” coverages, while slamming the same people, such as Luy and Napoles whom they had earlier claimed as the truth tellers and that indeed the three opposition senators are as guilty as hell. Even Noynoy then, before media took hold of the lists, virtually branded the opposition leaders as guilty, and wanted the cases against them rushed, as he wants to see them arrested, charged and imprisoned and even convicted. That is on record. ---- Bayan Muna Rep. Carlos Zarate, blamed De Lima for the circulation of several versions of the Napoles list. “They already had the evidence last year, they should have charged all those behind the scam and avoided the proliferation of these lists,” he said. How true, but as Noynoy, his porky allies in the Palace and in Congress, Leila, Grace Tan and Ombudsman Morales all wanted only the three opposition senators demonized, arrested, charged and detained in cells, they were one in shielding Noynoy and his allies, and throwing the kitchen sink at only the three opposition senators as their “success” in jailing the “corrupt” but fully protecting their really corrupt allies. And Leila had the face to claim that her whistleblowers were not coached? Really? So why was Luy only zeroing in on the three opposition leaders, when all the while, he had the list of all those legislators whom he never ever named in either his affidavits or his testimonies before the Senate? READ THE FULL REPORT...

ALSO: WINNERS AND LOSERS

SAGA of journalists--unwittingly can be prey, can be victims. Win some, lose some. When we think we’re winners, we may prove losers. And vice-versa. When we fret at having lost (birthday gifts from Napoles), turns out just as well that the gifts were not delivered by The Messenger. Two journalists that lost... but also won. Two media people who use their press ID unethically. As president of a Rotary Club, I was invited to a “Milk for Undernourished Children” launched by the Rotary Club president of Biñan, Laguna. The host asked me to deal with two uninvited reporters who offered to publicize our activity for a fee. The host had neither funds nor need for publicity. I introduced myself to the reporters; told them that I’d been asked by the host to request them to leave, or their newspaper will know what they’re up to. They left. Losers. But winners too because no one, least of all me, will let their newspaper know how they use their IDs to make money on the side. Walking out of a show, my journalist-companion paused to exchange pleasantries with a cabinet member who promptly asked us to join him to dinner. The 5-star hotel restaurant had wine, appetizers, steaks, desserts. My friend, close enough (affinity and location) to the host, leaned over to look at the bill. As we rode home, I asked, “How much did we eat?” “P15,000!” At that moment, something told me that knowing how certain politicians operate, Juan Pasan Cruz Taxpayer will be paying for that meal--to be referred to thereafter as “Media Representation Expense.” To be scribbled on that P15,000 chit will be my name and my newspaper’s. I’m intensely guilty up to now for what I’m certain is Juan Pasan Cruz Taxpayer paying for my P3,000 dinner. Previously feeling a winner for that elegant dinner, I suddenly was so guilty, a sick-to- the-stomach loser. I wanted to throw up. I wish I had instead a P30 McBurger that I, and not a civil servant’s “Media Representation Expense” paid for. Take the case of Korina Sanchez, Mike Enriquez, Luchi Cruz Valdez, etc. broadcast journalists all. According to Napolists, a birthday bounty was destined for them, from PDAF. Everybody can use that kind of birthday cash. Cash intended for these popular TV personalities, but The Messenger didn’t deliver. The gifts never got to the intended. Losers indeed these TV broadcasters for not getting their b-day gifts. But by losing, Sanchez, Enriquez, Valdez, etc. are now winners. They are clean for getting nothing from Napoles, nothing from PDAF. They are winners. READ MORE...


READ FULL REPORTS HERE:

A double standard

MANILA, MAY 26, 2014 (MANILA STANDARD) By Emil Jurado - For years, the business community has been abuzz with rumors that a large corporation owned by one of President Aquino’s relatives has been massively under-declaring its profits.

What’s even more interesting is the way that the company pays out secret dividends to its shareholders, most likely in the form of “ang pao.”

The mind-boggling figures of this large and diversified corporation may be enough to cause a headache for the Bureau of Internal Revenue.

To round out the operation, the presidential relative and his cousins formed three separate corporations which do nothing but invest millions—perhaps even billions—of pesos into topnotch companies. A little digging will reveal, however, that these three corporations are barely capitalized, and the value of their investments are not reflected in their respective financial statements. My gulay, it’s some kind of laundry laboratory!

There’s a term for converting untaxed and under declared profits into legitimate investments, right? I wonder whether the Anti-Money Laundering Council smells it, too.

