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FILIPINOS IN JAPAN OPTIMISTIC ABOUT CHANGES DUTERTE IS MAKING
[RELATED: Duterte ready to quit once federalism is complete]

[RELATED(2): The federalist papers: The Abueva draft]


OCTOBER 27 -Filipinos get together for lunch after attending Mass at Catholic Koiwa Church in Edogawa Ward, Tokyo, on Sunday. | DAISUKE KIKUCHI NATIONAL While all eyes are glued on new Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and his brutal crackdown on drug traffickers, Filipinos living in Japan appear optimistic about the changes he is making back home and hope ties between the two nations will grow stronger. Duterte, also known for making controversial comments is arriving Tuesday for a three-day visit to Japan, his first here since he assumed office in June. “I can’t wait to see” Duterte make many changes in the Philippines, said 52-year-old housewife Jocelyn Otsuka, who has lived in Japan for 25 years. She was interviewed by The Japan Times while visiting Catholic Koiwa Church in Edogawa Ward, Tokyo, on Sunday. She said she supports Duterte in his war against the drug trade. READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte ready to quit once federalism is complete...RELATED(2) The federalist papers: The Abueva draft ...

ALSO:
Duterte says God told him to stop cursing
{"So, I promise God to ... not express slang, cuss words and everything. So you guys hear me right always because (a) promise to God is a promise to the Filipino people.")
[RELATED: Bishop says conscience, not God, spoke to the President]


OCTOBER 29-Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks to journalists after inspecting a coast guard training demonstration at a Japan Coast Guard base in Yokohama, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016. Duterte is on a three-day official visit to Japan, his first as Philippine leader. AP/Eugene Hoshiko
The foul-mouthed Philippine president, who once called the pope a "son of a bitch" and told Barack Obama to "go to hell," says he has promised to God he won't spew expletives again. President Rodrigo Duterte's profanities have become his trademark, especially when threatening to kill drug dealers as part of his war on illegal drugs that has left thousands dead since he took office at the end of June. Duterte made the stunning pledge on arrival in his southern hometown of Davao city late Thursday from a trip to Japan. READ MORE...RELATED, Bishop says conscience, not God, spoke to the President...

ALSO: ON SATURDAY ALMOST SLIPPED - Rody stops self from new curse
[SWS: Duterte cabinet gets ‘good’ net satisfaction rating Sec. Andanar vows cabinet would not rest on its laurels]


OCTOBER 30 -President Rodrigo Duterte
A DAY after he claimed God admonished him for cursing, President Rodrigo Duterte almost slipped as he criticized the United States on Saturday but caught himself on time from blurting another expletive for which he has become world famous. “You already know that a mayor has already been killed. We should really avoid drugs because it will really destroy our country,” Duterte said during the launching of P59 billion worth of anti-poverty projects at the Shariff Kabunsuan Cultural Center in Cotabato City. “Believe me. You will see in my hometown that the teeth of elderly people are worn out, just like drug addicts. Whenever they have money, they spend it on shabu. I said, you sons...,” Duterte said stopping himself, then quickly told his audience. “You watch over me.” READ MORE...RELATED,
SWS: Duterte cabinet gets ‘good’ net satisfaction rating Sec. Andanar vows cabinet would not rest on its laurels...

ALSO: Duterte praises Japan for help to Philippines


OCTOBER 26 -Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, right, is greeted by Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida upon his arrival at a Japanese restaurant for dinner in Tokyo Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Duterte arrived in Japan earlier in the day for a three-day visit, his first since becoming Philippine leader at the end of June. (Kazushige Fujikake/Kyodo News via AP)
TOKYO—President Duterte was all praises for Japan for all the assistance it was providing the Philippines, but could not contain his anger and once more lashed out at the United States and the European Union for their criticism of his antidrug war.  In a profanity-laced speech before 1,200 members of the Filipino community in Japan, Mr. Duterte called the United States a bully and said he was not fazed even if critics would file cases against him. He is immune from suit as President, but he could be charged once he’s out of office. READ MORE...

ALSO: Japan’s Abe flashes the fist, Duterte-style
[RELATED: Duterte describes Japan visit a ‘defining moment’ for the two countries]


OCTOBER 28 -Photo shared by PMS head Secretary Bong Go on Facebook shows Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Duterte with Filipino and Japanese officials flashing Duterte’s trademark fist gesture.
TOKYO – On their first meeting on the side of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations summit in Laos last September, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told President Duterte that he was “quite a famous figure” in Japan and that he was “very excited” to see him in person. As he welcomed Duterte here for a visit upon his country’s invitation, Abe again let loose a bit by posing for a photo with the Philippine leader doing the signature fist bump. It was more than what was expected of the Japanese leader in extending his hand of friendship. The Japanese, after all, are known for being sticklers for protocol and seriousness. Abe was also happy to note that Duterte was fond of Japanese food and one of their bilateral meetings lasted 72 minutes.  READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte describes Japan visit a ‘defining moment’ for the two countries...

