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CLEAR ABOUT MARCOS' 'MISRULE', NOY WON'T COMMENT, INSTEAD WILL 'GIVE WAY' TO OTHER VOICES OVER MARCOS BURIAL
[RELATED: ‘They are scared,’ Martial law victim says of surprise Marcos burial]
[RELATED(2): Bambam Aquino blames Duterte for Marcos burial]


NOVEMBER 18 - Former President Benigno Aquino III did not comment directly on the burial of the late Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani on Friday noon.
- A report on GMA News TV's Balita Pilipinas quoted Aquino as saying: "Through the decades, I have been very clear as to what I thought of Mr. Marcos' mis-rule. I believe now I should listen and give way to our people's voices." A separate statement released by his spokesperson, Abi Valte, read: "Former President Aquino believes, at a time like this, it is fitting that we hear the voices of others: learn about their stories, the persons behind the statistics, their loved ones lost to the regime of Martial Law. They should never be forgotten." The controversial burial took place 10 days after the Supreme Court voted 9-5 to dismiss the petitions seeking to block the interment. READ MORE...RELATED, ‘They are scared,’ Martial law victim says of surprise Marcos burial... RELATED(2) Bambam Aquino blames Duterte for Marcos burial...

ALSO: Marcos family returns to Libingan for simple thanksgiving mass joined by quiet supporters
[RELATED: No anti-Marcos rally so far at Libingan, says PNP]


NOVEMBER 19 -Marcos' children Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos, Irene Marcos-Araneta, Imee Marcos and their mother Imelda Marcos, pay tribute to the flag-draped casket of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos during a ceremony of his burial at the Heroes' Cemetery in Taguig City, Philippines, Friday, Nov.18, 2016. Despite growing opposition, after the Supreme Court ruled that one of Asia's most infamous tyrants can be entombed in the hallowed grounds, Marcos was buried Friday at the country's heroes' cemetery in a secrecy-shrouded ceremony which opponents said mocked the democratic triumph won when a "people power" revolt ousted him three decades ago. AP/OACPA HPA
First published, 12:04 p.m.) — The Marcos family on Saturday morning offered a thanksgiving Mass a day after the remains of former President Ferdinand Marcos was laid to rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. Marcos’ eldest daughter Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos, with former Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. and former First Lady Imelda Marcos, attended and led the gathering despite outrage against the burial at the national shrine the day before. READ MORE...RELATED, No anti-Marcos rally so far at Libingan, says PNP...

ALSO: The military that ousted a dictator buried him a hero
[RELATED: Government execs against burial urged to quit]


NOVEMBER 19 -The Filipino soldier’s strength lies in his ability to obey orders. His character lies in the many times he has also disobeyed them.  I got on the phone with a retired general on Friday, November 18, hours after the hero's burial of the late dictator. He was at the gates of the Libingan ng mga Bayani, wanting to go in to pay his last respects to Ferdinand Marcos. At first I thought I’d misheard it. How could this man be there? He stood valiantly at Camp Crame with his troops in February 1986, fearless and proud to break away from his commander in chief. So I said in a rather shrill voice that betrayed my disbelief: "What are you doing there, sir?" He sounded shocked that I asked. "Why, I’m here to visit my former president." CONTINUE READING...RELATED,
Government execs against burial urged to quit...

ALSO A political issue: Marcos burial can be ‘reversed anytime’– Koko[RELATED: 'Yellows' hit for using Marcos burial to trash Duterte gov’t]


NOVEMBER 19 -Senate President Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III —INQUIRER PHOTO
The rushed burial of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani may be undone as several remedies may address the issue when the time comes, Senate President Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III said Saturday. “Of course, this being a political issue, let us not lose hope, because this can be reversed anytime,” said Pimentel, chief ally of President Rodrigo Duterte at the Senate. Pimentel is strongly against Marcos’ burial; his father, former Senate President Aquilino Pimentel Jr., was among opposition leaders detained during the strongman’s repressive martial rule. It was the President, whose father Vicente served in the Marcos Cabinet, who had allowed the late dictator’s interment at the LNMB. Pimentel, who heads the President’s party, said he is not keen to raise the matter again to Mr. Duterte as Marcos has already been buried. READ MORE...RELATED,
Yellows hit for using Marcos burial to trash Duterte gov’t...

ALSO:
(STANDARD) FM buried at Libingan - Marcos family opts for simple, solemn burial

[RELATED: Marcos family asks Filipinos to unite]


NOVEMBER 19 -HERO’S BURIAL. Former First Lady Imelda Marcos, Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos, former Senator Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. and Irene Marcos-Araneta, watch as military officers unfurl the tricolors—concurring with a 21-gun salute and a flower drop from a cloudy sky—as former President Ferdinand Marcos is finally laid to rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani Friday 27 years after he died in his Honolulu exile in 1989—condemned and described by human rights victims (right below) during Martial Law at their gathering at the Bantayog ng mga Bayani beside Camp Aguinaldo while Marcos supporters and media (left below) are held back at the gate of the LNMB by police and security authorities. Revoli Cortez/Norman Cruz

THE late strongman Ferdinand Marcos was buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani Friday noon, more than a week after the Supreme Court decided in favor of the burial and more than 27 years after he died in exile in Hawaii. Police said the burial was made unannounced to ensure peace and order during the solemn event.“This is part of the PNP’s order to ensure peace and order. Initially Senator Bongbong [Marcos] wanted the burial to be on Sunday but we were told yesterday that it will be today,” said National Capital Region Police Office director Oscar Albayalde. READ MORE...RELATED, Marcos family asks Filipinos to unite...

ALSO: (TIMES) Marcos buried at Libingan in a surprised, carfully planned rites


NOVEMBER 19 -FINAL WISH Members of the family of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, led by former first lady Imelda Marcos (in black), watch as military officers salute at the coffin containing the remains of the late former president. It was the supposedly the final wish of Marcos, who fell from power in 1986 and died in exile in Hawaii in 1989. AFP PHOTO FORMER strongman Ferdinand Marcos was buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani at noon on Friday in surprise but carefully planned rites befitting an ex-president, three decades after his ouster and subsequent death in exile. Protests erupted in campuses and across Metro Manila and major cities hours after the burial at the military-owned “heroes’ cemetery,” which was attended by about a hundred mourners led by former first lady Imelda Romualdez Marcos. Members of the media were barred from entering the Taguig City cemetery at the request of the Marcoses to keep the burial a “confidential” affair, a military spokesman said. But Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos let social media in to what she described as a “simple, private and solemn burial,” posting videos and photos of the event on her Facebook page within minutes after the wooden coffin containing the remains of her late father was lowered to an underground chamber. READ MORE...

ALSO: (GET REAL PH) - Ferdinand Marcos laid to rest with the quiet dignity a former President and soldier deserves


NOVEMBER 19 -Former President Ferdinand Marcos was finally laid to rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB) yesterday, the 18th November 2016. The “secret” funeral rites caught everyone by surprise and sent the usual anti-Marcos mobs on an eleventh-hour protest frenzy. The funeral itself was a dignified affair involving full military honours. The dignity with which it was conducted would have been the very reason why it had to be kept “secret”. Filipinos after all, specially those associated with the emotionalism of the Yellow camp, are not really known for quiet and dignified politically-motivated funerals. The fact that a Supreme Court ruling junking their petition to block Marcos’s burial at the LNMB demonstrates that even institutionally-applied rules do not move them. Indeed, flamboyant necropolitics has come to characterise the last 30 years of politics in the Philippines because of a culture of political emotionalism that routinely trumps logic and rationality. READ MORE...


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Clear about Marcos’ ‘misrule,’ Noynoy to ‘give way’ to other’s voices over Marcos burial


 Former President Benigno Aquino III did not comment directly on the burial of the late Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani on Friday noon.