* * *

Coffee shops and board rooms are also abuzz with the impending arrest and detention of minority senators Juan Ponce Enrile, Jinggoy Estrada and Bong Revilla, who have been charged with plunder for their alleged involvement in Janet Lim Napoles’ P10-billion pork barrel scam.

Justice Secretary Leila de Lima is just waiting for the arrival from abroad of Ombudsman Conchita Carpio Morales on the first week of June to file the plunder charges against the three minority senators and some 35 others. Most of them are indicted for graft and corruption and malversation of public funds.

There is also talk that somebody from Malacañang had told the Sandiganbayan justice that President Aquino would want the three senators arrested and detained immediately. Of course, this is just speculation.

Still, in Camp Crame, detention cells are already being refurbished. All these seem to highlight the fact that Malacañang is writing the script.

The three minority senators are actually luckier than ordinary mortals like us. If we would be arrested and detained for plunder, we would be thrown into ordinary jails and confined with 20 or more cell mates accused of rape, murder, homicide and other heinous crimes. We would take turns sleeping because of limited space.

The crime of plunder under the law is a non-bailable offense. But that also says that if the judge finds that the evidence is not that strong, the accused may post bail.

In the case of Enrile, for instance, while the crime of plunder was thrown at him, there’s no clear proof that he himself received kickbacks and commissions from Napoles or her former assistants. As a result, he may be granted bail.

For Jinggoy and Bong, it’s iffy. While whistleblower Ruby Tuason claims she delivered kickback money to Jinggoy, she did not say how much. And there’s no corroborative proof that she did. In the case of Bong, it all depends whether or not his signatures receiving his kickbacks were forged or not.

Then, there’s the matter of how long will they be detained. As I said, this will depend on proof. The crime they are accused of must be proven beyond reasonable doubt.

Thus, I’d say that the conviction of three minority senators will not happen before President Aquino steps down in 2016. Lawyers will always find ways and means to delay a case.

Santa Banana, just look at the gruesome Maguindanao Massacre where 58 people were killed. It has been more than four years now, and the trial itself has barely begun.

Look at the case against the Marcoses. It has been decades since they were indicted and many more cases are pending against them.

The ordinary man or woman may find due process and the rule of law frustrating and exasperating. They may ask why the case of Vhong Navarro against Cedric Lee and Deniece Cornejo was put on trial immediately. Why are the plunder cases against Enrile, Jinggoy and Bong still awaiting the arrival of the Ombudsman?

The plunder charges that the three senator are facing is a complex crime, on the other hand. It is not just a single offense.

What is difficult to understand, however, is the apparent application of a double standard treatment by Malacañang on its political enemies and political allies and supporters.

Let’s take the case of Budget Secretary Butch Abad who has been reported as the “tutor” of Napoles. He was also implicated in the scam because he used to be a congressman.

For one thing, there can never be a kickback or commission that legislators can pocket without a SARO or Special Release Allocation Order from the DBM, of which Abad is head. Those SAROs released by the DBM may have been done before his time, but under President Aquino’s watch. Abad cannot escape responsibility and accountability; he should also be charged with plunder.

There are also the involvement of Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala and Technical Education & Skills Development Authority Chief Joel Villanueva in the pork barrel scam.

Why isn’t the President proceeding with their indictment? Why cannot he be as zealous in applying the law to their cases as he is with the three minority senators?

FROM ABS-CBN

Why ER Ejercito was disqualified by Rose Carmelle Lacuata, ABS-CBNnews.com
Posted at 05/22/2014 11:56 PM | Updated as of 05/22/2014 11:56 PM


DISQUALIFIED. Laguna Gov ER Ejercito at the 2014 Palarong Pambansa in Laguna. Photo by Aki Yatco/Rappler

MANILA - The Commission on Elections' (Comelec) decision to disqualify Laguna Governor Emilio Ramon "ER" Ejercito was based on concrete evidence, the poll body's top official said Thursday.

In an interview on dzMM, Comelec Chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. said it is the commission's duty to look into election violations, whoever the candidate may be.

He also said Ejercito's disqualification case was already decided last September, and they needed time to review the case.

Brillantes said the evidence from the complainant who filed the case against Ejercito made it easier for the commission to investigate and decide on the case.

"Yung kay ER, bumilis lang yan kasi may complainant, nagprisinta siya ng ebidensya. Ayoko lang po 'yung sinasabi na may politika. Wala po kaming pinipiling partido," he said, dismissing claims that the administration is removing members of the Ejercito clan from power.