ALSO: EDITORIAL - DU30’s separation from America


OCTOBER 29 -Duterte Announces Philippine 'Separation' from US Last October 20, 2016 11:57 during the Philippines-China Trade and Investment Forum in Beijing. SOURCE VON ASIA NEWS
AS he himself admitted, he could not possibly separate the Philippines and our Republic from America– severe ties with the USA. These ties are formalized through treaties. It would need acts of our Congress to break those ties. That is why he said he only meant the separation to be between him—the individual Rodrigo Roa Duterte—and the USA and possibly by inference American human beings. And he made this more manifest by speaking to the Chinese leaders and the Chinese people about his affection for China and his being politically, economically and even militarily attracted to China and the Chinese. That unfortunate display of sentimentality, which we know must have disappointed not just the Americans but also those Chinese whose high hopes in their country’s foreign affairs is to become a friend of the United States and of the Philippines and the Filipinos they prize for being the “Americans of Asia.” Those who study Chinese-Philippine relations rigorously do not lose sight of this fact of our being. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Filipinos in Japan optimistic about changes Duterte is making


OCTOBER 27 -Filipinos get together for lunch after attending Mass at Catholic Koiwa Church in Edogawa Ward, Tokyo, on Sunday. | DAISUKE KIKUCHI NATIONAL

MANILA, OCTOBER 31, 2016 (JAPAN TIMES) BY DAISUKE KIKUCHI STAFF WRITER OCT 24, 2016 - While all eyes are glued on new Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and his brutal crackdown on drug traffickers, Filipinos living in Japan appear optimistic about the changes he is making back home and hope ties between the two nations will grow stronger.

Duterte, also known for making controversial comments is arriving Tuesday for a three-day visit to Japan, his first here since he assumed office in June.

“I can’t wait to see” Duterte make many changes in the Philippines, said 52-year-old housewife Jocelyn Otsuka, who has lived in Japan for 25 years.

She was interviewed by The Japan Times while visiting Catholic Koiwa Church in Edogawa Ward, Tokyo, on Sunday.

She said she supports Duterte in his war against the drug trade.

READ MORE...

In September, Duterte said he would be “happy to slaughter” an estimated 3 million addicts in the Philippines. So far, roughly 4,000 suspected dealers and users have been killed.

Human Rights Watch said last month that “the Philippine government should invite an independent investigation involving the United Nations into allegations of direct involvement by President Rodrigo Duterte in extrajudicial killings.”

Despite international criticism of these killings, Otsuka said she believes Duterte’s decision is necessary to be able to make changes in her home country.

“We had the same president for a long time, but nothing has changed,” but Duterte will follow through on his promises, Otsuka said.

“Extrajudicial killings are only for bad people … for the pushers, the drug lords … and not for the innocent people. He’s fighting for our rights, especially toward the pushers, illegal drugs and corruption,” she said.

Eri Ito, 48, said corruption is a major problem in the Philippines and she wants Duterte to stamp it out.

“The past few presidents were terrible. They were all thieves,” Ito said. “They just didn’t think anything and put money into their pockets.”

Ann Cabritit, 50, agreed, and said, “I’m happy because the Philippines will be very clean.”

Marizel Suzuki, 42, who runs a company, recalled growing up in the Philippines and said the drug trade has ravaged her home country.

“I think the situation is better now because a person addicted to drugs will not be able to buy it anymore. (Duterte) knows what he wants to change,” said Suzuki, who was also visiting the church.

During Duterte’s visit, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is reportedly looking to offer ¥5 billion in loans, aimed at facilitating agricultural development on the southern island of Mindanao, where Davao City is situated.

As longtime mayor of that city, Duterte occasionally attended receptions at the Japanese Consulate there to mark Emperor Akihito’s birthday, indicating he carries a favorable view of Japan, unlike, according to some of his recent comments, the way he feels about the United States.

During a visit last week to Beijing, Duterte announced a “separation” from the U.S., not so long after he called President Barack Obama a “son of a bitch.” Duterte later corrected himself and explained that he did not mean he will totally cut ties with Washington.

“Many Japanese people live there (in Davao), and they provide support to the Filipino people there. That’s why President Duterte knows the heart of the Japanese people,” said Otsuka, adding that she expects Duterte to strengthen bonds between the two countries, since financial backing from Japan would be an important source in revitalizing the Philippine economy.

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RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

Duterte ready to quit once federalism is complete Written by Ted Tuvera Sunday, 30 October 2016 00:00

President Rodrigo Duterte yesterday said he will no longer wait for his six-year term to be finished and readily give up his position if the country has already shifted to a federal form of government.

The country currently has a unitary presidential form of government.

“If that is finished in three years, you can count on it, I give you my word, if the framework is already there, I will resign to give way to a new president. You’ll have nothing more to think of,” he said during the launching of the Comprehensive Reform and Development Agenda for the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao and other Conflict Areas in Regions IX, X and XII in Cotabato City.

“Just hurry up the process... I myself will say it: I will go. I will no longer wait for six years. Just hurry up the process.”

Duterte has been pushing federalism, saying this will promote development in the countryside and address the longstanding conflict in Mindanao.

It had been the centerpiece of Duterte’s presidential campaign.

During his first State of the Nation Address on July 25, Duterte said he was willing to resign if a federal form of government would be adopted.

He added he would no longer run for President if the system would push through.

DUTERTE'S FEDERALIST FORM OF GOVT

Under Duterte’s federal set-up, the states will be largely autonomous and allowed to retain most of their income, rather than remitting it to the central government, which he believes will be a key driver of economic growth in the impoverished countryside.

He has said the central government would retain essential national functions, such as defense, foreign policy and customs.

Duterte’s political party, the PDP-Laban — is also leaning toward a presidential form of federal government.

Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III, a partymate of the President, has earlier said said Congress would be ready to tackle the constitutional changes by January after finalizing the Duterte administration’s first national budget.

But amending the Constitution is a highly sensitive subject in the country.

Lawmakers have not touched it since it was rewritten in 1987 following the “People Power” revolution that overthrew the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos. The Charter was redrawn to put in place safeguards to avoid another dictatorship, including limiting presidents to a single term of six years.

Tentative attempts by previous presidents to revise the Constitution failed amid strong opposition from groups that feared the leaders were merely seeking to extend their reigns. Last modified on Saturday, 29 October 2016 14:36

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RELATED(2) FROM THE MANILA STANDARD

The federalist papers: The Abueva draft posted October 30, 2016 at 12:01 am by Virgilio C. Galvez

FEDERALISM has long been imagined as an alternative to the current system of government. Its proponents admit, however, that it is not the silver bullet that will slay the monsters of poverty, corruption, and inequality that continue to plague the nation.

The Abueva draft


By Jose V. Abueva Chairman of the Consultative Commission President of Kalayaan College at Riverbanks, Marikina UP Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Administration (c) Abueva-Why-Change-from-Unitary-to-Federal-Republic.pdf http://federalmovement.rpweb.ph/?p=361

“A federal-parliamentary democracy is not proposed as a panacea or cure all for our myriad ills as a nation. There is no such thing as a cure all,” says Jose V. Abueva, chairman of the Citizen’s Movement for a Federal Philippines (CMFP), in his paper on federalism.

He views it as the appropriate structure that will nurture and promote ‘good governance’ and facilitate the “redistribution of power, wealth and opportunities in our unjust society ruled by an oligarchy.”

Abueva headed the Consultative Commission created on Aug. 19, 2005 by then President Gloria Arroyo to draft a new charter. In December, Abueva submitted a draft proposing a federal system and liberalization of the economic provisions in the 1987 constitution.

Arroyo, however, dropped the federalism proposal and only pushed for the adoption of a unicameral, parliamentary government through a people’s initiative. The Supreme Court would eventually junk, by an 8-7 vote, a petition for the holding of a plebiscite on the draft amendment.

The proposed Federal Republic in the Abueva draft would have a federal government based in Clark Economic Zone, in Angeles, Pampanga and 11 regional Estados or governments: 1. Bangsamoro (ARMM), 2. Davao region and Central Mindanao, 3. Zamboanga Peninsula and Northern Mindanao, 4. Central and Eastern Visayas, 5. Western Visayas-Palawan, 6. Southern Luzon, 8. Metro Manila (NCR), 9. Central Luzon, 10. Cordillera, and 11. Northern Luzon.

The Federal government would be responsible only for national security and defense, foreign relations, currency and monetary policy, citizenship, civil, political and other human rights, immigration, customs, the Supreme Court, the Constitutional Tribunal, and the Court of Appeal, and such functions of federal governments.

The 11 Estados and the local governments, on the other hand, would take care of functions and services “that impact directly on the lives of the people including peace and justice; agriculture and fisheries; energy, environment and natural resources; trade, industry and tourism, labor and employment, public works, transportation and communication; health; basic education, science and technology; culture (language, culture and the arts); social welfare and development; and public safety and police.”

Parlamento

In Abueva’s draft, the executive and legislative powers would be lodged in the Parlamento which shall be divided into the House of the People (Sambayanan) and the House of the States (Balay Estados or Senado).

Sambayanan representatives will be elected in parliamentary districts while Senadores will be elected by members of the Batasang Estados or State Assemblies. The Parlamento will elect the Prime Minister from among themselves, who will, in turn, form a Cabinet composed mostly of members of the Parlamento. A ceremonial President will be elected for a term of 5 years by the Parlamento and State Assemblies.

Judicial power will be vested in a Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. A Constitutional Tribunal will also be created which will solely resolve disputes involving the constitutionality of the decisions and actions of the Federal government and the States.

A Federal Civil Service shall also be created which will be source of professional career executives and administrative staff of the Federal government.

Regional government

As envisioned in the Abueva draft, the State Assembly exercises executive and legislative powers. The members of the Assembly will be elected from each State Assembly district, except for Metro Manila whose assembly will be composed of the mayors of the local government units.

The State Assembly will elect a State Governor and Vice Governor. The Governor will form the State Council (Cabinet) who will be composed mostly of members of the State Assembly.

Local government units that exist at the time of the new constitution’s approval will be retained. Judicial power will be lodged in a State Superior Court, Regional Trial Courts, Municipal Courts and other inferior courts. A State Civil Service will also be created at the regional government level.

The Abueva Parlamento will be composed of 299 representatives in the Batasang Estado and 28 Senadores in the Balay Estados.

Transitions

Recognizing the uneven political, economic, fiscal, and administrative capacities of the proposed regional Estados and resources within their jurisdictions, the Abueva draft proposes a transition period of 10 years from the adoption of the new charter.

“The more developed and ready among the States shall become fully operative on the first five years…and the less developed in the next five years.” It provides however that the Bangsamoro and Cordillera federal regions “shall be enabled to become operative in the first five years.”

Araneta Bayanikasan

One of the first advocates of Federalism was Dr. Salvador Z. Araneta who presented his draft Bayanikasan Constitution to the 1972 Constitutional Convention.

Araneta, a nationalist and advocate of Filipino First policies, coined Bayanikasan from the phrase Lakas ng Bayan which he said reflects the “the strength each citizen must possess to build a ‘good society, a great nation.’

His draft charter was endorsed by the Philippine Constitutional Association but did not gain support from a convention that was embroiled in the political maneuvers of the day—with the delegates divided into anti and pro-Marcos camps.

A distinguishing feature of the proposed Federal Republic envisioned by Araneta is that power is shared by a troika—the President, Prime Minister and the Speaker of Parliament. This will also be the case for the regional state governments.

Collective leadership

The Federal Troika will be elected by Parliament and renounce all party affiliations upon their election to office. The top three in the voting shall be elected as President, Prime Minister, and Speaker of Parliament.

Araneta dismissed concerns that his idea would be a case of too many cooks spoiling the broth because the Bayanikasan troika would each be working on different dishes.

The President shall supervise the Ministry of National Identity, Culture and Education, the Ministry of National Affairs, and the Ministry of National Defense, as well as the Authorities that may be created, and are related to those ministries.

The Prime Minister has jurisdiction over all other Ministries of the Federal Government related to the domestic and economic problems and such Authorities, as may be created to support those Ministries.

The Speaker of Parliament shall preside at all the meetings of Parliament and direct its affairs. He will also decide on all conflicts of jurisdiction between the President and the Prime Minister. In addition, he will participate in the preparation of the program of government to be submitted annually and from time to time to Parliament.”

Five regional states

Araneta’s draft proposes the creation of regional states: Northern Luzon, Southern Luzon, Visayas, Christian Mindanao, and Muslim Mindanao. Metro Manila will be the seat of the Federal government which shall have control over the capital.

The unicameral Parliament, whose representatives will come from each State, will be responsible for the delineation of the boundaries of the five States.

The State Troika will be made up of a Governor General, the Premier, and the Speaker of the State assembly. The Governor General shall have jurisdiction over peace and order, justice, culture, education, media, and all matters related to the development of human resources “in the spirit of an effective and meaningful democracy for all,” as well as interstate and State and Federal relations.

The Premier shall have supervision over natural resources and economic development while the Speaker of the State assembly shall have the corresponding powers and duties of the Speaker of Parliament.

Araneta favored a unicameral body because it would do away with gridlock in the legislative mill and would “avoid wastage of materials and human resources.”

Members of parliament will be composed of elected representatives from the Regional States, whose numbers will depend on the population within its jurisdiction, and whose terms, at least for the first election, will be limited to six years (for those elected with the highest number of votes) and to three years (for those elected with lowest number of votes).

An act of Parliament can be vetoed by the President and Prime Minister but Parliament can override this with a vote of 60 percent of its members.

Judiciary

Another innovative feature of the Araneta’s draft is the proposal to create a Constitutional Tribunal which is co-equal to the Supreme Court. He also pushed for the creation of Special Courts of Original Jurisdiction under the Trihunal to handle all cases involving Public Law.

Araneta defines public law as laws involving the State including impeachment proceedings, declaration of the unconstitutionality of an Act of the Legislative or the exercise of Executive powers, taxation cases, public utility cases, conflicts of jurisdiction between different government bodies, between the State government and Federal government and the supervision formerly exercised by the President over the three Constitutional Commissions—Electoral, Civil Service, and Audit.

The Tribunal also had jurisdiction over cases against public officials, and election disputes.

The Supreme Court, on the other hand, would “deal solely with those cases pertaining to private laws and would speed up the backlog of cases as well as those pending in courts.”

Appointees to the Supreme Court are made by the Chief Justice with the consent of the Constitutional Tribunal. Appointments will have to be approved by the Commission on Appointments and will hold office until the age of 65.

Knowing full well that the adoption of federalism would take time, Araneta proposes a 10-20-year transition period and recommends that a Caretaker government manage the transformation into a Federal Republic. READ MORE OF THE ABUEVA PRIMER HERE >> http://federalmovement.rpweb.ph/?p=361


PHILSTAR

Duterte says God told him to stop cursing By Jim Gomez (Associated Press) | Updated October 28, 2016 - 1:41pm 3 1005 googleplus0 2


Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks to journalists after inspecting a coast guard training demonstration at a Japan Coast Guard base in Yokohama, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016. Duterte is on a three-day official visit to Japan, his first as Philippine leader. AP/Eugene Hoshiko

MANILA, Philippines — The foul-mouthed Philippine president, who once called the pope a "son of a bitch" and told Barack Obama to "go to hell," says he has promised to God he won't spew expletives again.

President Rodrigo Duterte's profanities have become his trademark, especially when threatening to kill drug dealers as part of his war on illegal drugs that has left thousands dead since he took office at the end of June.

Duterte made the stunning pledge on arrival in his southern hometown of Davao city late Thursday from a trip to Japan.

READ MORE...

While flying home, he said he was looking at the sky while everyone was sound asleep, some snoring, and he heard a voice that said "'if you don't stop epithets, I will bring this plane down now."

"And I said, 'Who is this?' So, of course, 'it's God,'" he said.

"So, I promise God to ... not express slang, cuss words and everything. So you guys hear me right always because (a) promise to God is a promise to the Filipino people."

Duterte's vow was met with applause, but he cautioned: "Don't clap too much or else this may get derailed."

He shocked the dominant Roman Catholics last year when he fired an expletive while expressing his disgust over a monstrous traffic jam that trapped him while Pope Francis was visiting Manila. "I wanted to call. 'Pope, you son of a bitch, go home.' Don't visit here anymore," he told a mob of supporters, some of whom laughed.

He later apologized after Filipino bishops expressed shock and outrage.

It's not certain if the 71-year-old president, who has been compared to U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump because of his brash language, can keep his promise. Duterte has made a similar pledge in June when it became evident that he had won the May 9 presidential elections overwhelmingly on a pledge to end crimes, especially illegal drugs, and corruption.

He said then that he was enjoying his last moments as a "rude person" because "when I become president, when I take my oath of office ... that will be a different story. There will be a metamorphosis."

It didn't take long for Duterte to break the promise.

He has repeatedly leveled SOB-laced tirades against Obama, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, a few outspoken opposition politicians and human rights advocates, while heaping praises on Chinese and Russian leaders.

There were no expletives in his late Thursday speech, but Duterte still sounded mean toward critics.

When asked for his message for a Filipino beauty queen who won the recent Miss International pageant, Duterte said he was proud. "Many Filipinas are beautiful, but all of you there in the human rights commission are ugly."

Asked if the days of his cursing the U.S. and the E.U are over, Duterte didn't answer clearly.

"I do not want anybody reading my mind because I couldn't make a smart move anymore. But it's all calibrated, it's all about timing," Duterte said.

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Bishop says conscience, not God, spoke to the President Published October 29, 2016, 10:00 PM Share it! by Leslie Ann G. Aquino


Msgr. Arturo M. Bastes, Sorsogon Bishop. BICOLTODAY.COM PHOTO

“His conscience, not God, spoke to him.”

This is how Sorsogon Bishop Arturo Bastes explained the “voice of God” which President Duterte claims he had heard, telling him to stop cussing.

In an interview, the Catholic prelate said “it was the voice of his conscience… his conscience was bothering him” in reference to the President.

Bastes added that only “holy and mystic persons have that privilege of talking to God.”

In his flight back from Japan, the President shared this experience last Thursday: “I was looking at the skies as I was coming over here and I… everybody was asleep, snoring. A voice said, ‘You know, if you don’t stop, I will bring this plane down now.’ And I said, who is this? Of course, it’s God. Oh, okay. So, I promised God not to shout cuss words,” Duterte said.

Father Jerome Secillano of the Nuestra Senora del Perpetuo Socorro Parish in Manila welcomed Duterte’s promise.

Senator Joseph “JV” Ejercito told a radio interview yesterday: “Tignan natin (Let’s see). His presidency is just on its fourth month.” (With a report from Mario B. Casayuran)


MANILA STANDARD

ON SATURDAY ALMOST SLIPPED - Rody stops self from new curse posted October 30, 2016 at 12:01 am by John Paolo Bencito


President Rodrigo Duterte

A DAY after he claimed God admonished him for cursing, President Rodrigo Duterte almost slipped as he criticized the United States on Saturday but caught himself on time from blurting another expletive for which he has become world famous.

“You already know that a mayor has already been killed. We should really avoid drugs because it will really destroy our country,” Duterte said during the launching of P59 billion worth of anti-poverty projects at the Shariff Kabunsuan Cultural Center in Cotabato City.

“Believe me. You will see in my hometown that the teeth of elderly people are worn out, just like drug addicts. Whenever they have money, they spend it on shabu. I said, you sons...,” Duterte said stopping himself, then quickly told his audience. “You watch over me.”

READ MORE...

But aside from that instance, Duterte kept his word that he will no longer utter an expletive during his 30-minute speech.

On Friday, Duterte said he was on his return flight from a three-day official visit to Japan when he heard a small voice while everyone was asleep saying he would cause the plane to crash if he did not stop swearing.

But if he was able to keep himself from cursing, Duterte resumed his tirade against offenses he attributed to the United States.

“You talk to us as if we are still your colony, that we’re your servants,” Duterte said, referring to American officials. “When you give aide, there are many conditions.”

“You have always been like that, your regard for us is too low. You think we are still your puppets,” he added.

Duterte reiterated that instead of sending him to prison or treating him like a dog on a leash who won’t be fed if he didn’t behave, the Americans should help in solving the problem.

During his state visit to China two weeks ago, Duterte pushed his foreign policy pivot from the US and declared he will no longer go to the US and will be realigning himself with China and Russia.

“I will not go to America anymore” for assistance because “we will just be insulted there,” Duterte said of the Philippines’ closest ally since independence in 1946.

“I realign myself in your ideological flow and maybe I will also go to Russia to talk to Putin. There are three of us against the world. China, Philippines, Russia,” Duterte told Chinese government officials and business leaders who attended the Philippines-China Trade and Investment Forum.

With the “separation” from the US, Duterte said he would now be relying on the Chinese officials and businessmen.

“I announce my separation from the United States both in the military but economics also,” Duterte said. “I have separated from them so I will be dependent on you for a long time but don’t worry we will also help.”

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

SWS: Duterte cabinet gets ‘good’ net satisfaction rating Sec. Andanar vows cabinet would not rest on its laurels Published October 30, 2016, 5:15 PM Share it! By Genalyn Kabiling

The Duterte Cabinet is determined to further improve its work as it got a high public satisfaction rating based on a recent Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey.


MB FILE—Duterte Cabinet. mb.com.ph MB FILE

In the recent SWS survey on the performance of top government institutions conducted September 24–27, 49 percent of the 1,200 respondents were satisfied with the performance of the President Duterte’s cabinet while 13 percent were dissatisfied, resulting to a “good” +36 net satisfaction grade.

The Duterte Cabinet’s rating was higher compared to the “moderate” +22 score obtained by the cabinet of then President Benigno Aquino III.

“I welcome the result as a barometer of how we are doing in the cabinet,” Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar affirmed.

But he vowed the cabinet would not rest on their laurels yet. “The survey should be a lamp post to guide all the secretaries in improving their work.”


INQUIRER

Duterte praises Japan for help to Philippines By: Leila B. Salaverria / @LeilasINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer / 01:31 AM October 26, 2016


Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, right, is greeted by Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida upon his arrival at a Japanese restaurant for dinner in Tokyo Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Duterte arrived in Japan earlier in the day for a three-day visit, his first since becoming Philippine leader at the end of June. (Kazushige Fujikake/Kyodo News via AP)

TOKYO—President Duterte was all praises for Japan for all the assistance it was providing the Philippines, but could not contain his anger and once more lashed out at the United States and the European Union for their criticism of his antidrug war.

In a profanity-laced speech before 1,200 members of the Filipino community in Japan, Mr. Duterte called the United States a bully and said he was not fazed even if critics would file cases against him.

He is immune from suit as President, but he could be charged once he’s out of office.

READ MORE...

The President said threats to cut aid to the Philippines was a “demeaning” statement, making it appear as if he was a dog being taunted with a treat.

“You have the evidence, go ahead and file the case. I have no problem with it. I can rot in prison for my country. I am not a Filipino for nothing,” he said.

Poor but respected

Even if the Philippines is poor, it must be respected, he said.

“Do not fuck with our dignity,” he said.

He could accept such treatment and criticism as Davao City mayor, but not as President when he already carries the burden of sovereignty, he said.

On comments that he’s acting like a hoodlum, not a statesman, he said this was right. “You’re a fool. You only found out now?” he added.

In contrast, Mr. Duterte had nothing but good words to say about Japan, where he said he was “more comfortable.”


PHILSTAR

Japan’s Abe flashes the fist, Duterte-style By Christina Mendez (The Philippine Star) | Updated October 28, 2016 - 12:00am 1 389 googleplus0 0


Photo shared by PMS head Secretary Bong Go on Facebook shows Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Duterte with Filipino and Japanese officials flashing Duterte’s trademark fist gesture.

TOKYO – On their first meeting on the side of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations summit in Laos last September, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told President Duterte that he was “quite a famous figure” in Japan and that he was “very excited” to see him in person.

As he welcomed Duterte here for a visit upon his country’s invitation, Abe again let loose a bit by posing for a photo with the Philippine leader doing the signature fist bump.

It was more than what was expected of the Japanese leader in extending his hand of friendship. The Japanese, after all, are known for being sticklers for protocol and seriousness.

Abe was also happy to note that Duterte was fond of Japanese food and one of their bilateral meetings lasted 72 minutes.

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During the dinner that Abe hosted for Duterte and members of his delegation on Wednesday night at the Prime Minister’s residence, Abe hoped Duterte would be able to revisit Japan to enjoy the local cuisine.

Describing the three-day visit as a “great success,” Duterte said the relationship between the two countries “stands on unshakeable, firm ground by all counts” and that ties between the Philippines and Japan “are just excellent.”

There was no major hitch during the visit except that the President’s courtesy call on Emperor Akihito was cancelled due to the death of the royal’s uncle.

On a lighter note, Davao-based trader Sammy Uy said the photos showing them doing the fist bump with Abe and Duterte were taken after the Prime Minister called him to have his photo taken with him after dinner.

Abe then asked, “What is that for?” when he saw Duterte and some members of his delegation having their photos taken with the trademark gesture, Uy said.

Uy, who described himself as a “small” businessman who happened to be close to the special advisers of Abe, said the Prime Minister then joined Duterte and his team and the others followed.

“We are proud, our President is so contagious,” Uy, owner of Davao Farms Corp. who had contributed P30 million for Duterte’s campaign in the last elections, said.

'VERY SINCERE'

Uy said Abe was impressed with the President and that he found him “very sincere,” always thinking about the poor and the country.

He said the President was also very much concerned with his dignity and would never allow the Philippines to be insulted.

Uy said Abe “understands” Filipinos, unlike the “Americans who looked down on us.”

Uy was part of the business delegation. His good relations with the Prime Minister were bolstered by his friendship with Abe’s special advisor Katsuyuki Kawai, whom he described as a kind of counterpart of special assistant Christopher Go, the President’s trusted aide.

Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella said senior Japanese government officials told him they were also very impressed by Duterte’s passion “to protect his people” and that it was “one of the very rare times a leader had been received like this.”

“Apparently, he’s starting to be at this stage informally recognized… not just a regional but as a world leader,” Abella said.

In an ambush interview after the demonstration exercise by the Japanese Coast Guard in Yokohama, Duterte was obviously happy with how his official visit turned out.

“It was a very productive visit… the Prime Minister, we had almost about four hours of talk time and it covered a wide range of issues that would affect both countries… everything was discussed,” he said.

Duterte said his visit reaffirmed the friendship, cooperation and solidarity of the Filipino people with Japan, the country’s number one donor in terms of assistance.

Duterte also noted how the Japanese government was helping the country build up its maritime defense.

Full bloom

In welcoming Duterte in his official residence last Wednesday, Abe expressed hope that the relationship between the two countries would develop in full bloom.

“Mr. President, Japan is giving a rousing welcome to you upon your first time visit to Japan and between Japan and the Philippines, there is a deep, warm, family-like or brotherly relationship and my sincere hope is to develop our future in full bloom together,” he said.

At the start, Abe apologized for some delay in their schedule as the two leaders held bilateral meetings and witnessed the signing of agreements to help bolster maritime, agriculture and economic cooperation.

“Mr. President, I recount that you have a passion for Washoku Japanese cuisine and that is exactly why I took the initiative to prepare the Washoku for you tonight,” Abe said. “If you like it, please do come back to Japan as you wish to enjoy another batch of Washoku.”

Duterte said the Philippines-Japan relationship was borne out of mutual respect and trust.

“It is a relationship strengthened by a common commitment to uphold democracy, adherence to the rule of law and a peaceful settlement of disputes,” he said. “As countries and peoples that have shared a meaningful history, we now look forward to a future together as we chart a common path towards our aspiration for greater peace, progress and prosperity and beyond.

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Duterte describes Japan visit a ‘defining moment’ for the two countries Published October 29, 2016, 12:05 AM Share it! by Elena L. Aben


Back from his three-day official visit to Japan, President Duterte described his trip as another “defining moment” in the 60-year-old relations between the two countries where both reaffirmed their commitment to the rule of law and freedom of navigation in the South China Sea.

In his arrival speech Thursday night, the President said he and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe “discussed in full detail the state of Philippines-Japan ties and identified points of collaboration that will lead to a common path towards the achievement of shared objectives.”

“By all counts and by any measure, Philippines-Japan ties today are excellent and we agreed that we can take things to a higher level by harnessing our respective strengths and using these so both our economies can further grow and our countries can continue to play their rightful role in the region,” the President said.

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“As countries that share the values of democracy, adherence to the rule of law and peaceful settlement of disputes, the Philippines and Japan agreed to work closely to advance the rules-based regime to maintain stability and security in our region,” Duterte said.

Both Philippines and Japan have maritime disputes with Beijing over certain parts of the South and East China Sea.

“Enhancing capabilities in maritime security and maritime domain awareness is a key priority. Japan will play a vital role in modernizing the Philippines’capacities as a nation with maritime interests to protect. The acquisition of more maritime and air capability assets are crucial in addressing traditional and emerging threats to our nations, including piracy, criminality at sea and terrorism, as well as in responding to disasters, “ the President added.

“We have bilateral and multilateral venues at our disposal to ensure that commitments and responsibilities are complied with under international law, including the 1982 UNCLOS (United Nations Convention of the Law on the Sea),” he said.

WOO INVESTORS

A statement released by Malacañang said that Duterte and Abe on Wednesday signed agreements to acquire vessels and training aircraft for the Philippines.

After their expanded bilateral meeting at the Prime Minister’s Office, the two officials witnessed the signing of documents for the acquisition of patrol vessels and other equipment for the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) and TC-90 training aircraft which will enhance the country’s security.

A Memorandum of Implementation and Letter of Arrangement for the transfer of Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF)’s training aircraft TC-90s were also signed.

In his speech, Duterte also said that economic cooperation remains a linchpin between the Philippines-Japan dynamic relations.

“As I sought greater partnership to create an enabling environment for both our businesses to thrive, I encouraged private businesses in Japan to invest in the Philippines,” he said.

Among the deals signed between the businesses were investments in manufacturing and agriculture that will generate considerable number of jobs.

“Japan is well-placed to remain as the Philippines top trading partner,” said Duterte.

“We also agreed to harness Official Development Assistance (ODA) to support inclusive growth and sustainable development in the country. Japan is our number one ODA partner and under the JICA, high-impact projects benefiting our urban and rural areas will be undertaken,” he added.

Japan had also committed to continue to support the peace and development agenda in Mindanao, as the Duterte administration strives to bring lasting peace for the people of Mindanao and the country.

“In all my interactions in Japan, it was clear to me and to everyone that Japan is, and will always be, a true friend of the Philippines,” said Duterte.

Tags: Duterte describes Japan visit a ‘defining moment’ for the two countries, Japan, Manila Bulletin, mb.com.ph, News today, Philippine news, President Duterte, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, South China Sea


MANILA TIMES EDITORIAL

DU30’s separation from America BY THE MANILA TIMES ON ON OCTOBER 29, 2016 EDITORIAL


Duterte Announces Philippine 'Separation' from US Last October 20, 2016 11:57 during the Philippines-China Trade and Investment Forum in Beijing.

AS he himself admitted, he could not possibly separate the Philippines and our Republic from America– severe ties with the USA. These ties are formalized through treaties. It would need acts of our Congress to break those ties. That is why he said he only meant the separation to be between him—the individual Rodrigo Roa Duterte—and the USA and possibly by inference American human beings. And he made this more manifest by speaking to the Chinese leaders and the Chinese people about his affection for China and his being politically, economically and even militarily attracted to China and the Chinese.

That unfortunate display of sentimentality, which we know must have disappointed not just the Americans but also those Chinese whose high hopes in their country’s foreign affairs is to become a friend of the United States and of the Philippines and the Filipinos they prize for being the “Americans of Asia.” Those who study Chinese-Philippine relations rigorously do not lose sight of this fact of our being.

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It cannot be denied that Filipinos and Americans mostly value our two countries’ long-standing friendship. This friendship developed after the forces of the First Philippine Republic were defeated by those of the United States and our archipelago became an American colony.

The Philippines and the United States have maintained closeness that some Filipinos call a “special relationship.”

Cynically, some Filipinos laugh about that fiction—for they say the US government does not do anything with, in and for the Philippines unless it serves US interests. That, to us, is an unproductive and unnecessarily negative way of seeing these ties. For, despite the exaggerated claims of less than mature nationalists, our country and people nowadays do not do anything with the USA unless it serves our interests. That is how mature governments and peoples deal with each other.

It is true, however, that some Filipinos are more sentimentally attached to America than others. And we suspect that for various reasons—the foremost one being the predominance of American good life images on TV and films—much more than 50 percent of all Filipinos would vote for the Philippines to become an American state. That is because our Filipino leaders have governed our country like hell (as the Commonwealth President Manuel L. Quezon said he preferred to being governed by Americans).

It is hard to deny that life for the majority of Filipinos was better because we were better off and less corruptly governed when we had American governors-general than when we had Filipino presidents. Life under the gone and unlamented Aquino administration definitely has not been a relief from our decades of unhappy misgovernance by Filipino officials. And we still have to see what kind of governance we will really have under President Duterte (although his performance these 100-plus days boosts our hope that he will be the best president so far).

Some Filipinos, and to this segment of our population President Duterte obviously belongs, loathe themselves for having been influenced by America and Americans. The more is their bitterness if, as in President DU30’s case, they have experienced applying for a visa at the US Embassy and getting rejected.

Feelings of hatred for the United States—for that matter, feelings of hatred for other countries and peoples—should play no role in our dealings with them. Our objective should always be to promote our smallest and highest national interests.


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