PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
CLICK HERE TO READ ONLINE
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)


CNN OPINION: WHAT MILLENNIALS WANT FROM DONALD TRUMP
[RELATED: Why Millennials Don’t Like Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton]


JANUARY 20 -Son of Martin Luther King Jr., Trump meet 01:43 Son of Martin Luther King Jr., Trump meet 01:43 President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Martin Luther King III after they met at Trump Tower&lt in New York on Monday, January 16. Afterward, King said the meeting was constructive and that the two discussed the importance of voting accessibility. Trump didn't speak to the media about the meeting. Millennials just want an economy that works for us again. If Trump can pull it off, millennials -- and the parents of millennials still living at home -- will support him in record numbers. (Harlan Hill is a startup founder and political consultant. The opinions in this article belong to the author} (CNN) Mr. Trump, just give us a shot at the American Dream! I am 26 years old, so I came of age during the rise of President Obama. I supported Obama, voted for Obama and I fell victim to his economic malaise. In the shadow of the last eight years, millions of millennials like me just want Trump to give us a shot at the American Dream. We want the same opportunities our parents and grandparents had. READ MORE...RELATED, Why Millennials Don’t Like Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton...

ALSO: Another inaugural tradition - prayer service uproar by Episcopalians [RELATED: Pope to Trump: Help poor, outcasts]


JANUARY 20 -This Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015 file photo shows the nave of the Washington National Cathedral in Washington. A day after Donald Trump is sworn in, he and his cabinet members plan to attend a prayer service at the cathedral where "all faiths will be represented at his request," according to the Washington Episcopal bishop who oversees the cathedral. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) NEW YORK (AP) -- For years, the Washington National Cathedral, an Episcopal parish with a dual role as a civic gathering place, has hosted a prayer service for the newly sworn-in president. But keeping the tradition this year has caused an uproar among Episcopalians opposed to President-elect Donald Trump. COURTESY OF Mainichi Japan January 20, 2017.
NEW YORK — For years, the Washington National Cathedral, an Episcopal parish with a dual role as a civic gathering place, has hosted a prayer service for the newly sworn-in president. But keeping the tradition this year has caused an uproar among Episcopalians opposed to President-elect Donald Trump.  It's the latest example of the backlash against religious leaders, artists, celebrities and other participants in events surrounding the inaugural. READ MORE..RELATED, Pope to Trump: Help poor, outcasts..

ALSO: President Trump leads standing ovation for Hillary at Congress lunch[RELATED: World jittery over Trump’s ‘America first’]


JANUARY 21 -(US President Donald Trump speaks at the Inaugural Luncheon in the US Capitol January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Photo credits: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images/AFP)
US President Donald Trump on Friday led a standing ovation for his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, saying he was "honored" that she and her former president husband had attended his inauguration. "I was honored when I heard that Former President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton were coming today and I would like you to stand up," he said at a Congressional luncheon, urging lawmakers, his cabinet nominees and other dignitaries to stand. "There's nothing more I can say because I have a lot of respect for those two people," Trump added as attendees rose and clapped for the Clintons. Trump defeated Hillary Clinton, the former senator and secretary of state, in the November 8 election.(Hillary Clinton acknowledges the crowd at the Inaugural Luncheon in the US Capitol January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Photo credits: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images/AFP) FULL REPORT ...WATCH VIDEO...RELATED, World jittery over Trump’s ‘America first’...

ALSO: Trump sworn in as 45th US president; Pinoy leftists hold 'Dump Trump' rally in front of US embassy
[RELATED: Fact Check - Trump overstates crowd size at inaugural]


JANUARY 21 -
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday (Saturday Philippine time) — capping his improbable journey to the White House and beginning a four-year term that promises to shake up Washington and the world. An estimated 800,000 people will gather on the National Mall in the center of the nation’s capital to celebrate a man whose short 19-month political career has defied all predictions, and many norms. Small demonstrations popped up across the city center declaring Trump illegitimate and much larger rally is planned for Saturday, with Hollywood A-listers among the protesters. Protests against Trump also had hundreds of Filipinos converged on the US embassy Friday to denounce Donald Trump ahead of his inauguration as president of the United States, accusing him of sexism, racism and xenophobia. Chanting “Dump Trump,” the protesters from leftist groups also expressed concerns that Trump was a threat to the millions of Filipino immigrants living in the United States. READ MORE...RELATED, Fact Check: Trump overstates crowd size at inaugural...

ALSO: Palace congratulates new US Pres. Trump

[RELATED: Hundreds of thousands of women in DC to protest against Trump]


JANUARY 21 -Malacañang congratulated U.S. President Donald Trump as he took oath as the country’s 45th president on Friday, January 20 (Saturday, January 21 in the Philippines). “We congratulate the people of the United States for a successful 58th presidential inauguration,” presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said in a text message. (L) US President-elect Donald Trump (AP) ; (R) Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (MANILA BULLETIN) (L) US President-elect Donald Trump (AP) ; (R) Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (MANILA BULLETIN) In keeping with the two-century American democratic tradition, former reality show host and businessman Donald Trump was sworn in office at the Capitol Grounds in Washington D.C., replacing Barack Obama. The Palace, Abella said, is looking forward to closely working with Trump’s administration anchored on “mutual respect, mutual benefit and shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.” READ MORE...RELATED,
 Hundreds of thousands of women in DC to protest against Trump...

 


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE BELOW
OR CLICK HERE TO READ ONLINE

OPINION: What millennials want from Donald Trump


JANUARY 20 -Son of Martin Luther King Jr., Trump meet 01:43 President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Martin Luther King III after they met at Trump Tower&lt in New York on Monday, January 16. Afterward, King said the meeting was constructive and that the two discussed the importance of voting accessibility. Trump didn't speak to the media about the meeting.

MANILA, JANUARY 23, 2016 (CNN GLOBAL)  By Harlan Hill January 20, 2017 - Hill: Millennials just want an economy that works for us again. If Trump can pull it off, millennials -- and the parents of millennials still living at home -- will support him in record numbers. (Harlan Hill is a startup founder and political consultant. The opinions in this article belong to the author}

(CNN) Mr. Trump, just give us a shot at the American Dream!

I am 26 years old, so I came of age during the rise of President Obama. I supported Obama, voted for Obama and I fell victim to his economic malaise. In the shadow of the last eight years, millions of millennials like me just want Trump to give us a shot at the American Dream. We want the same opportunities our parents and grandparents had.
In the way of that dream are macroeconomic headwinds like automation and globalism that Trump can't control, but there are also several policies changes that he can control. You see, many American millennials have delayed major life milestones simply because we can't afford them.

READ MORE...

Trump's inauguration security, by the numbers

For instance, we've put off buying our first house, getting married and having children. If he pays attention to us in his first 100 days, President Trump can unleash the enormous economic potential of my generation.

He should start by making it easier for millennials to borrow money for a mortgage. After the 2008 Financial Crisis, the Federal Government cracked down on big bank lending. Today, the paperwork and bureaucratic red tape scares off millions of potential home buyers. In fact, according to a White House report, millenials are "less likely to be homeowners than young adults from previous generations".

This sets a ceiling on the property values of current homeowners and keeps millennials locked in an endless cycle of renting. Reduce the regulatory burden government imposes on banks and they will lend again.
In inaugural disaster, an odd succession quirk

In inaugural disaster, an odd succession quirk

Next, address the student loan crisis and higher education costs simultaneously. Bernie Sanders' promise of free college tuition sounds great on paper, but it doesn't address the ballooning costs of higher education.

If anything, Bernie's plan would give license to even higher costs. Instead get government out of the business of guaranteeing all student loan debt and back into the business of education grants. The reasoning is simple: before the government got involved, any college tuition increases matched inflation. But according to a report in Bloomberg Businessweek, since 1978, college tuition has exploded over 1,120%.

Only after you contain costs for current and future students, give graduates paths to debt forgiveness. Mr Trump has the opportunity to offer millenials a moment of mercy that they won't forget -- and it will pay dividends by affording us the financial stability to start forming family units.

A final word of advice: don't get bogged down in the distraction of social issues. Millennials don't care who wants to get married. Millennials don't want government telling women what to do with their bodies.

Millennials just want an economy that works for us again. If Trump can pull it off, millennials -- and the parents of millennials still living at home -- will support Trump in record numbers come 2020.---------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

RELATED EARLIER REPORT FROM FORTUNE MAGAZINE (COMMENTARY)

Why Millennials Don’t Like Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton Jack Cahn,David Cahn
Updated: Aug 21, 2016 10:16 PM Eastern


A young woman participates in a protest outside the Hyatt Regency Hotel where US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was speaking in Burlingame, California on April 29, 2016. Photography by JOSH EDELSON AFP/Getty Images

Millennials voted for Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Bernie Sanders in the primaries. But they got Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton instead as their candidates.

To be sure, voters overall aren’t happy with our choices for president. Polls show that 37% of registered voters have strongly unfavorable views of Clinton, and more than 50% have strongly unfavorable views of Trump. But the difference is Millennials, as a group, didn’t vote for Trump or Clinton.

Millennials gave Clinton less than 30% of their votes in key primaries and nearly precipitated her defeat nationwide. Trump won 20%-30% of millennial voters in key GOP primaries, generally behind both Cruz and Rubio. Young voters have already delivered both candidates an unambiguous rebuke.

See also: The Green Party's Open Letter to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

The fallout from Clinton and Trump’s nominations has been significant. Polling data shows only 20% of young people say they will vote for Trump, and 25% of young Republicans say they will vote for Clinton in November, according to USA Today.

And, recent anecdotal reports suggest that some young voters are even disaffiliating with the Republican Party.

Grassroots organizing, usually bolstered by young volunteers, is in shambles. Recently dozens of young RNC staffers left in protest of the Trump candidacy. Now, the GOP risks losing not just the White House but also the House and Senate.

See also: Donald Trump's Immigration Reform May Be Less Severe Than We Thought

For many young conservatives, Trump’s values are a deal breaker. Whereas millennials tend to identify as optimistic, tolerant of diversity and authentic, Trump vilifies undocumented immigrants, has threatened to ban Muslims from immigrating to the United States, and frequently taunts women. Trump’s flagrant insults and racism directed toward minority groups makes him an anathema to young voters.

“I didn’t want to be associated with the Trump campaign,” one former RNC staffer, who asked to remain anonymous, told Politico. “I don’t agree with what he has to say ... He’s not a person I feel comfortable working for. It’s just that simple.”

For Democrats, who traditionally rely on young voters as a core part of their coalition, the picture isn’t much prettier. As recently as late June, just 55% of Sanders voters said they would vote for Clinton; recent polling data shows just 41% of young voters are supporting Clinton.

The big fear for Democrats is not that millennial voters will support Trump – as Clinton widens her lead, this is increasingly unlikely – but that not enough millennials will show up in November.

Historically, young voters are less likely to turn out than their parents. There are a number of reasons for this: 1) Having never voted before, the default setting for many young people is not to vote, 2) Young voters are busy with school, starting families and with their first jobs. Politics (and taxes) are not yet a priority and 3) Politicians are less likely to campaign to millennials or address their issues, creating a negative feedback loop that discourages political participation.

Voter turnout among millennials may yet determine the outcome of this presidential election. In 2008 and in 2012, millennial voters delivered President Obama his margin of victory. Had Mitt Romney won just 50% of the millennial vote in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida, he would be president today. Likewise, in 2014 higher than expected turnout among millennial voters helped the GOP win its Senate majority.

Hillary Clinton recently launched a Millennial Engagement Program to address this issue. The team will set out with the explicit goal of encouraging young people to get the polls. Clinton’s staffers will leverage Obama and Sanders’ endorsements to rile up young voters. They will likely also highlight Clinton’s support for debt free college education and gun control, which are both critical issues for young voters.

At the end of the day, the success or failure of this approach will lie in Clinton’s ability to build a grassroots army. Thus far, the results are lackluster; Team Hillary lacks the gleam or enthusiasm of Obama and Sanders. For Clinton, never a darling of young voters, this is an uphill battle. Rather than give up or shift her focus elsewhere, Clinton needs to double down on this effort. It will make or break her campaign.

For Trump, the priority now needs to be on controlling the bleeding. Young voters consistently rank the economy as their #1 priority. And most voters (including millennials) believe Trump is the best candidate to improve our economy, according to Gallop. If the Trump campaign can focus on this message – instead of racism, immigration, and “Obama created ISIS” – he can shore up millennial support. To this end, Trump should leverage his children – especially Ivanka, whose charismatic RNC address stole the show – when campaigning to millennials.

Bottom line: The outcome of this election hinges on the candidates’ ability to get young voters to polls. Uninspiring candidates make voter turnout all the more vital – and difficult to predict.David Cahn and Jack Cahn are twin brothers, undergraduates at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and co-authors of When Millennials Rule: The Reshaping of America (Post Hill Press, August 2016)


MSN WORLD NEWS

Another inaugural tradition - prayer - under fire over Trump Canadian Press logo Canadian Press By RACHEL ZOLL, AP Religion Writer


This Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015 file photo shows the nave of the Washington National Cathedral in Washington. A day after Donald Trump is sworn in, he and his cabinet members plan to attend a prayer service at the cathedral where "all faiths will be represented at his request," according to the Washington Episcopal bishop who oversees the cathedral. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) NEW YORK (AP) -- For years, the Washington National Cathedral, an Episcopal parish with a dual role as a civic gathering place, has hosted a prayer service for the newly sworn-in president. But keeping the tradition this year has caused an uproar among Episcopalians opposed to President-elect Donald Trump. COURTESY OF Mainichi Japan January 20, 2017.

NEW YORK — For years, the Washington National Cathedral, an Episcopal parish with a dual role as a civic gathering place, has hosted a prayer service for the newly sworn-in president. But keeping the tradition this year has caused an uproar among Episcopalians opposed to President-elect Donald Trump.

It's the latest example of the backlash against religious leaders, artists, celebrities and other participants in events surrounding the inaugural.

READ MORE...

The cathedral for the largely liberal denomination will host an interfaith prayer service on Saturday, the day after Trump takes office. Bishop Mariann Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington wrote in a blog post that while she shared "a sense of outrage at some of the president-elect's words and actions," she felt an obligation to welcome all people without qualification, especially those who disagree and need to find a way to work together. That role "requires a willingness to put ourselves in places that make us uncomfortable," Budde wrote.

Episcopalians critical of the decision were also upset to learn that the cathedral choir, drawn in part from local Episcopal schools, would sing at the inauguration before the ceremony started, and that the interfaith service the next day would not include a sermon. They saw a missed opportunity to speak out against Trump's proposed temporary ban on Muslim immigrants and other policies, his calling Mexicans rapists and his remarks about grabbing women's genitals. Organizers for past services have said the presidential inaugural committees have chosen the preacher, and Trump chose not to have one this year.

Budde said most Episcopalians who have contacted her about the service "are dismayed, disappointed and angry."

The Very Rev. Randolph Hollerith, the cathedral dean, defended the decision to participate in the ceremonies. "Our willingness to pray and sing with everyone today does not mean we won't join with others in protest tomorrow," he said in a statement.

The emotional dispute within the church mirrors the broader fight about the morality of taking part in inaugural events this year, which has stretched across the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, a Bruce Springsteen cover band, the Radio City Rockettes and the marching band of historically black Talladega College in Alabama. Groups participating in inauguration events have said they viewed their role in part as serving the country and supporting democracy, not giving an endorsement.

Broadway star Jennifer Holliday, who backed out as a performer following protests from her gay and black fans, said she was pained by the reaction. "How could I have this much hate spewing at me, and I haven't even done anything? I guess it's not like those old days when political views were your own and you had freedom of speech," she said. "We live in a different time now and a decision to go and do something for America is not so clear-cut anymore."

Some clergy invited to offer prayers at Friday's swearing-in have also faced criticism. New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who will read from Scripture at the inaugural, said he told critics he had a "sacred responsibility" to participate. "Had Mrs. Clinton won and invited me I would have gone too. It's not the person. It's the office, right?" Dolan said on Sirius XM's Catholic Channel last week.

Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, who will offer a prayer near the end of Friday's program, said "I believe that all of us should pray for his great success, because his great success means our great success."

But critics contend Trump will be a president unlike any other, because of his policies and vulgarity, so traditions surrounding his inauguration should not hold. The Rev. Gary Hall, who retired in 2015 as dean of the National Cathedral, noted that the church was envisioned as a Westminster Abbey for the U.S. It has long been the site of national events, hosting inaugural interfaith prayer services, presidential funerals and national prayers of mourning, including a ceremony with evangelist Billy Graham three days after the Sept. 11 attacks. But Trump's "xenophobia and misogyny," among other behavior and proposed policies, have been "outside the bounds of all mainstream norms" and the church should not appear to bless him, Hall wrote.

"We cannot use the words, symbols, and images of our faith to provide a religious gloss to an autocrat," Hall wrote.

The head of the Episcopal Church, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, responded to the controversy over the cathedral with a statement urging all to pray for Trump and all civic leaders.

"Prayer is not a simplistic cheer or declaration of support," he wrote, but can also "ask God to intervene and change the course of history, to change someone's mind or his or her heart." Associated Press reporter Nancy Benac contributed to this report.

----------------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Pope to Trump: Help poor, outcasts 2 SHARES Share it! Published January 22, 2017, 12:11 AM By AGence France-Presse and Catholic News Agency

Vatican City — Pope Francis congratulated US President Donald Trump on his inauguration Friday, urging the new president to keep fighting for the poor at a time of “grave humanitarian crises.”

Francis offered his “cordial good wishes” and hoped Trump would be granted “wisdom and strength in the exercise” of his office.

But the pontiff struck a cautionary chord in his message to Trump, imploring the former reality TV star to continue to help those who suffer the most.


First Dance — United States President Donald Trump takes his First Lady Melania Trump on their first dance as America’s First Couple at The Salute to Our Armed Services Inaugural Ball in Washington, D.C. on Friday (yesterday in Manila). (Evan Vucci/AP|Manila Bulletin)

“At a time when our human family is beset by grave humanitarian crises demanding farsighted and united political responses, I pray that your decisions will be guided by the rich spiritual and ethical values that have shaped the history of the American people and your nation’s commitment to the advancement of human dignity and freedom worldwide,” wrote Francis.

“Under your leadership, may America’s stature continue to be measured above all by its concern for the poor, the outcast and those in need who, like Lazarus, stand before our door,” said the Pope.

Earlier in Washington, Trump had placed his left hand on a bible used by Abraham Lincoln and recited the US presidential oath.

But in his inauguration speech, Trump gave little indication his thoughts matched the Pope’s as he vowed to put “only America first” and make the country “rich again.”

While the tone of Francis’ congratulatory note was warm and optimistic, many, Catholics in particular, fear there could be tension between the Pope and the new president when it comes to immigration.

Reservations about the topic trail back to comments Pope Francis made during his Feb. 19 inflight news conference en route from Juarez to Rome responding to criticism of Trump, who had called Francis “political” and threatened to build a wall along the US-Mexican border.

“A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges, is not Christian. This is not in the Gospel,” the Pope had said, prompting former Vatican spokesman Fr. Federico Lombardi to release a statement the next day assuring the Pope’s comment “was never intended to be, in any way, a personal attack or an indication of how to vote.”

Pope Francis has been an outspoken supporter of migrants’ rights and the need to build bridges rather than walls.

New political era

Hundreds of thousands of people stood on the rain-splattered National Mall to see the 70-year-old Republican billionaire be sworn in, and deliver a stridently populist call-to-arms.

Trump promised to lift up the nation’s disenfranchised and those who felt betrayed by the political elites, declaring with vindication that “the forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”

“From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land,” Trump said, promising an end to business-as-usual in Washington. “From this moment on, it’s going to be only America First.”

During his inaugural address, Trump vowed that his presidency would usher in a new political era.

“We are transferring power from Washington, DC, and giving it back to you, the people,” he said.

Moments earlier, the incoming US leader had placed his left hand on a bible used by Abraham Lincoln and recited the 35-word oath spoken since George Washington.

First dance

As the day’s ceremonial rituals drew to a close, Trump and his wife Melania stepped out – the first lady stunning in an off-the-shoulder ivory gown – to lead the dance at one of the string of glitzy inaugural balls being held across the capital.

The pair slow-danced in a close embrace to a version of Frank Sinatra’s “My Way,” before they were joined by Vice-president Mike Pence and his wife Karen, and both families’ children.

“Well, we did it,” Trump told the revelers. “We won. And today, we had a great day.”

“This was a movement. And now the work begins.”

At another ball, Trump echoed his campaign pledge to help create lots of industrial jobs in the United States.

“We will not be taken advantage of any more. We’re going to have those great companies come pouring back in,” Trump promised again.

“We are not going to let you down. Remember the theme: Make America Great Again… Greater than ever before – it will happen.”

Smaller crowd

The popular turnout was visibly smaller than for Obama’s two inaugurations, in 2009 and 2013, with sections of the mall and bleachers along the parade route left nearly empty.

Throngs of Trump’s opponents also converged on Washington.

Most of their protests – by an array of anti-racist, anti-war, feminist, LGBT, and pro-immigration groups – were peaceful, but sporadic violence marred the day.

Several hundred masked, black-clad protesters carrying anarchist flags smashed windows, lit fires and scuffled with riot police blocks from the parade held in Trump’s honor, with at least 217 people arrested for vandalism.

Even the peaceful protesters were intent on spoiling Trump’s party – letting out a deafening roar as the presidential limousine rolled past.

“Not my president! Not my president!” they yelled, as the pro-Trump crowd in nearby bleachers chanted “USA! USA!”

Order of the day

Adhering to his vow to immediately start dismantling the healthcare reforms passed by outgoing president Barack Obama, Trump signed his first executive order in the Oval Office, targeting Obamacare.

It commands government offices to grant all possible exemptions to limit the “economic and regulatory burden” of the Affordable Care Act, as a prelude to a full repeal.

Trump directed government agencies to freeze regulations and take steps to weaken Obamacare.

Trump signed an order on the Affordable Care Act that urged government departments to “waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation” of provisions that imposed fiscal burdens on states, companies or individuals.

It also called for efforts to give states greater flexibility in implementing healthcare programs while developing “a free and open market in interstate commerce for the offering of healthcare services and health insurance.”

Health experts had speculated that Trump could expand exemptions from the so-called individual mandate, which requires Americans to carry insurance or face a penalty, or the requirement that employers offer coverage.

Experts also believe the administration could try to reduce the “essential benefits,” such as maternity care and mental health services, that insurance plans must cover.

The White House did not provide further details about the executive order.

Palace congratulates Trump

In Manila, Malacañang congratulated Trump as he took oath as the country’s 45th President of the United States (POTUS).

“We congratulate the people of the United States for a successful 58th presidential inauguration,” Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said in a text message.

Abella said the Philippine government is looking forward to closely working with Trump’s administration anchored on “mutual respect, mutual benefit, and shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.”

“We wish President Trump success in the next four years of his administration,” Abella said.

He said the Palace respects Trump’s “America First” pronouncement as defining the first principles of the new American leadership.