This, after Senator JV Ejercito claimed that recent events involving members of his clan seem to be part of a "concerted effort from the administration probably to remove the Ejercitos or Estradas."

Brillantes said it took the Comelec en banc 8 months to review the decision on Ejercito's case, but it was not because of lack of evidence.

He said Comelec commissioners debated on who would be governor of Laguna once Ejercito steps down.

"Matagal ang debate on who to succeed, kung yung vice-governor, o yung complainant," he said.

Brillantes also explained that even without a complainant, the Comelec has the power to disqualify any candidate or politician who commits an election violation.

"Maski walang complainant, basta nag-overspending, pwede namin siyang i-disqualify."

Edgar San Luis of the Liberal Party first filed the petition for disqualification against Ejercito, saying the latter was allowed to spend only P4.5 million or P3 for each of the 1,525,522 voters in Laguna.

The Comelec noted that Ejercito paid P6 million for just one advertising contract, which exceeded the poll spending cap.

The Comelec said that based on records, Ejercito spent P23,563,365 for his entire campaign.

Brillantes said that San Luis did not directly say that Ejercito overspent in his campaign, but the investigation proved that he did.

"In this case, yung complainant, sinabi na hindi niya sigurado kung nag-overspend, pero sa computation namin, nag-overspend siya. So sabi namin, disqualified ka na."

He added that the Campaign Finance Law limits the amount of money that can be used in an election campaign, regardless of the source of funds.

"Dapat alam niya that the limitation is on the expense, not the amount that came from his pocket. He is a legitimate candidate, ibinoto siya ng taong bayan, siya naman talaga ang elected na gobernador ng Laguna, but despite his election, hindi naman siya pwedeng suwayin ang batas ng election. Kapag sinuway mo yan, you will be liable for disqualification, as in this case," Brillantes said.

Ejercito is claiming that the money used in his campaign came from donations.

Ejercito was given 5 days to file a motion for a temporary restraining order (TRO) before the Supreme Court to stop the implementation of the Comelec decision.

FROM SOLAR NEWS ONLINE

Laguna governor to fight disqualification in SC


Laguna Governor ER Ejercito (Photo from the governor's official Facebook page)

Laguna Governor Emilio Ramon "ER" Ejercito will take the fight against his disqualification by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) the the Supreme Court.

The governor posted the following statement on Thursday (May 22) in his official Facebook page:
"I am prepared to take legal action against the disqualification order of the Comelec once we receive the documents.

"I will bring this matter to the Supreme Court and I am confident that the SC will uphold the rule of law and the voice of 550 thousand voters of the Province of Laguna who voted for me. I am also confident that the SC will uphold the mandate of the people of Laguna that they have so overwhelmingly entrusted to me during the last 2010 and 2013 gubernatorial elections.

"Thank you very much to all my supporters and all the Laguneños who continue to believe in my Good GovERnance and Public Service program and the good cause for which I stand for. Lalaban po tayo legally! Jesus Christ and Our Lady of Guadalupe will protect us Laguneños from harm."

A day before (May 21), the Comelec reaffirmed its resolution to disqualify Ejercito from office for overspending in the 2013 elections.

Ejercito is a nephew of former president and now Manila Mayor Joseph Estrada.

The Comelec issued the order on a basis of a resolution of its First Division issued in September 2013 granting the petition for disqualification filed by Edgar San Luis, who was Ejercito's rival in the May 13, 2013 gubernatorial race in Laguna.

Ejercito filed a motion for reconsideration of the original resolution.

The Comelec first made an announcement of its resolution to disqualify Ejercito in a post on the Comelec website on Sept. 26, 2013.

In that announcement, Comelec Chairman Sixto Brillantes Jr. said Ejercito spent over P6 million in television advertising alone.

But as candidate of Laguna, Brillantes said Ejercito was only allowed to spend the total amount of P4.5 million for his entire campaign for the May 13, 2013 national and local elections.

Laguna has a total of 1,525,522 registered voters for the May 13, 2013 elections.

Earlier, on Jan. 14, 2013, the Comelec promulgated Resolution No. 9615, which contains the implementing rules and regulations of the Fair Elections Act (Republic Act 9006).

A provision in that resolution only allows a candidate to spend P3 for every voter currently registered in the constituency where he filed his certificate of candidacy.

in the May 13, 2013 elections, Ejercito got a total of 549,310 votes and Comelec proclaimed him on May 17, 2013.

He was among the 400 elected officials whom the Comelec ordered last December 2013 to vacate their offices for failing to submit their Statement of Contributions and Expenditures (SOCE) or gave deficient documents.

Ejercito has five days to file a petition for a temporary restraining order before the Supreme Court. - Solar News Online

FROM THE TRIBUNE

Hypocrisy in claimed sensationalism Written by Ninez Cacho-Olivares Friday, 23 May 2014 00:00



Senators and congressmen whose names have been listed as having participated in the pork barrel scam from both the list of Janet Lim-Napoles and the claimed digital files of Benhur Luy published and aired over the media have been threatening the print media with either libel suits or class suits.

These legislators, and even former legislators said that media have no right to sensationalize such lists nor put out their names, since reputations are being ruined, even when there is absolutely no evidence to back up the lists.

Isabela Rep. Rodolfo Albano III was quoted as saying in reports that he and his colleagues been unfairly dragged into the pork barrel scam controversy and are innocent of the accusations leveled against them adding that these media entities would be facing libel suits, if not class suits.

“We will start with libel cases. We will take them to court in our respective districts. After that, if we find out that we have the same grievances, we will consider filing a class suit,” Albano said. That is clearly harassment from these public figures.

The same lawmakers from the Senate and the House, however, never showed the same reaction when media feasted on the Luy-Baligod almost daily media interviews implicating the three opposition senators, as well as the feasting on the Senate yellow ribbon committee portraying the three opposition senators as guilty, while praising the whistle-blowers of Leila. And not to forget, even those same legislators from the Senate and the House were joining in and feasting on the trial by publicity against the three senators.

But now that it is also they who have been named by Luy and Napoles in their lists, they are raising hell, and slamming media for their “sensational” coverages, while slamming the same people, such as Luy and Napoles whom they had earlier claimed as the truth tellers and that indeed the three opposition senators are as guilty as hell.

Even Noynoy then, before media took hold of the lists, virtually branded the opposition leaders as guilty, and wanted the cases against them rushed, as he wants to see them arrested, charged and imprisoned and even convicted. That is on record.

And there went Leila de Lima, gloating that Napoles had, oh yes, certainly and absolutely, spilled the beans on the three indicted senators, without however stating that there were more senators and congressmen in the list given to her by Napoles as she was also following orders from Noynoy that his allies must be protected. And Leila wouldn’t have ever made public that list given to her by Napoles, if the Luy digital list and other lists were never made public by the media.

Why even the Philippine National Police was readying the detention cells for the three indicted senators.

One can only conclude that as long as only the three opposition senators and a few opposition congressmen are charged and the allies are protected from being named by Benhur and Napoles, it is A-OK for media to ruin their reputations and destroy all their electoral chances in 2016 and even for the media to sensationalize these accusations against the three opposition senators, along with the Senate yellow ribbon hearing’s trial by publicity against the three demonized senators.

But the media have no right to do the same when it comes to the baring of the names of the allies, as their reputations are being destroyed?

If that is not pure hypocrisy and a clear double standard measure, what else is?

The same lawmakers even now say that releasing the list has caused the public scrutiny to shift away from Napoles, Luy and others involved in the scam with the circulation of several versions of the Napoles list.

Looks like they don’t mind any release of any list as long as they are not in it, but now say that “Napoles and Luy are the ones guilty. They were the ones who cooked up this scam.”

Bayan Muna Rep. Carlos Zarate, blamed De Lima for the circulation of several versions of the Napoles list.

“They already had the evidence last year, they should have charged all those behind the scam and avoided the proliferation of these lists,” he said.

How true, but as Noynoy, his porky allies in the Palace and in Congress, Leila, Grace Tan and Ombudsman Morales all wanted only the three opposition senators demonized, arrested, charged and detained in cells, they were one in shielding Noynoy and his allies, and throwing the kitchen sink at only the three opposition senators as their “success” in jailing the “corrupt” but fully protecting their really corrupt allies.

And Leila had the face to claim that her whistleblowers were not coached? Really?

So why was Luy only zeroing in on the three opposition leaders, when all the while, he had the list of all those legislators whom he never ever named in either his affidavits or his testimonies before the Senate?

FROM MALAYA


By Dahli Aspillera

WINNERS AND LOSERS By Dahli Aspillera | May 23, 2014

SAGA of journalists--unwittingly can be prey, can be victims. Win some, lose some. When we think we’re winners, we may prove losers. And vice-versa. When we fret at having lost (birthday gifts from Napoles), turns out just as well that the gifts were not delivered by The Messenger.

Two journalists that lost... but also won. Two media people who use their press ID unethically. As president of a Rotary Club, I was invited to a “Milk for Undernourished Children” launched by the Rotary Club president of Biñan, Laguna.

The host asked me to deal with two uninvited reporters who offered to publicize our activity for a fee. The host had neither funds nor need for publicity. I introduced myself to the reporters; told them that I’d been asked by the host to request them to leave, or their newspaper will know what they’re up to. They left. Losers. But winners too because no one, least of all me, will let their newspaper know how they use their IDs to make money on the side.

Walking out of a show, my journalist-companion paused to exchange pleasantries with a cabinet member who promptly asked us to join him to dinner. The 5-star hotel restaurant had wine, appetizers, steaks, desserts. My friend, close enough (affinity and location) to the host, leaned over to look at the bill. As we rode home, I asked, “How much did we eat?” “P15,000!”

At that moment, something told me that knowing how certain politicians operate, Juan Pasan Cruz Taxpayer will be paying for that meal--to be referred to thereafter as “Media Representation Expense.” To be scribbled on that P15,000 chit will be my name and my newspaper’s. I’m intensely guilty up to now for what I’m certain is Juan Pasan Cruz Taxpayer paying for my P3,000 dinner.

Previously feeling a winner for that elegant dinner, I suddenly was so guilty, a sick-to- the-stomach loser. I wanted to throw up. I wish I had instead a P30 McBurger that I, and not a civil servant’s “Media Representation Expense” paid for.

Take the case of Korina Sanchez, Mike Enriquez, Luchi Cruz Valdez, etc. broadcast journalists all. According to Napolists, a birthday bounty was destined for them, from PDAF. Everybody can use that kind of birthday cash.

Cash intended for these popular TV personalities, but The Messenger didn’t deliver. The gifts never got to the intended.

Losers indeed these TV broadcasters for not getting their b-day gifts. But by losing, Sanchez, Enriquez, Valdez, etc. are now winners.

They are clean for getting nothing from Napoles, nothing from PDAF. They are winners.

What about The Messenger who was supposed to deliver those birthday gift to the journalists?

These journalists had no way of knowing that the Napoles gifts were coming.

The Messenger never delivered the Napoles gift; never reached the journalists’ doorstep.

The Messenger (chief of staff, clerk, secretary, driver, concubine, bodyguard, mutual friend, relative) didn’t deliver. Acknowledgments, delivery receipts, signatures, IDs not required for security.

The messenger did not deliver. Napoles thinks the cash has reached the journalists. Sanchez, Enriquez, Valdez, etc. weren’t expecting any cash from Napoles, so they didn’t miss what they did not get. Radio just announced that The Messenger to the journalists had been identified.

The Messenger will be exposed. Just turned from Winner to Loser.

Luchi Cruz Valdez, a loser for not receiving what was meant for her, is now a winner: “I denounce the reckless inclusion of my name in a list that has no legal legs to stand on. Luy’s supposed record is largely hearsay; the reporting of such as anything even remotely truthful not only casts grave doubt on my person and professional integrity, but on that of the very institution of the press of which the Inquirer is part.

“...I would urge our colleagues in the PDI to have that much respect for its own readers and the larger Philippine public. The search for truth demands that news organizations demonstrate that they at least know the basic difference between loose words and established fact, and be responsible enough to at least qualify when one is spewed and the other is not quite really other. Beyond that, by all means, let the chips fall where they may. We - and I - continue to encourage all our institutions (the media included) to continue the quest for truth and justice.”

Truth and justice, so that winners may turn losers, and losers may turn winners.

***

For incidental reading, “From Loren to Marimar, The Philippine Media in the 1990s” edited by Sheila S. Coronel, winner: National Book Award for Media (1999) -- is must reading for anyone interested in how one of the most influential sectors in Philippine society operates: the media. The 35 articles in this anthology examine the structure of Philippine newspapers and television, describe Filipino forays into the World Wide Web, and probes such problems as ethics and ownership. They also trace how, in just a decade, the media in the Philippines have become as powerful as they are now. One of the things this collection explains is why media personalities have found their way into politics and why politicians are lining up to be news anchors or talk show hosts.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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