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HEADLINES NEWS THIS PAST WEEK...
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SUPERTYPHOON 'LAWIN': DEATH TOLL RISES TO 15 MOSTLY INSIDE HOMES - NDRRMC
[RELATED: DSWD - We will be 'color blind' in providing assistance]
[RELATED(2): STATE OF CALAMITY DECLARED -Lawin-devastated Cagayan, pleads for aid]
[RELATED(3):
At least 5 towns in Isabela badly-hit by supertyphoon Lawin]


OCTOBER 22 -Donate building materials and tools that would help residents rebuild their houses. Cheryl Gagalac, IFRC ABS-CBN A total of 15 people have been reported killed during the onslaught of supertyphoon Lawin in Cagayan Valley and Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR). National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) Executive Director Ricardo Jalad told radio dzBB in an interview that 13 of the fatalities were killed in separate landslides in CAR. Two more persons, including a CAFGU member and an old man, were killed in Isabela province, Jalad added. Jalad said only nine of the fatalities have been validated by the NDRRMC. The death toll may still increase as Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba told radio dzBB in a separate interview that four people have reported killed during the supertyphoon's onslaught. Mamba said the four fatalities were killed inside their homes that were damaged by the supertyphoon. He said the victims refused to leave their homes despite early warnings from the local government. READ MORE...RELATED, DSWD: We will be 'color blind' in providing assistance...RELATED(2), STATE OF CALAMITY DECLARED -Lawin-devastated Cagayan, pleads for aid... RELATED(3)  At least 5 towns in Isabela badly-hit by supertyphoon Lawin...

ALSO: Duterte visits supertyphoon-hit, Cagayan, Isabela, is in Tuguegarao City
[RELATED: Robredo visits typhoon-ravaged Cagayan]

[RELATED(2) ‘Lawin’: 18 dead, 40 thousand people still in shelters; Govt doing dry-run for capability to respond after super disaster]


0CT0BER 23 -Duterte visits typhoon-ravaged Cagayan, Isabela. TUGUEGARAO CITY
President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday visited Tuguegarao City in Cagayan province, one of the areas in northern Luzon hardest hit by supertyphoon Lawin. Duterte arrived in the city at past 1 p.m. along with top officials of the government, including Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III and Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo. The president led the ceremonial distribution of aids, including relief goods, to the affected residents of the city. From Tuguegarao City, Duterte is expected to proceed to Ilagan town in Isabela province. Duterte was in China when the supertyphoon slammed into Cagayan and Isabela provinces last week. READ MORE...RELATED,
Robredo visits typhoon-ravaged Cagayan... RELATED(2),
‘Lawin’: 18 dead, 40 thousand people still in shelters; Govt doing dry-run for capability to respond after disaster...

ALSO: No foreign aid for victims of ‘Lawin’; govt did not ask for aid yet
[RELATED: DSWD chief on lack of typhoon foreign aid: ‘We have enough funds for so far']

[RELATED(2):
‘IRREGULARITIES’ FOUND: 200,000 ‘Yolanda’ victims did not get aid — DSWD head ]
[RELATED(3): Emergency aid were released P 5,000 for each poor family for emergency shelter, P30,000 each for homes destroyed, P10,000 each for homes damaged]

 
OCTOBER 23 -More than 700 residents living on the shoreline take refuge on Alcala Gymnasium after pre emptive evacuation due to Supertyphoon Lawin in Alcala town, Cagayan. INQUIRER PHOTO / RICHARD A. REYES
TUGUEGARAO CITY—Three days after supertyphoon “Lawin” struck Cagayan province, local officials and residents were left wondering why they haven’t received foreign government assistance as they struggled to cope with the devastation left by one of the strongest storms to smash into the country. The aftermath of Lawin’s fury in Cagayan and other northern Luzon provinces this week was compared to that left by “Yolanda,” which flattened Eastern Visayas in November 2013 and drew world attention and massive foreign aid and numerous aid workers. In contrast, residents here on Saturday noticed the absence of foreigners then cope with Lawin’s destruction. That may be because the national government hasn’t appealed for foreign assistance, according to Romina Marasigan, spokesperson for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. READ MORE...RELATED,
DSWD chief on lack of typhoon foreign aid: ‘We have enough fundsso far’...RELATED(2): ‘IRREGULARITIES’ FOUND: UNUSED FUNDS - 200,000 ‘Yolanda’ victims did not get aid, — DSWD head... RELATED(3), As dry-run emergency aid (ESA) were released for LAWIN victims--P 5,000 for each poor family for emergency shelter, P30,000 each for homes destroyed, P10,000 each for homes damaged] ... 

DSWD chief Taguiwalo: Foreign aid not needed for now
(One Facebook user, however, commented that the Philippine government should set aside pride and personal grudges to give way for humanitarian works. "Even first world countries accept foreign aids/donations in times of calamities...Taguiwalo answered the comment by stressing that the government acquired a large amount of foreign aid during the onslaught of Supertyphoon Yolanda in 2013. "Hanggang ngayon hindi malinaw saan napunta ang malaking bahagi ng donations at tine-trace pa rin dahil maraming hindi nakinabang sa tulong," Taguiwalo said.)
[RELATED: Taguiwalo clarifies: PH still welcomes foreign aid; 'We are not saying we could do it on our own"]
(We welcome the foreign aid based on our needs and it should come without any condition. It depends on the extent of our needs. It is a clarification, we are not saying we could do it on our own. We are thankful to our friends, the individuals, organizations and other countries which are willing to help.)


OCTOBER 24 -Fishermen try to save fingerlings after flooding brought about by Super Typhoon Haima (local name: Lawin) destroyed their fish pens at Vigan township, Ilocos Sur province in northern Philippines, Thursday Oct. 20, 2016. Super Typhoon Haima slammed into the northeastern Philippine coast late Wednesday with ferocious winds and rain that rekindled fears and memories from the catastrophe wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. AP/Bullit Marquez
The Philippine government has sufficient funds to assist the victims of the onslaught of typhoons "Karen" and "Lawin," Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Judy Taguiwalo said. Taguiwalo stressed that the country is not asking for foreign assistance nor donations. "Mga mahal naming kababayan, kaunting paliwanag po: hindi tayo humihingi ng foreign assistance o donations mula sa ibang bansa para sa Karen o Lawin dahil nakitang may sapat na pondo ang gobyerno at mga ahensya nito para saklolohan ang mamamayang apektado," Taguiwalo said in a Facebook post on Sunday. Taguiwalo stressed that the Philippines should not be dependent on foreign assistance when it could stand on its own feet. The DSWD chief added that local government units and members of the private sector, headed by President Rodrigo Duterte, are working together to respond to the victims of the typhoons. READ MORE,,,RELATED, Taguiwalo clarifies: PH still welcomes foreign aid...

ALSO Duterte's top priorities for China's aid - Education, agri and health
[RELATED: Duterte wants to revive Marcos' agri, fishing programs]


OCTOBER 23 -Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping attend a signing ceremony in Beijing, China, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. AP/Ng Han Guan, Pool
The government would prioritize education, agriculture, and health programs in the $16 billion assistance to be provided by China next year, President Rodrigo Duterte said.  Speaking to officials and residents of typhoon-hit Isabela, Duterte said he would make sure that every centavo of the assistance would benefit the Filipinos  “The $16 billion is equivalent to more than half a trillion pesos. I expect that next year. Our lives will not prosper at once but next year, that money will come,” the president said. “The thrust of my government is first, education, second is agriculture, third is health,” he added. READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte wants to revive Marcos' agri, fishing programs...

ALSO: Change has come to Mindoro
[
MEANWHILE: A plea from a foreigner living in the Philippines to the President  -Duterte could fail Filipinos]


OCTOBER 23 -A tamaraw grazes in the forest. GREGG YAN
It was raining sheets at the Iglit-Baco National Park as we hunkered down inside a thatched hut with three ancient Fufu-amas, elders of the Taw’Buid tribe from Mindoro province. Clad in loincloth, they were smoking a mysterious herb supposed to be tobacco, that smelled like something else. I was last here in 2012 to photograph the endangered tamaraw (Mindoro dwarf buffalo) that several environmental groups are working to conserve. We’ve returned to understand the plight of this indigenous tribe sharing the land with the tamaraw. READ MORE...ALSO, A plea from a foreigner living in the Philippines to the President  -Duterte could fail Filipinos...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Death toll from supertyphoon Lawin rises to 15 —NDRRMC


OCTOBER 22 -Donate building materials and tools that would help residents rebuild their houses. Cheryl Gagalac, IFRC ABS-CBN

MANILA, OCTOBER 24, 2016 (GMA NEWS) Updated October 22, 2016 3:35pm - A total of 15 people have been reported killed during the onslaught of supertyphoon Lawin in Cagayan Valley and Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR).

National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) Executive Director Ricardo Jalad told radio dzBB in an interview that 13 of the fatalities were killed in separate landslides in CAR.

Two more persons, including a CAFGU member and an old man, were killed in Isabela province, Jalad added.

Jalad said only nine of the fatalities have been validated by the NDRRMC.

The death toll may still increase as Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba told radio dzBB in a separate interview that four people have reported killed during the supertyphoon's onslaught.

Mamba said the four fatalities were killed inside their homes that were damaged by the supertyphoon. He said the victims refused to leave their homes despite early warnings from the local government.

READ MORE...

In its bulletin issued 8 a.m. Saturday, the NDRRMC said the supertyphoon displaced a total of 143,531 people or 28,710 families in Ilocos region, Cagayan Valley, Central Luzon, Calabarzon, Bicol and CAR.

It said that a total of 92,002 people remained in evacuation centers and the rest are staying outside evacuation centers.

Cagayan province bore the brunt of the supertyphoon, where hundreds of houses, business establishments and government offices were damaged.

The NDRRMC said a total of 1,327 houses were damaged by the supertyphoon in Ilocos region, Cagayan Valley, Central Luzon and CAR.

At least 11 municipalities in Cagayan remained without power supply as of Saturday morning.

As the supertyphoon left a trail of destruction, the NDRRMC placed the cost of damage to agriculture and infrastructure at P657.8 million. —ALG, GMA News

------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

DSWD: We will be 'color blind' in providing assistance By Leilani S. Junio (philstar.com) | Updated October 23, 2016 - 6:08pm 2 239 googleplus0 0


A resident pulls his herd to dry area amidst flooding brought about by Super Typhoon Haima (local name: Lawin) which lashes Narvacan township, Ilocos Sur province in northern Philippines Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. Super Typhoon Haima slammed into the northeastern Philippine coast late Wednesday with ferocious winds and rain that rekindled fears and memories from the catastrophe wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines (Philippines News Agency) — Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Judy Taguiwalo said on Sunday that the agency would be “color blind” when it comes to helping the needy and the poor as instructed by President Rodrigo Duterte.

“We must help all Filipinos who come to us for help — regardless of their political affiliations or persuasions. The relief goods we distribute come from taxpayers — we have to give them to those in need as soon as possible," said Taguiwalo.

In line with this, she assured the public that they would work hard to give out the emergency shelter assistance (ESA) that calamity-affected families are entitled to.

She said that the ESA would be given not months or years later but immediately.

"We are also duty-bound to use all funds and resources for the purpose they are intended: assist the needy; improve lives; strengthen communities," she said after doing rounds in the northern Philippines provinces severely affected by Typhoon Lawin to see for herself "the effects in the ground level."

She was accompanied by other officials of the DSWD to prove that they are there and can be felt by the affected people as they turn over the DSWD's and the national government’s augmentation support to local government units (LGUs) in the form of family food packs (FFPs).

Among the areas that they visited were Tuguegarao City, Peñablanca and Enrile towns in Cagayan, and Ilagan City, Maconacon and Divilacan in Isabela.

“We are constantly coordinating with officials of the LGUs on our relief efforts, and at the same time we are also determining the depth and extent of the poverty of Filipinos who live in the provinces. What we are discovering affirms the truth that the Philippines is far from being developed, and that so much needs to be done by way of comprehensive economic and social reforms to address the poverty of millions,” she said.

“We also see that people are in serious need of support in the form of social services — they need more public hospitals, more schools, better roads, increased access to government services,” Taguiwalo said.

She cited also the importance of providing immediate relief to Filipinos affected by the two recent typhoons "Karen" and "Lawin."

"The sooner that actions are done to see the situation on the ground and to address the immediate needs of those affected, the better the chances that those affected will recover," she said.

In her visit to the northern Philippines, Taguiwalo said she was also able to see more clearly the necessity to implement programs that would provide people with steady livelihood opportunities.

According to her, the DSWD would strengthen its programs to help the poor gain employment and means of livelihood through the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP).

She also noted that communities could also unite to push for infrastructure projects through the empowerment program of the DSWD — the Kapig-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) scheme.

Meanwhile, she also instructed the DSWD's Disaster Response Assistance and Management Bureau (DReAMB) to form a team to augment the distribution of supplies for the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) because there have been landslides causing casualties there, particularly in Kalinga and Apayao.

---------------------------------------------

RELATED(2) FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

STATE OF CALAMITY DECLARED Supertyphoon-devastated Cagayan pleads for aid Published October 22, 2016 3:54pm Updated October 22, 2016 4:20pm

The governor of Cagayan province on Saturday pleaded for help from the national government and the private sector to help them recover from the devastation wrought by Supertyphoon Lawin.

"Humihingi po kami ng tulong, lalung-lalo na para sa shelter, nasabi na ho namin kay [Social Welfare] Secretary Judy Taguiwalo, sa private sector para tulungan po din kami tungkol dito, para sa mga nawalan ng bahay," Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba said in a radio dzBB interview.

He said the provincial government has placed Cagayan under a state of calamity.

Mamba said it would take several months for the province to recover from the devastation of the supertyphoon without the help of the national government.

"Matagal po siguro [bago kami makabangon] kung hindi kami tutulungan ng national government. Siguro aabutin ng buwan," the governor added.

READ MORE...

He said that almost all of the houses in the province, particularly in Tuguegarao City, were destroyed by the supertyphoon.


Restoration of electricity in affected areas. Alternative energy source like provision of solar lamps and chargers while power has not been restored Cheryl Gagalac, IFRC ABS-CBN

The supertyphoon slammed into Cagayan late Wednesday. It crossed parts of Luzon before exiting the Philippine Area of Responsibility on Thursday.

Mamba said Lawin is the strongest typhoon to hit Cagayan.

"First time ho ito, ang ganitong klaseng lakas. Wala na hong mas matindi dito. Ito na ho ang pinakamatindi. Ngayon lang ho kami nagkaroon ng Signal Number 5 sa Cagayan," he said.

The hoisting of Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal Number 5 over Cagayan and Isabela province was also the first in the history of PAGASA, the government's weather bureau.

Mamba said four people were killed by the supertyphoon. He said the victims were inside their homes when the supertyphoon slammed into Cagayan.

The fatalities were residents of Igig, Solana and Baggao towns.

"Grabe po talaga halos lahat ng mga bahay dito ay may partial damage or totally damaged. Mga eskuwelahan ay nagkasira-sira po, infrastructure ng mga offices ng capitol natin, ang city hall [ng Tuguegarao]," the governor said.

He addeed that 11 municipalities in the province remained without power supply. —ALG, GMA News

-------------------

RELATED(3) FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

At least 5 towns in Isabela badly-hit by supertyphoon Lawin Published October 22, 2016 5:26pm

A large part of northern Isabela was badly damaged by supertyphoon Lawin, officials said after an aerial survey on Saturday.

Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo said severe damage to crops and infrastructure in at least five towns in Isabela province were visible during the aerial survey.

Taguiwalo said the towns include Santo Tomas, San Pablo, Santa Maria, Tumauini and Cabagan.

She said they also saw the damage wrought by the supertyphoon in Tuguegarao City and Peñablanca in Cagayan province, the worst typhoon-hit area in Luzon.

Sen. Richard Gordon, chairman of the Philippine Red Cross, noted a 60 to 80 percent damage on infrastructure and agriculture in the two Cagayan areas.

Signal Number 5 was raised over Cagayan and Isabela provinces at the height of the supertyphoon, which made landfall over Peñablanca.

Taguiwalo, meanwhile, said that the provinces of Kalinga and Apayao were also badly hit by the supertyphoon.


Provide assistance to residents dependent on agriculture such as relief goods and alternative livelihood programs. Ted Aljibe, AFP ABS-CBN

The social welfare chief also led the distribution of relief goods to the affected villagers in Isabela province.

She said they will focus on rebuilding the damaged infrastructure, particularly the houses destroyed by the supertyphoon in Isabela province.

Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba also said in an earlier radio dzBB report that he has asked Taguiwalo to help the province in rebuilding the damaged homes.

Mamba said almost all of the houses in typhoon-hit areas in Cagayan province, including Tuguegarao City, were damaged by the supertyphoon, the strongest to hit the country so far this year. —ALG, GMA News


GMA NEWS NETWORK

Duterte visits supertyphoon-hit Tuguegarao City Published October 23, 2016 3:10pm


Duterte visits typhoon-ravaged Cagayan, Isabela. TUGUEGARAO CITY

President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday visited Tuguegarao City in Cagayan province, one of the areas in northern Luzon hardest hit by supertyphoon Lawin.

Duterte arrived in the city at past 1 p.m. along with top officials of the government, including Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III and Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo.

The president led the ceremonial distribution of aids, including relief goods, to the affected residents of the city.

From Tuguegarao City, Duterte is expected to proceed to Ilagan town in Isabela province.

Duterte was in China when the supertyphoon slammed into Cagayan and Isabela provinces last week.

READ MORE...

He arrived from his state visit late Friday, a day after the supertyphoon left the Philippines.

In its report early Sunday, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said a total of 158,825 people were affected by the supertyphoon in Cagayan Valley.

Of the number, a total of 82,948 people were affected in 28 municipalities in Cagayan province, which has been placed under a state of calamity.

The hardest hit town in the province, based on the number of persons displaced, was Enrile with 42,182 people displaced.

A total of 15,602 people in Isabela were also displaced by the supertyphoon. —ALG, GMA News

-------------------------

RELATED FROM ABS-CBN

Robredo visits typhoon-ravaged Cagayan Harris Julio, ABS-CBN News Posted at Oct 21 2016 07:36 PM Share Facebook Twitter GPlus LinkedIn Pinterest


A crowd gathers around Vice President Leni Robredo and Peñablanca, Cagayan

Mayor Marlyn Taguinod. Robredo visited the province, one of the worst hit by Super Typhoon Lawin, on Friday. Photo by Isagani Temporal, ABS-CBN News Vice President Leni Robredo on Friday visited Cagayan after Super Typhoon 'Lawin' devastated the province. She met with Cagayan Governor Manuel Mamba and local disaster officials to inquire about the damage, which will be the basis for the kind of assistance her office will provide.

Mamba said restoration of power and clearing of roads are their priorities at the moment, and they have already extended help to badly affected constituents. He also confirmed the death of two persons, one of whom was member of a family in Baggao who got tossed around when their house was blown away by strong wind. Mamba estimated, 11 municipalities were affected by 'Lawin', the strongest to have hit the province. He said, Lawin's wrath is a life- changing lesson for them.

Vice President Leni Robredo met with Cagayan Governor Manuel Mamba and local disaster officials on Friday after Super Typhoon Lawin devastated the province. Photo by Harris Julio, ABS-CBN News Robredo, for her part, shared what she learned during her visit in Batanes, which was also hit hard by a super typhoon recently.

She noted, old Ivatan houses stood the typhoon's wrath while modern ones sustained most of the damage. Robredo, concurrent head of the National Housing Authority, suggested that houses should now be patterned after these stone houses to make them calamity-proof or ready. She also wants the government to be more involved in crafting the designs of houses to be built for typhoon victims.

But, she emphasized that funds should also be allocated for mitigation programs and projects rather than consumed in recovery efforts during calamities. She vowed, government's help will arrive quicker than it did in the past. She is also mulling tapping Pag-IBIG for a more extensive support to those in need of calamity assistance.

After the meeting with Mamba, Robredo also went to Peñablanca, one of the areas hit hardest by the typhoon, where she addressed the concerns of the residents in a brief talk with them.

Most residents here are busy repairing their homes. In Tuguegarao City, flood is slowly subsiding. Robredo also visited Ilagan City, Isabela later in the afternoon.

----------------------------

RELATED(2) FROM THE INQUIRER

‘Lawin’: 18 dead, 40 thousand people still in shelters; Govt doing dry-run for capability to respond after disaster By: By the Inquirer Staff / @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer / 04:13 AM October 22, 2016


FLOOD IN CANDABA / OCTOBER 21, 2016A resident uses banca in a flooded Barangay San Agustine in Candaba, Pampanga, October 21, 2016, brought by strong rains of Supertyphoon Lawin.INQUIRER PHOTO / NIÑO JESUS ORBETA

More than 40,000 people who fled their homes as Supertyphoon “Lawin” (international name: Haima) lashed northern Luzon remained in temporary shelters on Friday, two days after one of the strongest storms to hit the country ripped through the region, leaving at least 18 dead, toppling trees and power pylons, shutting down communications and flooding wide areas.

Officials said the relatively small number of casualties from such a powerful typhoon was due partly to the early evacuation of more than 90,000 people from vulnerable communities along riverbanks and mountainsides.

Vice President Leni Robredo and Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo flew to Cagayan on Friday to survey the damage to the province, where the typhoon made landfall.

A DRY-RUN

“This typhoon is a dry run [for] our capability to respond in times of disasters, [for] our readiness to collaborate with various stakeholders, to minimize damage and make sure our people are protected and secured before, during and after a calamity,” Taguiwalo told reporters in Tuguegarao City, the provincial capital.

Lawin slammed into Cagayan late Wednesday with 225 kph winds and gusts of up to 315, nearly as powerful as Supertyphoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan) in November 2013 that left 7,300 dead in Eastern Visayas.

Romina Marasigan, spokesperson for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, said 40,515 people were still sheltered in evacuation centers as of Friday.

Marasigan said about 30 motorcyle-riding members of rapid response teams were dispatched to isolated barangays in the Cordillera provinces to assess the typhoon damage.

The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority also sent teams to help in rescue and road-clearing.

In Peñablanca, a farming town of about 42,000 people, where the typhoon made landfall, aid has yet to arrive, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP).

In San Pablo, another Cagayan Valley town about 20 kilometers south of Peñablanca, four families spent Thursday night on a roadside after Lawin flattened their homes.

“No one has helped us. It is just us and other families, helping each other on the side of the road,” Jovy Dalupan, a mother of two, told AFP.

Civil defense officials said 42 road segments and four bridges in the Ilocos, Cagayan Valley, Cordillera and Central Luzon regions had been blocked by floodwater and landslide debris. Only one, located in Tinoc, Ifugao, was cleared on Friday.

They said 65 barangays in Pampanga and Pangasinan were still under a meter of floodwater.

Disaster responders and local officials reported 18 people have been killed after Lawin barreled through Cagayan Valley and the Ilocos and Cordillera regions.

REPORTED FATALITIES

Among those killed was Rosita Rubaoa of Baggao, Cagayan, who was hit by debris from a hut that was blown away. An elderly woman, 85-year-old Aurora Cariaga, died inside her house after fierce winds tore off its roof in Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte. A landslide in Lubuagan, Kalinga, crushed Ceasar and Amelia Dua-as and their three children age 1, 4 and 6. Landslides also killed six others in Benguet province.

Marasigan said additional government relief goods from Central Visayas were flown on Friday to Tuguegarao on a military C-130 plane.

The typhoon destroyed P6.2 billion worth of crops in Cagayan and damaged P673.5 million worth of agricultural products and infrastructure in Ilocos Norte province. The Cordillera region reported agricultural losses of P26.16 million, mostly rice, corn and high-value crops.

PANGILINAN ASKED FOR SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET

Sen. Francis Pangilinan, Senate agriculture committee chair, urged the national government to release a supplemental budget to buy storm-damaged rice from farmers in the typhoon-affected areas.

On Friday, Ilocos Norte, Tuguegarao and Kalinga province were placed under a state of calamity.

Power has not been restored in some northern Luzon provinces although normal operations were restored at Laoag International Airport.

The typhoon churned toward China where officials suspended rail services in several provinces on the mainland’s south, where the typhoon was expected to make landfall. Authorities in Shenzhen ordered schools, markets and factories closed, halted public transportation and evacuated some areas.

Hong Kong hunkered down as Haima lashed the financial hub with rain and wind gusts of up to 109 kph. Schools and offices were shut, trading on the stock market suspended and commuter ferry services halted. More than 740 flights to and from the city’s international airport were canceled or delayed. —WITH REPORTS FROM JEROME ANING, JAYMEE T. GAMIL, JEANNETTE ANDRADE, DEXTER CABALZA, MELVIN GASCON, LEILANIE ADRIANO, VINCENT CABREZA, AFP AND AP


INQUIRER

No foreign aid yet for victims of Supertyphoon ‘Lawin’ By: Melvin Gascon / @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer / 12:35 AM October 23, 2016


More than 700 residents living on the shoreline take refuge on Alcala Gymnasium after pre emptive evacuation due to Supertyphoon Lawin in Alcala town, Cagayan. INQUIRER PHOTO / RICHARD A. REYES

TUGUEGARAO CITY—Three days after supertyphoon “Lawin” struck Cagayan province, local officials and residents were left wondering why they haven’t received foreign government assistance as they struggled to cope with the devastation left by one of the strongest storms to smash into the country.

The aftermath of Lawin’s fury in Cagayan and other northern Luzon provinces this week was compared to that left by “Yolanda,” which flattened Eastern Visayas in November 2013 and drew world attention and massive foreign aid and numerous aid workers. In contrast, residents here on Saturday noticed the absence of foreigners then cope with Lawin’s destruction.

That may be because the national government hasn’t appealed for foreign assistance, according to Romina Marasigan, spokesperson for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

READ MORE...

Marasigan said on Friday that the government had not requested help from foreign governments. However, the Asean Coordinating Center for Humanitarian Assistance and the Manila offices of the World Health Organization and United Nations Children’s Fund were on standby and ready to provide assistance once requested, she said.

The United Nations Population Fund has pledged “dignity and maternity tents” for pregnant and lactating mothers. Also on standy to help upon request are the Philippine Disaster Relief Foundation, Doctors Without Borders and World Vision with relief supplies and aid workers, Marasigan said.

While local governments struggled to distribute food and restore electricity and communication services here, the national news was about President Duterte’s “separation” from the United States, which he announced during his state visit to China.

Foreign help is welcome - Cagayan governor

Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba said the province would welcome any help from foreign governments, whether from the United States or China.

Donations such as blankets and bottled water that were flown to Cagayan came from private foreign groups.

Capt. Evelyn Audencial, spokesperson for the Army’s 5th Infantry Division based in Gamu town in Isabela province, said the military had not received word of any assistance from foreign governments.

“As of now there is none, but we also believe we can manage. Our troops have been working round-the-clock to be able to help our typhoon survivors,” she said.

RELIEF OPERATIONS FALTERED

Relief operations faltered as local governments awaited a decision by the Cagayan provincial board to place the province under a state of calamity to speed up the release of emergency funds.

Vice Gov. Melvin Vargas III said he and the Cagayan board were waiting for a request from the governor so they could convene and declare a state of calamity.

The Cagayan provincial disaster risk reduction and management council said Lawin killed four people, injured 11 others, destroyed more than 9,000 houses, displaced 28,000 people, and damaged P5.7 billion worth of crops and P433.8 million worth of infrastructure.

Provincial and municipal DRRM offices have been coping with limited quantities of food and other relief supplies.

On Saturday, local DRRM personnel and support crews were deployed to various barangays to distribute relief goods, which were delivered on Friday by two C-130 planes from Mactan.

Residents in Tuguegarao, Peñablanca and Solana towns, told the Inquirer they have not received a single pack of relief goods.

“Some people [from municipal government] came and took photos of my house, and left. They did not say anything about what kind of help they were giving,” said Erlinda Orteza, 60. The roof of her house in Barangay Maddarulug in Solana was blown away. TVJ

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Duterte: Separation with US doesn’t mean cutting diplomatic ties

‘Lawin’: 18 dead, 40 thousand people still in shelters

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

DSWD chief on lack of typhoon foreign aid: ‘We have enough funds’ by MB Online October 23, 2016 Share8 Tweet0 Share0 Email1 Share38


DSWD FACEBOOK PHOTO

Social Welfare and Development Secretary Judy Taguiwalo took to Facebook to explain why the government is not appealing for foreign aid for the victims of the typhoons Karen and Lawin.

In a Facebook post Sunday, October 23, the secretary said: “hindi tayo humihingi ng foreign assistance o donations mula sa ibang bansa para sa Karen o Lawin dahil nakitang may sapat na pondo ang gobyerno at mga ahensya nito para saklolohan ang mamamayang apektado. (The government is not appealing for foreign assistance or donations from other countries for the victims of Karen and Lawin because the government and its agencies apparently have enough funds to extend help to the affected residents.)”

She attributed this to the transparency of and lack of corruption in their process, promising to further enhance and clean up the system of relief and assistance distribution without any political influence.

Taguiwalo also assured the national and local governments are cooperating with private sector to deliver the help urgently needed by the typhoon victims.

The secretary’s Facebook post, which she urged to be shared, had been shared more than 15,000 times as of this posting.

In the aftermath of typhoon Lawin, Taguiwalo led the aerial survey of the devastated areas in northern Luzon.

On Sunday, the secretary joined President Rodrigo Duterte as the government handed out aid to the affected residents in Cagayan, Isabela and Ilocos Norte.

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RELATED(2) FROM THE INQUIRER

‘IRREGULARITIES’ FOUND: 200,000 ‘Yolanda’ victims did not get aid — DSWD head By: Yuji Vincent Gonzales / @YGonzalesINQ INQUIRER.net / 12:26 PM October 24, 2016


Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo disclosed on Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, that about 200,000 victims of Typhoon ‘Yolanda’ did not get aid. INQUIRER FILE

Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo on Monday said her department had submitted to President Rodrigo Duterte a report on supposed irregularities in government aid for victims of supertyphoon “Yolanda” in 2013.

In a press briefing in Malacañang, Taguiwalo said around 200,000 people from Regions 6 and 8 complained that they did not receive assistance from the government.

READ: COA: ‘Yolanda’ aid wasted, unused

“We have submitted the report to the President already and we asked him to initiate the investigation,” Taguiwalo said.

“The money has gone to the people but there are cases of irregularities or non-compliance… The exclusion of emergency shelter assistance is widespread,” she added.

Taguiwalo said the Department of Social Welfare and Development started an assessment of Yolanda donations when she assumed office in July upon the request of the people.

READ: Yolanda’ victims ask DSWD to probe housing aid funds

“We are doing our best that the Yolanda experience in terms of delayed provision of emergency assistance should not be repeated,” she said.

“We don’t want any form of irregularity or corruption, and the President was very clear about it,” she added. CBB/rga

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RELATED(3) FROM THE INQUIRER

Emergency aid released P 5,000 for each poor family for ESA, etc...By: Dona Z. Pazzibugan / @dpazzibuganINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer / 01:22 AM October 24, 2016


DSWD Secretary Dr. Judy M. Taguiwalo. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/MARIANNE BERMUDEZ

Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo ordered the release of P5,000 in emergency shelter assistance (ESA) to each poor family affected by Supertyphoon “Lawin” (international name: Haima) in northern Luzon.

In a memorandum circular she issued on Saturday, Taguiwalo directed field offices of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to hand out a uniform amount of ESA for the time being. The balance will be released after the local governments and the DSWD field offices have validated the count of damaged houses.

The DSWD is supposed to give out an ESA amounting to P30,000 each to families whose homes were destroyed by a disaster and P10,000 to those whose homes were damaged.

ESA funds will be ready to be distributed “in a month,” Taguiwalo said. The DSWD will also provide cash for work for affected families.

Taguiwalo asked the help of local government officials in Cagayan Valley, especially Cagayan and Isabela provinces that were directly hit by the typhoon, in determining the poorest of the poor who were most severely affected.

She said the DSWD wanted to prevent another debacle, as thousands of affected families are still waiting for their ESA three years after Yolanda struck the Visayas.


PHILSTAR

DSWD chief Taguiwalo: Foreign aid not needed so far By Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) | Updated October 24, 2016 - 10:35am 2 42 googleplus0 0


Fishermen try to save fingerlings after flooding brought about by Super Typhoon Haima (local name: Lawin) destroyed their fish pens at Vigan township, Ilocos Sur province in northern Philippines, Thursday Oct. 20, 2016. Super Typhoon Haima slammed into the northeastern Philippine coast late Wednesday with ferocious winds and rain that rekindled fears and memories from the catastrophe wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. AP/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippine government has sufficient funds to assist the victims of the onslaught of typhoons "Karen" and "Lawin," Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Judy Taguiwalo said.

Taguiwalo stressed that the country is not asking for foreign assistance nor donations.

"Mga mahal naming kababayan, kaunting paliwanag po: hindi tayo humihingi ng foreign assistance o donations mula sa ibang bansa para sa Karen o Lawin dahil nakitang may sapat na pondo ang gobyerno at mga ahensya nito para saklolohan ang mamamayang apektado," Taguiwalo said in a Facebook post on Sunday.

Taguiwalo stressed that the Philippines should not be dependent on foreign assistance when it could stand on its own feet.

The DSWD chief added that local government units and members of the private sector, headed by President Rodrigo Duterte, are working together to respond to the victims of the typhoons.

READ MORE...

"Pagsisikapan natin na paghusayin at linisin ang sistema ng relief and assistance dustribution nang walang halong pulitika," Taguiwalo said.

NEGATIVE COMMENT

One Facebook user, however, commented that the Philippine government should set aside pride and personal grudges to give way for humanitarian works.

"Even first world countries accept foreign aids/donations in times of calamities... It's for those who are badly affected by these calamities, after all, and not to be used as a weapon to feed one's ego by refusing to take what is offered," Facebook user Napoleon Nalcot said.

Taguiwalo answered the comment by stressing that the government acquired a large amount of foreign aid during the onslaught of Supertyphoon Yolanda in 2013.

"Hanggang ngayon hindi malinaw saan napunta ang malaking bahagi ng donations at tine-trace pa rin dahil maraming hindi nakinabang sa tulong," Taguiwalo said.

The cost of damage to agriculture in areas affected by Typhoon Lawin has reached P10.2 billion, according to the Department of Agriculture. This covers 467,068 hectares of agricultural areas in Regions 1 (Ilocos), 2 (Cagayan Valley), 3 (Central Luzon), 4A (Calabarzon), 4B (Mimaropa) and 5 (Bicol) and affects about 70,000 farmers.

On the other hand, Typhoon Karen's total damage has amounted to P2.97 billion which covers 260,002 hectares of agricultural areas in Regions 1, 3, 4A and 5.

RELATED: Cash, food aid sought for Typhoon Lawin victims

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Taguiwalo clarifies: PH still welcomes foreign aid By: Yuji Vincent Gonzales / @YGonzalesINQ
INQUIRER.net / 12:41 PM October 24, 2016


DSWD Secretary Dr. Judy M. Taguiwalo. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/MARIANNE BERMUDEZ

Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo on Monday said the Philippine government was not closing its doors to foreign donations for victims of natural calamities.

Taguiwalo made the clarification in a press briefing in Malacañang when asked about her now viral Facebook post about foreign aid for victims of supertyphoon “Lawin.”

In her post, Taguiwalo said the government was not soliciting international aid because it has sufficient funds to address the needs of affected families.

“Mga mahal naming kababayan, kaunting paliwanag po: hindi tayo humihingi ng foreign assistance o donations mula sa ibang bansa para sa Karen o Lawin dahil nakitang may sapat na pondo ang gobyerno at mga ahensya nito para saklolohan ang mamamayang apektado,” Taguiwalo wrote.

(To our beloved countrymen, just a few explanation: we are not asking for foreign assistance or donations from other countries for [the victims of] Karen or Lawin because we saw that the government and its agencies have sufficient funds to address the needs of the affected families.)

(“Hindi tayo dapat maging pala-asa at pala-hingi sa mga dayuhang gobyerno kung kaya nating tumindig sa sariling paa. Kung sama-sama, lahat makakaya (We should not be too dependent on foreign agencies if we could stand on our own feet. If we unite, we could do it),” she added.

But Taguiwalo said the government still welcomes donations from other countries and organizations based on the country’s needs as it conducts an assessment of the damage brought by Lawin and Karen in agriculture, livestock and infrastructure.

“Pasensya na kung ang naging dating ng komento na ‘yun ay hindi na natin kailangan ng foreign aid. Nakayanan natin nitong nakaraan, bago at pagdating ng Karen at Lawin, naging maagap ang pagtulong sa ating mamayan,” Taguiwalo said. (I would like to apologize if my comment sounded like we no longer need foreign aid. We were able to address the needs of the victims, before and during Karen at Lawin, we were able to help them immediately.)

“Handa tayong tanggapin ang tulong na ito batay sa ating pangangailan at batay sa walang kondisyon… Ito ay nakadepende sa extent ng need na kailangan natin. Paglilinaw ho ‘yun, hindi tayo nagsasabing kayang kaya na natin ito. Nagpapasalamat tayo sa mga kaibigan, indibidwal, organisasyon at ibang bayan na handa na silang tumulong,” she added. (We welcome the foreign aid based on our needs and it should come without any condition. It depends on the extent of our needs. It is a clarification, we are not saying we could do it on our own. We are thankful to our friends, the individuals, organizations and other countries which are willing to help.)

Citing initial report as of Oct. 24, Taguiwalo said Cordillera has the most number of affected families at 66,875, or a total of 304,796 individuals. RAM/rga


PHILSTAR

Duterte's top priorities for China's aid: Education, agri and health By Alexis Romero (philstar.com) | Updated October 23, 2016 - 7:18pm 0 0 googleplus0 0


Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping attend a signing ceremony in Beijing, China, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. AP/Ng Han Guan, Pool

 MANILA, Philippines — The government would prioritize education, agriculture, and health programs in the $16 billion assistance to be provided by China next year, President Rodrigo Duterte said.

Speaking to officials and residents of typhoon-hit Isabela, Duterte said he would make sure that every centavo of the assistance would benefit the Filipinos

“The $16 billion is equivalent to more than half a trillion pesos. I expect that next year. Our lives will not prosper at once but next year, that money will come,” the president said.

“The thrust of my government is first, education, second is agriculture, third is health,” he added.

READ MORE...

Duterte came home last Friday from a four-day visit to China which officials said signaled the recovery of the relationship between Manila and Beijing. The two countries’ relationship was strained by the dispute over the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea), a resource-rich area where about $5 trillion worth of goods pass through every year.

Duterte said part of the assistance would be used to provide the poor access to medicines. He said he is planning to revive the Botika ng Bayan, state-run drug stores that sell cheap medicines.

During his visit to typhoon victims in Tuguegarao also Sunday, Duterte said agriculture would get a “big slice” of the funds. He said the money would be used to buy seedlings and support farmer cooperatives.

“We will restore the financing for agriculture. We will set-up cooperatives,” the president said.

The president said the government would manage the cooperatives, noting that “there are a few success stories about financing.”

“In the meantime, if I think that you cannot really carry on the burden of operating the (financial mechanism). Don’t be insulted. It’s applicable to the entire Philippines,” he said.

MARCOS' 'MASAGANANG 99; BIYAYANG DAGAT

Duterte also bared plans to revive the agriculture programs of former President Ferdinand Marcos, whom he described as “one of the brightest Filipinos.”

He said he would come up with programs patterned after the Masagana 99 and Biyayang Dagat, which provided fishermen and farmers access to funds.

“I’d like to get the idea of Marcos. I will revive that. I will copy that,” the president said.

Duterte said the Defense and Interior departments would not get much from the funds because the security situation has improved. He also reiterated that he would not tolerate any form of corruption under his watch.

“We will make sure that everyone will benefit,” he said.

Last week, Trade Secretary Ramon Lopez said Duterte’s four-day visit to China has yielded about $24 billion worth of deals.

The figure covers loan facilities and private sector agreements and touches across different industries.

The deals signed include investments in agriculture, energy, tourism, food, manufacturing, tourism, telecommunications, and infrastructure.

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Duterte wants to revive Marcos' agri, fishing programs By Rosette Adel (philstar.com) | Updated October 23, 2016 - 3:55pm 26 1347 googleplus0 0


President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday announced that he would revive two of late President Ferdinand Marcos’s agriculture and fishery programs. PPD/King Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines — President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday announced that he would revive late President Ferdinand Marcos’ agriculture and fishery programs.

Describing Marcos as one of the brightest Filipinos, Duterte said he would revive Masagana 99 and Biyayang Dagat which were implemented during the Marcos dictatorship.

“Gusto ko lang kunin yung idea ni Marcos, malayo na ‘yun — iyong Biyayang Dagat pati Masagana 99. Bright ‘yung tao, alam niya ‘yung [ga]gawin niya ibalik ko ‘yun dahan-dahan ‘pag natanggap kong makuha ko [na budget],” Duterte said during his speech in Tuguegarao City, Cagayan.

Masagana 99 was a program which promoted the planting of Green Revolution varieties of rice developed by the International Rice Research Institute. It increased the production of rice and the country was able to export “bountiful” 99 cavans of rice per hectare, according to previous reports.


towards self sufficiency in it's staple product
The Philippines has always been a rice importing country since the time of President Manuel Quezon. However, at the onset of the Marcos administration, President Ferdinand E. Marcos revolutionized the agricultural sector and prioritized construction of various irrigation systems, farm to market roads and provided technical and financial support to the farmers, implemented the agrarian reform act and the Philippines had gained self sufficiency and even exported it's staple product which is rice. The President established the International Rice Research Institute in Laguna province and with the technical know how of its agricultural experts, a high yielding rice variety called Masagana 99 was produced and this spurred rice production throughout the country. FROM FLICKRRIVER.COM

On the other hand, Biyayang Dagat is a program for allowing fishermen to loan. Through this project, a study of the Department of Science and Technology revealed that fisherfolk were able to acquire fishing paraphernalia, diversified fishing activities and improved marketing mechanisms and marked capacity to pay for labor.

Duterte lamented how the two projects were not continued by the previous administrations. He said he ought to revive it using his administration’s budget which prioritizes education, agriculture and health.

“Sayang lang, nanghinayang ako ‘yung kanyang Masagana 99 at Biyayang Dagat kung iyon dinala ng husto yun, OK na tayo,” Duterte said, explaining that tirades of succeeding administrations to Marcos stopped the programs.

The president said he intends to revive the true function of the Landbank of the Philippines which was to provide financing for lands. He said it has become commercialized.

He also announced the turnover of millions of pesos worth of rice, free corn and vegetable seeds for Cagayan and its capital Tuguegarao in his speech on Sunday. He led the distribution of relief goods and emergency shelter assistance (ESA) to the families affected by the onslaught of Super Typhoon Lawin that devastated Cagayan last Oct. 19, 2016.

Last February, Duterte expressed admiration for Marcos' agriculture and fishery programs. He mentioned Masagana 99 and Biyayang Dagat as the projects which resulted in the halting of food importation in the country.


INQUIRER

Change has come to Mindoro By: Gregg Yan / @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer / 04:42 AM October 23, 2016


A tamaraw grazes in the forest. GREGG YAN

It was raining sheets at the Iglit-Baco National Park as we hunkered down inside a thatched hut with three ancient Fufu-amas, elders of the Taw’Buid tribe from Mindoro province. Clad in loincloth, they were smoking a mysterious herb supposed to be tobacco, that smelled like something else.

I was last here in 2012 to photograph the endangered tamaraw (Mindoro dwarf buffalo) that several environmental groups are working to conserve. We’ve returned to understand the plight of this indigenous tribe sharing the land with the tamaraw.

READ MORE...

Solar lamps


Taw’Buid elder Henry Timuyog shows off his family’s new solar lamp, courtesy of NGC and WWF. The reclusive Taw’Buid live simple lives as upland farmers and hunt game in the rugged mountains of Mindoro.

We, from the National Geographic Channel (NGC), Tamaraw Conservation Program and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), had just given the tribe some solar lamps that we hoped would warm ties and allow us outsiders to visit one of their distant forest villages and see how else we could help.

Close to 20,000 inhabit Mindoro’s central highlands, making the Taw’Buid (“people from above”), the largest of eight tribes here collectively called Mangyan by lowlanders.

Once occupying Mindoro’s lowlands, they were pushed into the mountains by Spanish colonizers and Filipino migrants. Peaceful, secretive and deeply animistic, they are careful not to rouse the anger of their gods.

“We cannot allow just anyone to visit,” said old Fuldo Gonzales.

Aside from the threat of disease from the lowlands, his people have reason to fear outsiders. In April, communist rebels attacked a government construction site building a road to Barangay Poypoy.


Fifty Mobiya solar lamps were given to Taw’Buid families, funded by the proceeds of National Geographic Channel’s Earth Day Run 2015. Ranger patrol kits and camera traps to photograph wildlife were also purchased As very few have access to electricity, most cut trees for firewood, used to both light homes and provide heat in fire pits, where families congregate and talk each night.

Revolutionary tax

The gutted hulk of a backhoe and grader bore testament to the price of refusing to pay the rebels’ revolutionary tax.

Contact with the Taw’Buid was established through missionary groups and the Tamaraw Conservation Program that employs tribesmen as trackers and forest rangers to protect the tamaraw that resembles the more familiar carabao but is found only in Mindoro.

About 10,000 thrived a century ago until a combination of cattle-killing rinderpest and poaching left less than 100 survivors by 1969, prompting the International Union for the Conservation of Nature to classify them as critically endangered, just a step away from extinction.

Tams-2


A family of Tamaraw (Bubalus mindorensis) photographed in the wild.

To support existing conservation drives, WWF partnered with Far Eastern University (whose icon happens to be a tamaraw), NGC, Banco de Oro, Primer Group of Companies, Hubbs Seaworld Research Institute and the Taw’Buid people for a project called “Tams-2” or “Tamaraw Times Two,” which aims to double the number of the tamaraw from 300 to 600 by 2020.

“Tams-2” has seen the number of tamaraw in the Iglit-Baco range rise from 327 in 2012 to 413 in April, the highest number ever recorded. “We’ll always protect the tamaraw,” said Taw’Buid chief Fausto Novelozo.“If the tamaraw ceases to exist, our people might well disappear.”

Four national laws protect the tamaraw from poaching, with Presidential Proclamation No. 273 declaring the animal a source of national heritage and pride. Tamaraw Month is celebrated every October in the Philippines.

As we trudged down a muddy trail from Mt. McGowen (also called Magawang), we saw over a dozen tamaraw in the swaying scrub. We also saw Fuldo looking troubled. The tribe had refused us a visit to their forest village, he said, citing how the gods were once angered when outsiders were allowed in, and one of their Fufu-amas died. “Though we need medicine and supplies, we cannot risk angering the gods of the Taw’Buid,” the old man explained.


Slopes of Magawang Mountain in the Iglit-Baco Range feature vast, billowing fields of talahib (Saccharum spontaneum) and cogon (Imperata cylindrica) occasionally broken up by stands of trees and wallowing holes. The area hosts other large mammals like deer and wild pigs as well.

We heeded their request, gave them our extra supplies and pushed on to another Taw’Buid village where outsiders are allowed, but where the rebels had struck.

As we sat and socialized with the community, I noticed some of the younger Taw’Buid fussing over cell phones. At the turnover ceremony, tribal chief Fausto had expressed reservations about them. “They are creating wants for our people, who now want to cut more trees and grow more rice so they can own one. We have always lived fine without them. To preserve who we are, we must return to the old ways.”

Like at least 5,000 indigenous cultures worldwide, the Taw’Buid are at a crossroads.

The Old Guard like Fausto, Fuldo and the ancient Fufu-amas might hold back the tide, but the younger ones, who have traded loincloth for T-shirts and basketball shorts and are tinkering with cell phones, are starting to embrace the future on their own terms.

At dusk, we said goodbye and left the village, knowing that with time, the forest trails would become paved roads, rivers irrigation canals and the Taw’Buid ordinary folk walking home from the fields.

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ALSO FROM THE INQUIIRER "A PLEA FROM A FOREIGNER LIVING IN THE PHILIPPINES"

Duterte could fail Filipinos Philippine Daily Inquirer / 12:12 AM October 07, 2016

I am a foreigner married to a Filipina. I have been living in the Philippines for eight months. Like many others, I support President Duterte’s mission to rid the country of illegal drugs and corruption.

Below are my thoughts about the actual impact on the present and the possible impact on the future of Mr. Duterte’s outrageous comments.

I believe that the President is the medicine the Philippines needs. However, I fear that the side effects he is causing may kill the patient.

He says he only answers to the Filipino people, and yet he may be about to destroy his presidency, thereby, also his ability to serve the very people who elected him and support him.

Most people, including me, like and appreciate his toughness—and his tough talk. And I understand that democracy, Filipino-style, cannot—and should not—be compared to a Western-style democracy.

But there is a limit. His comments, such as the ones about the missionary who was raped and murdered, as well as his reference to Hitler in killing addicts, don’t go down well with the outside world—to put it mildly. In fact, comments such as these will make him persona non grata in most of the developed countries, and even beyond.

He can say, “I don’t give a s—!” but he should. Because in serving the people of the Philippines, his duty is to ensure the wellbeing of all Filipinos. This includes, among other things, following the path of very good growth that he inherited from his predecessor by making sure that Filipino products continue to be exported around the world, and that overseas Filipino workers remain attractive to other countries, and the Philippines to foreign investors.

My fear is, if he persists in making outrageous comments, he might just incur the wrath of the West and, whether we like it or not, this would have dire consequences to the Philippines.

Imagine no more investments from abroad; imagine all foreigners pulling out their investments and selling their real property; imagine Filipino products being banned in other countries; imagine imported products being slapped new taxes; imagine Filipinos being repatriated by the thousands. Imagine no tourists visiting the Philippines.

ADDICTIVE TO FOREIGNERS

The Philippines and the Filipinos are “addictive” to foreigners.

Once people visit the Philippines they fall in love with the country and, in particular, with the Filipino people.

Believe me, Mr. President, Filipinos are the kindest and most welcoming people in the world.

You are the President. If you cause negative impacts, you would have let down the Filipino people. And it’s not enough for you to just say “I take full responsibility—shoot me!” because then your pledge to answer only to the Filipino people is not sincere—it is all about YOU!

I beg you Mr. President, be the medicine we all so much wish for the Philippines—but don’t kill the patient!


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