MANILA, NOVEMBER 21, 2016 (GMA NEWS) Published November 18, 2016 5:19pm - A report on GMA News TV's Balita Pilipinas quoted Aquino as saying: "Through the decades, I have been very clear as to what I thought of Mr. Marcos' mis-rule. I believe now I should listen and give way to our people's voices."

A separate statement released by his spokesperson, Abi Valte, read: "Former President Aquino believes, at a time like this, it is fitting that we hear the voices of others: learn about their stories, the persons behind the statistics, their loved ones lost to the regime of Martial Law. They should never be forgotten."

The controversial burial took place 10 days after the Supreme Court voted 9-5 to dismiss the petitions seeking to block the interment.

READ MORE...

Aquino, who was elected in 2010, had ruled out the said burial during his term, and was quoted as saying, "Not during my watch."

Aquino, who stepped down from office in June 2016, is the son of the late Sen. Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., considered one of the staunchest critics of the Marcos administration.

Noynoy's mother, Corazon "Cory" Aquino, took over the presidency after the 1986 People Power Revolution unseated Marcos. — Rose-An Jessica Dioquino/RSJ, GMA News

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

‘They are scared,’ Martial law victim says of surprise Marcos burial 0 SHARES Share it! Published November 19, 2016, 10:00 PM by Jel Santos


THIS PHOTO Posted on February 26, 2016 FROM ABS-CBN - Former First Lady  accidentally attended Mass for Martial Law victims on a  Wednesday's Our Lady of Perpetual Help mass in Baclaran. Marcos said she didn’t mind the accidental attendance. “It’s okay, heaven is big enough for everyone and we all have something to pray for.” She is a regular attendee at Baclaran Church.

Though she sat on a pavement at the back of People Power Monument, a silver-haired woman holding an umbrella stood out as the reason why citizens were gathering in many parts of the country late Friday night.

The woman, Ana Maria Nemenzo, 78, is one of the victims of Martial Law, an activist who went into hiding, was arrested, tortured and jailed. She was at the People Power Monument to protest the surprise burial of the author of Martial Law, former President Ferdinand Marcos, at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB) in Taguig City noon of Friday. She attracted our attention because she sat quietly, looking calm and regal, and seemed to have no companions.

The wife of the former president of the University of the Philippines related the events of what she called “the dark days.”

A retired Philippine Science High School history teacher, she was there as one of the many Martial Law victims and many citizens who all expressed surprise and disappointment on the “surprise burial” of the former dictator.

Yet, she spoke of a “triumph of the Filipino people” that could be found in the surprise burial of the dictator – “they are scared.”

“Hiding the burial to the Filipinos is somewhat a triumph. They (Marcos family) know that if the people knew about this, a large crowd will stop them. It only shows that they are scared,” Ana told the Manila Bulletin.

“This is the only way they could bury him — by taking everybody by surprise. They hid it to avoid the wrath of the people,” she added. “If they think this is healing, they are fooling themselves.”

When she first heard the news that Marcos would be buried that morning, she almost cried out of anger because the memories of the “dark times” started coming back.


NEMENZO, JR., FRANCISCO FORMER PRESIDENT University of the Philippines - Diliman GOOGLED PHOTO

Her husband Dr. Francisco Nemenzo Jr., who was UP president when Martial Law was declared, was also then into activism and educating the youth of the country’s situation of the country under Marcos.

She told the Manila Bulletin that she and her husband went to hiding for about three months after they were warned that they were being targeted for arrest. They had to leave their three children – aged 11, 9, and six years old –to relatives, she said.

Only minutes after Francisco and Ana had fled, military soldiers raided their house.

Unfortunately, a friend divulged their location and they were arrested by the authorities. The friend, she said, was also active in fighting the oppression of Marcos, but he was tortured and his children abducted, just for the information of their location.

Ana said she was in jail for about six months, while Francisco was detained for more than a year. Her eyes turning sad, she related how her husband, who was the UP president, faced a high-ranking general who tortured him.

“My husband told me that the general pointed a gun on his head. They kicked the chair where he was sitting. Then, he fell to his knees. He was about to get his glasses when they hit his head,” she said.

Despite undergoing difficulties and pain, the couple continued their activism. Immediately after they got out of jail, they continued their fight against tyranny and oppression of the administration.

Ana’s stories included how she witnessed soldiers raiding many schools, where students only could only fight back with their books and chairs.

She recalled many of her female friends who were sexually molested and tortured during the “dark times,” even naming a few.

Her family also suffered, she said. Her eldest son, Fidel, was shot during a protest in Manila, almost losing his life because of a bullet hitting the kidney. Now, that son is the Vice Chancellor of UP-Diliman.

“The burial of Marcos is not healing. You are just fooling yourselves,” Ana said when asked for a message to the Marcoses.

Earlier, the University of the Philippines bells rang several times to signify the university’s opposition to the burial of Marcos at the LNMB. Early yesterday afternoon, about a thousand people from various groups gathered around the monument most of them carrying placards denouncing the “surprise burial” and proclaiming that Marcos was not a hero.

Other pocket protest rallies were held at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, Miriam College, Ateneo de Manila University, Ayala Triangle in Makati, Timog-Morato Streets, and along Commonwealth Avenue-Dlliptical Road. Most of the groups later went to the People Power Monument.Also at the protest rally were Jim Paredes, a vocal anti-Marcos activist, who during his speech called on “millenials” to continue fighting for democracy; former Cabinet members, Armin Luistro, Dinky Soliman and former Presidential spokesmen Edwin Lacierda and Abigail Valte.

By evening, more people had gathered at the monument. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) placed the crowd estimate at 1,000 as of 7 p.m., increasing to 3,000 when the protest program ended shortly before 10 p.m. with the signing of Freddie Aguilar’s “Bayan Ko.”

Aside from the continuous chants of “Hukayin (exhume)” and “Marcos hindi bayani (Marcos not a hero)” of protesters, passing vehicles also participated in the nioise barrage. (With reports from Vanne Terrazola, Argyll Cyrus B. Geducos, Chito Chavez, and Martin Sadongdong)

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RELATED(2) FROM 'ONE MINDANAO' (MINdAnation.com blogsite ) commentary by

Bambam Aquino blames Duterte for Marcos burial By Carlos Munda - 2 days ago - in Opinion 621 0 Comments


Bambam Aquino says that President Duterte must be held accountable for the burial of Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

This statement conclusively proves that this guy is one of the biggest idiots in Philippine politics today. Or any other day for that matter.

Bambam, who looks like he doubles as a Ninoy Aquino cosplayer, is completely clueless to the fact that the real reason why Marcos is getting this burial is because his family – starting with the “sainted” Cory Aquino – fucked the country up so bad that people now actually think Marcos is a hero, and martial law was a good thing.

If there is anyone to blame for this clusterfuck, Aquino should start with a mirror and work his way back. His family have had more than its share of chances to fix the country. Filipinos have given them the benefit of the doubt – and yet her we are. Marcos is buried and poor little Bambam continues to whine like the little brat that he is, never once taking any responsibility for how the Aquino’s played a big part in putting the rest of the country in this situation.

For Bambam to pin the blame on Duterte – who’s only issue is that he is determined to clean up the mess that he inherited from all those other incompetent so-called leaders that came before him – is a cheap political shot.

There really must be something wrong with the Aquino blood as passing the blame seems to be a genetic thing.

These guys just can’t accept responsibility for the mess that they keep putting other people in.

Cory couldn’t face up to the fact that she was waaaaaaay in over her head even when the country was going to hell in a handbasket.

Noynoy couldn’t either with the Mamasapano fiasco. And now here we have Bambam Aquino, the designated family apologist. Trying to blame everyone except his own kin.

Well, we are not having any of that anymore.

We are done with the self-entitled Aquino clan and their politics of the privileged.

We are done with all these high sounding rhetoric that only feeds their egos, and yet leave the rest of the country to starve. We. Are. Done. With. All. Of. You.

And one last thing, I don’t even wan’t Marcos buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. I certainly don’t think he’s a hero. But neither was Cory, nor any of the succeeding Aquinos.

You, Bambam, most of all. You are like a small neckless dog that keeps on yapping. Yapping yapping yapping. We do not need you or your yapping, and we suffer the next three years of your presence only because we cannot kick you out right now.

THE AUTHOR


Carlos Munda Communications and Public Relations Consultant Region XI - Davao, PhilippinesPublic Relations and Communications Current MindaVote, Infinitemonkees.com, Edge Davao Previous St. Augustine Gold and Copper, Ltd. (SAGCL), Mindanao Media Broadcast Network Group, Inc., Office of Rep. Antonio F. Lagdameo, Jr. Education Ateneo de Davao University COPY/PASTE FROM LINKEDin


PHILSTAR

Marcos family returns to Libingan for thanksgiving mass joined by supporters By Kristine Daguno-Bersamina (philstar.com) | Updated November 19, 2016 - 5:19pm 35 1147 googleplus0 0


Marcos' children Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos, Irene Marcos-Araneta, Imee Marcos and their mother Imelda Marcos, pay tribute to the flag-draped casket of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos during a ceremony of his burial at the Heroes' Cemetery in Taguig City, Philippines, Friday, Nov.18, 2016. Despite growing opposition, after the Supreme Court ruled that one of Asia's most infamous tyrants can be entombed in the hallowed grounds, Marcos was buried Friday at the country's heroes' cemetery in a secrecy-shrouded ceremony which opponents said mocked the democratic triumph won when a "people power" revolt ousted him three decades ago. AP/OACPA HPA

MANILA, Philippines (First published, 12:04 p.m.) — The Marcos family on Saturday morning offered a thanksgiving Mass a day after the remains of former President Ferdinand Marcos was laid to rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

Marcos’ eldest daughter Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos, with former Senator Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. and former First Lady Imelda Marcos, attended and led the gathering despite outrage against the burial at the national shrine the day before.

READ MORE...

At least 2,000 supporters joined the Marcos family at the morning Mass.

Marcos' widow Imelda, clad in black, thanked supporters and local officials who traveled by bus from Marcos' home province to pay their respects. She said they had given her family strength as they kept the hope for nearly 30 years to have him buried at the national cemetery, which is reserved for former presidents, national artists and soldiers.

President Rodrigo Duterte, who gave the go-ahead for the burial, appealed for calm.

"I know Ferdinand will at last be at rest here at the Heroes' Cemetery," Imelda Marcos said in front of a black tomb surrounded by wreaths of white flowers. "But I know we still have a lot of criticisms to face."

Her daughter Imee and son Bongbong also thanked supporters and apologized for keeping the burial secret. Bongbong said there were reports that anti-Marcos groups would create trouble.

The burial threatens to open old wounds in the Philippines, where Marcos is accused of massive human rights violations and corruption under martial law he had placed the country during half of his 20-year iron-fist rule. He was ousted in a "people power" street protests in 1986 that sent him and his family into exile in Hawaii, where he died three years later.

At the Philippine Retail Investors Conference held on Saturday in Taguig, Vice President Leni Robredo continued to express disappointment over the surprise burial of the late dictator.

"We knew it (Libingan burial) was going to happen. Pero hindi na-imagine that it will be conducted hurriedly tapos patago," said Robredo.

"Yung sa akin lang, insulto yata yun sa Filipino people," she added.

The vice president said the burial disregarded the judicial process since there is a pending appeal against a Supreme Court vote in favor of a Libingan ng mga Bayani burial for the late strongman.

"Meron tayong prosesong sinusunod. Hinihintay natin yung motion for reconsideration. Hindi pa naging final or executory. Parang ang pakiramdam lang ay dinaya tayo all over again," said Robredo.

But representative from the Supreme Court (SC) said that the Libingan burial was legal, citing that there was no order from the high court to prevent the Marcoses from pushing through with the interment.

“The status as of November 8 up to today (November 18) is that the petitions are dismissed and the status quo ante order is lifted. Even if there is a motion for reconsideration, the legal status is that there is no order that stops the act at the moment,” SC spokesman Theodore Te said in a text message to The STAR on Friday.

Various groups vowed to continue their protests on the streets until November 30. - with reports from The Associated Press

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

No anti-Marcos rally so far at Libingan, says PNP By Perfecto T. Raymundo Jr. (philstar.com) | Updated November 19, 2016 - 2:52pm 4 103 googleplus0 0


A portrait of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos is placed beside his granite tomb as hundreds of supporters attend a mass at his graveyard Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016, a day after Marcos was buried in a secrecy-shrouded ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery in suburban Taguig city, east of Manila, Philippines. Long-dead Marcos was buried Friday at the country's Heroes' Cemetery in a secrecy-shrouded ceremony, a move approved by President Rodrigo Duterte that infuriated supporters of the "people power" revolt that ousted Marcos three decades ago. AP/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines (Philippines News Agency) - The Philippine National Police (PNP) has not monitored any rally protesting the burial of former President Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB) in Taguig City, an official said Saturday.

”We have not monitored any anti-Marcos rally. However, in any protest, we will exercise maximum tolerance,” National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) director, Chief Superintendent Oscar Albayalde, said in a text message.

Albayalde noted that under Batas Pambansa 880, “mayors are required to assign public spaces where people can protest freely. Without designation from mayors, all parks will be deemed freedom parks in their city.”

READ MORE...

In the case of the EDSA People Power Monument, it is not a freedom park, he said, explaining that the EDSA Shrine is a private property and the church which owns it has already announced in the past that it will not permit protest rallies to be conducted in their premises.

”Rallies in these places can be tolerated as we respect the freedom of assembly, provided that protests will be conducted peacefully and orderly,” Albayalde said.

”In case protesters become unruly and violent, the full force of the law will be applied,” he added.


RAPPLER.COM

The military that ousted a dictator buried him a hero Glenda M. Gloria @glendamgloria Published 1:18 PM, November 19, 2016 Updated 3:48 PM, November 19, 2016

The Filipino soldier’s strength lies in his ability to obey orders. His character lies in the many times he has also disobeyed them



I got on the phone with a retired general on Friday, November 18, hours after the hero's burial of the late dictator. He was at the gates of the Libingan ng mga Bayani, wanting to go in to pay his last respects to Ferdinand Marcos.

At first I thought I’d misheard it. How could this man be there? He stood valiantly at Camp Crame with his troops in February 1986, fearless and proud to break away from his commander in chief.

So I said in a rather shrill voice that betrayed my disbelief: "What are you doing there, sir?" He sounded shocked that I asked.

"Why, I’m here to visit my former president."

CONTINUE READING...

"But were you not at EDSA?"

"Yes, I was."

"So why are you there?"

"I was also a loyal soldier."

Before things could get complicated, I wished him well and left it at that.

It was the perfect punctuation to a Friday morning that left us all in a daze.

Marcos and his military

I spent the following hours wondering how many more among the soldiers who had revolted against the dictator also paid their respects last Friday, or are planning to do so in the coming days, weeks, months.

In his heyday, Marcos turned to the military to provide firepower to his ambitions.

In his burial at the heroes' cemetery last Friday, Marcos turned to the military to shield him from Filipinos who would not forget.

(READ: Behind the scenes: 12 hours to prepare for Marcos burial)

To illustrate how times have changed, the Air Force commandeered not its vintage Hueys – flying coffins, as they were often called – but its newly bought Bell choppers to bring the remains of the dead dictator from Batac to the Libingan.

To show you how things have become, some of the officers who were made to attend the burial had known Marcos as a commander-in-chief when they were only cadets of the Philippine Military Academy (PMA).

By the time they joined the battlefield, they were under the command of the country's first female commander-in-chief and Marcos had been disgraced and forced to live in exile in Honolulu.

To push the irony further, the current chief of staff, Armed Forces General Ricardo Visaya, is a true-blooded Ilocano from the town of Bacarra, Ilocos Norte, who chose not be at the burial of the Ilocanos’ most revered son.

Contradiction?

The military is a strange animal in a system where the president is also the commander-in-chief. It is in its DNA to be compliant to its civilian master. It is in its mandate, spelled out so clearly in the Constitution, to respect civilian supremacy over the military. It is in its operating system to obey orders, not to question them.

This is where it gets its strength and character. But this is also where its strength and character are tested.

Marcos knew this very well and exploited it to the hilt. When he declared martial law in 1972, he did not need public acquiescence for it. He had the military. The troops not only jailed his opponents, they also picked up the garbage, manned the traffic, scrubbed the streets, guarded schools and hospitals, drove public transport – in short, acted as government.

In exchange, the soldiers wore the badge of power, were allowed to dip their hands into an endless well of cash, and were given a free hand to flout the law.

Yet some of the young lieutenants who were deployed to the Martial Law machinery – 1971 graduates of the PMA – were the same officers who, two decades later, would plot the first military coup in Philippine history that would have failed – if not for the millions of Filipinos who decided to support it.

The EDSA revolt, and the subsequent botched mutinies that followed, exposed the deep-seated problems of the armed forces: corruption, nepotism, abuse, factionalism.

It has been a rough ride to reform from 1986.

(READ: 'Welcome home, my soldiers': The AFP 30 years after EDSA)

Yet here we are – watching the military bury the commander-in-chief it had ousted.

One of those who stood up to the dictator was the retired general I spoke with on the phone last Friday. He revolted, yes. But he was also a loyalist, he said.

I do not see this as a contradiction. Neither do I see anything wrong with a military implementing orders without question – and doing it as precisely and as secretly as it had been trained to do.

The Filipino soldier’s strength lies in his snappy ability to obey orders. His character lies in the many times he has also disobeyed them.

And woe to the president and commander-in-chief who will not know – or anticipate – the difference. – Rappler.com

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Government execs against burial urged to quit By Rhodina Villanueva and Janvic Mateo (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 20, 2016 - 12:00am 0 6 googleplus0 0


Speaking before a crowd of anti-Marcos groups and activists at the University of the Philippines College of Law, Saguisag said Cabinet officials – especially those who had been active in the anti-dictatorship struggle – should not take the matter sitting down. File photo

MANILA, Philippines - Martial law human rights victims now in government should make the strongest statement against the Libingan ng mga Baya­ni burial of ousted dictator Ferdinand Marcos by resigning, former senator Rene Saguisag said yesterday.

Speaking before a crowd of anti-Marcos groups and activists at the University of the Philippines College of Law, Saguisag said Cabinet officials – especially those who had been active in the anti-dictatorship struggle – should not take the matter sitting down.

“Like in the case of Supreme Court spokesman Theodore Te – instead of saying that the decision is final and that Marcos can be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani, it would be good to hear, from where I stand, that he is resigning,” Saguisag, a human rights victim, said.

“My advice goes to other members of the government, especially those who were with us in the struggle, that they may consider resigning from their posts,” he added.

Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo said on Friday she was against the burial but would rather keep quiet in deference to President Duterte.

Another prominent leftist in the Cabinet is Rafael Mariano of the Department of Agrarian Reform.

“We cannot go on like this, that there is this sense of deja vu of what happened in 1972, and that it took the salvaging of Ninoy Aquino before the Filipino people was awakened. I hope more and more will be made aware of the truth behind all these,” the former senator pointed out.

Saguisag described the first few months of the Duterte administration as worse than during Marcos’ time.

“During that time, many were arrested and tortured but not many were killed in the beginning. To me, every human life matters,” he said. “With the way things are going now – threat of suspending the privilege of writ of habeas corpus, threat of martial law – we don’t know what will happen next,” he warned. “It is best for the President to review and consider a change of course. We, in the tiny HR (human rights) community, are very worried,” he pointed out.

For his part, Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) secretary-general Renato Reyes said the so-called good relations between the administration and the leftist movement are now being put to the test.

“As to what will happen next, we’ll see. But definitely, we are very dismayed of what had just happened. We will have the President answer for this,” he said.

He added the development would affect the commitment of the government to indemnify martial law victims.

Bonifacio Ilagan, spokesman for the Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang (CARMMA), called on the President to sever his alliance with the Marcoses.

“We are set to come out with this unity statement that will gather millions of signatures to send a strong message that we oppose the burial of the dictator at the LNMB,” he said referring to the Libingan by its initials.

‘Exorcism’ might work

If it would take the rites of exorcism to “fully reverse” the burial of Marcos, then so be it, said National Union of People’s Lawyers president Edre Olalia.

He made the pronouncement to emphasize the determination of groups opposed to the burial to have the Supreme Court withdraw the interment.

“We will leave it to the court to order the most practical and decent mode to reverse and revert (the burial), including exorcism rites if allowed,” he said.

Olalia represents petitioners contesting Marcos’ Libingan burial. Former lawmakers Satur Ocampo and Neri Colmenares led the petitioners.

EXHUMATION

Rep. Edcel Lagman on Friday said he would file a motion asking the SC to order the exhumation of Marcos’ body.

The lawmaker, one of the petitioners in the case, last week asked the High Court to stop the Marcos burial until the magistrates have decided on the appeals.

The petitioners said they would proceed with the filing of appeal against the SC ruling that paved way for the Marcos burial at the heroes’ cemetery.

Olalia said an exhumation of the remains of Marcos “is the most logical consequence” of a favorable SC order.

The petitioners – based on rules – have until Nov. 26 to file a motion for reconsideration.

They said they will also file a motion to cite in contempt the military and the Marcos family for what they called premature execution of the Nov. 8 SC decision, which they argued was not yet final and executory.

In the absence of an MR, Olalia filed on Nov. 11 an “extremely urgent motion” to hold in abeyance the execution of the SC ruling and sought the re-issuance of the status quo ante order. The High Court did not act on the motion.

For Olalia, not stopping the burial could indicate that cases that are not yet final can be “executed and pre-empted unilaterally” even without waiting for the mandatory 15-day period for an appeal.

CHR CHAIR ROSALES

Aside from a contempt case against the military and the Marcoses, torture victim and former Commission on Human Rights (CHR) chair Loretta Ann Rosales said they might also ask the SC to conduct a forensic examination on the buried supposed remains of Marcos.

“Marcos should not be buried there, more so his wax figure,” Rosales, who is currently in the United States, told The STAR in a phone interview.

The former CHR chief was referring to rumors that the supposed “preserved body” of Marcos displayed in a glass crypt in Batac, Ilocos Norte was actually a wax figure.

The Marcoses had been claiming the one on display was the dictator’s skillfully preserved remains.

There were reports the body in the glass crypt was still in the mausoleum during the burial.

If there is ever a silver lining in the burial controversy, Rosales said it is the fact that the youth have awakened and are protesting the “sneaky” burial of the late dictator.

“The youth who are gradually rising in protest were not born in the days of dictatorship but are waking up to the ways of martial rule which ignore democratic processes and gloss over the rules of the court,” she said.

Exhumation possible

Even if the body of Marcos has already been buried, it can still be exhumed if the SC rules in favor of various petitions against his burial at the Libingan, said Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III and Sen. Francis Escudero in separate interviews.

“If the petitions and motions for reconsideration will succeed, the SC can order to undo what has been done,” Pimentel said in an interview with dwIZ.

He said some officials should be held in contempt if the temporary restraining order (TRO) issued by the SC on Duterte’s burial go-signal was still in force despite the court’s ruling upholding the Chief Executive’s power to do so.

“If the TRO is still there, then there may be some people guilty of contempt,” Pimentel said.

“There have been many instances the SC has reversed itself,” Escudero said.

Marcos’ body was buried at the LNMB on Friday under shady circumstances just days after the SC upheld Duterte’s discretion to order the interment.

The petitioners in the case as well as the general public only learned of the burial as the Marcos remains were being flown from Batac, Ilocos Norte on a military helicopter.

When news of the burial spread, Sen. Francis Pangilinan, president of the Liberal Party, immediately called for the exhumation of the remains and their transfer to another place.

“He may have been buried there but this does not mean he will remain buried there,” Pangilinan said. “Because as long as there are people fighting against abuse and dictatorship, we will push that his remains be transferred,” he said. “We will work tirelessly to undo this monumental injustice inflicted upon the tens of thousands of victims and upon the nation.”

Lagman, who was among the petitioners against a hero’s burial for Marcos, earlier said their next move was to file a motion to exhume the remains.

He said they would try to determine whether the remains “precipitately and stealthily interred at the LNMB” was really the body and not the wax figure housed in the Marcos mausoleum in Batac.

“If the ‘remains’ of the dictator are exhumed, then it is opportune that a forensic examination be conducted to determine whether what was buried were his mortal remains or a mere wax replica,” Lagman said in a statement.

He also rebuffed the SC spokesman’s statement that nobody has submitted an appeal to the Supreme Court to stop the burial.

“That’s not correct because on Nov. 10 I filed a manifestation at the Supreme Court that even if we have not received the Supreme Court’s decision we will file for a motion for reconsideration and ask the Supreme Court to do all remedies available so it will not become moot and academic – our motion for reconsideration for the premature burial of Marcos,” he said.

No revisionism

Akbayan party-list Rep. Tom Villarin said “no amount of state-sponsored revisionism will erase the fact that he is a dictator who was ousted by popular will and died in ignominy and infamy as a villain.”

“The enemies of freedom who buried Marcos yesterday will be held accountable tomorrow,” he said.

“The dictator may be dead and buried but those who benefited from his rule still live and continue to flourish in scandalous lifestyles at the expense of the people,” he added.

“We will never forget, and we will exact justice until the winds of change truly come to our shores.”

Youth group Samahan ng Progresibong Kabataan (SPARK) also denounced the hasty burial of Marcos.

“When the dictator divested the rights of thousands if not millions of our countrymen, he deserves no just merit to any special privileges,” SPARK said in a statement.

SPARK also warned the public of “yellow opportunism,” apparently referring to allies of the former Aquino administration who were seen joining the protests Friday, to “hijack the event.”

“The culture of impunity was not invented only months ago, they too are guilty of its proliferation. The yellows are just as culpable and repulsive as the sitting president,” the group said.

Party-list group Sanlakas criticized Duterte for reducing the Marcos burial issue to just a clash of political clans – Marcos and Aquino.

“The President cannot simply reduce the issue to a clash of political clans, especially if he is aware of the injustices and crimes committed by the Marcos dictatorship,” Sanlakas secretary-general Aaron Pedrosa said.

In Bacolod City, San Carlos Bishop Gerardo Alminaza called for massive protests against the burial. Alminaza called for the ringing of church bells at 3 p.m. on Nov. 25 in protest.

“Let us not forget. We will always remember: no peace, no closure, without justice and reparation,” Alminaza said. – Non Alquitran, Paolo Romero, Giovanni Nilles, Gilbert Bayoran, Celso Amo


INQUIRER

Marcos burial can be ‘reversed anytime’–Pimentel By: Tarra Quismundo - Reporter / @TarraINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer / 04:56 PM November 19, 2016


Senate President Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III —INQUIRER PHOTO

The rushed burial of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani may be undone as several remedies may address the issue when the time comes, Senate President Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III said Saturday.

“Of course, this being a political issue, let us not lose hope, because this can be reversed anytime,” said Pimentel, chief ally of President Rodrigo Duterte at the Senate.

Pimentel is strongly against Marcos’ burial; his father, former Senate President Aquilino Pimentel Jr., was among opposition leaders detained during the strongman’s repressive martial rule.

It was the President, whose father Vicente served in the Marcos Cabinet, who had allowed the late dictator’s interment at the LNMB. Pimentel, who heads the President’s party, said he is not keen to raise the matter again to Mr. Duterte as Marcos has already been buried.

READ MORE...

NEXT PRESIDENT COULD UNDO THE BURIAL

But he said, Mr. Duterte could still have a “change of heart.” Or else, the next President could undo the burial.

“Then by 2022, when we have a new President and he believes that there are disqualified persons buried in the Libingan ng mga Bayani, then he can order their transfer, or their removal,” he told the Inquirer when reached by phone.

Pimental said the Commission on Audit (COA) may also “disallow all expenses connect with the burial once it reviews the transactions” of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), which was tasked to make the funeral arrangements.

Such disallowance would compel the military to “justify, explain or return the sum spent.”

“If it was allowed, then what was done must be reversed,” Pimentel said.

The senator noted that the state has remaining claims of money from the Marcoses, who is known to have amassed stolen wealth of about $5 billion to $10 billion.

“They owe the state a huge debt, and yet the state even gave them a favor,” he said.

“This is not because of the legal (aspect). It is because a benefit is given to a person or his family against which the government has financial claim, which has not been returned and/or repaid,” he continued.

The issue of Marcos’ burial also prompted Pimentel to file a measure that would set aside land within the LNMB for the burial of “Filipinos of historical interest,” separate from plots reserved for the military.

This area, per his proposal, shall be called Libingan ng mga Makasaysayang Pilipino, where former Presidents of the Philippines, statesmen, dignitaries, and national artists and scientists may be interred.

Creating such delineation would “preserve the LNMB as a military memorial consistent with the purpose intended” when it was established in 1947, he said.

As protests continued over the burial, Pimentel said Filipinos should continue exercising their constitutional rights and take the time for some reflection on how much we value lessons of history.

“This will strengthen our democracy. This will also show the people that the Philippines has a lot of problems, this is one of them but this is not the only one. So, therefore, this will also prompt us to value our time, value our priorities,” Pimentel said.

“Let us allow all of these exercises to happen and then we will learn some lessons, and we will be a better democracy, a stronger country and a more historically conscious people because of all of these developments,” he said.

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RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

'Yellows' hit for using Marcos burial to trash Duterte gov’t
Written by Tribune Wires Sunday, 20 November 2016 00:00 By Ted Tuvera and Charlie V. Manalo


SEPTEMBER 16, 2010 PHOTO FROM CEBU DAILY NEWS =A sea of yellow supporters and volunteers greeted Aquino after the winning Presidenial election.

A group yesterday warned of “yellow opportunism” amid high emotions on the interment of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB).

Youth group Samahan ng Progresibong Kabataan (Spark) assailed allies of former President Aquino for “hijacking” the anti-Marcos sentiment and used it as a chance to criticize the Duterte administration for initiating the burial of the late strongman.

Prominent personalities from the Aquino administration were among those present in a spontaneous overnight
demonstration at the People Power Monument along Edsa in Quezon City last Friday.

“They have been in power for six years and did nothing to prevent (the Marcos burial). The culture of impunity was not invented only months ago, they (the yellows) too are guilty of its proliferation,” Spark spokesperson Joanne Lim said.

“The yellows are just as culpable and repulsive as the sitting president. We must and can remain independent from the opposing faction of the ruling elite,” she added.

Lim also pointed out that the issue of the Marcos dictatorship should not be limited to rivalry between the Marcos and Aquino families as noted by President Duterte.

“The youth shall no longer allow factions of the political elite to be their pawns for their vested interests. The future is not theirs to begin with,” the youth leader said.

YELLOW ALLIES SPOTTED

Spotted during the unorganized rally in Edsa were Aquino’s former spokesman Edwin Lacierda, former Social Welfare Sec. Dinky Soliman and former Presidential Peace Adviser Ging Deles.

On the other hand, top yellow elected leader Vice President Leni Robredo yesterday said the Marcos burial is more of an insult to the Filipino people.

Robredo, whose vice presidency is currently being quizzed by the dictator’s son former Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., was one of those who condemned the secret interment at the LNMB the other day.

Nonetheless, militant groups yesterday said they will launch massive demonstrations against the Marcos burial, saying that the dictator’s body should be exhumed.

In a press conference, Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (Bayan) secretary general Renato Reyes said they will lead a mass rally on November 25, the day of President Duterte’s arrival from the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders’ summit in Lima, Peru.

Bayan plans to stage rallies in various places in Manila.

The National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) vowed not to violently disperse protestors who are expected to make noise this week.

“Rallies in these places can be tolerated as we respect the freedom of assembly, provided that protests would be conducted peacefully and orderly,” NCRPO chief Oscar Albayalde said yesterday.

Meanwhile, Bongbong said it’s time to move on now that their father’s remains are finally honored ceremoniously,

“Let my father’s burial be the first day among many days of our continuing to work for the unity and the progress of our country,” Marcos Jr. said in his social media account a day after his dad at LNMB.

The Marcoses were back at the LNMB in Taguig City yesterday morning but unlike last Friday, which was more of a private affair for the family, Marcos supporters and loyalists from as far as Ilocos Norte were allowed to get near the dictator’s grave.

VINDICATION FOR BONGBONG AND FAMILY

But for Marcos Jr., his dad’s burial is a vindication they’ve been longing since the former president died in 1992 while in exile in Hawaii, USA after being ousted from Malacañang in 1986.

“Twenty-seven years in the making. Finally my father gets the rest he rightfully and legally deserves,” he said.

It is recalled that in many instances, Duterte said he is “indebted” to the Marcos family for helping him win the elections after an “overwhelming support” from the Ilocano voters that are believed to be the “Solid North” or the die -hard loyal supporters of the Marcoses.

But as for leftist leaders that considered Duterte as “ally”, the self-proclaimed “progressive” Duterte has now turned “regressive”.

The August Twenty-One Movement (ATOM), which was among the groups that sought the ouster of Marcos, said the forcing-through, fast-break stunt pulled off last Friday by the Marcos family and their supporters was a finishing touch on the dictator’s long list of sneaky tricks against the Filipino people.

In a related development, an ally of the Marcoses dared members of Duterte’s Cabinet to vacate first their post before criticizing his decision allowing the burial of Marcos at LNMB.

At the weekly Kapihan sa Annabelle’s, lawyer Larry Gadon said that if some members of the President’s official family cannot toe Duterte’s line, they have to resign for their post outright as their pronouncements, even if done on a personal capacity, is reflective of the position of the government, aside from the fact they are using official time and government resources in doing so.

“If they want to criticize President Duterte’s decision to allow Marcos to be buried at the LNMB, they should resign first,” said Gadon.

Gadon ran for senator in the last elections under the party established by the late strongman, the Kilusang Bagong Lipunan (KBL).

THOSE ACTIVE CRITICS IN DUTERTE GOVT SHOULD RESIGN

Gadon named Vice President Leni Robredo, Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo, Agrarian Reform Secretary Rafael Mariano, Labor Undersecretary Joel Maglungsod, National Anti-Poverty Commission head Liza Maza and Presidential Commission on Urban Poor head Terry Ridon as those very active in criticizing Duterte’s decision.

While Taguiwalo has been documented to have been tortured by the military during Martial Law days, Robredo’s father, Antonio Gerona was appointed Municipal Trial Judge by Marcos in 1980.

“The problem with them is that they are not only criticizing the decision of the President using official government time and resources, they are also muddling the issue,” said Gadon.

BEING A HERO NOT THE ISSUE

“The issue is not about Marcos being a hero but his entitlement to buried at the LNMB because it was specifically put up for former soldiers and presidents like him,” the lawyer said.

AFP REGULATION

Gadon said that according to Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) Regulation G 161-373, the following persons are entitled to interment at the LNMB:

(a) Medal of Valor awardees;

(b) Presidents or Commanders-in-Chief, AFP;

(c) the secretaries of the National Defense;

(d) AFP Chiefs of Staff;

(e) General/Flag Officers;

(f) Active and retired military personnel of the AFP;

(g) former AFP members who laterally entered/joined the Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG);

(h) veterans of the Philippine Revolution of 1896 and the First and Second World Wars, as well as recognized guerrillas;

(i) government dignitaries, statesmen, national artists and other deceased persons whose interment has been approved by the commander-in-chief, Congress or the Secretary of National Defense;

(j) former presidents, Secretaries of National Defense, widows of former Presidents, Secretaries of National Defense and Chiefs of Staff;

(k) national artists and national scientists of the Philippines.

While the same regulation also prohibits “personnel who were dishonorably separated/ reverted/ discharged from the service and personnel who were convicted by final judgment of an offense involving moral turpitude” from interment at the Heroes’ Cemetery, Gadon said they do not apply to Marcos.

“They can question his war medals all they want but the undeniable truth is that he was a former soldier and president and those are enough to qualify to be buried at the LNMB,” said Gadon.

“There is no provision there stating one should be a hero first before he or she can be allowed to be buried at the LNMB. In fact, newspaper columnist Bobi Tigalo said that if we are to be strict in alowing only heroes to be buried at the LNMB, then we have to exhume no less than 80 percent of the bodies buried there,” said Gadon.

Further, Gadon said that if the oppositors are really sincere in questioning Marcos’ alleged human rights violations as grounds for barring his burial at the Heroes’ Cemetery, then they should also protest the AFP personnel who were part of the government’s anti-insurgency campaign thoughout the years and are now buried at the LNMB.

“Almost all the time you can hear activists denouncing AFP personnel as human rights violators, fascists, terrorists, murderers, etc. but are they aware that the same people they are denouncing who happened to pass away, may also be buried at the LNMB? So, why are they not protesting?” asked Gadon.

“Now, I’m not praying for this to happen but we all know that inevitably, we all are going to leave this world. And if that happens to former President Fidel Ramos, who was instrumental in the implementation of Martial Law as former head of the Philippine Constabulary, would they also oppose his burial at the LNMB?” he added.

“Let’s just be fair and accord Marcos his entitlement as a former soldier and president,” Gadon said.


MANILA STANDARD

FM buried at Libingan: Marcos family opts for simple, solemn burial posted November 19, 2016 at 12:01 am by Joel E. Zurbano and John Paolo Bencito


HERO’S BURIAL. Former First Lady Imelda Marcos, Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos, former Senator Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. and Irene Marcos-Araneta, watch as military officers unfurl the tricolors—concurring with a 21-gun salute and a flower drop from a cloudy sky—as former President Ferdinand Marcos is finally laid to rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani Friday 27 years after he died in his Honolulu exile in 1989—condemned and described by human rights victims (right below) during Martial Law at their gathering at the Bantayog ng mga Bayani beside Camp Aguinaldo while Marcos supporters and media (left below) are held back at the gate of the LNMB by police and security authorities. Revoli Cortez/Norman Cruz

THE late strongman Ferdinand Marcos was buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani Friday noon, more than a week after the Supreme Court decided in favor of the burial and more than 27 years after he died in exile in Hawaii.

Police said the burial was made unannounced to ensure peace and order during the solemn event.

“This is part of the PNP’s order to ensure peace and order. Initially Senator Bongbong [Marcos] wanted the burial to be on Sunday but we were told yesterday that it will be today,” said National Capital Region Police Office director Oscar Albayalde.

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Marcos’ eldest daughter, Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos, thanked President Rodrigo Duterte and the Supreme Court for allowing the burial at Libingan ng mga Bayani, which according to her, was the last wish of her father before he died.

“The last wishes of my beloved father came true at last. The former President Ferdinand Edralin Marcos is now laid to rest with fellow soldiers,” she said. “Me and my family, from the bottom of our hearts, thank

you all for sharing the rights of my father to be laid here at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.”

“First of all, to President Duterte who proposed this, and to the [justices of the] Supreme Court who decided this, and to the thousands of supporters of our family. You came along and prayed for almost three decades to witness this,” she said.

The governor said they made the burial private because they wanted a solemn and peaceful funeral.

“We apologize and we are asking for your understanding for the decision made by our family to have simple, private and solemn burial of my father,” she said. “Our never-ending gratitude to all. Long live Philippines.”

Marcos’ namesake and only son former Senator Ferdinand Marcos Jr. extended his gratitude to President Duterte. “Our family will forever be thankful for his kind gesture,” he said.

“It is our sincerest hope that this will lead the nation towards healing as we endeavor to move the country forward to give every Filipino a better life,” he added.

Former first lady Imelda Marcos, wearing a black terno, walked alongside children Imee, Ferdinand Jr., and Irene, while soldiers carrying his wooden casket marched slowly to his grave.

The former president was given a 21-gun salute. His only living sibling, Fortuna Marcos-Barba, watched the burial from her wheelchair.

Marcos’ remains were flown in from a mausoleum in Batac, Ilocos Norte, to the Libingan ng mga Bayani in Taguig and was interred shortly before noon—10 days after the Supreme Court voted 9-5-1 to dismiss the consolidated petitions seeking to stop it.

Many groups, including those from the militant left, opposed the Marcos burial at the heroes’ cemetery.

“Like a thief in the night, even in death,” said Renato Reyes of the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan, adding that the hasty burial of Marcos appears to be out of fear of the growing protests of the people.

“The heirs of Marcos want to sneak in the dictator’s remains at the LNMB, away from the indignation of the Filipino people. They are mistaken though if they think we will let this day pass without any protest,” he said.

“We call on the people to make known their outrage by joining the Black Friday protests at 12 noon in various areas and by holding indignation rallies tonight at 6 p.m. Let this day be marked not by the rejoicing of the heirs of the dictator, but by the cries of outrage by the Marcos victims and the people who refuse to forget the judgment of history,” Reyes said.

PETITIONS REJECTED

The Supreme Court on November 8 rejected a petition by human rights victims to stop the transfer of Marcos’ remains to the Libingan.

The burial was a fulfillment of the campaign promise Duterte made in February while he was in Marcos’ home province of Ilocos Norte.

Duterte said he believed Marcos should be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani, not because he was a hero, but because he was a soldier and a former president.

“The issue about Marcos’ burial at the Libingan has created division among our people. Almost all Ilocanos have bad feelings about that,” he said. “If you don’t want to call him a hero, then just think of him as a soldier.”

He said allowing a hero’s burial for the former president would help unite the country.

Ferdinand Marcos was the country’s President from 1965 to 1986, ruling as a dictator under Martial Law from 1972 to 1981. He was ousted in the People Power revolt in 1986 and died in exile in Hawaii. Before becoming president, Marcos also served as a member of the House of Representatives from 1949 to 1959 and of the Senate from 1959 to 1965, where he was also Senate President from 1963 to 1965.

Duterte on Friday said the decision to proceed with the burial was entirely legal and pleaded for national healing.

“We have to decide once and for all. Me, I was legalistic about it. President Marcos was a president for so long and he was a soldier. That’s about it,” Duterte told state television RTVM shortly after arriving in Lima, Peru to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit this weekend.

Dodging criticism about human rights violations committed during Marcos’ 20-year rule, Duterte said that these were allegations yet to be proven.

In a statement read by presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella, Duterte said that he was only doing the legal thing.

“Let history judge but I will do what it is legal and the Supreme Court has ruled that it is,” Duterte said.

Abella echoed Duterte’s plea for Filipinos to find it in their hearts to forgive the late strongman.

“Hopefully, both sides will exercise maximum tolerance and come to terms with the burial of former President Ferdinand Marcos,” Abella said.

Communications Assistant Secretary Ana Marie Banaag said that critics of the burial have already been given a chance to prove their case, reiterating that it’s already time for the late strongman to be buried.

“The President was so clear about that since the campaign period,” Banaag said in a Palace briefing.

Abella, along with senior Cabinet officials who were with the President in Peru, said Duterte didn’t know about the date of the burial.

“As far as I know, he was not sure of the exact date,” Abella said of the President at a press briefing.

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana also said he, too, was not informed about the burial.

“I do not know. I am here in Lima, Peru with the President,” Lorenzana said in a text message.

The defense chief, whose department supervises the Armed Forces of the Philippines, which oversess the Libingan ng mga Bayani, said he was only informed that the Marcoses wanted the burial to take place “not later than Dec. 1.”

Abella also said that there’s “nothing sneaky” about the rushed burial.

“I believe the President has done his part and the issue of the actual burial itself belongs to the Marcos family,” he added.

Abella also said there was no direct conversation” between Duterte and the Marcos family as the President’s focus in the past days was on Peru, where he would attend this year’s Apec Summit.

Abella’s statement, however, contradicted Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald Dela Rosa’s claim that Duterte knew Marcos would be buried on Friday.

It was Dela Rosa who broke the news of the burial at around 10 a.m., and said that the military was informed about the burial date last Thursday, Nov. 17, at 5 p.m.

AFP spokesperson, Brigadier General Restituto Padilla affirmed Dela Rosa’s claims, saying that Duterte himself was aware when Marcos would be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

“The President is always kept aware of everything that’s happening in the country,” Padilla said.

He added that there was no announcement regarding Marcos’ interment “in deference” to the wishes of the Marcos family.

“They are the ones who lost someone, not us. We just provide the services,” Padilla said.

Padilla said they were informed late by the Defense Department to provide burial services for the late strongman on Friday noon.

“That’s why we were given short notice, because of their request to do it in private,” Padilla said.

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA STANDARD

Marcos family asks Filipinos to unite posted November 19, 2016 at 11:30 pm by Joel E. Zurbano


REST IN PEACE, MR. PRESIDENT. An honor guard carries the remains of former President Ferdinand Marcos to his grave in private rites at the Libingan ng mga Bayani on Friday. On Saturday, hundreds of Marcos supporters went to the graveyard to pay their final respects.

THE family of the former President Ferdinand Marcos has asked Filipinos to unite amid the ongoing protests following the burial of the former president at the Libingan ng mga Bayani, which took the public by surprise on Friday.

“Let my father’s burial be the first day amongst many days of our continuing to work for the unity and the progress of our country,” said Marcos’ namesake and only son former Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. who, along with his mother Imelda and sisters Imee and Irene, returned to the cemetery on Saturday for a holy mass.

FERVENT WISH

Bongbong said it was his father’s fervent wish that when he came to the end of his days, that he be buried in a simple soldier’s ceremony.

“This was in keeping with his idea that he was but a soldier doing his duty, a citizen serving his country. We have waited 27 years to fulfill that wish that he left us with. But we are here today and we are able to grant him that wish,” he said.

“We heard news that there was a plan to make turmoil. What we don’t want to happen is innocent people to get hurt or injured,” he said.

Imelda also thanked the supporters. She said her husband stood pat for what is right and good for the people. “If you’re in the side of the truth, God is in your side,” she said.

The family also thanked President Rodrigo Duterte for his recognition of Marcos’ service to the nation, and all the members of the Armed Forces of the Philippines who came to pay their last respects.

Marcos was buried at the Libingan Friday noon, a week after the Supreme Court decided in favor of the burial.

TO ENSURE PEACE AND ORDER

Metro Manila Police director Oscar Albayalde said the burial was made unannounced to ensure peace and order situation during the solemn event.

Marcos’ eldest daughter and Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos said they made the burial to be private because they want a solemn and peaceful funeral march. She apologized to the people for the family’s sudden decision.

The camp of former Vice President Jejomar Binay revealed that during the term of former President Benigno Aquino III, the Marcos family already agreed to the proposal that the burial be made in Batac, Ilocos Norte. But Mr. Aquino ignored it and failed to act on the proposal of Binay.

“The Aquino administration missed an opportunity to lay the Marcos burial issue to rest when it did not act on former Vice President Binay’s recommendation made as early as 2011 to allow the burial of Marcos in Batac, Ilocos Norte,” said Binay’s spokesman Joey Salgado.


MANILA TIMES

Marcos buried at Libingan BY THE MANILA TIMES ON NOVEMBER 19, 2016 HEADLINES


FINAL WISH Members of the family of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, led by former first lady Imelda Marcos (in black), watch as military officers salute at the coffin containing the remains of the late former president. It was the supposedly the final wish of Marcos, who fell from power in 1986 and died in exile in Hawaii in 1989. AFP PHOTO

FORMER strongman Ferdinand Marcos was buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani at noon on Friday in surprise but carefully planned rites befitting an ex-president, three decades after his ouster and subsequent death in exile.

Protests erupted in campuses and across Metro Manila and major cities hours after the burial at the military-owned “heroes’ cemetery,” which was attended by about a hundred mourners led by former first lady Imelda Romualdez Marcos.

Members of the media were barred from entering the Taguig City cemetery at the request of the Marcoses to keep the burial a “confidential” affair, a military spokesman said.

But Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos let social media in to what she described as a “simple, private and solemn burial,” posting videos and photos of the event on her Facebook page within minutes after the wooden coffin containing the remains of her late father was lowered to an underground chamber.

Flown by helicopter

A military helicopter, escorted by two choppers, brought Marcos’ remains to the Libingan past 11 a.m. from his hometown of Batac, Ilocos Norte, where they had been preserved and put on public display after being flown home from Hawaii in 1993.

The pine casket was brought by honor guards to a black hearse, then transferred to a caisson for a funeral procession to the gravesite just beside those of three other former presidents – Elpidio Quirino, Carlos Garcia and Diosdado Macapagal.

Artillery fire was heard at exactly 12 noon as officers of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) provided the former president and World War 2 veteran military honors during the rites that lasted for about an hour.

“Upon arrival there [of the remains]the last rites were heard, led by our chief chaplain, and appropriate final honors were rendered, which included a 21-gun salute,” AFP spokesman Brig. Gen. Restituto Padilla told reporters in a news conference at Villamor Air Base, near the cemetery.

The casket was lowered as the last taps were sounded, which Padilla said was a final salute to any soldier laid to rest. The flag flew half-mast.

Marcos’ 87-year-old widow Imelda, a member of Congress, received the folded Philippine flag that draped the coffin from acting AFP Chief of Staff Gen. Glorioso Miranda, accompanied by other military generals who served as ceremonial pallbearers.

The area of entombment, which had a “simple marble finish,” was sealed, and the mourners left behind a flame lit from a cauldron, Padilla said.

Marcos’ tombstone read: “Ferdinand E. Marcos, 1917-1989, Filipino.”

Security was very tight in and out of the Libingan, with 2,000 military and police forces barring “unauthorized people” from entering the cemetery and desecrating the Marcos grave.

Short notice

Marcos loyalist Cherry Cobbarubias said details of the interment were withheld to prevent a violent a clash between anti- and pro-Marcos groups.

The police and military were informed of the burial at 5 p.m. on Thursday. The military however is capable of providing a funeral service on short notice, officials said.

Work on the late strongman’s final resting place was completed weeks ago, the military said, even before the Supreme Court’s order to temporarily suspend the burial and eventual decision last November 8 to allow it to proceed.

The Marcos burial at Libingan came 27 years after his death in Honolulu, Hawaii on September 28, 1989.

President Rodrigo Duterte, during the election campaign, vowed to overturn his predecessors’ decision not to allow Marcos to be interred at the Libingan. He ordered the military to proceed with the burial last July 11.

Duterte’s verbal order was questioned by victims of Marcos’ Martial Law regime and militant groups before the Supreme Court, which ruled 9-5 in favor of the Marcoses.

Court spokesman Theodore Te said there was nothing to prevent the burial as the petitions against it were dismissed and the status quo ante order was lifted last November 8.

“The legal status is that there is no order that stops the act at the moment,” Te said.

At Villamor Air Base, Marcos’ eldest child Gov. Imee Marcos, accompanied by siblings former senator Ferdinand Jr. and Irene, read a short statement thanking the President and the Supreme Court. They did not take questions.

Governor Marcos apologized to their supporters who were unable to get into the Libingan.

“At last our beloved father Ferdinand Edralin Marcos’s final instruction to be buried alongside his fellow soldiers was carried out today,” she said.

President Duterte, who was in Lima, Peru for a summit of Pacific rim leaders, urged anti-Marcos protestors to forgive the late strongman.

“Well, it seems to be a very raucous issue for the nation but I would like to pray that everybody would find a space in his heart for forgiveness,” he said in a video message. FERNAN MARASIGAN, MICHAEL JOE T. DELIZO, JOMAR CANLAS, CATHERINE S. VALENTE AND AFP


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Ferdinand Marcos laid to rest with the quiet dignity a former President and soldier deserves November 19, 2016by benign0


[Photo courtesy Manila Bulletin.]

Former President Ferdinand Marcos was finally laid to rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB) yesterday, the 18th November 2016. The “secret” funeral rites caught everyone by surprise and sent the usual anti-Marcos mobs on an eleventh-hour protest frenzy. The funeral itself was a dignified affair involving full military honours.

The dignity with which it was conducted would have been the very reason why it had to be kept “secret”. Filipinos after all, specially those associated with the emotionalism of the Yellow camp, are not really known for quiet and dignified politically-motivated funerals.

The fact that a Supreme Court ruling junking their petition to block Marcos’s burial at the LNMB demonstrates that even institutionally-applied rules do not move them. Indeed, flamboyant necropolitics has come to characterise the last 30 years of politics in the Philippines because of a culture of political emotionalism that routinely trumps logic and rationality.

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Anti-Marcos “activists”, their minds imprisoned by their inbred notions of what they consider to be “right”, cannot seem to comprehend the thinking behind having to keep the Marcos funeral low-key. In fact, there really was no “secret” behind it. The intent to bury Marcos at the LNMB was, itself, 30 years in the making with successive Philippine governments over those three decades not implementing any concrete measures to prevent it.

Furthermore, it formed a key part of the campaign platform of current President Rodrigo Duterte who, as even the most rabid anti-Marcos folk admit, did deliver on that promise.

Politics is a tough game. Those who are most clever win. The 30-year journey of the former President’s remains from Ilocos to the LNMB involved exceptional astuteness, patience, and strategic acumen on the part of the Marcos family.

The stealth funeral we saw yesterday was a tactical execution that rightly-so blindsided everyone. Indeed, whilst the anti-Marcos people use the word “blindsided” like it was a bad thing, from another more objective perspective, it can be regarded as an exemplar of quiet achievement that, yet again, reveals just how inept and disorganised the anti-Marcos mob is.

While the anti-Marcos mobs think in terms of 15-day “grace periods” for appeals and temporary restraining orders (TROs), the camp of the Marcoses and that of President Rodrigo Duterte think in terms of decades-long timeframes in the manner with which they execute towards their goals.

That sort of long-term strategic execution acumen results, in the case of the latter, in an excellent urban community such as Davao City and, in the case of the earlier, final closure and peace for a man who was a Philippine president and a soldier.

benign0
benign0 is the Webmaster of GetRealPhilippines.com.
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