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IN THE FACE OF TRUMP's TRAVEL BAN, NATIONS CRITICIZED IT BUT IN THE HEART OF THE MUSLIM WORLD IT WAS MET WITH A CONSPICUOUS SILENCE


JANUARY 30 - 8 AM TORONTO TIME --U.S. President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with the Saudi Arabia's King Salman in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017.© REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with the Saudi Arabia's King Salman in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. CAIRO — The Germans criticized it. The British voiced their discomfort. The French, the Canadians and even some Republican senators in Washington stood in open opposition. But in Cairo and Riyadh, in the heart of the Muslim world, President Trump’s decision to bar millions of refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from the United States was met with a conspicuous silence. King Salman of Saudi Arabia, home of Islam’s holiest sites, spoke to Mr. Trump by telephone on Sunday but made no public comment. President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt, whose capital, Cairo, is a traditional seat of Islamic scholarship, said nothing. Even the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, a group of 57 nations that considers itself the collective voice of the Muslim world, kept quiet. Leaders in Iran and Iraq, two of the countries targeted by Mr. Trump’s order, issued furious denunciations on Sunday and vowed to take retaliatory measures. But the silence in the capitals of Muslim-majority countries unaffected by the order reflected a lack of solidarity and an enduring uncertainty about the direction that Mr. Trump’s foreign policy might take in some of the world’s most volatile corners. Will he move the American Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem? Designate Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization? Fall in line with Russia in dealing with the conflict in Syria? READ MORE...

ALSO: Duterte warns undocumented Filipinos in US: Get out
(The president, however, said that he is willing to open the country as a sanctuary for Muslim refugees.)
[RELATED EARLIER: ‘Duterte can’t help illegal Pinoys in US’]


JANUARY 30 -President Rodrigo Duterte said that he will not interfere with US President Donald Trump's immigration ban. File MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte warned undocumented Filipinos in the United States to go home following US President Donald Trump's travel ban. "So 'yung mga Pilipinong nandoon, you better be on the right track. If you are not allowed to stay there, you are overstaying, get out," Duterte said at a news conferencee early Monday. On Donald Trump's immigration order Palace says it's too early to react to Trump's travel ban The president said that he will not "lift a finger" if Filipinos in the US get caught due to violation of the law. Trump issued an executive order temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-major countries—Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan for the next 90 days. He also suspended the admission of all refugees for 120 days. Duterte said that he will not interfere with Trump's policy as the new US president did not interfere with his war on drugs. "Kasi nu'ng sinabi rin niya ako, 'We will not interfere in your drug war, you're doing it right.' So out of respect for that statement, I can only answer him in the manner that he has told me. Hindi ako makialam," Duterte said. The president, however, said that he is willing to open the country as a sanctuary for Muslim refugees. READ MORE...RELATED, ‘Duterte can’t help illegal Pinoys in US’...

ALSO: Philippines' Maxine Medina exits after climbing to Miss Universe final 6


JANUARY 30 -Philippines' candidate Maxine Medina on stage with host Steve Harvey at the Miss Universe pageant in Manila, Philippine on Jan. 26, 2017. Medina was part of the final six contestants of the prestigious beeauty competition. MUO/Tom Starkweather
MANILA, Philippines (7th update; First published 8:30 a.m.) — In trimming 86 candidates to six, the Miss Universe pageant on Monday included the Philippines' representative Maxine Medina before she bowed out. The 26-year-old Medina advanced to the final six after nailing the evening gown and swimsuit segments. Maxine stood out in her Rhett Eala red gown with glittery top and embellished trumpet skirt. For the question and answer segment, the six top contestants talked about the refugee crisis and human rights, among other political and social issues. Asked what would be the "most significant change" in the world in the last 10 years, Maxine picked the Miss Universe pageant. In the last 10 years in being here in the world is that I saw people being in one event like this in Miss Universe. It's something big to us that we are one as a nation, we are all together. READ MORE...

ALSO: Iris Mittenaere of France is new Miss Universe


JANUARY 30 -(Miss France Iris Mittenaere (R) is crowned the new Miss Universe by Former Miss Universe Pia Wurtzbach (L) during the Miss Universe pageant at the Mall of Asia Arena on January 30, 2017. Photo credits: Ted Aljibe/AFP)
The new Miss Universe is Miss France Iris Mittenaere. During the question and answer portion for the Final 3 contestants, which was on how to overcome failures, Mittenaere answered, “I think when you fail, you have to elevate yourself and try again.” Earlier, during the question and answer part for the Top 6, Miss France was asked about her thoughts on refugees. She said, “countries have the right to open and close their borders. In Europe, we have open borders. We want to have the biggest exchange of people. Open borders allow us to travel more in the world.” The first runner up is Miss Haiti Raquel Palissier. The second runner up is Miss Colombia Andrea Tovar. Prior to the announcement, Miss Universe 2015 Pia Wurtzbach ended her reign through a grand walk on stage. Her message to the new Miss Universe is, “fasten your seatbelt.” READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE BELOW
OR CLICK HERE TO READ ONLINE

In Face of Trump’s Order, Some Muslim Nations Are Conspicuously Silent


U.S. President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with the Saudi Arabia's King Salman in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017.© REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

MANILA, JANUARY 30, 2017 (NEW YORK TIMES)  By DECLAN WALSH - U.S. President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with the Saudi Arabia's King Salman in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017.
CAIRO — The Germans criticized it. The British voiced their discomfort. The French, the Canadians and even some Republican senators in Washington stood in open opposition.

But in Cairo and Riyadh, in the heart of the Muslim world, President Trump’s decision to bar millions of refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from the United States was met with a conspicuous silence.

King Salman of Saudi Arabia, home of Islam’s holiest sites, spoke to Mr. Trump by telephone on Sunday but made no public comment. President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt, whose capital, Cairo, is a traditional seat of Islamic scholarship, said nothing.

Even the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, a group of 57 nations that considers itself the collective voice of the Muslim world, kept quiet.

Leaders in Iran and Iraq, two of the countries targeted by Mr. Trump’s order, issued furious denunciations on Sunday and vowed to take retaliatory measures. But the silence in the capitals of Muslim-majority countries unaffected by the order reflected a lack of solidarity and an enduring uncertainty about the direction that Mr. Trump’s foreign policy might take in some of the world’s most volatile corners.

MORE QUESTIONS ARISE

Will he move the American Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem? Designate Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist organization? Fall in line with Russia in dealing with the conflict in Syria?

READ MORE...

“Trump has promised to do all kinds of things, but it’s not clear what he will move on immediately,” said Nathan J. Brown, a Middle East expert at George Washington University. “Nobody seems to know. It’s not even clear if Trump knows.”

The lack of political solidarity may be a sign of the enduring weakness of Muslim leaders who frequently pay lip service to the “ummah,” or global community of Muslims, but are more often driven by narrow national interests — even when faced with grave actions seen as an affront to their own people.

“They don’t have a strong basis of legitimacy at home,” said Rami G. Khouri, director of the Issam Fares Institute at the American University of Beirut. “They are delicately perched between the anger of their own people and the anger they might generate from the American president.”

Mr. Trump’s executive order — which froze all refugee arrivals in the United States and barred the entry of citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for 90 days — has sent a whirlwind of confusion, anxiety and fury across the Middle East and Africa. Refugees have been turned back at airports, families separated indefinitely and long-planned trips upended.

“I thought in America, there were institutions and democracy,” said Fuad Sharef, 51, an Iraqi Kurd bound for New York who was turned away from the Cairo airport with his wife and three children on Saturday morning. “This looks like a decision from a dictator. It’s like Saddam Hussein.”

GREEN-CARD HOLDERS

On Sunday, Trump administration officials backtracked on one aspect of the order, saying green-card holders would be allowed to return to the United States. In a Facebook post on Sunday evening, Mr. Trump insisted that his policy was not a “Muslim ban” and accused the news media of inaccurate reporting. Hours earlier, he had characterized the conflict with the Islamic State in starkly sectarian terms, asserting on Twitter: “Christians in the Middle East have been executed in large numbers. We cannot allow this horror to continue!”

In fact, a majority of the Islamic State’s victims have been Muslims, many of them shot, burned or beheaded. Among the Muslims who managed to escape Islamic State territory are the refugees Mr. Trump has now excluded.

GERMANY'S MERKEL

In a phone conversation with Mr. Trump on Saturday, Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany cited the 1951 Refugee Convention, which calls on signatories to take in people fleeing war, according to Steffen Seibert, Ms. Merkel’s spokesman. Yet in much of the Middle East, Mr. Trump is less likely to get such a scolding.

He has drawn close to Mr. Sisi of Egypt, whom he called a “fantastic guy,” and is considering designating the Muslim Brotherhood, Mr. Sisi’s sworn enemy, a terrorist organization. In a call last week, the two leaders discussed a possible visit to the White House by Mr. Sisi, whose administration faces accusations of human rights abuses — an unthinkable prospect during the Obama administration.

In his order on Friday, whose stated aim is to keep extremists out of the United States, Mr. Trump invoked the September 11 attacks three times. Yet Saudi Arabia, which was home to 15 of the 19 attackers, was not included on the list of countries whose citizens would be shut out. That reflects the deep economic and security ties between the United States and Saudi Arabia. Mr. Trump also has a personal financial link: In August 2015, just as his campaign was gathering steam, the Trump Organization registered eight companies in Saudi Arabia that were linked to a hotel development in the city of Jidda.

PAKISTAN

Pakistan, another country whose citizens have carried out attacks in the United States, also ducked Mr. Trump’s list. Although Mr. Trump had a chummy phone call with Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif shortly after the election in November, Pakistanis are nervously waiting to see if Mr. Trump will pull American troops from neighbouring Afghanistan.

“There’s a lot of concern,” said Zahid Hussain, a political analyst in Islamabad, Pakistan. “For now, they want to keep quiet and see how things go.”

MEETING WITH ARAB LEADER

On Monday, King Abdullah II of Jordan is scheduled to meet in Washington with members of the Trump administration and Congress, the first Arab leader to do so since the executive order was issued.

As recently as the early 2000s, many Muslim-majority countries were in broad agreement on issues like the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and sanctions against Iraq. Now, after several regional wars and a surge in sectarian strife, that consensus has been shattered.

Additionally, religious and multinational organizations that represent Muslims more broadly are viewed as toothless forces. The Organization for Islamic Cooperation, which has headquarters in Saudi Arabia, fired its leader last fall after he made a joke at the expense of Mr. Sisi of Egypt.

In the early days of Mr. Trump’s campaign, the Islamic scholars at Al Azhar, the ancient seat of Islamic learning in Cairo, spoke out against the “smear campaigns being launched against Muslims in America.” But the scholars have yet to weigh in on Mr. Trump’s executive order, and even if they do, few observers expect them to stray from official Egyptian government policy.

For many citizens of those countries, the docility of their leaders is frustrating. Samer S. Shehata, of the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies in Qatar, said that many of his students had already canceled their plans to study in the United States. “I don’t think anyone is under any illusion that if you are a Muslim or an Arab, you’re going to be treated different in this Trump presidency,” he said.

Mr. Khouri, of the American University of Beirut, said the disconnect between rulers and civilians in some countries spoke to the underlying anger that fueled the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. “Even when this American move is insulting Muslims and Islam, they do nothing about it,” he said. “That’s going to create more anger, and more pressure, in the Arab world. It’s terrible.”


PHILSTAR

Duterte warns undocumented Filipinos in US: Get out 37 SHARES 4 2 0 Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) - January 30, 2017 - 4:45pm


President Rodrigo Duterte said that he will not interfere with US President Donald Trump's immigration ban. File

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte warned undocumented Filipinos in the United States to go home following US President Donald Trump's travel ban.

"So 'yung mga Pilipinong nandoon, you better be on the right track. If you are not allowed to stay there, you are overstaying, get out," Duterte said at a news conferencee early Monday.

On Donald Trump's immigration order Palace says it's too early to react to Trump's travel ban

The president said that he will not "lift a finger" if Filipinos in the US get caught due to violation of the law.

Trump issued an executive order temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-major countries—Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan for the next 90 days. He also suspended the admission of all refugees for 120 days.

Duterte said that he will not interfere with Trump's policy as the new US president did not interfere with his war on drugs.

"Kasi nu'ng sinabi rin niya ako, 'We will not interfere in your drug war, you're doing it right.' So out of respect for that statement, I can only answer him in the manner that he has told me. Hindi ako makialam," Duterte said.

The president, however, said that he is willing to open the country as a sanctuary for Muslim refugees.

READ MORE...

"Ako, in the name of humanity and God, we'll have to make some adjustments. If there is a compelling reason for us to offer sanctuary, I'm one of those na okay lang ako," the president said.

Trump's immigration order sowed more chaos and outrage across the country Sunday, with travelers getting detained at airports, panicked families searching for relatives and protesters marching against the sweeping measure that was blocked by several federal courts.

Before Trump signed the order, more than 67,000 refugees had been approved by the federal government to enter the US, said Jen Smyers, refugee policy director for Church World Service. More than 6,400 had already been booked on flights, including 15 families that had been expected over the next few weeks in the Chicago area from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Iran, Syria and Uganda.

The bulk of refugees entering the US are settled by religious groups. All that work ground to a halt after Trump signed the order. — with reports from Associated Press

--------------------------------------

RELATED EARLIER NEWS FROM THE INQUIRER

‘Duterte can’t help illegal Pinoys in US’ By: Nimfa U. Rueda - @inquirerdotnet 05:49 AM January 26, 2017

LOS ANGELES—The nearly one million undocumented Filipinos in the United States, who face an uncertain fate under President Donald Trump, will not get any help from President Duterte as his administration must respect Trump’s immigration policy.

“It is our policy not to interfere with the policies of other countries like the United States of America,” Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar told a press conference at the Philippine Consulate in Los Angeles on Monday night (Tuesday in Manila).

Andanar said Mr. Duterte “cares for any Filipino, not only in the Philippines but around the world,” but his government has to “respect the (Trump) administration” and uphold its policy of noninterference.

Many Filipino-American advocacy groups are worried that Trump will implement tough immigration policies that may lead to harsh and abusive treatment of undocumented immigrants.

The groups, including the Filipino Migrant Center, the Pilipino Workers Center (PWC) and the Migrant Heritage Commission (MHC), have launched legal assistance programs for undocumented Filipinos and an awareness campaign on how to protect their rights.

PWC Associate Director Lolita Andrada Lledo said the Duterte government should provide support for undocumented Filipinos who send money back home and whose remittances greatly help the Philippine economy.

“They’re Filipino citizens, and just like overseas Filipino workers around the world, they’re our heroes, ang bagong bayani (modern-day heroes),” she said. “Why not help them?”

“This is the best time for (Mr. Duterte) to show he cares for undocumented Filipino workers who feel threatened under Trump,” she added. “They need to feel that they are not alone.”

Lledo said if the Mexican government was able to help protect the rights and welfare of their people, so can the Philippine government.

“The Mexican government, for example, had pushed for the issuance of consular ID cards that gave undocumented Mexicans a sense of security,” she said.

Immigration lawyer and MHC Executive Director Arnedo Valera agreed with Lledo and said Andanar was “misinformed.”

“Noninterference stems from respect of another country’s sovereignty, and does not preclude diplomatic negotiations and international agreements and bargaining between sovereign countries like the United States and the Philippines,” said Valera, who is also an international law expert.

Valera said, for example, Mexican President Pena Nieto and Trump recently had an “open and constructive” dialog about the more than four million undocumented Mexicans in the United States.

Similarly, President Duterte can meet with Trump to discuss immigration issues./ac


PHILSTAR

Philippines' Maxine Medina exits after climbing to Miss Universe final 6 7 SHARES 0 0 0 Rosette Adel (philstar.com) - January 30, 2017 - 10:40am


Philippines' candidate Maxine Medina on stage with host Steve Harvey at the Miss Universe pageant in Manila, Philippine on Jan. 26, 2017. Medina was part of the final six contestants of the prestigious beeauty competition. MUO/Tom Starkweather

MANILA, Philippines (7th update; First published 8:30 a.m.) — In trimming 86 candidates to six, the Miss Universe pageant on Monday included the Philippines' representative Maxine Medina before she bowed out.

The 26-year-old Medina advanced to the final six after nailing the evening gown and swimsuit segments. Maxine stood out in her Rhett Eala red gown with glittery top and embellished trumpet skirt.

For the question and answer segment, the six top contestants talked about the refugee crisis and human rights, among other political and social issues.

Asked what would be the "most significant change" in the world in the last 10 years, Maxine picked the Miss Universe pageant.

In the last 10 years in being here in the world is that I saw people being in one event like this in Miss Universe. It's something big to us that we are one as a nation, we are all together.

READ MORE...

With Medina and two other candidates failing to advance, left to compete for the crown were:

Miss France - Iris Mittenaere Miss Colombia - Andrea Tovar Miss Haiti - Raquel Pelissier Mittenaere of France was crowned Miss Universe after wowing the judges with her Moulin Rouge national costume, her answers in the two question and answer portions and her final walk.

image: http://media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine-star/entertainment/2017-65th-miss-universe/14_PHILIPPINES-maxine-sherri-hill.jpg

Maxine at the start of the Miss Universe telecast on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. MUO/Tom Starkweather

image: http://media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine-star/entertainment/2017-65th-miss-universe/14_PHILIPPINES-maxine-swimwear.jpg

Maxine walks in her swimwear at the preliminary competition of Miss Universe on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017. Philstar.com/Efigenio Toledo IV

image: http://media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine-star/entertainment/2017-65th-miss-universe/14_PHILIPPINES-maxine-gown.jpg

Maxine in her emerald gown by designer Rhett Eala at the Miss Universe preliminary competition on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017. Philstar.com/Efigenio Toledo IV

image: http://media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine-star/entertainment/2017-65th-miss-universe/14_PHILIPPINES-maxine-costume.jpg

The national costume of Maxine Medina featuring a headress reportedly worth about a million pesos. Philstar.com/Efigenio Toledo IV

Judges were Miss Universe 1993 Dayanara Torres from Puerto Rico, Miss Universe 1994 Sushmita Sen from India, Miss Universe 2011 Leila Lopes from Angola, Editorial Director of Editorial Director of popular fashion and pop-culture magazine, Paper, TV star Cynthia Bailey, and Emmy and Tony award-winning producer Francine LeFrak scored the candidates based on their ability to articulate themselves under pressure while sharing a thoughtful, well-informed response.


INQUIRER

Iris Mittenaere of France is new Miss Universe posted January 30, 2017 at 10:59 am by Arlene Lim


(Miss France Iris Mittenaere (R) is crowned the new Miss Universe by Former Miss Universe Pia Wurtzbach (L) during the Miss Universe pageant at the Mall of Asia Arena on January 30, 2017. Photo credits: Ted Aljibe/AFP)

The new Miss Universe is Miss France Iris Mittenaere.

During the question and answer portion for the Final 3 contestants, which was on how to overcome failures, Mittenaere answered, “I think when you fail, you have to elevate yourself and try again.”

Earlier, during the question and answer part for the Top 6, Miss France was asked about her thoughts on refugees.

She said, “countries have the right to open and close their borders. In Europe, we have open borders. We want to have the biggest exchange of people. Open borders allow us to travel more in the world.”

The first runner up is Miss Haiti Raquel Palissier.

The second runner up is Miss Colombia Andrea Tovar.

Prior to the announcement, Miss Universe 2015 Pia Wurtzbach ended her reign through a grand walk on stage.

Her message to the new Miss Universe is, “fasten your seatbelt.”

READ MORE...

She also said, once the reign of the new Miss Universe is over, she will have gained a deeper sense of maturity.

She added, “sa mga kababayan ko, thank you so much!”

Pia received a rousing applause from the audience.

Philippines’ candidate to this year’s pageant Maxine Medina made it to the Top 6.

She was asked what development in the last 10 years made a mark on her.

Maxine replied by talking about bringing all people in the world together.

“We are here. As one nation, we are all together,” she said.

Just before the final announcement, host Steve Harvey told the person who handed him the name of the winner, “this has got to be right. If this happens again, you will not leave the Philippines.”

And just before he read the content of the paper, Pia handed him eyeglasses to help him read.

The crowd roared in laughter.

Towards the end, Harvey said, “I got it right!”


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