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BREAK IN STYLE: POPE FRANCIS SHUNS TRADITION / A LITTLE 'DEVIL' AT SCHOOL



[PURE AND SIMPLE Pope Francis, admired for his humility, urges the faithful to lead a simple lifestyle in the first Mass he celebrated as leader of the Catholic Church. AFP]

VATICAN, MARCH 18, 2013 (INQUIRER) On his first day as shepherd of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics, Pope Francis picked up his luggage at a Vatican hotel, personally thanked each member of the staff and even paid his own bill. Then, at his first Mass, he delivered a short, unscripted homily—in Italian, not the Latin of his predecessor—holding the cardinals who elected him responsible for keeping the church strong.

Pope for barely 12 hours, Francis brushed off years of tradition and formality on Thursday with a remarkable break in style that sent a clear message that his papacy is poised to reject many of the trappings enjoyed by now-retired Benedict XVI.

That was hardly out of character for Francis. For years, as Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the Argentine pastor took the bus to work, kissed the feet of AIDS patients and prayed with former prostitutes, eschewing the luxurious residence that would have been his due as archbishop of Buenos Aires.

Global spotlight

But now he is Pope—the first from the New World and the first Jesuit—and his style both personal and liturgical is in a global spotlight.

On his first day, he couldn’t have signaled a greater contrast to Benedict, the German academic who was meek and generous in person but formal and traditional in public.

The differences played out on Thursday in the Sistine Chapel as the 76-year-old Francis celebrated his first public Mass as Pope.

Whereas Benedict read a three-page discourse in Latin, Francis had a far simpler message. Speaking off-the-cuff for 10 minutes in easy Italian, he said all Catholics must “build” the Church and “walk” with the faith.

New style

The new style was evident even in Francis’ wardrobe. Rather than wear the new golden pectoral cross he was offered after his election on Wednesday, he kept the simple crucifix of his days as bishop. He also turned down the red velvet cape that Benedict wore when he was presented to the world for the first time in 2005, choosing the simple white cassock of the papacy instead.

“It seems to me what is certain is it’s a great change of style, which for us isn’t a small thing,” Sergio Rubin, Francis’ authorized biographer, told The Associated Press.

Rubin said the new Pope “believes the Church has to go into the streets” and be one with the people it serves and not impose its message on a society that often doesn’t want to hear it.

For this reason, as Cardinal Bergoglio, “he built altars and tents in the squares of Buenos Aires, and held Masses with former prostitutes and homeless people in the street,” Rubin said. “He did this to express the closeness of the church to those who are suffering.”

More changes

Rubin said he expected to see more changes—even substantive ones—once Francis gets his footing.

“I think the categories of progressive and conservative are insufficient,” Rubin said. “Pope Francis is someone with a great mental openness to enter into dialogue. He is very understanding of different situations. He doesn’t like to impose.”

Marian devotee

Francis began on Thursday with an early morning trip in a simple Vatican car—not the papal sedan—to a Roman basilica dedicated to the Virgin Mary, where he prayed before an icon of the Madonna.

Like many Latin American Catholics, Francis has a particular devotion to the Virgin Mary, and his visit to the St. Mary Major basilica was a reflection of that. Laying flowers on the altar, he then prayed before a Byzantine icon of Mary and the Infant Jesus.

“He has a great devotion to this icon of Mary, and every time he comes from Argentina he visits this basilica,” said the Rev. Elio Montenero, who was present for the Pope’s arrival. “We were surprised today because he did not announce his visit.”

Francis himself had foreshadowed the visit, telling the 100,000 people packed into rain-soaked St. Peter’s Square after his election that he intended to pray to the Madonna “that she may watch over all of Rome.”

Charming

The new Pope, known for his work with the poor in Buenos Aires’ slums, had charmed the crowd when he emerged on the loggia and greeted them with a simple and familiar: “Brothers and sisters, good evening.”

On Thursday, members of his flock were charmed again when Francis stopped by the Vatican-owned residence where he stayed before the conclave to pick up his luggage. But that wasn’t the only reason he made the detour.

“He wanted to thank the personnel, people who work in this house,” said Rev. Pawel Rytel-Andrianek, a guest at the residence. “He greeted them one by one, no rush, the whole staff, one by one.”

Good example

Francis then paid his bill “to set a good example,” Vatican spokesperson Rev. Federico Lombardi said.

“People say that he never in these 20 years asked for a (Vatican) car,” Rytel-Andrianek said. “Even when he went to the conclave with a priest from his diocese, he just walked out to the main road, picked up a taxi and went to the conclave. So very simple for a future Pope.”

Francis displayed that same sense of humility immediately after his election, spurning the throne on an elevated platform that was brought out for him to receive the cardinals’ pledges of obedience, said Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York.

“He met with us on our own level,” Dolan said.

Later, he traveled by bus back to the hotel along with the other cardinals, refusing the special sedan and security detail that he was offered.

Gospel of simplicity

Francis, said US Cardinal Donald Wuerl, has signaled his adherence to a “Gospel of simplicity.”

“He is by all accounts a very gentle but firm, very loving but fearless, a very pastoral and caring person ideal for the challenges today,” Wuerl said.

Cardinal Thomas Collins, the archbishop of Toronto, agreed.

“He’s just a very loving, wonderful guy. We just came to appreciate the tremendous gifts he has. He’s much beloved in his diocese in Argentina. He has a great pastoral history of serving people,” Collins said in a telephone interview.

Sense of humor

And he has a sense of humor.

During dinner after his election on Wednesday, the cardinals toasted him, Dolan said. “Then he toasted us and said, ‘May God forgive you for what you’ve done.’”

FROM ABS-CBN

Pope Francis remembered as a 'little devil' at school by Sonia Avalos, Agence France-Presse Posted at 03/15/2013 8:24 AM | Updated as of 03/15/2013 8:24 AM

BUENOS AIRES - Decades before he became Pope Francis, Jorge Bergoglio was a "little devil" who jumped up and down the stairs of his century-old Buenos Aires school, the establishment's mother superior told AFP.

The Argentine cardinal memorized his multiplication tables aloud as he skipped steps at the De la Misericordia school, where he celebrated his First Communion at the age of nine, Sister Martha Rabino remembered.

"He was a devil, a little devil, very mischievous, like every boy," the 71-year-old nun said with a smile.

"Who would have known that he would become pope!"

Rabino wept tears of joy when the 76-year-old Jesuit, who still shares tea with milk with the school's nuns, was elected to the throne of St. Peter on Wednesday, becoming the first Latin American leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.

"That's how saints are," said Rabino, who taught catechism to Cristina Kirchner in the nearby city of La Plata decades before she became president of Argentina.

Bergoglio and Kirchner are known to have a frosty relationship, but Rabino voiced hope that the Argentine leader's visit to the Vatican for the cardinal's formal installation as pope next week would change things.

"The two have very strong personalities and very firm convictions, but I was very happy to read the letter that Cristina sent," she said, referring to the congratulations conveyed by Kirchner. "She will probably kiss his ring, so she will have to reconsider things."

The new pope's family home in the Flores neighborhood was only two blocks away from the school's parish church and the family attended mass there every Sunday.

When he a became priest, Bergoglio returned to lead mass during important events.

"The family went to mass every Sunday. The mother was very Christian and pious. He learned a lot from her," Rabino said.

Other nuns marked the childhood and spiritual life of Bergoglio, like Sister Rosa, his first teacher. He visited her frequently until her death last year at the age of 101.

"He liked to ask Sister Rosa what he was like when he was a child, and the sister, who was old but very lucid, would reply: 'You were a devil. Did you get better?' And he would roar with laughter," Rabino said.

"Sister Rosa would tell him: 'I remember when you learned your multiplication table on the stairs and you jumped the steps, two by two, repeating: two, four six. You were tireless,'" she said.

His catechism teacher, Sister Dolores, was also a big influence and he cried during a night of prayer after her death two years ago.

"She was another nun that he deeply loved," Rabino said.

"She was his catechist when he was eight years old and he never forgot her. He visited her until her death and when she died he spent the night crying, he didn't drink anything."

Bergoglio spent his childhood in the Flores neighborhood and he developed his religious vocation at the San Jose de Flores Basilica, where he led mass at the start of every Holy Week.

The cardinal offered his resignation to Pope Benedict XVI when he turned 75, but the pontiff rejected it, Rabino recalled.

"He was a visionary for rejecting it. Bergoglio was thinking of returning to Flores. He told me 'I will spend my last days here.' But Benedict didn't let him. It was possibly an inspiration that came from the Holy Spirit," she said.

Moving slowly along school hallways due to arthritis in her feet, which forces her to walk around in slippers, Rabino remembered the joy of learning that Bergoglio had become pope.

"I jumped from my seat. I think that was his first miracle as Holy Father," she quipped.

The nun described the new pope as "a discreet, serene man of great spirituality, very firm but modest and accessible." The cardinal, she said, refused to take taxis, preferring to take the bus.

She said Bergoglio writes long letters by hand in very small print, always signing them with the words "pray for me."

"Now we have to pray for him more than ever," she said. "He is a gift to the church, a breath of fresh air, like opening the windows."

© 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


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