“In like manner, national interest is the primary consideration that guides President Rodrigo Duterte. His pursuit of peace and order is the bedrock of economic inclusivity and self-sufficiency,” he said.

Abella said the Palace also welcomes Trump’s foreign policy direction as it promises a more placid and mutually beneficial relationship especially with America’s long standing allies like the Philippines.

“We find resonance with their intention to ‘seek friendship and goodwill and reinforce existing alliances, without imposing America’s way of life on others,’” he said. (With reports from EWTN News, Reuters, and Argyll Cyrus B. Geducos)


MANILA STANDARD

Trump leads standing ovation for Hillary Clinton at Congress lunch posted January 21, 2017 at 04:21 am by AFP


(US President Donald Trump speaks at the Inaugural Luncheon in the US Capitol January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Photo credits: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images/AFP)

US President Donald Trump on Friday led a standing ovation for his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, saying he was "honored" that she and her former president husband had attended his inauguration.

"I was honored when I heard that Former President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton were coming today and I would like you to stand up," he said at a Congressional luncheon, urging lawmakers, his cabinet nominees and other dignitaries to stand.

"There's nothing more I can say because I have a lot of respect for those two people," Trump added as attendees rose and clapped for the Clintons.

Trump defeated Hillary Clinton, the former senator and secretary of state, in the November 8 election.


(Hillary Clinton acknowledges the crowd at the Inaugural Luncheon in the US Capitol January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Photo credits: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images/AFP)

 

-----------------------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

World jittery over Trump’s ‘America first’ (Associated Press) | Updated January 22, 2017 - 12:00am 11 7 googleplus0 1

The billionaire businessman and reality television star – the first president who had never held political office or high military rank – promised to stir a “new national pride” and protect America from the “ravages” of countries he says have stolen US jobs. AP/John Locher MANILA, Philippines - President Donald Trump’s inaugural speech promised an “America first” policy, but offered no specifics about America’s place in the world.

The billionaire businessman and reality television star – the first president who had never held political office or high military rank – promised to stir a “new national pride” and protect America from the “ravages” of countries he says have stolen US jobs.

“This American carnage stops right here,” Trump declared. In a warning to the world, he said, “From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this moment on, it’s going to be America first.”

Here are some reactions from around the world:

Close Ad X

Afghans disappointed but hopeful

Like many in the Afghan capital of Kabul, restaurant owner Mohammad Nahim watched the presidential inauguration ceremonies but was disappointed to not hear any mention of Afghanistan.

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

“Trump did not mention a word about Afghanistan in his speech and the salaries of the Afghan army and police are paid by the US,” he said. He added that if the US stops helping Afghanistan, “our country will again become a sanctuary to terrorists. I hope Trump will not forget Afghanistan.”

Speech resonates in Mexico

Perhaps no country was watching the speech more closely than Mexico. Trump has made disparaging remarks about immigrants who come to the United States illegally and sought to pressure companies not to set up shop in Mexico by threatening a border tariff on goods manufactured there and exported to the US.

So Trump’s talk of “protecting our borders,” “America first” and “buy American and hire American” had particular resonance in America’s southern neighbor.

Ricardo Anaya Cortes, president of the conservative opposition National Action Party, called for “the unity of all Mexicans, unity in the face of this protectionist, demagogic and protectionist speech we just heard. Unity against that useless wall, against deportations, against the blockade of investment.”

“The challenge is enormous... We demand the federal government leave aside tepidity, that it tackle with absolute firmness and dignity the new relationship with the United States,” Anaya said.

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto sent three tweets after Trump’s inaugural speech Friday:

– “I congratulate @realDonaldTrump on his inauguration. We will work to strengthen our relationship with shared responsibility.”

– “We will establish a respectful dialogue with the government of President @realDonaldTrump, to Mexico’s benefit.”

– “Sovereignty, national interest and the protection of Mexicans will guide the relationship with the new government of the United States.”

Pakistan worries about Muslim comments

A group of retired government officials gathered after morning prayers for a walk in a sprawling park in the heart of the federal capital of Islamabad and the topic of their conversation was President Trump’s inaugural speech.

They expressed concern that Trump would target the Islamic world, particularly Pakistan, because of his campaign rhetoric about Muslims as well as his inaugural speech in which he promised to eradicate Islamic terrorism worldwide. Pakistan has often been accused of harboring militant insurgents and declared terrorist groups that have targeted neighboring India, against whom Pakistan has fought three wars, as well as Afghanistan. Pakistan denies the charges.

“Likely there is more trouble in store for the Islamic world and our country will take the most brunt of the harsh treatment from President Trump administration,” said Mohammad Afzal.

Concern in Tokyo

Some Tokyo residents are worried that Trump’s “America first” policy will usher in an era of populism and protectionism at the expense of the rest of the world.

Tadashi Gomibuchi, who works in the manufacturing industry, recorded Trump’s inauguration speech overnight as he was keen to hear what the new president had to say.

“Trump is trying to make big changes to the way things are. Changes are good sometimes, but when America, the most powerful, loses stability ... it’s a grave concern,” he said. “If you take his words literally, it may destabilize the world going forward and I’m really worried. I hope things will lead to a soft landing.”

Retiree Kuninobu Inoue, who lived in the US during the 1990s, is concerned about trade frictions between Japan and the US, citing Trump’s decision to withdraw from the 12-nation Trans Pacific Partnership.

“Japan-US relations are not just about security. Our good relations rely so much on trade,” he said.

In his congratulatory message to Trump, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stressed the importance of the Asia-Pacific region as a source for growth but also tensions.

“In the 21st century, while the Asia-Pacific region is the source of the global economic growth, the security environment of the region is becoming more severe,” he said.

China braces for trouble ahead

A Chinese state-run nationalist tabloid, the Global Times, says President Trump’s inauguration speech indicates that the US and China would inevitably face trade tensions.

The newspaper said in a commentary following Trump’s inauguration that “dramatic changes” lay ahead for the US and the global economic order.

“Undoubtedly, the Trump administration will be igniting many ‘fires’ on its front door and around the world. Let’s wait and see when it will be China’s turn,” it said.

The paper noted that Trump blamed foreign trade policies for failing to put “America first,” and said trade tensions between the US and China seemed “inevitable within the four years ahead.”

The paper says it expects that the Trump administration, in seeking to bring factories back to the US from China, will use the US government’s relations with Taiwan as “merely a bargaining chip for them to put trade pressure on China.”

Taiwan tweets

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen tweeted her congratulations to Trump, saying: “Congratulations @realDonaldTrump. Democracy is what ties Taiwan and the US together. Look forward to advancing our friendship & partnership.”

Trump didn’t mention the self-ruled island in his speech, but he angered China and broke diplomatic protocol by talking by phone with Tsai shortly after winning November’s election.

S. Koreans put security first, worry about alliance

Some in South Korea worried that President Trump would ask Seoul to shoulder a bigger share of the cost of US forces stationed in South Korea as a deterrent against aggression from North Korea, or that their country will be caught in a conflict between the US and China.

“I think the biggest challenge is national defense,” said Park Geon-rok, a 30-year-old designer, adding that South Korea was “heavily influenced by the US.”

In an editorial, the English-language JoongAng Daily said South Korea’s relations with the US under Trump will face a challenge as the new leader will likely ask Seoul to pay more for the cost of the US military forces in the country and renegotiate a bilateral free trade agreement. But the paper also notes it is “fortunate” that Trump has a strong position on North Korea’s nuclear weapons.

In place of impeached President Park Geun-hye, Acting President and Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn said in his congratulatory message to Trump that South Korea wishes to bolster the already close ties with the US and cooperate on stopping North Korea’s nuclear development.

Indians fret about immigration prospects

Among dozens of young, urban Indians who watched Trump’s inauguration and speech at a club in a New Delhi, the 27-year-old Jigar Gorasia said getting work visas for professionals and green cards will become a problem.

“It is going to be a little bit challenging for those,” said Gorasia, who studied and worked in Chicago before moving back to India last year.

Divya Narayanan, a 21-year-old student of journalism, said that Trump as president worried her. “Someone at the level of the US president coming out and saying things which are bigoted, which are sexist, it sets a precedent for other people in the country, right?”

Vitenamese say speech too America-focused

A Vietnamese analyst said Trump’s speech was disappointing because it mainly served the domestic audience.

“I think this speech would be right for an election campaign, but not an inauguration speech,” said Nguyen Ngoc Truong, president of Hanoi-based private policy think-tank Center for Strategic Studies and International Development.

“It should not be that simple because in an inauguration speech, you must introduce an objective and multi-faceted vision, not just one-sided vision to the American public,” he said. “I don’t think Trump could have a magic stick to be able to manage America to realize the goals that he outlined.”

Australians find speech divisive

An Australian father of two, Marek Rucinski, found Trump’s speech “very divisive” and lacking substance.

“Normally these speeches are used to rally and unite people,” he said. “It was, again, more bluster.”

Rucinski was among some 8,000 to 10,000 people who attended a Women’s March anti-Trump rally in Sydney’s Hyde Park.

Self-described feminist Niall Anderson watched the president’s inauguration in disbelief.

“Just disbelief that this can happen in 2017,” the 35-year-old said.

The Australian newspaper’s foreign editor Greg Sheridan wrote that “Trump answered one big question with his inauguration address: There is to be no transition from campaign Trump to presidential Trump.”


TRIBUNE

Trump sworn in as 45th US president Written by AFP and Tribune Wires Saturday, 21 January 2017 00:00

Pinoy protesters say ‘Dump Trump’

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday (Saturday Philippine time) — capping his improbable journey to the White House and beginning a four-year term that promises to shake up Washington and the world.

An estimated 800,000 people will gather on the National Mall in the center of the nation’s capital to celebrate a man whose short 19-month political career has defied all predictions, and many norms.

Small demonstrations popped up across the city center declaring Trump illegitimate and much larger rally is planned for Saturday, with Hollywood A-listers among the protesters.

Protests against Trump also had hundreds of Filipinos converged on the US embassy Friday to denounce Donald Trump ahead of his inauguration as president of the United States, accusing him of sexism, racism and xenophobia.

Chanting “Dump Trump,” the protesters from leftist groups also expressed concerns that Trump was a threat to the millions of Filipino immigrants living in the United States.

READ MORE...

“It is alarming to know that an accused sexual predator, a known racist, sexist, xenophobic man is assuming the presidency of the strongest capitalist country in the world,” Joms Salvador, secretary-general of women’s group Gabriela, told AFP.
“The decades of struggle of women across the world to fight for their rights is threatened by Trump’s presidency.”

The roughly 300 people who gathered near the US embassy in Manila held placards with the message “@realDonaldTrump hands off Filipino immigrants” and “Trump you’re trash.” They symbolically dumped photos of Trump in the rubbish bin.
Trump enters office with a 37 percent approval rating, the lowest on record, according to a CBS News poll.

Protesters vow full force attendance

Trump’s swearing-in on thesteps of the Capitol — scheduled to be administered by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts at 11:47 a.m. — will be carried live Friday on screens around the globe. Rain is forecast.

Three former presidents will be in attendance along with numerous dignitaries, including his Democratic presidential rival — a former first lady and secretary of state.


FROM LEFT,
Michael Moore, Alec Baldwin and Robert De Niro, Lead Anti-Trump Rally in NYC S -Protesters have vowed to be out in force Friday, and thousands marched in New York on Thursday night, joined by A-list actors Robert de Niro and Alec Baldwin, Oscar-winning director Michael Moore and singer Cher. Sally Field, Mark Ruffalo and Rosie Perez also spoke at the event outside Trump International Hotel. Graham Winfrey Jan 19, 2017 8:59 pm @GrahamWinfrey

But Trump supporters were gathering in Washington to trumpet the success of their man.

Trump’s working-class supporters have sent him to Washington to turn the page on the Obama era and upend the political status quo.

Trump has vowed to act, and swiftly.

He is expected to sign four or five decrees Friday, and then a raft of others beginning Monday to dismantle every policy he can without waiting for congressional approval.

Among his pledges for day one: sign orders to speed deportations of convicted criminals, begin building a wall on the US-Mexico border, and cancel billions of dollars in US funding to United Nations climate change programs.

“He is committed to not just day one, but day two, day three, of enacting an agenda of real change,” incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters.


All aboard! Jon Voight, Hulk Hogan, Mike Tyson, Aaron Carter and more celebs who’ve jumped on the Trump Train; Jon Voight is the latest celebrity to jump on the Trump Train. In a statement to Breitbart, Voight says that Donald Trump is “funny, playful, and colorful, but most of all, he is honest.” “When he decided to run for president, I know he did it with a true conviction to bring this country back to prosperity. He is the only one who can do it. No frills, no fuss, only candid truths,” says Voight. SCREENERTV.COM

Trump’s first major legislative lift will be dismantling the health care reforms known as Obamacare.

Congressional Republicans, led by House Speaker Paul Ryan, have sought for years to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and now Trump, despite potential pitfalls, has a golden opportunity.

Obama’s White House staff cleaned out desks


EMPTY WHITE HOUSE DESKS

As Obama’s White House staff cleaned out their desks and the normally busy corridors of the West Wing fell quiet, many staffers expressed relief at the prospect of rest, but foreboding about the road ahead.

That sentiment is echoed across many of the world’s capitals. Trump has vowed to tear up Obama’s policies and re-examine decades-old alliances with Europe and in Asia.

When Trump descended the escalators of his glitzy New York tower in June 2015, his candidature was dismissed and even mocked.


AT THE ROSE GARDEN: Obama has offered a gracious welcome to Trump, saying he is rooting for him and there will be a smooth handover. Well, someone should tell his staff this. They are still crying and thinking the world will end. President Barack Obama is rooting for President-elect Donald Trump‘s success, he said Wednesday afternoon during a nine-minute address in the White House Rose Garden – but his clearly devastated staff didn’t look so sure. With Vice President Joe Biden at his side, a sometimes smiling but always composed Obama said Tuesday’s election in which his party’s nominee lost the nation’s highest office was a setback for his agenda but not for the nation. ‘We are now all rooting for his success in uniting the country,’ he said. ‘Everybody is sad when their side loses an election. But the day after, we have to remember that we’re actually on one team,’ Obama said. GOOGLE IMAGES

But shortly before mid-day Friday, Trump will place his hand on Abraham Lincoln’s bible, recite the oath of office on the steps of the Capitol and become the most powerful man on earth.

In the primaries, he dominated a crowded Republican presidential field with bare knuckle rhetoric and star power. He rode that same wave of anti-elite sentiment to victory over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the November election. Hilary Clinton won the popular vote by over 2.7 million, but lost under the electoral college systems count.

At 70 years of age, he is the oldest man ever to begin work in the Oval Office.

But the real estate mogul and onetime television reality star is also a political neophyte — he will be the first president never to have held elected office, served in the government or the armed forces.

For his supporters, like Jake, a Californian who traveled to Washington for the inauguration, that is a central part of Trump’s appeal.

“It honestly feels like we won the American Revolution again,” he said. “I really feel like we’ve taken back our culture, we’ve taken back our country.

“We’ve really been under attack from a lot of the establishment on both sides of the aisle — we’ve been under attack from the media, from the celebrities.”

Big changes


TRUMP INAUGURATION PHOTO

The change in Washington — in many ways a company town — was already palpable late Thursday when Trump bopped along to country music during a pre-inaugural concert at the foot of the Lincoln Memorial.

The music popular in America’s heartland had replaced the strains of Beyonce and Bruce Springsteen that marked Barack Obama’s two terms at the White House.

For his critics, Trump’s arrival in Washington on Thursday on board an Air Force jet was more like a hostile takeover than a traditional changing of the guard.

One of Obama’s last acts in office was to speak to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and declare trans-Atlantic ties vital for world order — a statement that would have been a banal platitude before this rocky transition.

Still, Obama has one more part to play, hosting Trump and his wife Melania in the Blue Room of the White House for morning tea Friday.

The two presidents and their families will then travel the 2.5 miles (four kilometers) down Pennsylvania Avenue to the swearing-in ceremony at the Capitol.

Addressing the nation

After promising to “faithfully execute the office of president of the United States” and “preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States,” Trump will deliver the most important speech of his life.

Inaugural addresses — from Lincoln to John F. Kennedy — echo across American history. Phrases like “malice towards none” and “ask not what your country can do for you” have been seared into the vernacular.

The most noted inaugural addresses had sought to lift Americans’ gaze up from the rancor and troubles of the day toward the horizon and a better tomorrow.

Trump aides are promising an address that is at once short — at around 20 minutes — and philosophical.

“It’s going to be a very personal and sincere statement about his vision for the country,” said incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer.

“He will discuss what it means to be an American, the challenges that we face, as members of the middle class, that they face,” he said.

“I think it’s going to be less of an agenda and more of a philosophical document, a vision of where he sees the country, the proper role of government, the role of citizens.”

In brief remarks on the eve of becoming president, Trump vowed to bring unity, but there was also a rallying cry for his base.

“We’re going to unify our country,” he said, before telling supporters: “You’re not forgotten anymore.”

“We’re going to get our jobs back. We’re not going to let other countries take our jobs any longer. We’re going to build up our great military.”

After his speech, Trump will attend a luncheon inside the Capitol, before heading back to the White House to begin the business of governing.

Trump pledges to unify US on inauguration eve

Billionaire Republican Trump has pledged to bring unity to America as he swept into Washington on the eve of the most consequential moment of his life — his inauguration as 45th president of the United States.

Trump will cap an extraordinary and improbable run for the White House when he takes the reins from President Obama at mid-day, launching the nation into uncharted waters.

He spent the afternoon in Washington attending pre-inaugural festivities that have become traditions for presidents-elect.
“We’re going to unify our country,” Trump told a cheering crowd of thousands in front of the Lincoln Memorial after a concert that ended in a burst of fireworks.

“We’re going to do things that haven’t been done for our country for many, many decades,” he added. “It’s going to change. I promise you.”

Earlier in the day, Trump lunched with Republican congressional leaders and his cabinet nominees. He then was whisked to Arlington National Cemetery, where he and Vice President-elect Mike Pence laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

He then crossed back over the Potomac River to speak at the marble memorial, where at one point he looked up and saluted the seated statue of Abraham Lincoln.

“There’s never been a movement like this,” he said, describing the wave of support among working-class Americans who pushed Trump to victory over Hillary Clinton in one of the most divisive elections in US history.

“Well, you’re not forgotten anymore,” he said. “We’re going to get it turned around. We’re going to bring our jobs back.”
Later he tweeted: “Thank you for joining us at the Lincoln Memorial tonight — a very special evening! Together, we are going to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!”

Farewell


JANUARY 20 -The Obama family exited the east side of the U.S. Capitol building this afternoon after Donald Trump’s inauguration, heading first by helicopter to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, where they boarded Air Force One bound for Palm Springs, California. After leaving a written letter for his successor, Donald Trump, on the Resolute Desk, President Obama left the Oval Office for the last time this morning and walked down the White House Colonnade. “Are you feeling nostalgic?” a reporter shouted along the way. “Of course,” Obama replied. “Any final words for the American people?” Obama was asked. “Thank you,” he said. ABC NEWS

Just blocks away, the Obamas were finishing their packing as they prepared for their last night in the White House.

In some of his final acts as president, Obama commuted the sentences of 330 people, mostly drug offenders, called Chancellor Angela Merkel to declare US-Germany ties “essential,” and took a parting shot at Congress for blocking his efforts to shutter the military prison at Guantanamo Bay.

Friday will revolve around the age-old ritual of the swearing-in, when Trump will transform from ordinary citizen to the leader of the world’s most powerful nation.

While Trump has confided that he sought inspiration from John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan while writing his inaugural address, Spicer said the words will be Trump’s own: a personal statement that will be “more of a philosophical document” than a to-do list.

Democrats opposed to a Trump presidency are organizing. About a third of US House Democrats will boycott Friday’s ceremony. In the Senate, Democrats are obstructing the path of Trump’s cabinet nominees, only a handful of whom look to be confirmed Friday.

Trump completed his 15 cabinet selections Thursday by naming Georgia ex-governor Sonny Perdue to be agriculture secretary.

For the first time since 1989, the cabinet will feature no Hispanics.

The new administration has asked over 50 individuals to remain in critical posts to “ensure the continuity of government,” Spicer said, including Obama’s special envoy to the coalition fighting the Islamic State group, Brett McGurk.

----------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Fact Check: Trump overstates crowd size at inaugural By Jonathan Lemire and Jill Colvin (Associated Press) | Updated January 22, 2017 - 9:57am 1 3 googleplus0 0


This Jan. 19, 2013 photo shows crews laying down special mats to protect the lawn on the National Mall, for the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer incorrectly said Saturday, Jan. 21 that 2017 was “the first time in our nation’s history that floor coverings had been used to protect the grass on the mall.” AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump's speech Saturday at the headquarters of the Central Intelligence Agency turned into the latest battle in, as he put it, his "running war with the media." He had two central complaints: that the media misrepresented the size of the crowd at his inauguration and that it was incorrectly reported a bust of Martin Luther King Jr. was removed from the Oval Office. A look at those assertions:

TRUMP: "I made a speech. I looked out. The field was — it looked like a million, a million and a half people."

The president went on to say that one network "said we drew 250,000 people. Now that's not bad. But it's a lie." He then claimed that were 250,000 right by the stage and the "rest of the, you know, 20-block area, all the way back to the Washington Monument was packed."

"So we caught them," said Trump. "And we caught them in a beauty. And I think they're going to pay a big price."

THE FACTS: Trump is wrong. Photos of the National Mall from his inauguration make clear that the crowd did not extend to the Washington Monument. Large swaths of empty space are visible on the Mall.

Thin crowds and partially empty bleachers also dotted the inaugural parade route. Hotels across the District of Columbia reported vacancies, a rarity for an event as large as a presidential inauguration.

And ridership on the Washington's Metro system didn't match that of recent inaugurations.

As of 11 a.m. that day, there were 193,000 trips taken, according to the transit service's Twitter account. At the same hour eight years ago, there had been 513,000 trips. Four years later, there were 317,000 for Obama's second inauguration. There were 197,000 at 11 a.m. in 2005 for President George W. Bush's second inauguration.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer later added to the misstatements.

Spicer claimed that it was the first time white "floor coverings" were used to protect the grass on the National Mall and that it drew attention to any empty space. But the same tarp was used four years ago.

Spicer also said it was "the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the Mall, preventing hundreds of thousands of people from being able to access the Mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past."

The Secret Service says that this was the first time security fencing was installed around the National Mall for an inauguration. To get onto the Mall, people were required to go through one of seven checkpoints where their bags were checked, but there were no magnetometers used at those checkpoints.

A law enforcement official not authorized to publicly discuss the inauguration says officials were "not aware of any issues with flow rate in and around the National Mall."

Spicer then said, "This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration — period — both in person and around the globe."

He offered no evidence and there is no immediate way to confirm such a claim.

But photo taken during Barack Obama's 2009 inauguration showed substantially more people on the Mall. It is not known how many people watched the ceremony on television around the globe. In the U.S., Nielsen estimates 31 million viewers watched TV coverage, but that's less than Barack Obama's and Ronald Reagan's first inaugurations.

The exact size of the crowd Friday may never be known. The National Park Service stopped providing estimates in the 1990s.

___

TRUMP: The president also went after a reporter who incorrectly wrote that the president had removed a bust of Martin Luther King Jr. from the Oval Office. The reporter later acknowledged the error, saying a Secret Service agent and a door had obstructed his view of the bust when reporters were allowed into the room briefly after Trump's swearing in.

"But this is how dishonest the media is," Trump said.

"Now, big story, the retraction was like, where?" he asked. "Was it a line or do they even bother running it?"

THE FACTS: Trump is right. The reporter for Time magazine made an error. The White House said Trump never removed the King bust from the Oval Office.

The error about the bust was first transmitted in a pool report distributed among reporters. The White House often uses a pool system when not all reporters who want to attend an event can be accommodated in a space.

At 7:30 p.m., reporter Zeke Miller wrote a pool report saying, "The MLK bust was no longer on display."

Once Miller realized his error, an update was sent to the pool. "The MLK bust remains in the Oval Office, in addition to the Churchill bust, per a WH aide. It was apparently obscured by a door and an agent during the spray. Your pool offers sincerest apologies."

Miller also corrected the error on Twitter, and Time magazine corrected its story based on his report.

"Correction: An earlier version of the story said that a bust of Martin Luther King had been moved. It is still in the Oval Office," it reads. __

Associated Press writer Jessica Gresko contributed reporting.


MANILA BULLETIN

Palace congratulates new US Pres. Trump 16 SHARES Share it! Published January 21, 2017, 4:17 PM By Argyll Cyrus Geducos


Malacañang congratulated U.S. President Donald Trump as he took oath as the country’s 45th president on Friday, January 20 (Saturday, January 21 in the Philippines).

“We congratulate the people of the United States for a successful 58th presidential inauguration,” presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said in a text message.

(L) US President-elect Donald Trump (AP) ; (R) Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (MANILA BULLETIN) (L) US President-elect Donald Trump (AP) ; (R) Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (MANILA BULLETIN)

In keeping with the two-century American democratic tradition, former reality show host and businessman Donald Trump was sworn in office at the Capitol Grounds in Washington D.C., replacing Barack Obama.

The Palace, Abella said, is looking forward to closely working with Trump’s administration anchored on “mutual respect, mutual benefit and shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.”

READ MORE...

“We wish President Trump success in the next four years of his administration,” Abella said.

On Friday, presidential legal counsel Salvador Panelo also congratulated Trump on his unexpected but overwhelming victory over Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton last November.

“We hope that the administration will be a success because your success, his success, will be the success of the American people,” he said.

Panelo also expressed confidence that the two countries will have a more harmonious relationship under the leadership of Duterte and Trump “from the body language of the two presidents.”

He added that the relationship between the countries would even be better than in the previous years as Trump admired Duterte’s dedication to cleanse the country, starting with the problem in illegal drugs.

Communications secretary Martin Andanar, in his Facebook page, also said that Duterte and Trump “would really get along.”

He also likened Trump to Duterte saying the former subscribes to nationalism, non-interference, combating drugs and people-centered programs.

In December, Duterte revealed that he was rooting for Trump to win the U.S. elections as the latter “does not appear hostile or antagonistic” to him.

Duterte said he liked Trump as they talked in the same manner and because Trump indicated that Washington would be the last to interfere in Philippine affairs.

Duterte has repeatedly criticized Obama after joining the numerous critics of his drug war.

Foreign policy

Abella said the palace welcomes Trump’s foreign policy direction as it promises a more placid and mutually beneficial relationship especially with America’s longstanding allies like the Philippines.

“We find resonance with their intention to ‘seek friendship and goodwill and reinforce existing alliances, without imposing America’s way of life on others,’” he said.

Abella added that the country’s diplomatic ties have to reflect its longstanding relationship with ally countries but under the terms and conditions that protect the interests of Filipinos.

“While there is a promise of spring U.S.-ward, as an independent and sovereign nation we will expand our collaboration with other friends and partners in the international community, in accordance with the principles of international law,” he said.

“Our priority remains to be the common good of the Filipino people and the national interest.”

‘America First’

Abella also said the palace respects Trump’s “America First” pronouncement as defining the first principles of the new American leadership.

“In like manner, national interest is the primary consideration that guides President Rodrigo Duterte. His pursuit of peace and order is the bedrock of economic inclusivity and self-sufficiency,” he said.

According to Abella, the Palace continues to recognize the need to strengthen the country’s relations with its allies as the progress, prosperity, and national well-being of the Philippines rely on such harmonious partnerships.

“The community of nations prosper as each one seeks its common good, and when it comes together to support the well-being of our common humanity,” he said.

-----------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Hundreds of thousands of women in DC to protest against Trump Associated Press / 10:17 PM January 21, 2017


Thousands of protesters fill the Benjamin Franklin Parkway as they participate in a Women’s March Saturday Jan. 21, 2017 in Philadelphia. The march is being held in solidarity with similar events taking place in Washington and around the nation. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)

Updated: 2:27 a.m., Jan. 22, 2017

WASHINGTON — Wearing pink, pointy-eared “pussyhats” to mock the new president, hundreds of thousands of women massed in the nation’s capital and cities around the globe Saturday to send Donald Trump an emphatic message that they won’t let his agenda go unchallenged over the next four years.

“We march today for the moral core of this nation, against which our new president is waging a war,” actress America Ferrera told the Washington crowd. “Our dignity, our character, our rights have all been under attack and a platform of hate and division assumed power yesterday. But the president is not America. … We are America and we are here to stay.”

The women brandished signs with messages such as “Women won’t back down” and “Less fear more love” and decried Trump’s stand on such issues as abortion, health care, gay rights, diversity and climate change. Their message reverberated at demonstrations around the world, from New York, Philadelphia and Chicago to Paris, Berlin, London, Prague, Sydney and beyond.

Boston professor Garland Waller, 66, part of the Washington mobilization, said she was “devastated” after the election and had to take action. “I don’t know what to do to make a difference anymore, and this feels like a first step,” she said.

Saskia Coenen Snyder, a teacher at the University of South Carolina who came to a rally in Columbia, said: “I’m not sure we could have picked a more irresponsible, misogynistic and dangerous man to be president.”

There were signs that the crowds in Washington could top those that turned out for Trump’s inauguration on Friday. City officials said organizers of the Women’s March on Washington more than doubled their original turnout estimate to 500,000.

More than 600 “sister marches” were planned around the world, and plenty of men were part of the tableau, too. Organizers estimated 3 million people would march worldwide. In Chicago, organizers canceled the march portion of their event for safety reasons after an overflow crowd estimated at 150,000 turned out.

Seventy-one-year-old Allan Parachini, who traveled from Hawaii to the Washington march, called it “the most impressive crowd I’ve seen since Woodstock.”

Retired teacher Linda Lastella, 69, who came to Washington from Metuchen, New Jersey, said she had never marched before but felt the need to speak out when “many nations are experiencing this same kind of pullback and hateful, hateful attitudes.”

“It just seemed like we needed to make a very firm stand of where we were,” she said.

As demonstrators rallied alongside the National Mall, Trump opened his first full day as president by attending a prayer service at the Washington National Cathedral, a tradition for the day after inauguration. The crowd planned to head his way after hours of speakers and music, with a march toward the grassy Ellipse behind the White House.

On Trump’s way back to the White House, his motorcade passed several groups of protesters that he would have been hard-pressed to miss.

On the streets, feminist leader Gloria Steinem described the worldwide mobilization as “the upside of the downside: This is an outpouring of energy and democracy like I have never seen in my very long life.”

“Sometimes we must put our bodies where our beliefs are,” she told the crowd, labeling Trump an “impossible president.”

Hillary Clinton, who lost to Trump, took to Twitter to thank the participants for “standing, speaking and marching for our values.”

The marches displayed a level of enthusiasm that Clinton herself was largely unable to generate during her campaign against Trump, when she won the popular vote but he outdistanced her in the electoral vote.

At rallies around the world, many participants wore hand-knit “pussyhats” — a message of female empowerment aimed squarely at Trump’s crude boast about grabbing women’s genitals.

They “ain’t for grabbing,” actress Ashley Judd told the Washington crowd.

The marches were a magnet for A-list celebrities, unlike Trump’s inauguration, which had a deficit of top performers.

Cher, in the nation’s capital, said Trump’s ascendance has people “more frightened maybe than they’re ever been.” In Park City, Utah, it was Charlize Theron leading demonstrators in a chant of “Love, not hate, makes America great.” In New York, actresses Helen Mirren and Cynthia Nixon and Whoopi Goldberg joined a crowd of protesters marching to Trump’s local home.

In Paris, thousands rallied in the Eiffel Tower neighborhood in a joyful atmosphere, singing and carrying posters reading “We have our eyes on you Mr. Trump” and “With our sisters in Washington.” Hundreds gathered in Prague’s Wenceslas Square in freezing weather, mockingly waving portraits of Trump and Russia’s Vladimir Putin.

“We are worried about the way some politicians talk, especially during the American elections,” said organizer Johanna Nejedlova.

In Sydney, thousands of Australians gathered in solidarity in Hyde Park. One organizer said hatred, bigotry and racism are not only America’s problems.

The rallies were a peaceful counterpoint to the window-smashing unrest that unfolded on Friday when self-described anarchists tried to disrupt the inauguration. Police used pepper spray and stun grenades against demonstrators. More than 200 people were arrested. –Nancy Benac and Ben Nuckols

* * *

Associated Press Writers Alanna Durkin Richer, Brian Witte and David Dishneau in Washington contributed to this report.


MANILA STANDARD EDITORIAL

President Donald Trump: Total allegiance to the United States
posted January 22, 2017 at 12:01 am
(Full text of US President Donald Trump’s inaugural speech)

CHIEF Justice Roberts, President Carter, President Clinton, President Bush, President Obama, fellow Americans and people of the world, thank you.

We, the citizens of America, are now joined in a great national effort to rebuild our country and restore its promise for all of our people.

Together, we will determine the course of America and the world for many, many years to come. We will face challenges, we will confront hardships, but we will get the job done.

Every four years, we gather on these steps to carry out the orderly and peaceful transfer of power, and we are grateful to President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama for their gracious aid throughout this transition. They have been magnificent. Thank you.

US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump dance during the Freedom Ball at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The ball is part of the celebrations following Trump’s inauguration. AFP
Today’s ceremony, however, has very special meaning because today, we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another, but we are transferring power from Washington, D.C. and giving it back to you, the people.

For too long, a small group in our nation’s capital has reaped the rewards of government while the people have borne the cost. Washington flourished, but the people did not share in its wealth. Politicians prospered, but the jobs left and the factories closed. The establishment protected itself, but not the citizens of our country. Their victories have not been your victories. Their triumphs have not been your triumphs. And while they celebrated in our nation’s capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land.

That all changes starting right here and right now because this moment is your moment, it belongs to you. It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America. This is your day. This is your celebration. And this, the United States of America, is your country.

What truly matters is not which party controls our government, but whether our government is controlled by the people. January 20th, 2017 will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again. The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.

Everyone is listening to you now. You came by the tens of millions to become part of a historic movement, the likes of which the world has never seen before.

At the center of this movement is a crucial conviction, that a nation exists to serve its citizens. Americans want great schools for their children, safe neighborhoods for their families, and good jobs for themselves. These are just and reasonable demands of righteous people and a righteous public.

But for too many of our citizens, a different reality exists: mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; rusted out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation; an education system flush with cash, but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge; and the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential.

This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.

We are one nation and their pain is our pain. Their dreams are our dreams. And their success will be our success. We share one heart, one home, and one glorious destiny. The oath of office I take today is an oath of allegiance to all Americans.

For many decades, we’ve enriched foreign industry at the expense of American industry; subsidized the armies of other countries, while allowing for the very sad depletion of our military. We’ve defended other nations’ borders while refusing to defend our own.

And spent trillions and trillions of dollars overseas while America’s infrastructure has fallen into disrepair and decay. We’ve made other countries rich, while the wealth, strength and confidence of our country has dissipated over the horizon.

One by one, the factories shuttered and left our shores, with not even a thought about the millions and millions of American workers that were left behind. The wealth of our middle class has been ripped from their homes and then redistributed all across the world.

But that is the past. And now, we are looking only to the future.

We assembled here today are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city, in every foreign capital, and in every hall of power. From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first, America first.

Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American families. We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs.

Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. I will fight for you with every breath in my body and I will never ever let you down. America will start winning again, winning like never before.

We will bring back our jobs. We will bring back our borders. We will bring back our wealth. And we will bring back our dreams.

We will build new roads and highways and bridges and airports and tunnels and railways all across our wonderful nation. We will get our people off of welfare and back to work, rebuilding our country with American hands and American labor.

We will follow two simple rules; buy American and hire American.

We will seek friendship and goodwill with the nations of the world, but we do so with the understanding that it is the right of all nations to put their own interests first. We do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone, but rather to let it shine as an example. We will shine for everyone to follow.

We will reinforce old alliances and form new ones and unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate from the face of the Earth.

At the bedrock of our politics will be a total allegiance to the United States of America, and through our loyalty to our country, we will rediscover our loyalty to each other. When you open your heart to patriotism, there is no room for prejudice.

The bible tells us how good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity. We must speak our minds openly, debate our disagreements honestly, but always pursue solidarity. When America is united, America is totally unstoppable.

There should be no fear. We are protected and we will always be protected. We will be protected by the great men and women of our military and law enforcement. And most importantly, we will be protected by God.

Finally, we must think big and dream even bigger. In America, we understand that a nation is only living as long as it is striving. We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk and no action, constantly complaining, but never doing anything about it.

The time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour of action.

Do not allow anyone to tell you that it cannot be done. No challenge can match the heart and fight and spirit of America. We will not fail. Our country will thrive and prosper again.

We stand at the birth of a new millennium, ready to unlock the mysteries of space, to free the earth from the miseries of disease, and to harness the energies, industries and technologies of tomorrow. A new national pride will stir ourselves, lift our sights and heal our divisions.

It’s time to remember that old wisdom our soldiers will never forget, that whether we are black or brown or white, we all bleed the same red blood of patriots.

We all enjoy the same glorious freedoms and we all salute the same great American flag. And whether a child is born in the urban sprawl of Detroit or the wind-swept plains of Nebraska, they look up at the same night sky, they will their heart with the same dreams, and they are infused with the breath of life by the same almighty creator.

So to all Americans in every city near and far, small and large, from mountain to mountain, from ocean to ocean, hear these words. You will never be ignored again.

Your voice, your hopes, and your dreams will define our American destiny. And your courage and goodness and love will forever guide us along the way.

Together, we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And yes, together we will make America great again.

Thank you. God bless you. And God bless America.


GO TO > > HEADLINE NEWS PAGE ONE

GO TO > > NEXT HEADLINE NEWS (coming next week)

GO TO >> PRESIDENT DU30 NEWS THIS PAST WEEK

GO TO > > BUSINESS PAGE

GO TO > > PHNO TRAVEL/LFESTYLE/FOOD

GO TO >> SHOWBIZ CHATTER


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

 EMAIL:  PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE 
© Copyright, 2017 All rights reserved


BACK TO PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE