PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
CLICK HERE TO READ ONLINE
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

ON THIS PAGE, DUTERTE AND THE U.S.

RODY OBLIGES AMERICA: HE CANCELS FIREARMS DEAL WITH U.S.[RELATED: Rody looks forward to working with Trump to enhance PH-US relations]
[RELATED(2) Duterte: 'I don't want to quarrel anymore, because Trump has won']


NOVEMBER 8 -“I would like to announce now that the (order for) 26,000 of M16 (rifles) that I am ordering for the police is canceled. We will not insist on buying expensive arms from them... They should forget it, they still say it would be arriving on July of 2017. I am ordering the police to cancel it,” Duterte said.
President Duterte jumped the gun on the United States yesterday saying he is canceling the purchase of American assault rifles that a US legislator had asked the US State Department to halt supposedly as sanction on the alleged summary killings in Duterte’s bloody war on drugs. In a speech at the ceremonial signing of the Executive Order recreating the Bangsamoro Transition Commission (BTC), the President said that the Philippines does not need to import firearms anymore. READ MORE...RELATED,
Rody looks forward to working with Trump to enhance PH-US relations...RELATED(2) Duterte: 'I don't want to quarrel anymore, because Trump has won'...

ALSO:
Donald Trump elected 45th United States president
[RELATED: How a Donald Trump presidency can affect the Philippines]
[ANALYSIS by Lila Ramos Shahani: Clinton, Trump and the West Philippine Sea]


NOVEMBER 9 -Ends eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House. Donald Trump on Wednesday earned Wisconsin's 10 electoral votes, putting him over the 270 threshold needed to win the presidential elections. AP Photo/Evan Vucci, file photo WASHINGTON (UPDATE 3, 3:58 p.m.) — Donald Trump was elected America's 45th president Tuesday, an astonishing victory for a celebrity businessman and political novice who capitalized on voters' economic anxieties, took advantage of racial tensions and overcame a string of sexual assault allegations on his way to the White House. His triumph over Hillary Clinton will end eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House and threatens to undo major achievements of President Barack Obama. He's pledged to act quickly to repeal Obama's landmark health care law, revoke the nuclear agreement with Iran and rewrite important trade deals with other countries, particularly Mexico and Canada. READ MORE...RELATED, How a Donald Trump presidency can affect the Philippines...  ALSO, [ANALYSIS by Lila Ramos Shahani: Clinton, Trump and the West Philippine Sea...

ALSO: Weekend brings more anti-Trump protests across America[RELATED: Philippines leader vows better US ties after Trump win]


NOVEMBER 13 -
(CNN) -- As President-elect Donald Trump's administration begins taking shape, thousands poured onto the streets of a divided nation again Saturday to express their frustration at the stunning election result. From New York to Los Angeles, demonstrators have marched in various American cities for four nights since Trump's unexpected victory Tuesday capped an acrimonious campaign. While largely peaceful, the protests have resulted in blocked highways and bridges, arrests during clashes with police and the early Saturday shooting of a man at a march in Portland, Oregon. In Los Angeles' MacArthur Park, the site of immigrant rights protests over the years, demonstrators took turns Saturday swatting a stick at a piñata resembling Trump. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, a Democrat, praised the protesters. READ MORE...RELATED,
Philippines leader vows better US ties after Trump win ...

ALSO: NOVEMBER 14 -Biggest supermoon in 68 years tonight
[VIDEO FROM WEATHER NETWORK: Get ready for the closest Full Moon in 86 years]
[ALSO: By Fr. Tito Calauag - We light our candles–to see each other in the dark]


NOVEMBER 14 -FILE - This Sunday, June 23, 2013 file photo shows a supermoon over the Statue of Liberty in New York. Monday, Nov. 14, 2016 will have the closest full moon of the year, or every 14 months to be precise. It will also be the closest the moon comes to us in almost 68 years. And it won't happen again for another 18 years. AP Photo/Julio Cortez
 Philippines – Under clear skies, Filipinos can witness tonight the biggest and brightest “supermoon” in 68 years. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said the moon will pass by the earth at a distance of 356,621.611 kilometers, the closest it has passed the earth since 1948, at 7:21 p.m. tonight. “This year’s supermoon is one of the closest and biggest in 68 years and it won’t happen again until 2034,” PAGASA said. The moon’s average distance from the earth is 384,400 km. READ MORE... RELATED, Get ready for the closest Full Moon in 86 years, here's when... RELATED(2) By Fr. Tito Calauag - We light our candles–to see each other in the dark...

ALSO
Du30 eyes best of two worlds: Keeps US ties, leans toward China
(Duterte called himself “just a small molecule in the planet” compared with Trump. “He is now president of the most powerful country in the world,” he said. “What we share in common is the passion to serve.”)
[RELATED: EDITORIAL -
Analysts see Trump as problem for Du30]


NOVEMBER 11 -SINGING A SONG. Visiting President Rodrigo Duterte and host Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak go ‘shalala lala in the morning/in the sunshine/in the evening’—popularized by the Dutch Eurodance group Vengaboys—as they sing to the high nines, having fun together with the intermission number during the state banquet hosted by the latter at the Perdana Putrajaya Thursday.
PRESIDENT Rodrigo Duterte declared Friday that he would continue to shift the Philippines toward China despite Donald Trump’s victory in the US presidential election. At an early morning briefing in Davao, Duterte said that while the US would remain a friend and ally, the Philippines’ foreign policy was now geared toward China and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. “I will pursue what I’ve started,” Duterte said following his return from a state visit to Malaysia. “My partnership with China and the rest of Asean will remain. I am not in the habit of reneging on my word.”READ MORE... RELATED, .EDITORIAL - Analysts see Trump as problem for Du30...

ALSO: Excellent' first meeting for Obama, Trump at Oval Office
[RELATED: Coast-to-coast protests vs Trump]


NOVEMBER 11 -President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
WASHINGTON — In a cordial beginning to their transfer of power, President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump met at the White House Thursday. Obama called the 90-minute meeting "excellent," and his successor said he looked forward to receiving the outgoing president's "counsel."  At the close of the Oval Office sit-down, Obama said to Trump, "We now are going to want to do everything we can to help you succeed because if you succeed the country succeeds."  The two men, who have been harshly critical of each other for years, were meeting for the first time, Trump said. The Republican called Obama a "very good man" and said he looked forward "to dealing with the president in the future, including counsel."  READ MORE...RELATED, Coast-to-coast protests vs Trump ...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE BELOW
OR CLICK HERE TO READ ONLINE

Rody obliges US, cancels arms deal


“I would like to announce now that the (order for) 26,000 of M16 (rifles) that I am ordering for the police is canceled. We will not insist on buying expensive arms from them... They should forget it, they still say it would be arriving on July of 2017. I am ordering the police to cancel it,” Duterte said.

MANILA, NOVEMBER 7, 2016 (TRIBUNE) Written by Ted Tuvera Tuesday, 08 November 2016 - President Duterte jumped the gun on the United States yesterday saying he is canceling the purchase of American assault rifles that a US legislator had asked the US State Department to halt supposedly as sanction on the alleged summary killings in Duterte’s bloody war on drugs.

In a speech at the ceremonial signing of the Executive Order recreating the Bangsamoro Transition Commission (BTC), the President said that the Philippines does not need to import firearms anymore.

READ MORE...

A report the other week said the US State Department has canceled selling 26,000 M16 rifles to the Philippines due to worries over Duterte’s war on illegal drugs but other Federal sources said the sale has just been put on hold.

“I would like to announce now that the (order for) 26,000 of M16 (rifles) that I am ordering for the police is canceled. We will not insist on buying expensive arms from them... They should forget it, they still say it would be arriving on July of 2017. I am ordering the police to cancel it,” Duterte said.

“Let’s stop buying arms for the moment. Let us just have a moratorium of violence and, maybe, we can use the money; use (these) for some other endeavors. That is what I am asking. Instead of purchasing guns which will be used only for Filipinos to kill each other. So, what do we get? Because you buy that you have to buy bullets. And if you have the bullets, that can only be used for Filipinos to kill each other Moro or Christians,” he said.

But despite his pronouncement to limit violence, Duterte said that he still wanted to purchase cheaper guns from other sources other than the US.

“We will just have to look for another source that is cheaper and maybe as durable and as good as those made from the place we are ordering them,” he said.

Last week, Duterte mouthed that he wants to import missiles from Russia and other sort of weapons from China after the US State Department reportedly halted its selling of M4 riffles to the Philippine National Police (PNP) a few days back.

“Go to Russia, we can buy missiles. Let’s use missiles. I told (Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana), visit Russia because they are inviting us,” Duterte said in Sual, Pangasinan on Wednesday last week.

“Even China. You know, China is open. Anything you want. I even got a brochure. The Chinese said that we only need to choose the items in it,” he added.

Cardin's statement a twisted report


ANDANAR

Presidential Communications Office (PCO) Secretary Martin Andanar said last Nov. 3 that an American friend who is a reporter in Washington D.C. told him that the statement of US Senator Ben Cardin about the rifle deal has been twisted.

”When the news came out, my American friend who is also a reporter in Washington D.C. talked to me and said the news has been completely twisted. He said that was not what Sen. Cardin has been said,” Andanar said in a radio interview.

According to a news agency report, the US State Department has stopped the sale of 26,000 rifles to the PNP following opposition from Cardin over concerns about human rights violations in the Philippines.

”Senator Cardin was just referring to terrorists because there are alleged some instances in the past that the rifles have reached the terrorists,” Andanar said.

”Number two, it’s between the State Department and the US senator. Just like in any arms deal, the senators really intervene. But as far as the US government is concerned, they are not really cancelling. They are just really giving respect to the senator,” he added.

Andanar, however, said if the US would eventually cancel the arms deal, “there are many other sources where we can buy.”

He said the statement of the US lawmaker might be part the political noise due to the upcoming presidential election.

”It’s an election year in the US. Perhaps this noise is just like in our situation every time there is an election year, candidates create noise,” Andanar said.

Andanar said the communication department of Malacanang has strategies to counter foreign negative press but he refused to reveal them.

”I cannot really divulge the strategies because I don’t also want the opposition to see our strategies. But we are already executing some and we will execute more,” he said.

US drills to continue


LORENZANA

Despite Duterte’s pronouncements to halt joint-military exercises with the United States, Defense Secretary Lorenzana said yesterday it will still continue by next year.

In a chance interview in Malacanang, the Defense chief revealed that Duterte merely agreed to trim down the traditional US-RP war games after convincing the latter during their recent Cabinet meeting. The scheduled Balikatan Exercises in 2017 will proceed.

“We presented our recommendations. (Duterte) practically approved all our recommendations. Our recommendation was that the exercises will (have to) go on, except major exercises involving landing exercises,” Lorenzana said.

“The Balikatan (exercises) remains. What’s left are exercises that are mostly focusing on counterterrorism, humanitarian assistance and disaster response,” he added.

Asked if there will be changes in the conduct of the Balikatan, which is the first of the three major annual US-RP war games, Lorenzana said that there are no changes saying that there will be 1,000 US troops present during the process.

The other major joint-military war games held between US and Philippine forces are the Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) and the Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise (Phiblex).

Lorenzana also said that the Commander in Chief’s directive on terminating the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement (EDCA) is somewhat disregarded as it remains to be in effect.

------------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Rody looks forward to working with Trump By Edith Regalado (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 10, 2016 - 12:00am 0 2 googleplus0 0


In a statement relayed through Communications Secretary Martin Andanar, President Duterte also expressed his wish “for enhanced Philippine-US relations anchored on mutual respect, mutual benefit, shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.” Presidential Communications (Government of the Philippines) facebookpage

KUALA LUMPUR – President Duterte is looking forward to working with the incoming administration of United States president-elect Donald Trump.

In a statement relayed through Communications Secretary Martin Andanar, Duterte also expressed his wish “for enhanced Philippine-US relations anchored on mutual respect, mutual benefit, shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.”

The President’s statement yesterday was a departure from his usual tirades against outgoing US President Barack Obama.

READ MORE...

Duterte was in Bangkok, Thailand to pay his respects to the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej yesterday before proceeding to Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia for a two-day visit.

In his statement, the President said the US presidential election is “a testament to the enduring traditions of its democratic system and the American way of life.”

“The two-party system gives American voters freedom of choice based on party platforms, not just on personalities,” the President said.

Philippine-US relations are on the rocks amid Duterte’s constant badmouthing of Obama because of the latter’s calling his attention to human rights violations in the conduct of his war on drugs.

Duterte has also declared his pivot to China and Russia while professing to stick to an independent foreign policy.

President Duterte recently named a businessman involved in a Trump real estate project in Manila as a special envoy to the US.

SPECIAL ENVOY TO THE US

Jose E. B. Antonio is founder of the Century Properties Group Inc. (CPGI), the company behind Trump Tower Manila.


Amb. Jose E.B. Antonio Chairman & CEO of Century Properties Group, Inc. (CPGI). He graduated Cum Laude from San Beda College with a Bachelor’s degree in Commercial Science (major in Marketing). He attended Ateneo de Manila’s Graduate School of Business, and received a Master’s Degree in Business Management (MBM). He also attended Harvard University’s Owner/President Management Program, and graduated in 2003. In 2005, he served as the Philippines’ Special Envoy to the People’s Republic of China. FROM CNETURY PHILIPPINES WEBSITE

Antonio’s mission is to enhance business ties and strengthen economic affairs between the two countries, the CPGI said in disclosure to the Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE).

In a mock election for Filipino guests at an election event sponsored by the US embassy yesterday, Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton emerged the winner with 82 percent of the votes as against Trump’s 13 percent, deputy chief of mission Michael Klechesky announced.

“Obviously we can’t say what will be the policy of the next administration. That’s impossible but what we can say with great confidence is that our relationship over the years, over the decades, has been extremely strong, extremely close,” Klechesky told reporters at the Tent at Sofitel Philippine Plaza Hotel.


YASAY

Foreign Affairs Secretary Perfecto Yasay Jr. said “the election of Trump signals an opportunity for change that can result in a stronger Philippine-US relationship.”

Reboot

With the election of a new US president, the Duterte administration should now reboot its relations with Washington, senators said.

“Since this is a new administration or a new leader, we can always start with a clean slate,” Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III said.

Pimentel also congratulated the Republican Party for “having captured the White House and produced a new president.”

He also said he expects Trump and Duterte to get along well. “This is no longer Obama who commented on the program of our President in a negative way,” Pimentel said.

Senate Minority Leader Ralph Recto said that with Trump as the new US leader, Duterte should stop cursing the US and start mending fences with a long-time ally.

“Here’s what Duterte should do in the opening days of the Trump era. First, send a nice congratulatory letter. And declare a moratorium on cursing,” Senate Minority Leader Ralph Recto said in a statement.

“He (Duterte) should stop dropping F-bombs on the White House occupant. Those intercontinental expletives he fires do no good,” he said.

The senator said Duterte may send Vice President Leni Robredo to Trump’s inauguration if he cannot make it.

“Anyone with a lower rank (to the inauguration) will convey the message that we are stuck in the Chinese orbit and have downgraded our Washington presence,” Recto said, referring to Duterte’s pro-China leanings.

He said the President should consult advisers on how to reboot the country’s relations with the US, taking into account Trump’s ascendancy and the administration’s thrusts towards an independent foreign policy.

“We must be friends with whoever has won because that will be to our advantage,” Sen. Grace Poe said.

Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian expressed hope Trump’s rise would just be a continuation of stable Philippine-American trade relations.

Keep the BPOs Albay Rep. Joey Salceda said he hopes the Trump administration would keep American business process outsourcing (BPO) in the Philippines and provide citizenship to undocumented Filipinos in the US.

“His (Trump’s) anti-immigrant posture commits to deport all illegal immigrants – some 360,000 TNTs – hope he will provide a pathway to citizenship,” Salceda, a former socioeconomic planning secretary, said.

OPTIMISM

In a statement, the lawmaker also expressed optimism that despite Trump’s promise to give Americans stable jobs, American firms would still hire Filipinos for BPO operations.

“No need to waste emotions, anyway. Probably, Duterte was right in separating from the US after all,” Salceda added. “I just pray now for the best for the US and the world economy. But, Republicans are bad for Philippine interests,” he said.

The legislator said Filipinos are “competitive” and well suited for jobs in BPOs, owing to their “neutral accent, socio-cultural predisposition to Western lifestyle and $300 a month – only two days in American wages.”

Salceda, however, said he was worried about Trump’s unwillingness to keep a US promise to provide financial aid to developing nations considered most vulnerable to climate change. “So, now, who would pay for the storm damages America created?” he asked.

“On a global perspective, the US accounts for 400 of the 900 Nobel laureates, 80 percent of the best universities and being an open society, openness to immigration has helped it acquire the best of the world’s talents,” he said.

“Closing the doors, building walls may undermine this major source of global innovation. Thus, endanger the source of global growth, thus affect the Philippines which has $16-billion trade (surplus of $1.5 billion), 782,000 tourists,” he pointed out.


PERNIA

While Trump’s ascendance could spawn uncertainties in the Philippines, Duterte’s realigning with China could stave off a worse scenario, Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Ernesto Pernia said yesterday.

“We have a safety net which was foreseen by the President. He foresaw that there’s this likelihood that Trump will become (US) president so he decided to pivot to China,” Pernia said in Davao City.

“He’s a clairvoyant... We are now diversifying our friends so we don’t crash when the country you depend on is in trouble,” he said in a briefing after the Philippine Development Forum in Davao City.

During his campaign, Trump said he would ban migrants and BPOs since they are taking jobs from Americans.

“An open economy is better than a closed, inward-looking economy. Maybe some in the BPOs will be going back to the US,” he said.

But Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III said a candidate and a president are “two different people.”

“We are not sure what a Trump presidency will follow in terms of its policies,” Dominguez said. - Marvin Sy, Pia Lee-Brago, Paolo Romero, Christina Mendez, Delon Porcalla, Prinz Magtulis

------------------------------------------

RELATED FROM IBTIMES ONLINE

Duterte: 'I don't want to quarrel anymore, because Trump has won' Romil Patel By Romil Patel November 9, 2016 19:21 GMT

Filipino president adopts a conciliatory tone after frequent and hostile outbursts towards Obama.


Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte shakes hands as he arrives to meet with the Filipino community during his official visit in Kuala Lumpur, ...

Since taking office on 30 June, Rodrigo Duterte's relationship with the US has been marked by a war of words and anger over Washington's concerns about the rising death toll in his deadly war on drugs.

But the president of the Philippines was in high spirits on Wednesday (9 November) following Donald Trump's unprecedented US election victory.

Dubbed the "Trump of the East" during the Philippine election campaign, Duterte said he is looking forward to working with the incoming president and even drew similarities between the pair.

"I would like to congratulate Mr Donald Trump. Long live," Duterte said at a gathering of Filipinos in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.


PHILSTAR

Donald Trump elected 45th United States president By Julie Pace and Robert Furlow (Associated Press) | Updated November 9, 2016 - 3:43pm 8 284 googleplus0 0


Ends eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House.

Donald Trump on Wednesday earned Wisconsin's 10 electoral votes, putting him over the 270 threshold needed to win the presidential elections. AP Photo/Evan Vucci, file photo WASHINGTON (UPDATE 3, 3:58 p.m.) — Donald Trump was elected America's 45th president Tuesday, an astonishing victory for a celebrity businessman and political novice who capitalized on voters' economic anxieties, took advantage of racial tensions and overcame a string of sexual assault allegations on his way to the White House.

His triumph over Hillary Clinton will end eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House and threatens to undo major achievements of President Barack Obama. He's pledged to act quickly to repeal Obama's landmark health care law, revoke the nuclear agreement with Iran and rewrite important trade deals with other countries, particularly Mexico and Canada.

READ MORE...

The Republican blasted through Democrats' longstanding firewall, carrying Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, states that hadn't voted for a GOP presidential candidate since the 1980s. He needed to win nearly all of the competitive battleground states, and he did just that, claiming Florida, Ohio, North Carolina and others.

Global stock markets and U.S. stock futures plunged deeply, reflecting investor alarm over what a Trump presidency might mean for the economy and trade.

A New York real estate developer who lives in a sparking Manhattan high-rise, Trump forged a striking connection with white, working class Americans who feel left behind in a changing economy and diversifying country. He cast immigration, both from Latin America and the Middle East, as the root of the problems plaguing many Americans and taped into fears of terrorism emanating at home and abroad.

CONGRESS FULLY UNDER REPUBLICANS

Trump will take office with Congress expected to be fully under Republican control. GOP Senate candidates fended off Democratic challengers in key states and appeared poised to maintain the majority. Republicans also maintained their grip on the House.

Senate control means Trump will have great leeway in appointing Supreme Court justices, which could mean a major change to the right that would last for decades.

Trump upended years of political convention on his way to the White House, leveling harshly personal insults on his rivals, deeming Mexican immigrants rapists and murderers, and vowing to temporarily suspend Muslim immigration to the U.S. He never released his tax returns, breaking with decades of campaign tradition, and eschewed the kind of robust data and field efforts that helped Obama win two terms in the White House, relying instead on his large, free-wheeling rallies to energize supporters. His campaign was frequently in chaos, and he cycled through three campaign managers this year.


PHOTO AFTER HIS WINNING SPEECH WITH HIS FAMILY

His final campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, touted the team's accomplishments as the final results rolled in, writing on Twitter that "rally crowds matter" and "we expanded the map."

The mood at Clinton's party grew bleak as the night wore out, with some supporters leaving, others crying and hugging each other. Top campaign aides stopped returning calls and texts, as Clinton and her family hunkered down in a luxury hotel watching the returns.

At 2 a.m., Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta told the crowd to head home for the night. "We're still counting votes and every vote should count," he said.


CLINTON AND HER CAMPAIGN CHAIR PODESTA

Trump will inherit an anxious nation, deeply divided by economic and educational opportunities, race and culture.

Exit polls underscored the fractures: Women nationwide supported Clinton by a double-digit margin, while men were significantly more likely to back Trump.

More than half of white voters backed the Republican, while nearly 9 in 10 blacks and two-thirds of Hispanics voted for the Democrat.

Doug Ratliff, a 67-year-old businessman from Richlands, Virginia, said Trump's election would be one of the happiest days of his life.

"This county has had no hope," said Ratliff, who owns strip malls in the area badly beaten by the collapse of the coal industry. "You have no idea what it would mean for the people if Trump won. They'll have hope again. Things will change. I know he's not going to be perfect. But he's got a heart. And he gives people hope."

SWEEPING CHANGES

Trump has pledged to usher in a series of sweeping changes to U.S. domestic and foreign policy: repealing Obama's signature health care law, though he has been vague on what he could replace it with; building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border; and suspending immigration from country's with terrorism ties. He's also praised Russian President Vladimir Putin and spoken of building a better relationship with Moscow, worrying some in his own party who fear he'll go easy on Putin's provocations.

The Republican Party's tortured relationship with its nominee was evident right up to the end. Former President George W. Bush and wife Laura Bush declined to back Trump, instead selecting "none of the above" when they voted for president, according to spokesman Freddy Ford.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, a reluctant Trump supporter, called the businessman earlier in the evening to congratulate him, according to a Ryan spokeswoman.

Democrats, as well as some Republicans, expected Trump's unconventional candidacy would damage down-ballot races and even flip some reliably red states in the presidential race. But Trump held on to Republican territory, including in Georgia and Utah, where Clinton's campaign confidently invested resources.

HILARY STRUGGLED THROUGHOUT THE RACE

Clinton asked voters to keep the White House in her party's hands for a third straight term. She cast herself as heir to President Barack Obama's legacy and pledged to make good on his unfinished agenda, including passing immigration legislation, tightening restrictions on guns and tweaking his signature health care law.

But she struggled throughout the race with persistent questions about her honesty and trustworthiness. Those troubles flared anew late in the race, when FBI Director James Comey announced a review of new emails from her tenure at the State Department. On Sunday, just two days before Election Day, Comey said there was nothing in the material to warrant criminal charges against Clinton. ___

Associated Press writers Catherine Lucey, Bradley Klapper, Vivian Salama, Hope Yen, Jill Colvin and Lisa Lerer and AP Polling Director Emily Swanson contributed to this report.

-----------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

How a Donald Trump presidency can affect the Philippines By Levi A. So (philstar.com) | Updated August 5, 2016 - 9:00am 149 6830 googleplus4 2


In this Aug. 1, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in Columbus, Ohio. Hillary Clinton raised $63 million in July for her presidential campaign, her best month yet and a summertime haul that puts her ahead of President Barack Obama’s fundraising at the same point in his re-election race. AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File

MANILA, Philippines — Donald Trump started as the unlikely candidate.

He accused Mexico of sending rapists to the US, said immigrants steal jobs from Americans, pledged to ban Muslims entry to the US, threatened to commit a war crime, made misogynistic tirades, and insulted the disabled, the media, war heroes, countries and a hundred other things.

The world is keeping Trump under close scrutiny.

A poll by the Pew Research Center showed that Trump was the unpopular choice when it comes to making right decisions on world affairs, getting negative ratings in nearly every country surveyed in Europe and Asia.

Now that he has clinched the Republican nomination, Asia has all the more reason to keep a closer watch, especially as the region can lose big time if Trump and his foreign policy make it to the White House.

A slew of Trump’s plans is already sending jitters to the region. These include migration bans, trade protectionism, and the pullout of US military forces from allied countries.

Immigration

Illegal immigration is the signature issue of the Trump campaign. He has proposed a 2,000-mile wall along the US-Mexico border as part of his immigration reform plan. He also proposed to refuse all Muslims from entering the US after the December 2015 San Bernandino attacks.

His latest proposal last June was to ban immigrants “from areas of the world where there is a proven history of terrorism against the United States, Europe or our allies."

CNN crunched the numbers and came up with 40 countries, including the Philippines where two terror groups are listed, or as many as 10.2 million people who could be affected by such a policy.

In its breakdown, it said that the State Department has granted 2,561,762 nonimmigrant visas in 2015 to residents of those countries. The Philippines was issued the second most number of visas last year at 235,221.

Current counts show that there are 4 million Filipinos in the US. They sent 31.22 percent of the total worker remittance, which sustains the Philippine economy, in 2015.

Overseas Filipinos in the US also sent the most in remittances last year at $8.04 billion.

Trade

Although saying he is pro-free trade, Trump has opposed several US trade agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which he claims were poorly negotiated and led to loss of jobs for Americans

He also said he would penalize American companies that would manufacture outside the US.

As the world's manufacturing hub, Asia would get hit hard. And within Asia, the Philippines and South Korea would be the most at risk, securities firm Nomura said in an interview with Bloomberg late last month, revealing results of its investor survey.

Trump has opposed a 2012 free trade deal between the US and South Korea which he said is killing jobs in America. He also wants South Korea, which has long hosted US bases, to pay for security Americans are providing there.

PHILIPPINE EXPORTS

Meanwhile, Philippine exports to the US could be affected if tariffs are placed. The booming business process outsourcing (BPO) industry in the country would also be greatly affected if Trump brings jobs back to the US.

FT Confidential Research forecast an estimated $25.5 billion in BPO revenues this year.

Nomura's survey showed that 77 percent of respondents expect a Trump government to brand China as a currency manipulator, which could trigger a range of trade barriers.

Trade restrictions with China, the world’s largest manufacturing assembler and biggest trading partner of the US in 2015, could have substantial "knock-on effects" to other Asian countries that supply high value-added parts and components to Beijing, Nomura said.

Security

Trump promised to expand the presence of US troops in the disputed South China Sea to deter China yet, at the same time, said he would withdraw military forces from allied countries like Japan and Korea unless they “increase their contribution significantly”—a move that could threaten security in the region.

China may assert itself more prominently in the region’s geopolitics if US alliances with Japan and Korea weakens, Bonnie Glaser, director of the China Power Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, noted.

Beijing also expects Trump to focus more on the ISIS threat and less on the US pivot to Asia pushed by President Barack Obama, which is seen by many in China as a threat to its rising power, Glaser added.

Analysts are in agreement that as far as China is concerned, dealing with “businessman” Trump would be easier, if not favorable, to Beijing compared to a government led by Hillary Clinton who is seen to continue the US pivot to Asia and push for parties to abide by the Hague-based tribunal’s decision. — Video by Efigenio Toledo IV

 
How Donald Trump's foreign policies can affect... by philstarnews

---------------------------------------------------------

ANALYSIS by Lila Ramos Shahani -- PHILSTAR

Clinton, Trump and the West Philippine Sea CONJUGATIONS By Lila Ramos Shahani (philstar.com) | Updated August 1, 2016 - 12:00am 24 6268 googleplus2 1


Lila Ramos Shahani

On the day the Award of the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) was released—disallowing, among other things, Chinese nine-dash line claims—both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump issued statements of support for the process.

Clinton said: “The US has a deep and abiding interest in the South China Sea and in the free flow of commerce—so critical to our economy—that flows through it. It is important that all claimants abide by this ruling and continue to pursue peaceful, multilateral means to resolve disputes among them.”

Trump’s statement was, “We urge all parties in the dispute to respect the decision of the international court and resolve matters peacefully.”

These two, Clinton and Trump, are now, of course, the official presidential candidates of their respective parties. Come November, one of them will become the president and commander-in-chief of the United States of America. The winner will face China regarding the South China Sea, the West Philippine Sea, and our Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Our government has welcomed the PCA Award and stated that our negotiations with China will be based on it. However, the way things play out in this situation will depend much on US-Chinese relations.


Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump. AP

What those relations will be, exactly, depend very much on the policies of whoever the next US president will be. Not only do the two candidates have widely divergent views of the situation; China itself has some very distinct attitudes towards the two candidates. But first, where do the two of them stand? How do their views differ?

CLINTON AND LANGUAGE OF DIPLOMACY

Hillary Clinton, respecting language as a weapon of diplomacy and believing in “keeping our cards close to our chest,” has avoided provocative speech, but her record and history are well-known to all players. She is considered a South China Sea hawk, both in terms of freedom of navigation and treaty obligations with regional players like Japan, South Korea and the Philippines.

She is well-versed in UNCLOS and its insistence on sea claims decided by coastline rather than historical interests. Thanks to her tenure as Secretary of State, she has been considered the face of the US “pivot to Asia” and is expected to support—if not push directly—law-of-the-sea issues even more forcefully than Obama.

Her 2010 statement at an Asia-Pacific forum that South China Sea freedom of navigation was a matter of “national interest” to the US was noted around the world and prompted an angry walkout by the Chinese foreign minister.

TRUMP's POSITION CONFUSING

Trump's position, in the meantime, is even more confusing. He stokes the anger and disaffection of his supporters by railing against China for stealing American jobs; threatens to take it to task for currency manipulation; proposes a 45 percent tariff on all Chinese imports—which one assumes would include all the Trump-branded merchandise he has made there. His official campaign website, however, is devoted entirely to economic issues and only mentions freedom of navigation in passing.

But, only last week, he set off media truth meters, saying China is "in the South China Sea and (building) a military fortress the likes of which perhaps the world has not seen." Politifact rated his statement as “Half True.” He did not, however, indicate what, if anything, he intended to do.

China’s attitude towards Clinton is clear.

The 2010 walkout at the Vietnam meet was neither her first, nor latest, confrontation with Chinese officialdom. Chinese feminists remember her from a 1995 speech as first lady to the United Nations' World Conference on Women in Beijing. The speech was censored in China.

Supporting a younger generation of Chinese feminists being detained at the time, she called President Xi Jinping "shameless" on Twitter in 2015, saying his detention of five young feminists—cracking down on them while hosting a meeting on women's rights—“inexcusable.” Beijing’s state media fired back, accusing her of being a “rabble-rouser,” China-bashing to win election points.

While not getting nearly the negative media coverage she faces at home, a quasi-official newspaper editorial insisted that she “was not welcome in China” just before an official visit as US Secretary of State; a Chinese TV pundit also called her a “crazy old woman.” Even her clothes and hairstyles get openly mocked. Ultimately, however, it is her “lawyer-ly-ness” they hate and dread. She presses aggressively for rule-of-law on exactly the issues that China claims special “historic” exceptions to—including the nine-dash line—while her own sense of “American Exceptionalism” makes her see the US as policeman of the world.

MIXED RESPONSE FROM CHINA

China’s responses to Trump have been much more mixed, have evolved over time and are expressed differently by government and the public—as reflected on the internet and in media polls. At first, he, too, was mocked; was called a “big- mouthed clown” and presented as positive proof that liberal democracy was in decline. But, as he became a serious presidential contender—and as it became clear that Clinton would be his opponent—those attitudes began to change. Officialdom believes that, as president, he will be a more favorable to China than Clinton.

His stances on trade—first seen as totally outrageous—are now being talked about as little more than the negotiation points of a clever businessman. And China—convinced it has the best businessmen in the world—remains confident that it can make deals with him. They embrace his anti-Muslim xenophobia as reinforcing their own internal issues with the Uighurs—infamously fraught with human rights violations. They also consider themselves to be a nation particularly adept at “handling” egotistical world leaders.

Thousands of Chinese Internet users are literally “fans” of Trump—for a number of reasons. In the fortune-seeking atmosphere of China today, his success as a businessman inspires the “aspirational class.” The combination of business success and his frequent authoritarian pronouncements—no matter how impossible those goals might be in reality—resonate with the general belief that iron-fisted control of state capitalism is the secret of China’s success and that a businessman like Trump would be a person they could work with. And his “reality TV” persona attracts mightily—is, in fact, for many, the only reason for following the US election in the first place.

Official attitudes are somewhat more subdued. China’s leadership is frankly concerned about his statement that Japan and South Korea should develop their own nuclear weapons and quit depending upon expensive US military defense—which they never pay for. Nuclear-armed neighbors are not what China wants to see. They would, however, welcome his proposed abandonment of defense alliances with those countries and, of course, the Philippines, if at all possible. Geopolitical and foreign affairs mavens are in a rare state of agreement that Trump’s neo-isolationist plans would throw all of Asia into turmoil. That is a situation China believes it might gain benefit from.

As opposed to his neo-isolationism, Clinton has been seen as the very incarnation of American Exceptionalism & Manifest Destiny. China, therefore, favors Trump.

WHO WILL WIN

No matter who wins the US presidency, the US is a big, powerful country with a quietly entrenched bureaucracy.

Tensions between the State Department, which sees trade and diplomacy as the means of maintaining world influence, and the Defense Department, committed to geopolitical goals involving the projection of American power—and large defense budgets—as the method of maintaining American global supremacy, continue to exist.

Clinton, with her long-time supporters in the Pentagon and her experience as Secretary of State, would likely be able to strike a successful balance.

Far from being the total hawk China portrays her to be, she has played a critical role in such delicate operations as getting the Iran nuclear treaty negotiations going, first by supporting tougher financial sanctions against Iran, and then opening back-channel treaty talks.

She reached out—unsuccessfully—to the Taliban, attempting to find a peaceable solution to the Afghan conflict. And, perhaps most notably, she oversaw the rapprochement with the pro-Chinese military junta in Myanmar, setting the stage for elections and the release of Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi (whose party is now in power there) from years of house arrest.

Conversely, Trump is likely to encounter resistance from both.

The Defense Department, for instance, has pointed out that many of his proposals would constitute war crimes—and that they would refuse to obey such orders as torture or bombing cities occupied by ISIS, even if they were still filled with civilians.

They are politically outraged by what they see as Trump’s “cozying up” to Russia in general, and Putin in particular.

Every pitch the Pentagon makes before the US Congress puts Russia at the top of the list of threats to world peace, and Trump’s views that NATO is obsolete and that fulfillment of European treaty obligations should depend upon whether they’ve “paid their fair share,” leaving most Defense officials in near apoplectic silence.

The State Department is equally polarized against many of his stated policies on trade, diplomacy and treaty obligations. So, even though he and Clinton may make very similar statements about supporting PCA’s Award, the sheer ability to act upon that support is much more problematic, given a Trump presidency. This is not about anyone in this country supporting or opposing a candidate in the US election. This is about ensuring the sovereignty of the Philippines and its rights over its own EEZ—the West Philippine Sea.

In sum, Clinton, is the more hawkish candidate, and so most likely to continue current US policy in the Asia-Pacific region. Under her, American treaty obligations with the Philippines are not likely to change. Trump, on the other hand, comes across as a neo-isolationist who seems to take treaty obligations lightly. With Trump as president, we can expect a more volatile and unpredictable US policy in Asia, something that China may actually benefit from.

In the end, what we need is an independent foreign policy—one in which our national interests take precedence and set the terms for negotiating with China, the US and other states.


CNN WORLD NEWS

Weekend brings more anti-Trump protests across nation By Ray Sanchez and Azadeh Ansari CNN


THE 'NOT MY PRESIDENT' PROTEST

(CNN) -- As President-elect Donald Trump's administration begins taking shape, thousands poured onto the streets of a divided nation again Saturday to express their frustration at the stunning election result.

From New York to Los Angeles, demonstrators have marched in various American cities for four nights since Trump's unexpected victory Tuesday capped an acrimonious campaign.

While largely peaceful, the protests have resulted in blocked highways and bridges, arrests during clashes with police and the early Saturday shooting of a man at a march in Portland, Oregon.

In Los Angeles' MacArthur Park, the site of immigrant rights protests over the years, demonstrators took turns Saturday swatting a stick at a piñata resembling Trump.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, a Democrat, praised the protesters.

READ MORE...

"I've been proud of my city, proud of students out there and people who are exercising their patriotic right," he told CNN Saturday.

"I know the headlines are always the few people who jump onto a freeway or two or three people who spray paint something. We'll always deal with lawless behavior. The main story is that Americans, not just in my city but around the country, are saying we want to continue to embrace people regardless of how they worship God, who they love, where they live or even immigration status."

In New York, angry crowds -- some carrying signs with messages such as "Not my president" -- marched to the President-elect's doorstep, Trump Tower, where he lives and works.

For part of the march up Fifth Avenue, they chanted, "Donald Trump go away. Racist -- sexist -- anti-gay."

Outside the gleaming tower, demonstrators at one point booed at people standing on balconies.

"Words can't describe how disgusted I am that he was elected over Hillary (Clinton)," Shoshi "Rabin" Rabinowitz said Friday night, explaining her motivation for being near Trump Tower.

Fellow protester Nick Truesdale said, "I think he needs to really address all the divisive, hateful things he's said in the past and recant them, denounce them."

Reacting to this week's demonstrations, Trump tweeted Thursday night, "Just had a very open and successful presidential election. Now professional protesters, incited by the media, are protesting. Very unfair!"

The President-elect appeared more conciliatory Friday morning, saying: "Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have passion for our great country. We will all come together and be proud!"

Protests across US

Among the cities that were scenes of Friday protests were Los Angeles; New Haven, Connecticut; Orlando; Chicago; Boston; Asheville, North Carolina; Nashville; and Columbus, Ohio. There were also marches at schools in Denver and Omaha, Nebraska.

Groups across the country are angry about policies Trump has promised to enforce concerning immigration, the environment, LGBT rights and other issues.

The Facebook page for a protest planned in Burlington, Vermont, said: "Come protest the xenophobia, racism, homophobia, misogyny, and climate science denial of the Trump/Pence regime!! Come show your support for our Muslim, queer, immigrant, and female family!!"


Anti-Trump protest turns to riot as thousands across United States ... National Post image Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images

The protests were mostly peaceful, but some were marred by violence.

In Portland, a man was injured in a shooting early Saturday on the Morrison Bridge during a protest march.

The suspect was believed to be in a vehicle on the bridge when a confrontation unfolded with a member of the crowd, Portland police said in a statement. The suspect got out of the vehicle and fired multiple shots before fleeing.

The victim's injuries were not life-threatening, and he was treated at a hospital.

Protesters also blocked the street outside Portland City Hall on Friday. Police tried to disperse the demonstrators, but tensions remained high.

"Burning projectiles being thrown at officers," police posted on their Twitter page Friday night.

City officials earlier appealed for calm after a Thursday night protest by about 4,000 people turned violent. Windows on businesses were broken and a car dealership was vandalized. Twenty-six people were arrested, police said.

"We had some anarchists who hijacked that event and did terrible damage to our neighbors and friends," Mayor Charlie Hales said at a news conference. "They spread violence and fear and detracted from the legitimate exercise of those First Amendment rights."

In Boston, hundreds gathered on Boston Common for a "Love Rally in the Common." Organizers said on Facebook: "Let's unite together to peacefully show all of those whom Donald Trump or his supporters have put down that we still care about them, and to give them an opportunity to have their voices be heard."

Some arrests were made in Los Angeles, but the police department did not immediately provide details on the number arrested.


'Don't Vote for Racists!' Latin Grammys Include Anti-Trump Protest by Leftist Musicians

In Chicago, police told CNN they are investigating an incident this week in which a group of people reportedly beat a man while yelling that he voted for Trump.

Cell phone video captured the man in a minor traffic accident Wednesday on Chicago's West Side.

The 49-year-old driver, David Wilcox, told CNN affiliate WGN-TV that a car scraped the side of his vehicle as he was about to make a left turn at a busy intersection.

"I heard a lady yell something about 'that guy is one of those Trump supporters,' " Wilcox told the station. "I turned and said to her, 'That has nothing to do with this.'"

The situation then apparently escalated as bystanders yelled anti-Trump taunts at Wilcox. The video shows Wilcox being knocked to the pavement, repeatedly being punched and kicked as a handful of people gather around him.

Interstates blocked

In Miami, hundreds walked down Biscayne Boulevard chanting, "Love Trumps Hate," and carrying signs with messages such as "How many judges will it take to ruin America?" video from CNN affiliate WSVN-TV showed.

Some protesters walked onto Interstate 95 and surrounded cars, bringing four lanes of traffic to a standstill, according to the WSVN footage.

In Iowa City, Iowa, about 75 protesters shut down I-80 briefly, police Sgt. Chris Akers said. Nobody was arrested, he said.

In Dallas, protesters dragged and kicked a Trump piñata through the streets. A store window was reportedly smashed.

American flag burned


Over the last two weeks, anti-racism protesters across the country have burned the Star-Spangled Banner at demonstrations in Denver, New York, ...

In Atlanta, about 500 people marched downtown, said Atlanta police spokesman Lukasz Sajdak. They tried to walk onto a highway, but law enforcement officers turned them back. No arrests were made.

An American flag was burned near Georgia's state Capitol, something that didn't please protesters Sanjay and Akshita Mendonca, who say they voted for Clinton.

"The current situation is not good for us and our children," said Sanjay Mendonca, 40. "I'm here for my kids because I don't want them to think we didn't do something. ... A lot of people feel hopeless right now."

When asked why he was protesting, 20-year-old Alex Hariri said, "Trump does not support anyone in the community I know. I'm a gay Middle Eastern man. He's against everything I am."

US vs Mexico soccer game

After a presidential campaign noted for Trump's heated rhetoric on undocumented Mexican immigrants, crowds gathered to build bonds during the US-Mexico 2018 World Cup qualifier game Friday in Columbus, Ohio.

US soccer fans put politics aside as they greeted Mexican fans with high-fives.

"The atmosphere is absolutely amazing," Christian Couch said. "It's a sport that we all love, and that's why we are here. I don't think politics should play a part in this game."

Mexico beat the US 2-1.

CNN's Ralph Ellis, Khushbu Shah, Steve Visser, Joe Sutton, Rolando Zenteno, Max Blau, John Murgatroyd, Martin Savidge and Andreas Preuss contributed to this report.

TM & © 2016 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

-----------------------------------

RELATED FROM EXPRESS.CO.UK

Philippines leader vows better US ties after Trump win By VICKIIE OLIPHANT PUBLISHED: 18:06, Wed, Nov 9, 2016 | UPDATED: 18:30, Wed, Nov 9, 2016

PHILIPPINE President Rodrigo Duterte vowed he would stop quarrelling with ally the United States following the shocking election of Donald Trump.

The maverick leader, dubbed "Trump of the East", has repeatedly hit out at Washington in recent months, accusing the Barack Obama administration of failing the Philippines" and insisting he would "break up with America".

The firebrand politician called Mr Obama a "son of a b****" last month and warned him not to question his policy of extrajudicial killings which has seen around 3,000 people killed by death squads deployed in a deadly war on drugs.

President Rodrigo Duterte vowed he would stop quarrelling with ally the United States
He has also threatened to cut defence pacts and end military joint drills, as relations between the two countries continued to fall apart.

But now, the Philippine leader has pledged to forget their “quarrel” and will work together with Mr Trump to improve their relationship.


President Duterte praised Trump for his win

In a speech to the Filipino community during a visit to Malaysia, Mr Duterte said: “I would like to congratulate Mr. Donald Trump. Long live.”

"We are both making curses. Even with trivial matters we curse. I was supposed to stop because Trump is there.

“I don't want to quarrel anymore, because Trump has won."


The firebrand politician called Mr Obama a "son of a b****" last month

The 71-year-year old chief executive admitted, however, he was told to “shut up” now Mr Trump had won.

He said: "I was kind of thinking along the way -- perhaps about 30 minutes from the airport -- what would I tell you because I'm just been four months and there's been a lot of controversies, including my quarrel with America.

“I don't want to have enemy.

"They told me, since Trump won, 'Why don't you just shut up?'"

Mr Duterte won a May election by a huge margin and is often compared to Trump, having himself been the alternative candidate from outside of national politics.

He campaigned on a populist, anti-establishment platform and struck a chord among ordinary Filipinos with his promises to fix what he called a broken country.

Teddy Locsin Jr, Mr Duterte's incoming ambassador to the United Nations, said there were a few parallels between Mr Trump and Mr Duterte.

He said: ”I remember Trump in the middle of one of his statements, he said 'I will not talk like this after I become president’.

"I remember someone who also said the same thing."

The Office of Communications Secretary Martin released a statement, affirming Mr Duterte's optimism to have an "enhanced Philippines-US relations."

It read: "President Duterte wishes President-elect Trump success in the next four years as Chief Executive and commander-in chief of the US military, and looks forward to working with the incoming administration for enhanced Philippines-US relations anchored on mutual respect, mutual benefit and shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.”


PHILSTAR

Biggest supermoon in 68 years tonight By Helen Flores (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 14, 2016 - 12:00am 0 1 googleplus0 0


FILE - This Sunday, June 23, 2013 file photo shows a supermoon over the Statue of Liberty in New York. Monday, Nov. 14, 2016 will have the closest full moon of the year, or every 14 months to be precise. It will also be the closest the moon comes to us in almost 68 years. And it won't happen again for another 18 years. AP Photo/Julio Cortez

MANILA, Philippines – Under clear skies, Filipinos can witness tonight the biggest and brightest “supermoon” in 68 years.

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said the moon will pass by the earth at a distance of 356,621.611 kilometers, the closest it has passed the earth since 1948, at 7:21 p.m. tonight.

“This year’s supermoon is one of the closest and biggest in 68 years and it won’t happen again until 2034,” PAGASA said.

The moon’s average distance from the earth is 384,400 km.

READ MORE...

A supermoon or technically a “perigee full moon” is a phenomenon that occurs when a full moon coincides with the moon being the closest it gets to the earth on its orbit.

The full moon can appear as much as 14 percent larger in the sky and 30 percent brighter to the people’s eyes than at minimum size and brightness.

The word “perigee” comes from the Greek words peri, which means “near” and gee, which means “earth.”

Astronomy experts said the best way to see a supermoon is in an area with little pollution and with little to no artificial light.

The upcoming supermoon’s pull of gravity could also create higher-than-usual tides in some parts of the US.

PAGASA said during the supermoon the gravitational pull makes high tides higher and low tides lower.

Filipino fishermen know this event and so avoid fishing during full moon.

-----------------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE WEATHER NETWORK

WATCH: Get ready for the closest Full Moon in 86 years, here's when

All about the Supermoon
With Chris St. Clair.


REPORT Scott Sutherland
Meteorologist/Science Writer

Tuesday, November 8, 2016, 12:59 PM - A celestial lineup stretches across our evening sky, a filament eruption from the Sun meant another possible round of Auroras across Canada's skies, and getting ready for the closest Full Moon in 86 years! It's the Night Sky This Week!

The Moon and planets stretch out across the sky

Look up in the sky over the next few evenings, in the hour or so just after sunset, and you'll see the Moon and three planets jostling into position in a celestial lineup across the night sky.

Although not visible to the unaided eye, distant Pluto is also taking part in this display (located at the centre of the crosshairs in the animation above).

If you have very dark skies and a decent enough telescope (something with at least a 10" aperture), aim it at the trio of stars between Mars and Venus, and focus just above the middle star of the trio (which goes by the name Manubrij, or Omicron Sagittarii). It's a dim magnitude 14.24, but it's there.

Throughout the week, this arrangement will stretch out across the sky, as the Moon rises later and later, and the planets get farther apart from each other as well.

As of Friday night, Saturn is below the tree-tops in the view above, but would still be visible in flatter terrain. Beyond that, the arrangement stretches out even further, so that, by Sunday, it will stretch from the eastern horizon to the western horizon.

In these instances, I find it to be a very cool exercise to imagine a line intersecting the planets, so that you can "see" the plane of our solar system.

READ COMPLETE REPORT HERE

-----------------------------------------

RELATED(2) FROM THE INQUIRER

We light our candles–to see each other in the dark By: Fr. Tito Caluag - @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer / 07:15 AM November 13, 2016



“By your perseverance you will secure your lives.”

After the Trump victory, I saw several people—I am sure there were so many more, not to mention the memes—posting messages that we should pray more. My instinct was to agree that we need more prayers, but I started to think that we should also act more.

I came across what my good friend, Fr. Art Borja, SJ, posted, “(sigh… sigh) somewhere in the distant past—oh how so seemingly distant it is—we would say, ‘It’s better to light a candle, than curse the darkness!’”

Ah, yes, how seemingly distant it was when perseverance in prayer and action—the discernment, choice and action process of a contemplative in action—led us to light a candle that set our country on fire and the world.

Confluence of events

The recent confluence of events invites us to reflect and enter the solitude of our soul and heart, the sacred space where we encounter God. But we must move from the solitude of sacred space back into the world to do what God asks of us.

READ MORE...

Yes, please, let us enter our sacred space and may I give this “pabaon” for your consideration.

One of the lights of our modern era is Mahatma Gandhi, an epitome of perseverance. The Oscar-winning movie of his life depicts how he seemingly was a solitary candle in the dark when he started his crusade.

Despite the obstacles, he stood his ground and continued his work and advocacy through nonviolent action. The perseverance created one of the greatest movements in history, what we now call the nonviolent movement for change.

Movement for change

Parker Palmer, educator, writes about the four stages of a movement in the article “Divided No More: A Movement Approach to Educational Reform.”

First, individuals feel this disconnect or anomaly in their life, “leading divided lives,” and they decide (or at least desire) to stop living this divided life.

Second, these individuals discover each other and decide to band for mutual support, thus forming a community with this foundational inspiration of the desire and decision to regain wholeness and integrity.

Third, “empowered by community, they learn to translate ‘private problems’ into public issues.”

Fourth, “alternative rewards emerge to sustain the movement’s vision, which may force the conventional reward system to change.”

The divided life is basically a disconnect between our interior and exterior lives. As many spiritual and psychology writers say: welcome to the human situation. Yet this discovery of our dividedness is an invitation to reflect and make a choice to live our life divided no more and to reintegrate.

Perseverance

This requires choice and such a choice needs prayer and reflection that will guide us to the right action. This is perseverance, to be consistently a contemplative in action in the same way Gandhi was and gave birth to the nonviolent movement; in the same way Ignatius of Loyola did that led to the founding of the Society of Jesus; in the same way—the most excellent way—that Christ lived his life and opened for us the way to eternal life of justice, peace and love.

He showed with his own life of perseverance that, indeed, it is the path to secure one’s life and eternal life at that.

So it is that we must start our movement that leads to eternal life where true justice and equality, and peace and love reign. This is the real change, the only real change that transforms our life towards real justice and peace that finds fulfillment in real love.

We must light our candles to discover each other in the darkness. Darkness does not extinguish light; it dies only when we allow it to die. Christ is the light that will shatter the darkness.

As the first reading from Isaiah in the Christmas Midnight Mass prophesies, “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom a light has shone.”

There are no accidents in God’s plan. This is what I believe in and this is what gives me hope. A light will shine and “by your perseverance you will secure your lives.”

To live in faith and hope in this promise is what will form us as a community and it is only in such a community, as Palmer points out, that we will be empowered individually and collectively.

Let us light our candles and “go forth and set the world on fire.” This is the real change. —CONTRIBUTED


MANILA STANDARD

Du30 eyes best of both worlds: Keeps US ties, but leans toward China

posted November 12, 2016 at 12:01 am by Sara Susanne D. Fabunan


SINGING A SONG. Visiting President Rodrigo Duterte and host Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak go ‘shalala lala in the morning/in the sunshine/in the evening’—popularized by the Dutch Eurodance group Vengaboys—as they sing to the high nines, having fun together with the intermission number during the state banquet hosted by the latter at the Perdana Putrajaya Thursday.

PRESIDENT Rodrigo Duterte declared Friday that he would continue to shift the Philippines toward China despite Donald Trump’s victory in the US presidential election.

At an early morning briefing in Davao, Duterte said that while the US would remain a friend and ally, the Philippines’ foreign policy was now geared toward China and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

“I will pursue what I’ve started,” Duterte said following his return from a state visit to Malaysia. “My partnership with China and the rest of Asean will remain. I am not in the habit of reneging on my word.”

Duterte called himself “just a small molecule in the planet” compared with Trump. “He is now president of the most powerful country in the world,” Duterte said. “What we share in common is the passion to serve.”

READ MORE...

In a state visit to China last month, Duterte announced a formal “separation” from the US and said he wanted to pivot to China and Russia -- widening a split with his nation’s biggest security ally. Since being sworn in as president in June, Duterte has vowed to end joint military exercises with the US, called for American soldiers to leave the southern island of Mindanao, and told President Barack Obama to “go to hell.”

Even so, with the two countries still bound by several agreements including a mutual defense treaty, Duterte said the Philippines would maintain its cooperation with the US.

“It is still part of trying to play off the United States against China,” said Segundo Romero, a professorial lecturer in development studies at the Ateneo de Manila University.

“His anti-US stance is a mix of sentiments against country and against its leadership.”

In a statement on Wednesday, Duterte said he looked forward to enhancing Philippine-US relations under a future Trump administration, adding that they were “anchored on mutual respect, mutual benefit and shared commitment to democratic ideals and the rule of law.”

PH-US FIRENDSHIP NEVER CHANGED

An official from the American embassy, meanwhile, said the long-standing friendship has never changed.

In a television interview, US Embassy press attachè Molly Koscina noted that since the friendship started 70 years ago, the relationship between Manila and Washington has grown stronger.

“There have be no changes on our side,” Koscina said in an interview on the show Unang Balita.

“I just want to remind you that the US-Philippine relationship has spanned 70 years and in those 70 years there are 12 presidents, both Republican and Democratic. And through this time, our relationship has only grown stronger,” she said.

Following Trump’s victory, US embassies all throughout the world, including its posting in the Philippines, are preparing a smooth transition for President-elect Donald Trump.

Koscina said President Barrack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry are now coordinating with the incoming administration to ensure effective transition.

Trump’s victory shocked the world on Tuesday, sending the US on an uncertain path.

Trump, 70 years old, a real-estate developer and former reality TV host, is the oldest and 45th President of the US. With Bloomberg

PRESIDENTIAL PARTY TIME IN MALAYSIA

 
https://youtu.be/t-ZgeZO5BF8?t=97

Party time! Philippine leader Duterte, Malaysian PM Najib show off karaoke skills RT RT Subscribe1,955,129 Published on Nov 11, 2016 Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak show off their karaoke skills at a state dinner in the Malaysian city of Putrajaya on Thursday.

Duterte sang Bette Midler's ‘Wind Beneath My Wings’ while Najib chose Cliff Richard's ‘The Young Ones’. Duterte & Najib also sang in duet performing ‘Sha-La-La-La-La-La’ by The Walkers.

RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air


MANILA STANDARD (EDITORIAL)

Analysts see Trump as problem for Du30 posted November 10, 2016 at 12:01 am by Sara Susanne D. Fabunan


US President-elect Donald Trump arrives at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Trump stunned America and the world Wednesday, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB

THE Philippines will have to deal with an American president who sees Filipinos as freeloaders, a political analyst said after learning that Donald Trump had won the US elections.

“Trump… doesn’t have a foreign policy,” said Ramon Casiple of the Institute for Political and Electoral Reform. “Relying on his campaign pronouncements, then, the Philippines will have to deal with a US president who is very much of a position that sees the Philippines as a freeloader.”

Casiple, who spoke on the sidelines of a US election-watch party at the Sofitel Plaza in Pasay City, said it was unclear how Trump would accept President Rodrigo Duterte’s independent foreign policy stance.

He said Trump could play hardball with Duterte, given his pivot away from the US and toward China.

READ MORE...

He added that the 70 years of longstanding relationship between the US and the Philippines could be crucial, given the shifting directions in foreign policy.

The victory of Trump, a real estate developer and former reality TV host, shocked the world on Tuesday and put the United States on an uncertain path.

During the US election watch party organized by the US Embassy, diplomats, Filipino officials and university students were stunned on learning of Trump’s victory.

US EMBASSY AFTER CLINTON LOSS

As soon as the electoral votes reached to 115 versus 147, in favor of Trump, the US Embassy suddenly wrapped up the party without finishing the whole count.

The auditorium turned quiet while the US Embassy staff quietly packed up. This was in contrast to the celebratory election watch in 2012, when US President Barack Obama won reelection.

US Embassy press attaché Molly Koscina said they were looking forward to working with the President-elect and the transition team to ensure a peaceful transfer of power.

“In our democratic system, the American people are responsible for deciding who the next President will be. We look forward to working with the President-elect and the transition team to ensure a peaceful transfer of power, as the State Department has done with each new President for well over 200 years,” she said.

US Chargé d’Affaires Michael Klecheski said he was confident that the American’s “extremely strong” ties with Filipinos will continue.

University of the Philippines professor and maritime expert Jay Batongbacal said a Trump presidency would be “more withdrawn in foreign affairs and less proactive in Asia.”

“That means less unwanted attention for Philippine affairs which would be good news for President Duterte,” he said.

But he also warned that with Trump’s “isolationist and anti-immigrant attitudes” will cause a backlash against Filipinos living in the US.


PHILSTAR

'Excellent' first meeting for Obama, Trump By Julie Pace (Associated Press) | Updated November 11, 2016 - 2:41am 0 96 googleplus0 0


President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

WASHINGTON — In a cordial beginning to their transfer of power, President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump met at the White House Thursday. Obama called the 90-minute meeting "excellent," and his successor said he looked forward to receiving the outgoing president's "counsel."

At the close of the Oval Office sit-down, Obama said to Trump, "We now are going to want to do everything we can to help you succeed because if you succeed the country succeeds."

The two men, who have been harshly critical of each other for years, were meeting for the first time, Trump said. The Republican called Obama a "very good man" and said he looked forward "to dealing with the president in the future, including counsel."

READ MORE...

Obama blasted Trump throughout the campaign as unfit to serve as a commander in chief. Trump spent years challenging the legitimacy of Obama's presidency, falsely suggesting Obama may have been born outside the United States.

But at least publicly, the two men appeared to put aside their animosity. As the meeting concluded and journalists scrambled out of the Oval Office, Obama smiled at his successor and explained the unfolding scene.


Trump meets with Obama at White House in symbolic start to transition of power - Chicago Tribune

WATCH ON VIDEO: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/91876532-132.html

If Trump makes good on his campaign promises, he'll wipe away much of what Obama has done during his eight years in office. The Republican president-elect, who will govern with Congress fully under GOP control, has vowed to repeal Obama's signature health care law and dismantle the landmark nuclear accord with Iran.

First lady Michelle Obama also met privately in the White House residence with Trump's wife, Melania, while Vice President Joe Biden prepared to see Vice President-elect Mike Pence later Thursday.

Trump traveled to Washington from New York on his private jet, breaking with protocol by not bringing journalists in his motorcade or on his plane to document his historic visit to the White House. Trump was harshly critical of the media during his campaign and for a time banned news organizations whose coverage he disliked from his events.


ABC NEWS SPECIAL REPORT

From the White House, Trump headed to Capitol Hill for meetings with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky to discuss the GOP legislative agenda. Ryan, who holds the most powerful post in Congress, was a sometime critic of Trump, was slow to endorse him and did not campaign with the nominee. Pence intended to join both meetings.

As scores of journalists waited to be admitted to the Oval Office to see Obama and Trump together, they saw White House chief of staff Denis McDonough walking along the South Lawn driveway with Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law. A handful of Trump aides trailed them.

SHOW OF CIVILITY

The show of civility at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue contrasted with postelection scenes of protests across a politically divided country. Demonstrators from New England to the heartland and the West Coast vented against the election winner on Wednesday, chanting "Not my president," burning a papier-mache Trump head, beating a Trump pinata and carrying signs that said "Impeach Trump."


ABC NEWS SPECIAL REPORT - blob:http://abcnews.go.com/427e86d7-d98c-43e9-a477-a508153ebfee

Republicans were emboldened by Trump's stunning victory over Hillary Clinton, giving the GOP control of the White House and both chambers of Congress.

"He just earned a mandate," Ryan said.

In an emotional concession speech, Clinton said her crushing loss was "painful and it will be for a long time" and acknowledged that the nation was "more divided than we thought."

Still, Clinton was gracious in defeat, declaring: "Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead."


Trump ditches the media as he travels to meet with Obama. Waiting for Trump People stand on the steps of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, next to the White House in Washington, on Nov. 10, 2016, as they wait for the arrival of President-elect Donald Trump for his meeting with President Barack Obama. (Susan Walsh / AP) CHICAGO TRIBUNE

In Washington, Trump's scant transition team sprang into action, culling through personnel lists for top jobs and working through handover plans for government agencies. A person familiar with the transition operations said the personnel process was still in its early stages, but Trump's team was putting a premium on quickly filling key national security posts. The person was not authorized to discuss details by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.

According to an organizational chart for the transition obtained by The Associated Press, Trump was relying on experienced hands to help form his administration. National security planning was being led by former Michigan Rep. Mike Rogers, who previously worked for the FBI. Domestic issues were being handled by Ken Blackwell, a former Cincinnati mayor and Ohio secretary of state.


Donald and Melania Trump Will Meet With Barack and Michelle Obama at the White House on Thursday FROM ET ONLINE

Trump was expected to consider several loyal supporters for top jobs, including former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani for attorney general or national security adviser and campaign finance chairman Steve Mnuchin for Treasury secretary. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker were also expected to be under consideration for foreign policy posts.

As president-elect, Trump is entitled to get the same daily intelligence briefing as Obama — one that includes information on U.S. covert operations, information gleaned about world leaders and other data gathered by America's 17 intelligence agencies. The White House said it would organize two exercises involving multiple agencies to help Trump's team learn how to respond to major domestic incidents.


The president-elect was accompanied by his wife, Melania, who had a meeting with First Lady Michelle Obama. Trump and Obama in Oval Office  He, along with Vice-President-elect Mike Pence, then met Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan, saying they "can't get started fast enough, whether it's healthcare or immigration". Mr Ryan described it as a "fantastic, productive meeting". COURTESY OF THE BBC UK Image copyrightEUROPEAN PRESS AGENCY

WATCH ON ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT VIDEO: http://alturl.com/cyn6v ___

AP writer Jonathan Lemire in New York contributed to this report.

-----------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Coast-to-coast protests vs Trump 12:09 AM November 11, 2016


Protesters Donald Trump’s presidential election march around Campus Martius Park, Wednesday Nov. 9, 2016, in Detroit. A day after Trump’s election to the presidency, campaign divisions appeared to widen as many thousands of demonstrators flooded streets across the country to protest his surprise triumph. AP

CHICAGO—The raw divisions exposed by the presidential race were on full display across America on Wednesday, as protesters flooded city streets expressing shock and anger over Donald Trump’s surprise election as the 45th president of the United States.

From New England to heartland cities like Kansas City and along the West Coast, thousands of demonstrators carried flags and anti-Trump signs, disrupting traffic and declaring that they refused to accept Trump’s triumph.

Protests happened in major cities, including Boston, Chicago, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and Washington, and on college campuses in California, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

‘Not my president’

In Chicago, where thousands had recently poured into the streets to celebrate the Chicago Cubs’ first World Series victory in over a century, several thousand people marched through the Loop.

They gathered outside Trump Tower, chanting “Not my president!”

Chicago resident Michael Burke said he believed the president-elect would “divide the country and stir up hatred.”

He added there was a constitutional duty not to accept that outcome.

In New York, thousands of protesters filled streets in midtown Manhattan as they made their way to Trump Tower, Trump’s gilded home on Fifth Avenue, where police installed barricades to keep the demonstrators at bay.

Demonstrators gathered in Union Square holding signs saying “Love Trumps Hate” and “Trump Grabbed America by the Pussy!” before marching down in the thousands to chant in front of Trump Tower.

System broken

“The Electoral College is broken,” protester Nicholas Forker said of the US indirect voting system. “I think it definitely needs to be reformed. . .I think it’s ridiculous.”

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton appears to be on pace to win the popular vote, despite losing the electoral count that decides the presidential race.

Hundreds of protesters gathered near Philadelphia’s City Hall despite chilly, wet weather.

Participants—who included supporters of both Clinton and independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who lost to Clinton in the primary—expressed anger at both Republicans and Democrats over the election’s outcome.

‘Impeach Trump’

In Boston, thousands of anti-Trump protesters streamed through downtown, chanting “Trump’s a racist” and carrying signs that said “Impeach Trump” and “Abolish Electoral College.”

The protesters gathered on Boston Common before marching toward the Massachusetts Statehouse, with beefed-up security including extra police officers.

A protest that began at the Minnesota State Capitol on Tuesday night with about 100 people swelled as it moved into downtown St. Paul.

Protesters blocked downtown streets and traveled west on University Avenue where they shouted expletives about Trump in English and Spanish.

There were other Midwest protest marches in Omaha, Nebraska, and Kansas City, Missouri.

Students walk out

In Des Moines, Iowa, hundreds of students walked out of area high schools at 10:30 a.m. to protest Trump’s victory.

The protests, which were coordinated on social media, lasted 15 to 45 minutes.

Marchers protesting Trump’s election chanted and carried signs in front of the Trump International Hotel in Washington.

Media outlets broadcast video Wednesday night showing a peaceful crowd in front of the new downtown hotel. Many chanted “No racist USA, no Trump, no KKK.”

Another group stood outside the White House. They held candles, listened to speeches and sang songs.

Dallas activists gathered by the dozens outside the city’s sports arena, American Airlines Center.

In Oregon, dozens of people blocked traffic in downtown Portland, burned American flags and forced a delay for trains on two light-rail lines.

Earlier, the protest in downtown drew several Trump supporters, who taunted the demonstrators with signs.

A lone Trump supporter was chased across Pioneer Courthouse Square and hit in the back with a skateboard before others intervened.

Several thousand chanting, sign-waving people gathered at Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland, California.

A night earlier, in the hours after Trump won the election, Oakland demonstrators broke windows and did other damage.

In San Francisco, hundreds marched along Market Avenue, one of the city’s main avenues, to join a vigil in the Castro District, a predominantly gay neighborhood.

Trump effigy burned


Mexicans burn Donald Trump effigies in Easter ritual - Business Insider

In Los Angeles, protesters on the steps of City Hall burned a giant papier-mâché Trump head in protest. Later, in the streets, they whacked a Trump piñata.

Hundreds massed in downtown Seattle streets.

Many held anti-Trump and Black Lives Matter signs and chanted slogans, including “Misogyny has to go,” and “The people united, will never be defeated.”

Five people were shot and injured in an area near the protest, but police said the shootings and the demonstration were unrelated.

Back in New York, several groups of protesters caused massive gridlock as police mobilized to contain them under a light rain.

They held signs that read “Trump Makes America Hate” and chanted “hey, hey, ho, ho Donald Trump has got to go.” and “Impeach Trump.”

Police said they arrested 15 people. —REPORTS FROM AP, AFP AND NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE


CONTINUE >> TO NEXT HEADLINE NEWS

GO TO >> PRESIDENT DU30 NEWS THIS PAST WEEK


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

 EMAIL:  PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE 
© Copyright, 2016 All rights reserved


BACK TO PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE