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HEADLINES NEWS THIS PAST WEEK...
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

'MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS NOT NECESSARILY BITTER, VENGEFUL' - NOY AQUINO
(RELATED: EARLIER INQUIRER REPORT- Human rights group hits Aquino for failing to convict Arroyo]
[RELATED(2): LP with Trillanes plotting vs Duterte]



SEPTEMBER 26 -FORMER PRESIDENT NOY AQUINO
Martial law victims fighting to ensure that such a dark period in history will never be repeated are not necessarily bitter or vengeful, according to former president Benigno Aquino III. STAR/File photo MANILA, Philippines – Martial law victims fighting to ensure that such a dark period in history will never be repeated are not necessarily bitter or vengeful, according to former president Benigno Aquino III.
In fact, Aquino, whose family was a victim of the Marcos dictatorship, said some of them were a personal source of inspiration for being able to move on with grace despite what they had been through. The former president was asked about the people he looked up to aside from his parents who were democracy icons. Former senator Benigno Aquino Jr. was assassinated in 1983 after a long battle with the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos. His mother Corazon was installed into the presidency when a bloodless people’s uprising occurred three years after the assassination. Aquino said that an aunt and the nanny who took care of him when he was young were both oppressed during martial law but he never heard them talk about “getting even” or wishing that their persecutors experience the same things that happened to them. READ MORE...RELATED, EARLIER INQUIRER REPORT -Human rights group hits Aquino for failing to convict Arroyo...RELATED(2) LP with Trillanes plotting vs Duterte...

ALSO:
Zamboanga City on alert for arms shipments to Abu Sayyaf
[RELATED: Police bust gunrunning syndicate selling gov’t guns, ammo to ASG]

[RELATED(2):
Abu Sayyaf releases 3 Indonesian captives, turned over to govt by MNLF founder Misuari]


SEPTEMBER 27 -The BRP Tarlac, the Philippine Navy's newest and biggest ship, at the Naval Station Romulo Espaldon in Zamboanga City. MIGUEL DE GUZMAN, file
ZAMBOANGA CITY, Philippines — Security forces have stepped up monitoring for war materiel that someone might try to slip to the Abu Sayyaf group in Sulu and Basilan. This, after police intelligence agents arrested three suspects and seized a cache of rifle grenades, high-powered rifles and ammunition in a village beside the Philippine National Police headquarters in San Juan, Metro Manila. The weapons and ammunition, which have been traced to the Government Arsenal, were supposed to go to the Abu Sayyaf in Sulu, police said. Chief Inspector Helen Galvez, spokesperson of the Zamboanga City Police Office, said they are in close coordination with the military and port security to monitor and thwart attempts to sneak war material to the bandit group, which has been the target of intensified military operations. “We have intensified our monitoring in the port areas even in the finger wharves that are loosely operated,” she said. READ MORE...RELATED,
Police bust gunrunning syndicate selling gov’t guns, ammo to ASG... RELATED(2) Abu Sayyaf releases 3 Indonesian captives, turned over to govt by MNLF founder Misuari...

ALSO: High-powered guns for Abu Sayyaf from ARMM war lords seized in San Juan
(Four men who are allegedly supplying high-powered guns to the Abu Sayyaf Group and war lords in ARMM including politicians were arrested)
[RELATED: Death for Abu Sayyaf weapons supplier — Dela Rosa]
[RELATED(2): GOV’T SOUGHT MNLF’S HAND: Pressure on Abus led to release of hostages—AFP]


SEPTEMBER 27 -Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald Dela Rosa is seen in this file photo. Philstar.com
MANILA, Philippines – Four men who are allegedly supplying high-powered guns to the Abu Sayyaf Group and war lords in ARMM including politicians were arrested in San Juan City. Police Chief Inspector Roque Merdegia of the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group's Anti-Transnational Crimes Unit identified the suspects as Unding Kenneth Isa, Hja Risdimona Isa, Aliamer Akarab Mandih and Hurbin Alhi Sahibul. Armed with search warrant, ATCU agents went to Barangay West Crame in San Juan City on Saturday around 10 a.m. where they confiscated cache of M203 grenade launchers, M14, M16, and thousands of ammunition. Isa and a certain “Wahid,” both natives of Indanan, Sulu, were believed to be supplying high-powered guns to the Abu Sayyaf and other armed groups in ARMM, delivering it from Manila to Zamboanga, then to Jolo, Sulu. READ MORE...RELATED, Death for Abu Sayyaf weapons supplier - Dela Rosa...RELATED(2),
GOV’T SOUGHT MNLF’S HAND: Pressure on Abus led to release of hostages—AFP...

ALSO:
Arraigned for malicious libel, Trillanes wants settlement out of court on Binays case against him; But rejected right away by Jun Jun
(Jun Jun Binay said 'No, your honor" which closed the door to any negotiations for the amicable settlement of the case.)
[RELATED: Typically arrogant, Trillanes on being arraigned over libel case - Let’s see who gets convicted first]


NOVEMBER 2014 PHOTO GOOGLE SEARCH Now that Jojo Binay and his son Jun-Jun are no longer in power, they still can bring Sen. Antonio Trillanes before a court to answer for his libelous remarks against father and son, as Trillanes was arraigned yesterday before a Makati City Court, despite the senator’s many excuses for postponement. While Trillanes pleaded not guilty yesterday to the charge of libel during his arraignment in the libel case pending before Branch 142 of the Regional Trial Court of Makati City against Trillanes for his malicious and libelous statements that Mayor Jun-Jun and/or his family bribed the Justices of the Court of Appeals for the issuance of the temporary restraining order against the preventive suspension order issued by the Office of the Ombudsman, it should be remembered that the Court of Appeals cited Senator Trillanes in contempt of court for his allegations about the bribery. But the Supreme Court has sustained the regularity of the issuance of the Court of Appeals of the temporary restraining order in connection with the preventive suspension order.
During the hearing, the Information was read by the Court to Trillanes, who pleaded “not guilty’ to the charge against him.
But when the Court inquired from both parties if they were willing to discuss the possibility of an amicable settlement of the case. Trillanes nodded to indicate his consent, but former Makati Mayor Jun-Jun firmly responded, “No, Your Honor,” which closed the door to any negotiations for the amicable settlement of the case. READ MORE...RELATED,
Trillanes on being arraigned over Binay libel case: Let’s see who gets convicted first...

ALSO COMMENTARY - PARTs 1 & 2: What Marcos prisons were really like


SEPTMEBR 26 -BY ONE WHO WAS THERE ,INCARCERATED: BY POLITICAL JOURNALIST RIGOBERTO TIGLAO -First of Two Parts I bet given that title, you’d be expecting a tale of horrors inside the dictator Marcos’ prisons. I rest my case: The Yellow Cult has been extremely successful in painting a one-sided picture of the Marcos era. An objective assessment is much, much more complicated than the good versus evil narrative of the Yellow Cult that overthrew Marcos. That is unfortunate for us, as a nation has to have an accurate picture of its past. Marcos’ wife, Imelda, and his children, have long abandoned efforts to counter the Yellow Cult’s narratives. These have even been given new impetus recently because of Bongbong Marcos’ bid for the vice presidency this past May and President Duterte’s order to allow the strongman’s burial at the official government cemetery, misnamed “Libingan ng mga Bayani.” The Ilocano trait of parsimoniousness must have gotten the better of them. The Marcos family’s near silence to defend the strongman — “Let history judge my father,” was all Bongbong could say — is in contrast to the strongman’s aggressiveness in addressing accusations against martial law, even several books to defend his regime in detail. READ MORE... RELATED PART 2...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

‘Martial law victims not necessarily bitter, vengeful’


FORMER PRESIDENT NOY AQUINO

MANILA, OCTOBER 3, 2016 (PHILSTAR) By Aurea Calica September 26, 2016 - Martial law victims fighting to ensure that such a dark period in history will never be repeated are not necessarily bitter or vengeful, according to former president Benigno Aquino III. STAR/File photo MANILA, Philippines – Martial law victims fighting to ensure that such a dark period in history will never be repeated are not necessarily bitter or vengeful, according to former president Benigno Aquino III.

In fact, Aquino, whose family was a victim of the Marcos dictatorship, said some of them were a personal source of inspiration for being able to move on with grace despite what they had been through.

The former president was asked about the people he looked up to aside from his parents who were democracy icons.

Former senator Benigno Aquino Jr. was assassinated in 1983 after a long battle with the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

His mother Corazon was installed into the presidency when a bloodless people’s uprising occurred three years after the assassination.

Aquino said that an aunt and the nanny who took care of him when he was young were both oppressed during martial law but he never heard them talk about “getting even” or wishing that their persecutors experience the same things that happened to them.

READ MORE...

Aquino disclosed his nanny, who was six months pregnant, was arrested three times during Marcos’ time. The only offense he could think of was that she was under the employ of a family seeking democracy.

Aquino had also been talking about the sufferings of his family while his late father was incarcerated for seven years before they went into exile in Boston.

A documentary shown during his last Independence Day rites at the Palace was again screened during the informal forum on the night of Sept. 23 at St. Theresa’s College in Quezon City. It was the day that martial law was implemented though it was signed on Sept. 21, 1972.

Aquino also cited former lawmaker and Commission on Human rights chair Loretta Ann Rosales as among those who were not thinking of personal vengeance while continuing to defend human rights.

Listening to them could make people pause and think: “Why is the hatred of the nuisances… deeper?” Aquino said, adding these people must have found the “grace of God” in their sufferings.

Another idol, he said, was South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician and philanthropist Nelson Mandela, who was incarcerated for 27 years but held no rancor against his enemies.

Aquino said he had a one-on-one talk with Mandela, who was president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999, when he came here in the country and met with his mother.

Aquino said Mandela, during his detention, was reportedly being poisoned little by little, and “to see somebody without bitterness” after all of that was remarkable.

“(I was) trying to imagine how, (while) you were oppressed for so long you were filled with anger… I have so many examples,” the former president said.

But despite being passionate about the martial law issue, Aquino said the issue on whether Marcos should be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani was beyond him.

“I’ve kept quiet about the Marcos burial because I’ve got so many years to say my point and it’s time to hear everybody else’s point,” he said, noting the vocal opposition of various sectors when President Duterte announced his approval of the burial.

“They have shared their own stories,” he said.

Supposedly scheduled this month, the Marcos burial at the heroes’ cemetery was halted by a status quo ante order issued by the Supreme Court, where various oppositions were filed by victims of human rights abuses during the martial law years.

During the gathering on Friday night, Aquino stressed the importance of keeping a permanent record to prevent attempts at historical revisionism.

Those opposing the burial of Marcos at the heroes’ cemetery believe that the state should not pay tribute to a dictator or it will send the wrong signal to the young generation.

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EARLIER INQUIRER REPORT (JULY 2016)

Human rights group hits Aquino for failing to convict Arroyo SHARES: 5250 VIEW COMMENTS
INQUIRER.net By: Yuji Vincent Gonzales, July 19th, 2016 05:41 PM


Former President Benigno Simeon Aquino lll. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/JOAN BONDOC

A human rights group on Tuesday blamed the administration of former President Benigno Aquino III for failing to convict his predecessor, former President and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, despite supposed rights abuses committed during the latter’s term.

Reacting to the Supreme Court decision acquitting Arroyo of plunder charges, Karapatan secretary-general Cristina Palabay said Aquino only used Arroyo as a cover-up for his alleged “inefficiency and ineptitude in governance.”

READ: SC junks remaining Arroyo plunder case, sets her free

“#BoySisi, with all his fault-finding against former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, failed to convict her. BS Aquino only used Arroyo as an excuse for his inefficiency and ineptitude in governance, and pursued charges against Arroyo only for a show,” Palabay said in a statement.

In an 11-4 vote, the high tribunal granted Arroyo’s petition seeking the dismissal of her remaining plunder case at the Sandiganbayan for the alleged misuse of the P366-million Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO) fund.

Arroyo was arrested in 2011 on electoral fraud charges in connection with the 2007 polls but was allowed bail in 2012. However, before she could be freed, the Sandiganbayan ordered her arrest for plunder involving alleged misuse of P366 million in intelligence funds of the PCSO when she was President.

READ: Arroyo faces new PCSO plunder complaint, lawyer says

Palabay said the Aquino administration did not pursue Arroyo’s prosecution over the killings of journalists and human rights advocates, lamenting that “there was no substantial progress on these cases.”

“We are reminding the Supreme Court that the Arroyo government left behind 1,206 victims of political killings and 206 victims of enforced disappearances among activists, peasants and human-rights workers,” Palabay said.

READ: More could have been done to convict Arroyo—solon

The group said that while “plunderers and murderers” like Arroyo are set free from prison, more than 500 political prisoners remain in jail, “many of them arrested during the Arroyo regime.”

Palabay also pointed out it was under the Arroyo administration when the Maguindanao massacre, dubbed the single deadliest event for journalists in the world, happened. TVJ

“The case which symbolizes the height of impunity remains unresolved during the whole Aquino term. Arroyo, just like Aquino, has benefitted from the systematic human rights violations in order to stay in power and plunder the nation’s coffers,” Palabay said.

“The challenge for the Duterte administration is to render justice for those whose rights were violated by the Arroyo and Aquino regime. Arroyo and Aquino should be prosecuted and punished,” she added./rga

RELATED STORIES

Arroyo on acquittal: Justice, righteousness prevailed

Palace calls for respect of Arroyo acquittal

SC ruling to acquit Arroyo draws mixed reaction from senators

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA STANDARD

LP, Trillanes plotting vs Duterte posted October 02, 2016 at 12:01 am by John Paolo Bencito


DUTERTE Cabinet Secretary Leoncio Evasco Jr.

THE Liberal Party is plotting with unidentified businessmen to oust President Rodrigo Duterte, according to long-time Duterte ally and Cabinet Secretary Leoncio Evasco.

“They are convincing the military and police, [particularly] Senator Antonio Trillanes IV, to join in their cause to topple Duterte,” Evasco told journalists in Dapitan City on Friday.

“They will fail,” Evasco said, explaining that the businessmen are associated with the Liberal Party who cannot not accept that they were defeated by somebody from Mindanao.

“That’s because they look down on us,” Evasco said. “They did not know that our minds were molded by our experiences, our studies, and our outlook of life that the elite don’t have.”

Evasco said the businessmen are paying off media men to play up the issues of summary and extrajudicial killings and the burial of former President Ferdinand Marcos to encourage people to oppose the Duterte administration.

“Sad to say, there are a lot of media practitioners who succumbed to the temptation of money. And we are talking of millions of pesos here,” Evasco said.

The President earlier accused forces loyal to former President Benigno Aquino III of fanning intrigues against him by blaming him for the killings of nearly 3,000 people in his tough campaign on illegal drugs.

He said “yellow” people whom he did not name are now laying the groundwork for his impeachment but he will press on because he was ready to lose his life, honor and the presidency.

He began his remarks after the swearing in of dozens of new government bureaucrats by hitting the United States and calling American leaders “hypocrites” for meddling in his war against crime.

“It was good they did it because it was an opportunity for (President) Duterte to enunciate his independent foreign policy,” Evasco said, adding that the President’s rivals are now saying that Duterte is a communist enticing “armed adventurism.”

“By being rich, America or the European Union or the UN, have no right to tell us what is good for us.

In pursuing an independent foreign policy, you must be a friend to everybody.

And if the President is resisting the bullying of our supposed friend, the United States, it doesn’t mean we are already aligning with the opposite, China or Russia,” he added.


PHILSTAR

Zamboanga City on alert for arms shipments to Abu Sayyaf By Roel Pareño (philstar.com) | Updated September 27, 2016 - 4:24pm 1 1346 googleplus0 0


The BRP Tarlac, the Philippine Navy's newest and biggest ship, at the Naval Station Romulo Espaldon in Zamboanga City. MIGUEL DE GUZMAN, file

ZAMBOANGA CITY, Philippines — Security forces have stepped up monitoring for war materiel that someone might try to slip to the Abu Sayyaf group in Sulu and Basilan.

This, after police intelligence agents arrested three suspects and seized a cache of rifle grenades, high-powered rifles and ammunition in a village beside the Philippine National Police headquarters in San Juan, Metro Manila.

The weapons and ammunition, which have been traced to the Government Arsenal, were supposed to go to the Abu Sayyaf in Sulu, police said.

Chief Inspector Helen Galvez, spokesperson of the Zamboanga City Police Office, said they are in close coordination with the military and port security to monitor and thwart attempts to sneak war material to the bandit group, which has been the target of intensified military operations.

“We have intensified our monitoring in the port areas even in the finger wharves that are loosely operated,” she said.

READ MORE...

Galvez said police are also validating information passed to the presidential hotline on guns and ammunition being smuggled to the Abu Sayyaf through Zamboanga City.

The interception of the arms cache was the result of cooperation between the police and the military.

“We shared intelligence reports. Malaki ang tulong ng pulis sa ating intensified police and military operations,” Maj. Tan said. AFP: We will crush Abu Sayyaf supporters Tan stressed that the military will not tolerate anyone providing support to the Abu Sayyaf.

“With our previous pronouncement, since the suspect is said to be a former politician, nagbigay kami ng statement before na kahit sino pa ‘yan sasagasaan yan ng AFP (Armed Forces of the Philippines) as long as ganoon ang ginagawa nila,” he said.

He said security forces have been working together to find the source of the Abu Sayyaf's weapons and ammunition and stop the flow of war materiel to the group.

“We are very concerned [because] the Abu Sayyaf group is not running out of supply of guns and ammunitions despite the series of encounters [and the ] recovery of their armaments,” he said.

Tan also said the military is concerned because the Abu Sayyaf seems to be using weapons from the Government Arsenal.

“Iyan ang pinakamasakit na gawin mo sa kapwa mo sundalo. We are angry and we don’t tolerate it,” Tan said.

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Police bust gunrunning syndicate selling gov’t guns, ammo to ASG by Aaron B. Recuenco September 28, 2016 Share12 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share67

Police authorities busted a gunrunning syndicate yesterday tagged as one of the suppliers of firearms to the notorious Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) bandits and political warlords in Mindanao in a raid in their hideoutnear Camp Crame in Quezon City.

Armed with a search warrant, the police raided the safehouse of Unding Kenneth Isa in Barangay West Crame and seized grenade launchers, M14 and M16 rifles and thousands of ammunition with an estimated value of P6 million.

An in-depth investigation was immediately ordered by Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa after it turned out that most of the seized guns from the group of Isa came from the government arsenal.

“Most of the ammos are traced back to the government arsenal… we suspect that they have a contact from the government arsenal,” said Dela Rosa.

“We want to put a stop to this. If possible we put these people on a firing squad because this is a big offense. You’re giving arms to the enemy,” he added.

Aside from Isa, police also arrested were Hja Risdimona Isa, Aljamer Akarab Mandih and Hurbin Alhi Sahibu.

Chief Supt. RoelObusan, head of the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG), said the operation stemmed from reports that Isa is involved ingunrunning operations serving clients mostly from Mindanao.

Worse, Obusan said among their clientsare ASG members based in Sulu.

“They have been delivering firearms and ammunition to war lords in ARMM (Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao), delivering it from Manila to Zamboanga then to Jolo using Sports Utility Vehicles,” Obusan revealed.

“Based on our intelligence reports, they have been delivering the firearms using the RORO (Roll On, Roll Off). We have traced a lot of deliveries in the past,” he added.

ORDER FOR MATERIEL - ASG STRENGTHENING ARMS

Dela Rosa said Isa ran as vice governor of Sulu in the May 2016 elections but lost. He was presented to media yesterday but he refused to talk.

Obusan said Isa arrived in Manila in 2012 and put up a small garments business in Cubao.“The business is small yet, they were able to send their three children to a private school. Isa himself is a registered owner of four firearms,” said Obusan.

“His lifestyle is not commensurate to his income so I believe that this illegal activity is the main source of their income,” he added.

Chief Insp. Roque Merdegia, head of the CIDG- Anti-Transnational Crimes Unit (ACTU), said they received information that Isa made a direct deal with some ASG members last month for the purchase a cache of M203 grenade launchers, M14 rifles, explosive materials and thousands of ammunition.

The order for materiel was reportedly made by a ranking ASG commander.

“Allegedly, the ASG is now strengthening their armaments to fight head on with government forces in Sulu and Basilan, and to intensify their kidnapping and bombing operations,” said Merdegia.

But even before the gun transaction last month, Merdegia said they already monitored the illegal activity of Isa.

“The illegal gun running activities intensified before the 2016 elections, wherein Isa reportedly ran for Sulu Vice Governor, but eventually lost,” said Merdegia.

Interviewed after the press briefing, dela Rosa shared that Isa told him that they were supposed to be allies because they both came from Mindanao.

“I told him he is a fool. I am a policeman and you are a criminal yet you want me to be your ally,” said Dela Rosa.

Merdegia said cases of illegal possession of firearms and illegal possession of explosives were filed against the suspects.

COURT MARTIAL

Meanwhile, two enlisted personnel of the Philippine Army (PA) will face court martial proceedings for reportedly stealing firearms and ammunitions and selling it to armed elements in Basilan, including the Abu Sayyaf.

Col. Benjamin Hao, Army spokesman, identified the two as Sergeant Jeffrey Ordonio and Technical Sergeant Santiago Caasi.

Hao said initial investigation showed that Sgt. Ordonio was allegedly found to have stolen 1,000 rounds of various ammunitions/bullets.

Ordonio was arrested by troops from the 10th Infantry Division and policemen at Mawab, Compostela Valley last Sept. 23.

Caasi who allegedly soldM203s, M-14 and M-16 rifles and bullets to criminal elements was arrested by soldiers from the 1st Cavalry squadron at Camp Jacobo Zobel in Labangan, Zamboanga del Sur, last September 20. (With a report from Francis T. Wakefield)

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RELATED(2) FROM PHILSTAR

Abu Sayyaf releases 3 Indonesian captives, turned over to govt by MNLF founder Misuari By Alexis Romero (philstar.com) | Updated October 2, 2016 - 1:50pm 3 52 googleplus0 0


The Armed Forces of the Philippines has been carrying out intensified operations against the Abu Sayyaf in Sulu. Google Maps

MANILA, Philippines — Three Indonesian hostages were released Sunday by the Abu Sayyaf in Sulu and were turned over to the local government by fugitive Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) founder Nur Misuari, a Cabinet official said.

Presidential peace adviser Jesus Dureza said Misuari called him to inform him of the release, which happened before noon.

“Chairman Misuari requested me to relay this new development to President [Rodrigo] Duterte, in whose behalf I expressed gratitude for the efforts,” Dureza said in a statement issued to Malacañang reporters.

The Indonesian kidnap victims — identified as Edi Suryono, Ferry Arifin, and Muhamad Mohammad Mahbrur — were turned over to Sulu Gov. Totoh Tan, who then brought them to the military. They will undergo debriefing before they are sent back to Indonesia.

Suryono, Arifin, and Mahbrur were kidnapped by the bandit group from their tugboat last June 22 at Simisa Island in Sulu.

Despite the development, Dureza said the Duterte administration’s stance against holding talks with the Abu Sayyaf has not changed.

“Nothing has changed. The military operations against them will continue. We are also trying to avail the cooperation of the local MNLF, and the local government of Sulu,” he told radio station dzBB.

“The stakeholders in the area want to do away with this plague because it has been affecting the whole province of Sulu. They are being viewed as a hostage area,” he added.

Maj. Filemon Tan Jr., spokesperson of the Armed Forces Western Mindanao Command, said the neutralization of brothers Nixon and Brown Muktadil and the wounding of four oof their followers early this week from the military operations might have pressured the Abu Sayyaf group to free the their captives.

The Muktadil brothers were tagged in the the cross-border abduction of 26 Indonesian and Malaysian nationals since April.

MISUARI ASKED TO INCLUDE ABU SAYYAF IN TALKS

Earlier, Duterte claimed that Misuari is asking him to include the Abu Sayyaf bandits in peace talks and to consider giving them a general amnesty. The president, however, rejected Misuari’s proposal.

“If that’s the case then let’s not talk anymore. I will not. For the life of me, I will not,” he told Marines in Fort Bonifacio on Sept. 27.

“Why should I talk to animals? What’s the point? They are merciless,” he added.

The MNLF has "vehemently" denied that Misuari asked that the bandit group be included in peace talks.

Dureza said Misuari did not ask him for anything during their conversation except to relay to Duterte the release of the three kidnap victims. He said the Abu Sayyaf still has captives but declined to identify them.

“We’re trying to find ways and means to recover them,” the presidential peace adviser said. Misuari also secured release of Norwegian, 3 Indonesians Misuari has been charged with rebellion over the 2013 Zamboanga siege, which left more than 200 people dead. The 20-day crisis started after his followers tried to raise their flag at the Zamboanga City Hall and held hostage hundreds of civilians.

Duterte has expressed readiness to talk to Misuari and has promised not to implement the arrest warrant against the MNLF founder.

Misuari was also credited for the release of Norwegian kidnap victim Kjartan Sekkingstad last month. Sekkingstad was abducted along with three companions in Samal Island off Davao del Norte on Sept. 21, 2015.

Two of Sekkingstad’s companions, Canadians John Ridsdel and Robert Hall, were beheaded early this year after their families had failed to pay the P300 million ransom demanded by the kidnappers. His Filipina companion, Maritess Flor, was released last June 24.

Misuari also played a role in the release of three Indonesians last month in Sulu. The Indonesians, who were abducted last July in Sabah, were turned over to the MNLF founder before they were brought to authorities. -- with Roel Pareño


PHILSTAR

High-powered guns for Abu Sayyaf, ARMM execs seized in San Juan By AJ Bolando (philstar.com) | Updated September 27, 2016 - 12:01pm 4 3271 googleplus1 0


Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald Dela Rosa is seen in this file photo. Philstar.com

MANILA, Philippines – Four men who are allegedly supplying high-powered guns to the Abu Sayyaf Group and war lords in ARMM including politicians were arrested in San Juan City.

Police Chief Inspector Roque Merdegia of the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group's Anti-Transnational Crimes Unit identified the suspects as Unding Kenneth Isa, Hja Risdimona Isa, Aliamer Akarab Mandih and Hurbin Alhi Sahibul.

Armed with search warrant, ATCU agents went to Barangay West Crame in San Juan City on Saturday around 10 a.m. where they confiscated cache of M203 grenade launchers, M14, M16, and thousands of ammunition.

Isa and a certain “Wahid,” both natives of Indanan, Sulu, were believed to be supplying high-powered guns to the Abu Sayyaf and other armed groups in ARMM, delivering it from Manila to Zamboanga, then to Jolo, Sulu.

READ MORE...

The authorities said that the illegal gun running activities intensified before the 2016 national elections, wherein Isa reportedly ran for Sulu Vice Governor, but eventually lost.

The CIDG added that last month that Isa and Wahid went to Manila along with unidentified extremists to buy a cache of M203 and M14 firearms, explosives components, and thousands of ammunition, upon orders of an unidentified Abu Sayyaf commander.

Upon receiving the information, the CIDG launched a surveillance operation and a test buy that led to the serving of the search warrant.

Cases for violations of RA 10591 (Comprehensive Firearms and Ammunition Regulation Act) and RA 9516 (Illegal Possession of Explosives) were filed against the suspects through inquest proceedings.

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Death for Abu Sayyaf weapons supplier — Dela Rosa INQUIRER.net By: Julliane Love De Jesus, September 27th, 2016 01:26 PM


Bato: ASG arms suppliers deserve death by firing squad

Either by firing squad or by hanging, Philippine National Police (PNP) chief Dir. Gen. Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa said he wanted those supplying guns to the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) dead.

Visibly exasperated, Dela Rosa vowed to execute individuals sending weapons to the enemies.

“Pa-firing squad natin kung sino ‘yang gago na ‘yang gumagawa nito,” he said during a press briefing in Camp Crame.

“Malaking offense ito ‘di ba? You’re giving arms to the enemy. So, death by hanging ba yan, or death by firing squad? How I wish ma-firing squad natin mga responsable dito,” he said.

Dela Rosa presented to media on Tuesday morning Unding Kenneth Isa, the alleged leader of a gunrunning syndicate.

The PNP Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) said it arrested Isa from a house in Barangay West Crame in San Juan City, a stone’s throw away from the PNP headquarters in Camp Crame.

READ: PNP seizes P6M in weapons, ammo intended for Abu Sayyaf

The CIDG said Isa, who ran for Sulu vice governor in May’s elections but lost, was arrested with three others last Saturday.

CIDG director Chief Supt. Roel Obusan said Isa, of Indanan, Sulu, was tight-lipped during interrogation about the source of the firearms.

But Dela Rosa said, “We will not stop until there’s no stone left unturned.”

The operation stemmed from a tip the CIDG received in July that Isa and a certain “Wahid” were supplying guns to Abu Sayyaf bandits and war lords in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. The weapons were reportedly delivered from Manila to Zamboanga, then to Jolo, Sulu, loaded on sports utility vehicles ferried on roll-on roll-off ferries.

In August, Isa, Wahid and unidentified ASG members reportedly went to Manila to buy a cache of M203 grenade launchers and M14 rifles, explosives components, and thousands of ammunition. They were reportedly sent by an unidentified Abu Sayyaf commander. CBB

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RELATED(2) FROM THE INQUIRER

GOV’T SOUGHT MNLF’S HAND: Pressure on Abus led to release of hostages—AFP
SHARES: 1867 VIEW COMMENTS INQUIRER.net By: Yuji Vincent Gonzales, September 18th, 2016 01:34 PM

 
https://youtu.be/JBBFS6rq9Ao
Philippine government hopeful in rebel peace talks INQUIRER.net INQUIRER.net Subscribe64,618 Add to Share More 434 views 4 0 Published on Aug 24, 2016 Philippines Presidential Peace Adviser says the second day of peace negotiations between the new Philippines government of President Rodrigo Duterte and communist rebels were "friendly". Category News & Politics

The Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) on Sunday said the pressure that the government has been putting on the terrorist Abu Sayyaf Group led to the recent release of its captives.

Echoing the statement of Peace Process Adviser Jesus Dureza, AFP spokesperson Brig. Gen. Restituto Padilla said the government sought the help of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) for the release of Norwegian hostage Kjartan Sekkingstad on Saturday.

“We do know that much of the pressure that has been applied to the group has caused many of these events to unfold,” Padilla said over ABS-CBN News Channel.

“We did seek the assistance of the MNLF and they have extended their cooperation,” he added.

Sekkingstad, one of the four people captured by the bandit group in Samal last year, was released around 2 p.m. on Saturday. He is set to be presented to the media by President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday.

Dureza said Sekkingstad stayed overnight in the place of MNLF chair Nur Misuari, who he said helped in the release and volunteered to host his stay due to bad weather.

Two of Sekkingstad’s companions, Canadians John Ridsdel and Robert Hall, were beheaded separately. Hall’s Filipino girlfriend Marites Flor was also freed in June.

MNLF on Sunday said three Indonesian nationals were also freed by the Abu Sayyaf and were already with Misuari in Indanan town. However, Padilla said the AFP has yet to confirm the information from their men on the ground.

READ: Abu Sayyaf frees 3 Indonesian hostages—MNLF

“Sec. Dureza is on the island, but he is not yet in possession of any of these kidnap victims,” Padilla added.

The freed victims were identified as Lorens Koten, Theodores Kopon, and a certain Manuel. Sulu-based professor Octavio Dinampo said he had “heard P30 million was paid to the Abu Sayyaf Group.” RAM/rga


TRIBUNE

Trillanes wants settlement out of court on Binays case against him Written by Angie M. Rosales Wednesday, 28 September 2016 00:00 f


NOVEMBER 2014 PHOTO GOOGLE SEARCH

Now that Jojo Binay and his son Jun-Jun are no longer in power, they still can bring Sen. Antonio Trillanes before a court to answer for his libelous remarks against father and son, as Trillanes was arraigned yesterday before a Makati City Court, despite the senator’s many excuses for postponement.

While Trillanes pleaded not guilty yesterday to the charge of libel during his arraignment in the libel case pending before Branch 142 of the Regional Trial Court of Makati City againstTrillanes for his malicious and libelous statements that Mayor Jun-Jun and/or his family bribed the Justices of the Court of Appeals for the issuance of the temporary restraining order against the preventive suspension order issued by the Office of the Ombudsman, it should be remembered that the Court of Appeals cited Senator Trillanes in contempt of court for his allegations about the bribery.

But the Supreme Court has sustained the regularity of the issuance of the Court of Appeals of the temporary restraining order in connection with the preventive suspension order.

During the hearing, the Information was read by the Court to Trillanes, who pleaded “not guilty’ to the charge against him.

But when the Court inquired from both parties if they were willing to discuss the possibility of an amicable settlement of the case.

Trillanes nodded to indicate his consent, but former Makati Mayor Jun-Jun firmly responded, “No, Your Honor,” which closed the door to any negotiations for the amicable settlement of the case.

READ MORE...

The Court set the continuation of the proceedings on November 9 and December 14.

The lawyer of Junjun Binay, Dan Subido, in a statement said: “Despite the previous attempts of Senator Trillanes to delay the proceedings, he was finally arraigned today for maliciously maligning the reputation of the Binays. We look forward in convicting him. Let this be a lesson to him so that he will no longer use his position in bullying and destroying the reputation of people.”

Trillanes: Case won’t stop me from bringing down corrupt officials

Trillanes on Tuesday said no libel case will stop him from “bringing down corrupt officials,” after he pleaded not guilty in a libel case filed against him by former Makati Mayor Junjun Binay.

“I will face this case. It will not stop me from bringing down corrupt people like them. I am not afraid. If I will speak my mind again in the future, if I speak again in the future, it is because I need to do it,” Trillanes said in an interview.

He appeared irked at the Binay claim that he is sure to be convicted, saying: Why do they say that? Do they control the Makati Court? Let’s see who will get convicted first before the Sandiganbayan,” Trillanes said

The case before the Sandiganbayan is over the corruption of the father and son (Binays), the senator said.

Binay Sr. is facing four counts of graft, nine counts of falsification of public documents and one count of malversation of public funds in connection with the overpriced Makati City Hall Building II.

The younger Binay, meanwhile, is facing two counts of graft and one count of malversation as co-accused of his father.

Binay Jr, is not out to bring down Trillanes as he is merely exercising the right to defend himself over defamatory statements made against him by the latter, Sen. Nancy Binay yesterday said, explaining the libel case filed by her brother against her colleague.

The issue, which stemmed from Trillanes’ claims that the former mayor allegedly bribed some of the associate justices of the Court of Appeals (CA) with P25 million each to stop the implementation of the suspension order issued to him by the Office of the Ombudsman.

Trillanes refused to be swayed by allegations that Binay’s camp has “control” of the Makati courts.


Nancy on Duterte hidden wealth rap: Ang hirap maghusga! Trillanes alleged that Duterte had over P227.41 million in the Julia Vargas branch of the Bank of the Philippines. He also claims that Duterte's bank accounts had about P2.4 billion in transactions from 2006 to 2015.ABS-CBN News Posted at 02 May 2016 05:10 PM

Senator Binay said the matter of the libel case against Trillanes is part of the due process that her family has sought before the courts, to put in proper perspective whatever offenses committed to them.

“Ever since this is what we do. It’s not all about publicity. We are not doing this to stop him (from what he’s doing). We are just exercising our right because he has been destroying us. Since has been been arraigned, it can be proved in court if what he said to destroy us,” she said.

Senator Binay dismissed Trillanes’ assertion that the libel case against him will not prosper.

“At this point, he takes care of his life,” she said.

The lady senator could only muse over the fact that Trillanes, who was at one point, was hand in hand with Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano in investigating her father, the former Vice President, on his alleged wrongdoings while he was still Makati City mayor, are now at odds with each other.

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RELATED FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

Trillanes on being arraigned over Binay libel case: Let’s see who gets convicted first Published September 27, 2016 4:42pm By KATHRINA CHARMAINE ALVAREZ, GMA News


A STEADFAST 'HERO-WANNABE'

Senator Antonio Trillanes IV on Tuesday said no libel case will stop him from "bringing down corrupt officials," after he pleaded not guilty in a libel case filed against him by former Makati Mayor Junjun Binay.

“Hinaharap ko ‘to. It will not stop me from bringing down corrupt people like them. Hindi ako matitinag. If I will speak my mind again in the future, kung kailangan gagawin ko,” Trillanes said in an interview.

Trillanes was arraigned at the Makati Regional Trial Court Branch 142 over a libel complaint filed last year by Binay.

The complaint involves Trillanes’ statements that two justices of the Court of Appeals received P25 million each in exchange for a temporary restraining order on the implementation on Binay’s suspension as then mayor of Makati.

Lawyer Dan Subido, who represents Binay, said they “look forward in convicting” Trillanes.

“Bakit niya masasabi yun, kontrolado ba nila yung korte sa Makati? Tingnan natin kung mauuna ako ma-convict o mauuna sila ma-convict sa Sandiganbayan,” Trillanes said.

“Sa kanila kasi, ang kaso nila doon sa Sandiganbayan ay pangungurakot nilang mag-ama,” the senator added, referring to former Vice President Jejomar Binay.

Binay Sr. is facing four counts of graft, nine counts of falsification of public documents and one count of malversation of public funds in connection with the overpriced Makati City Hall Building II.

The younger Binay, meanwhile, is facing two counts of graft and one count of malversation as co-accused of his father.

Senator Nancy Binay, for her part, said their family was just exercising their right.

“Kami, we just follow the rule of law so nandun na yug proseso umaandar na siya,” Binay said.

Asked to comment on Trillanes’ statement that the Binays would be convicted first, Senator Binay said: “Parang hindi din, 'di ba? So parang at this point, bahala siya sa buhay niya.” —KBK, GMA News


MANILA TIMES COMMENTARY

PART 1: What Marcos prisons were really like BY RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2016 ANALYSIS AND COMMENTARY


RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO

First of Two Parts

I bet given that title, you’d be expecting a tale of horrors inside the dictator Marcos’ prisons. I rest my case: The Yellow Cult has been extremely successful in painting a one-sided picture of the Marcos era.

An objective assessment is much, much more complicated than the good versus evil narrative of the Yellow Cult that overthrew Marcos. That is unfortunate for us, as a nation has to have an accurate picture of its past. Marcos’ wife, Imelda, and his children, have long abandoned efforts to counter the Yellow Cult’s narratives.

These have even been given new impetus recently because of Bongbong Marcos’ bid for the vice presidency this past May and President Duterte’s order to allow the strongman’s burial at the official government cemetery, misnamed “Libingan ng mga Bayani.” The Ilocano trait of parsimoniousness must have gotten the better of them.

The Marcos family’s near silence to defend the strongman — “Let history judge my father,” was all Bongbong could say — is in contrast to the strongman’s aggressiveness in addressing accusations against martial law, even several books to defend his regime in detail.

READ MORE...


Marcos, political detainees after a jog, with the two ladies as visitors: Three of these were members of the Communist Party’s Executive Committee, its highest commanding body, who were released after at least two years. In the photo is one who is now a ranking executive of PLDT-Smart, another a top Singapore-based executive of the French news agency, Agence France Presse; and another a top negotiator for the Communist Party in the peace talks with the government. Several of them now live comfortable, middle-class lives in North America and Europe.

For instance, in Marcos’ Five Years of the New Society (published in May 1978), obviously to debunk claims of military abuses, the strongman stated that that 2,083 members of the AFP had been “dismissed and penalized for various abuses, including torture and ill-treatment of detainees and 322 had been sentenced to disciplinary punishment.” General Espino as well as Jose Crisol, Deputy Defense Secretary in charge of civilian relations had also reported that 2,500 to 2,900 military personnel were discharged as a result of complaints by detainees. In a speech marking the lifting of martial law in January 1981, Marcos claimed that more than 8,800 officers and men had been dismissed from the AFP during the period of martial law, because of human-rights accusations against them.

While obviously self-serving assertions, no Yellow narrative has ever reported these claims by Marcos and his officials, and to this day, these figures have not been disputed.

Rabid anti-Marcos writers have also routinely claim that during the regime, 50,000 Filipinos were detained. This is a half-truth as while this many probably would have been detained in the first few months of martial law.

However, reports, even by the Amnesty International that has been critical of martial law, point out that many of those detained in these first months were released a few months after, that by 1980, there only 1,913 political prisoners, and by 1981 – to prove that martial law was indeed lifted — only 243.

I believe that there was indeed a drastic reduction of political prisoners after martial rule was stabilized, since in December 1974, I was among probably a thousand out of the 1500 detainees released from Marcos prison euphemistically called Ipil Rehabilitation Center, which was the biggest in the country, in the “spirit of Christmas”, Marcos had declared. Many of those released returned to the underground, even becoming top communist leaders and NPA commanders.

Enrile and Ramos’ silence

Sadly, former senator Juan Ponce Enrile, who was officially the administrator of Martial Law, and Fidel V. Ramos, who officially supervised the military and the Philippine Constabulary (PC) had shirked from their duty to give their assessment and explanation of military abuses during martial law.

Ramos even has a public forum through his wordy, half-paged columns in the Manila Bulletin. Yet he has never written, a word on the issue, not even in recent weeks when martial law abuses have become a hot topic

The officials who were responsible, and accountable, for Marcos’ prisons and alleged human rights abuses, were indisputably Enrile and Ramos. Marcos in November 1972, or two months after he imposed martial issued General Order No. 16 which created the “Command for the Administration of Detainees” (COMCAD) with Enrile appointing Ramos as its commander, who was the authority supervising all detention centers, including that of the armed forces. The implementing guidelines of the COMCAD had detailed procedures for investigating whether the detainees should be kept in prison, with its main goal to be that of minimizing the occurrence of arbitrary detention.”

Enrile and Ramos obviously have been political opportunists, afraid that their accounts would create the image that they were defenders of that strongman rule. After all, would Ramos have won their presidency in 1992, would Cory Aquino have endorsed him if he explained the real score of alleged martial law abuses?

I cannot fathom though why these octogenarians in their twilight years, and retired from politics, remain silent, refusing to provide us with their detailed account of the martial law years — after they supervised the military until the very end of Marcos’ rule. They should at least release to scholars and researchers documents regarding their administration of martial law, which I’m sure they have.

The crucial questions they have to answer:
Was it state policy during Martial Law of using torture, extra-judicial killings, and detention of those who opposed the strongman?

Or, were these just then illegal actions by rogue even sadistic military men and police, the same kind of crimes committed before and after martial law? *

Did they attempt to stop these human rights abuses, and bring to court, even the military courts these criminal men in uniform? How many of the political detainees were Communist Party or New People Army members who were trying to topple government, and how many of those killed were in fire-fights with the military or paramilitary groups? How many were the Moro casualties as result of the MNLF and MILF’s secessionist war against the Republic, and were these listed as part of those allegedly killed or “disappeared” during martial law.

Yellow narratives of the Marcos years do not even raise these questions.

Cut-and-paste book

In a cut-and-paste book on the Marcos years totally based on narratives of biased sources and second-, and even third-hand accounts — funded I was told by either Manuel Lopez or his clan and rushed as a propaganda tool against Bongbong Marcos’ bid for the presidency — the author claimed that the dictator’s detention camps were “similar” to the USSR’s horrific prisons that made up the so-called The Gulag Archipelago, depicted vividly in Nobel laureate Alexandr Solzhenitsyn’s novel of that title.

I nearly fell off my seat reading that. That’s total rubbish.

It was that reference to Gulag Archipelaego that triggered a surge of memories for me. I read Solzhenitsyn’s book in fact while I was in a Marcos prison. How can you not believe the narrative of a man of letters who spent eight years in several gulags?

I compared the Marcos prison where I was reading to Solzhenitzen’s description of the Soviet gulag: Marcos’ prisons, in comparison, would be a middle-class drug rehabilitation camp, or teen-agers summer camp .

The Gulag Archipelago in fact helped convince me in 1974 to resign from the Communist Party. If communism’s first ever experiment resulted in such horror such as the Soviet gulag (and similar prisons in the second big experiment, Mao’s China), Marxism-Leninism must have —even if it is a powerful tool for social analysis — some deep flaw that goes against the humanist values civilization had struggled to develop for centuries. Marcos’ dictatorship was after all still part of the set of capitalist political systems.

I can speak of what Marcos prisons were because I was there, together with my late wife Raquel, in five detention centers, spending most of my 21st and 22nd year of life on this earth there.

These were the detention cells of the Philippine Constabulary’s 5th Constabulary Unit in Camp Crame, that of the Intelligence Service of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (ISAFP) in Camp Aguinaldo, that of the National Intelligence Coordinating Authority in its headquarters at V. Luna Road in Quezon City (where it still is) as well as Ipil Youth Rehabilitation Center and the maximum security Youth Rehabilitation Center both in Fort Bonifacio — these latter two being the biggest during martial law.

I just hate it when a book is written by a gullible, crackpot writer expecting to make money out the Yellow cult’s panic over Bongbong Marcos’s vice-presidential candidacy last May. I was told the author was promised that the book would be distributed to all high schools as a required textbook, if the Yellow candidate Mar Roxas had won. With 7 million high school students , the author would have been a multi-millionaire if that had happened.

Yellow Senator Riza Hontiveros has been stupidly trying to still implement that money-making plot, reportedly asking the Lopezes and Osmenas to pay for the books’ distribution, the store price of which is an astounding P2,500.

The author didn’t even care about martial law when it was upon us, and had a reputation for being so credulous in her reportage that the newspaper’s editor told me she wanted her fired. Her gullibility is much worse now: she quotes without question mostly anti-Marcos American writers, communist party members, and the narratives of the Yellow Cultists to portray Marcos’ prisons so different from I actually experienced.


THE AUTHOR R. TIGLAO

As an actual detainee, I owe it to history to correct these distortions of what happened.

My account of the Marcos prisons will be Monday, and I am glad that I have to cut this essay in two parts for editorial space-concerns. I ask my fellow detainees in Ipil and YRC, to present their assessments of Marcos’ prison, especially those that are contrary to mine, in the comment section of this column, or through email, and I promise they will be published in the internet version of this paper.

Marcos’ crimes against the nation are beyond the small minds of ignorant Yellow writers, too lazy to even do real research. The worst was his refusal to bring his dollar holdings back to the Philippines and give it to the central bank, which could have used it to prevent our debt default in 1983.

It wasn’t any Marcos economic policy but solely that debt default that caused us a steep three-year economic depression that put us in such a quagmire for nearly two decades.

41 COMMENTS

JD on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 11:19 PM
There were 40 million Filipinos then. Why is the narrative of the measly 0.1% of the population being made out to be representative of the country’s situation then? Ridiculous perspective, right?

One of the Yellow Cult’s biggest successes was in painting Martial Law as Macoy’s means of holding on to power. What the millenials aren’t being taught is how pervasive the communist movement was already then, especially at the provincial scene. There was more to fear from the revolutionary tax collection campaigns than there was with the PC-INP.

Forum trolls would frequently scare millenials by saying – “There is no freedom of speech in social media under Martial Law.”
Yeah, right. Just imagine if the Communist movement did become successful with their revolution back in the early 70s. We’d be “enjoying” the same “freedom of speech” here now as NoKor.

Funny how the Yellows would use the term “desaparecidos” to refer to Martial Law victims – The Commies caused more disappearances.

The elitist disente millenials are looking like really proud buffoons. And they are clueless about it.
REPLY

RONAN on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 6:30 PM
I was born on 1971. My mum is only manicurista an my father is a security guard. During those times I can clearly remember that my parents were able to afford a holiday every year sa Bicol. They can afford to play bowling, watch the cinema and eat out without the worry of money. And they where renting an apartment as well at that time. Partida na apat pa ang anak nila. BUt after Marcos was ousted everything seems to had become very expensive. galunggong na sabing pag kain ng mahirap naging ay hindi na halos makayan ng mahirap. And yes that is Cory’s punchline beforeduring that snap election, sabi niya and galungong daw ay pag kain ng mahirap.
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HANS on SEPTEMBER 25, 2016 9:36 PM
This is a very good insight especially from one who did not really experience the early tears of martial law. It is true i would say that the country became one that was only for the rich after Marcos. Lack of vision or perhaps lack of feeling for the poor by the subsequent leaders probably led to this state.

ED VICENTE on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 5:22 PM
The big lie of the irrelevant aging communists and their yellow cult allies is that the Marcos years is being distorted by historical revisionists sympathetic to Marcos that’s why the candidacy of Bongbong did very well nationwide, proof that the brainwashing of the young has been successful. The SWS exit polls showed that Bongbong fared best among the age group 45 and above, the age of those that were well and alive to fully experience the years under Marcos. Surveys done this year show that the highest favourable rating given a president from Marcos to Noynoy was Marcos by a wide margin and again, getting his highest ratings from those that were alive to experience his rule fully and not from the younger set that were not born yet or were too young to know. The yellow propaganda must be exposed for what it is and reveal who are behind it other than the Lopez family, the leading yellow oligarchs.
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KITS DAVID on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 12:15 PM
I guess what happened during the Martial Law were dependent on people’s character or behavior. Other people saw opportunities to use their authority, resulting to abuses of ordinary citizens, I mean the military personnel here. But why would you read about people who speaks good about military personnel and Martial Law in general? I think because these people has morals, and guided by their customs.
REPLY

LAOTSU on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 3:04 AM
I don’t think Martial Law era in the Philippine was most peaceful time. Had you only heard in Sorsogon about the Doctor who served the poor for free, but was killed by government soldier, because he was accused of alleged NPA symphatizer by virtue of the doctor’s good spirit to cure the poor for free, you would no longer be in favor of Martial Law. The issue on security and safety can be fulfilled by police visibility in the place. Police are required to follow the rules of their engagement in all circumstances to balance their power and authority over the people they serve in a democratic environment. By Martial Law, this police power is concentrated only in the police and they can abuse it. We can have safe and security in our place in a democratic rules if government and its police are honest in their duty to serve the people. In a democratic rule the rule of laws are to be observed strictly by everyone. The economy during marcos era was playing from 3 to 4 percent growth, not even too sure, because media was controlled. Infrastructure- was not also reasonable compared to money that should had been infused to the projects. The infrastructures projects could have been better, if all the money were used to the projects and not monopolized.
REPLY

VILMA CONOL on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 2:39 AM
Thank you Mr. Tiglao..
This is what we are waiting ..ML was never been a bad society.. It was a prosperous time that so much we enjoyed a peaceful life. . Good and helpful community…when ML was lifted.. and after edsa 1..our nightmare started with Cory’s leadership..the promised for a better society have not been served..crimes after crimes and more rallys happened.. too much democracy that made most of us crazy and afraid of the surroundings..esp during night time… annyhow.. ML was beyond the best ever before with PFEM.. than of those presidents that run our government… only now we experience again the same environment we been longing.. now with PRRDU30..
REPLY

LENIA HETHERINGTON on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 2:05 AM
Mr. Tiglao, I wish that you will write a book about your experienced during the Martial Law years to counter the book that Riza Hontiveros wrote and distributed to the high schools. So please do write a book with your own unbiased version.
REPLY

FLIPPINFLIPS on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 12:35 AM
RE: his (Marcos) refusal to bring his dollar holdings back to the Philippines and give it to the central bank.

I’m in the US doing research on FEM and ML, if Marcos brought back his dollar holdings, they would not have had the same interest rates as the international money markets. Besides, it was not entirely his call but also the advise of his financial managers. Who among the other 3rd world leaders, or even South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, would have brought back their dollar holdings and kept them?

Would hoarding dollars save the Philippine economy then? Nope. There were no manufacturing industries to support or back up the economy. Even if Marcos flooded the Philippines with dollars, the Sys, Gokongweis, Ayalas, Tans, Cojuangcos, Enriles, Elizaldes, Aranetas, Concepcions, etc. were not the zaibatsus and keiretsus of Asia because they did not industrialize.

Marcos, along with his technocrats, were experimenting with Keynesian economics, while the industrialized countries were already preparing for the neo-Keynesian era. We know that with the benefit of hindsight, but there was no way Harvard-educated Filipino business and finance leaders could have known it then.
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RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 5:54 PM
The central bank managed to bring into the Philippines fictitious dollars (which led to the overstatement of the international reserves.) It would have been a cinch from it to bring back real dollars, which Marcos stashed in Switzerland/

ROLDAN GUERRERO on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 12:14 AM
We of the younger generation are ignorant of how Martial Law looked like. I am one of those who are disinformed about it and I almost believe what the Yellow Cult are doing 30 years before until now. But being an Ilocano, I am sure FM is not as bad as what they picture him. Just the other day, I had time to research about Martial Law. The first thing i saw was a video in youtube showing Riza Hontiveros as a contestant in Student Canteen, that was year 1981, the year Martial Law was lifted and she was 14 years old. Hontiveros, now called Honti-VIRUS, a perennial Senatorial Loser…but made it now? How did it happen? This BUGOS Senator said she was an activist during Martial Law meaning the time when she was a BABY TILL she was13 yrs old. The next video I watched explained why Martial law has to be declared by FM and it manifested it was Because NINOY AQUINO and JOMA SISON,THE CO-FOUNDERS OF CPP/NPA NDF why Martial Law was declared. Ninoy Aquino and Joma masterminded the Plaza Miranda bombing where LP Candidates were seriously injured and many died. In this regard may I have the indulgence of Amb. Tiglao to let us know why Marcos declared Martial Law. I hope Amb. Tiglao will write a narrative why Martial Law was declared. We want to know why the Yellow Cult are portraiting Ninoy Aquino as a hero, who was convicted of TREASON who should die by Firing Squad.
REPLY

AVN41000 on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 12:11 AM
I was 15 years old when Martial Law was declared in 1972 and 24 years old when Martial Law was lifted in 1981, meaning I was a Martial Law baby and never experienced such bad things during Martial Law. Not even a single member of my family and relatives had been tortured, imprison or any other things because we are law abiding citizens. I studied in the province, Baguio City and also in Manila but never joined those student protests and I was a law abiding student and citizen and enjoyed the fruits of Martial Law contrary to those claimed by the Yellows and the Communist. That is why our belief to Pres. FE Marcos and can never be twisted by these Yellows, the Oligarchs, the Catholic Church and the Communists. These are the evils in our society and not the Marcos family and Martial Law!…Those people who claimed to victims of Martial Law were not law abiding citizens and wanted us to be under Communist regime and anti-democracy…Thank you Mr. Tiglao for being truthful about Martial Law and hoping that more people specially the young generations will be enlightened and will know the truth.
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DOUGLAS O ROSETE on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 10:22 PM
I maintain that Martial Law was necessary to quell two insurgencies: that of the communists and southern Philippine terrorists. Martial Law was the best thing that ever happened to our country and probably the best years on the lives of Filipinos. People who claimed to have suffered have only themselves to be blamed for being misguided. Without Martial Law , our country could have been fragmented if not taken over by the communists already.
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BENJ on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 6:55 PM
Prior to the declaration of Martial law, no one is safe travelling the inner barrios and towns of Nueva Ecija! Immediately after the declaration, everything turned out safe wherein businesses and agricultures flourished with government support. No abusive police amd military, even during my college days along Morayta and Recto! We always feel safe and protected!
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LYN on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 10:21 PM
I agree i was first year college in FEU then… i like that peaceful time of marshall law …

MARLENE SWING on SEPTEMBER 24, 2016 1:55 AM
That was true. Life then was safe because criminals were afraid of the strongman whom they accused of Dictatorship. But the truth, Marcos was never a dictator. I knew it because I was already 15 years old that time.

SIMEON E. ANEKANG on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5:26 PM
We just hope a lot are still living who experience Martial Law to share their actual story. I did not experience it, we just based our conclusion on books, articles, and of course story of our parents and grand parents. When I work overseas in south korea some of their citizen still remember the glory days of our country which the envy, they even experience famine. I just nod when they say that it was due to Marcos that our country falls.
After 30 long years, we are still claiming to be the next tiger of ASIA?? which is so hard to achieve. Let us examine ourselves and support one another, after a fight or misunderstanding we have to release all our angers or hatreds. Let us not hate a person or people but his or her misdeed (s), because once we do that it is very hard to forgive him or her. That us Filipinos. I just hope that our leaders will work together to raise every Filipino proud here and abroad. Personal vendetta is not good.
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ELY on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 3:11 PM
It is really sad that the young generations are being mislead by the exaggerated lies by those who hated former President Ferdinand E. Marcos so much .

Our late former Pres. F. E. Marcos may have had mistakes , as everybody does , but during Martial Law years (although there were some Military men who abused their positions) majority of the Filipino people felt safe .

According to the late Father Conrado Balweg’s rare interview , the NPA and their sympathizers were about to be decimated prior to the so called “EDSA REVOLUTION” in 1986 … it proliferated when the late Pres. Cory Aquino took over , with the help of people (even a Country perhaps) who had their own personal interests.

I do hope that somebody , like you Mr. Roberto Tiglao sir , would write a book that would also inform the young generations about the good benefits derived during the Martial Law years [Philippine Style] as well as the Super and Infra-structures constructed during the Marcos Administration which every Filipino are enjoying now.

HATRED is one of the deadly sins and inculcating it into the minds of our Youths , would only lead them into perdition .
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FIELD on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 2:33 PM
During Martial Law, a kin was sick early morning, around 5:00 in the morning. Before we reached the hospital, we passed by a police checkpoint. The police politely asked some questions, after that, we proceeded to the hospital and no untoward incident occurred.
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LAKAY on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 2:30 PM
Thanks Mr. Tiglao you opened the minds of all the people who had been duped by the twisted story on the real account of Martial Law by those who gained during the time of the Aquino’s, we hope that others who really experienced what happened will come out and share their stories.
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COLEMAN on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 2:05 PM
” But if we want to talk about an objective judgment of history – we need to understand that history is not in one
color. Historic events are multifaceted and mistakes were made aplenty from every side…”

– V.Putin, Sept 1. 2009

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M C on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 1:18 PM
In the onset of martial law while I was on my second year in Diliman, sheepish knocks in the door woke me up in the middle of the nite. Upon opening the door, a very respecful guy in civilian clothes with other guys around him was on the door asking the whereabouts of my brother. If my memory serves me right, I think he introduced himself as a Col. Manuel. As they were even very timid to come in, I invited them in and asked if they wanted to have coffee. Indeed, only about four of them came in so I heated coffee for them. Then, they asked if they can just go around the house and check all the rooms. As my dad have already came down by that time, my father told them that they are free to go and inspect all the rooms to find my brother. Indeed, they went to all the rooms very quietly and respectfully with nary any loud voices nor banging of doors or cabinets. Maybe, it helped that we were soon conversing with them in the Ilocano dialect. Thereafter, I went out on the street and saw that several Metrocom, police and black colored cars have surrounded our haus at Balic Balic in Sampaloc. As the haus also extends to the back street, several Police cars were also there. Up to now, i have yet to hear or watch on TV a military or police raiding team to be so respectful of the tenants of the house they were raiding.
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CHARLITO on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 10:37 AM
During martial law years is the safest moment of my life. We can roam around freely without having to fear of snatchers and drug addicts. Now is so much different. During those times LAW ABIDING farmers enjoyed the benefits of masagana 99 rice program, some joined the training of civilian home defense force (CHDF) with passion and nationalism. today is so much different.
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LAOTSU on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 1:54 PM
Hello Charlito,

I had a different experience of Martial Law. Army and police were so abusive. I could not see good future when I saw that everything in business was controlled by the marcoses, and those who had power and encharged of the government agency made more money. I could not see any good opportunity to navigate in Marcos time, example what happened to the SONS and Daughters of coconut famers who paid for the scholarship program every production time. Very corrupt government during Marcos Time! That is why Bongbong Marcos should be ashamed in running for government office. The Marcoses should be very grateful to Filipino people, because despite of what Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos did in the Philippine government, the Filipino people are still too kind for them. Had that oppression, corruption and abuse happened to other country with a violent population, the Marcoses might had been in the land of oblivion. However, the most ungrateful Filipinos I have ever seen in this world are the Marcoses, for reason that they are not sorry for their faults and wrong doings in the Philippine government. The CHDF in our place was extortionist of big and small fishermen; he was a murderer and a supplier of dynamite to fishermen who engaged in illegal fishing; He encouraged fishermen to engage in dynamite fishing, so he could make more money. No to Martial Law!

BHEBS NAVARRO on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 10:26 AM
Proud to be a “yellow cultist!” Expressing a truth is not being the enemy of the people. Freedom to speak is not complaining. It’s easy to conceal things during the so called “New Society” because only 1 or 2 tv & newspaper operate & then some but all controlled. Lol
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CRIS on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 10:15 AM
Me and my family had lived before, during and after martial law years…we was never been harmed or whatsoever coz we just simply abide the laws…
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PAPELITO on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9:48 AM
I was in 4th year HS at the time and I had seen with my own eyes the military raiding and arresting a Mayor at 4am who’s residence is right across ours. The Military personnel were all smartly dressed in military uniforms and knocked on the door. They did not force themselves in and actually waited for the mayor to get dressed then loaded him to their truck.

During the time of my youth, we had stay-in parties and never experienced any untoward incident with the military. I had friends who were members of leftist organizations and from them I heard how they manage to agitate the police/military during their rallies in order to get the desired effect that they can use to accuse the government of human rights violation!

It is apparent that most of the accusations were probably in the provinces or hinterlands, It can be inferred they are casualties of war!
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MARINO GUIEB on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9:30 AM
I also had my experience of Martial Law. I was detained in Camp Aquino in Tarlac for 3 months and more than 3 months also in Camp Olivas in Pampanga. Except the interrogations at midnight (in Tarlac), never did i experienced torture. We can mingle with the guards within the compound on any of our free time which is a complete contrast of what is being peddled.by people who are claiming to be victims of ML.I was released on March 2, 1973 without any scratch.
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RENE SAGUISAG on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9:18 AM
Thank you Mr. Tiglao for your true impartial reporting.
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RICELANDER on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9:16 AM
This is the kind of writing the Yellows would readily brand as revisionism. They would not refute them though item by item, they would simply brush them off as revisionism.

In fairness to Juan Ponce Enrile, he seems to have found use for his time as retiree going the rounds defending Martial law, taunting the anti-Marcos forces to a public debate. “Takot sila!” he guffaws.

FVR is another story altogether. Wala lang. Recently, Neri Colmenares was narrating how he was abused by the PC in his days as an activist. How he railed to the heavens against Ferdinand Marcos, but not a word against FVR, who was head of the PC. Raissa Robles, too, I have seen pictures of her happily rubbing elbows with FVR. Raissa Robles loves to write about the abuses and crimes of Martial law, most of them committed by officers and men then under the direct command of FVR. She too berates Marcos like the meanest monster who ever lived but curiously friendly to FVR.

These anti-Marcos forces seem to have the daring to badmouth a dead man but not the courage to confront people alive who could yet answer back.
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KUROKURO LANG on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 12:32 PM
This is what i am longing for! There are people who can provide the real story but they simply chose to close their mouths. Fvr is one. He should talk now because i believe now is the right time. If he dies tomorrow hopefully not, we will forever be caught in a tug of war of personal thought about the marcos regime. Sadly this comment is so right they can only fight to what is long dead not with the people living with direct involvement of the so called martial law.

JUNIOR on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 6:23 AM
This yellow cultist are doing evil practice trying to brain wash the youth so that they will become like them. What will happen for the future generation. Someone must stop them right away. Just think about this, all the cases filed against Marcos, nothing ever win. They keep blaming marcos of what happening around philippines. The truth will come out.
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LEODEGARDO PRUNA on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9:45 AM
True!

ALEX on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5:59 AM
Anu ang maasahan mo sa mga angkan ng mga yellow,eh mula pa noong mga unang panahon ay mga gago at mga traydor(makapili ang lolo noong panahon) at balasubas(luisita ay napasakamay noon sa pamamagitan ng panloloko) kaya walang napala ang bayan.
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ROSALYN ILAO on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5:43 AM
I wasn’t born yet during Martial Law and I heard both good and bad things about the late President. I’m glad to read an article written by someone who actually experienced Martial Law and dared to tell his truth..
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MANUEL on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5:48 PM
There are a lot of them actually.Former communist leaders and cadre who were arrested and jailed when martial law was proclaimed.The likes of Nilo Tayag and a lot of Kabatang Makabayan members who,when they were released had abandoned the communist ideology and re-told the truth about who really Marcos was and the dirty propaganda war that the leftist and their oligarchs backers are trying to portray against the former strongman.But just like BBM had already told the Filipino nation,”let history be the judge of what his father did to this nation”.History has its own way of telling what is the truth and who was right.Also with the help of people like Mr, Tiglao,and of others who is willing in the name of truth will tell all and everything that really happened in the past,unmistakably,Mr Marcos can get his justice of what his crimes really are during those tummultuos days of what we all call as the martial law days…

MARCIAL LEX on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5:40 AM
Long live Mr. Tiglao, may the history judge late President Marcos with fairness and truth!!
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FIELD on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 5:01 AM
Marcos briefly put in prison some of his opponents and critics to teach them some lesson not to abuse our democracy and freedom of expression. If you noticed, most of them were detained for several months only.

Those who stayed very long in prison were enemies of the state who were trying to bring the Philippine government down.

In an interview, former Defense Minister Enrile said that when Martial Law was declared, the Philippines had only 48,000 soldiers. with that limited number of soldiers, how can you fight the communist rebels and secessionist moro rebels if Marcos did not declare Martial Law?
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FIELD on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 4:08 AM
i wondered why critics of Marcos led us to believe that Gen. Fabian Ver should be held responsible also for the alleged human rights violations during Martial Law, when in fact, it was Gen. Romeo Espino who was the AFP Chief of Staff during Martial Law. and Gen. Ver was more like an aide of Marcos.

watch the video of Irwin Ver when he said that the demonization of his father Fabian Ver, started only after former senator Ninoy Aquino was assassinated.

also, read the recent column of Cito Beltran 2 days ago. He wrote that “For many years, my father was given the impression by a high-ranking Metrocom official that his warrant of arrest was ordered by Imelda Marcos or one of her relatives. It was only when Senator Juan Ponce Enrile (who was Minister of Defense) told me on ‘Straight Talk; that he had my dad detained for being ‘makulit,’ did we learn the truth.”

it looks that some people wove some stories to make the Marcoses look bad in the eyes of the Filipino people.

Thanks to the internet, and we are now learning the truths.
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P.AKIALAMIRO on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 2:36 AM
I have my own personal experiences with Martial Law as an adult. I think is is a question of whether Martial Law was te right thing to have been declared or not. I have had encounters with chaos caused by activists, especially in Manila, particularly in the university belt. With my own assessment, I am more of the opinion that yes, Martial Law, was justified because the happenings right before the proclamation were getting “out of hand”. Now, since it was the right thing to do by the government, the ‘victims of the Martial Law should have understood what Martial Law means: the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus,etc., etc.This being the essence of Martial Law, why are these ‘victims’ complaining when they transgress the rules of Marrtial Law? How come the ‘law-abiding’ citizens are not complaining and are benefactors of Martial Law? I was there before, during and after Martial Law and I speak with my own experienxces during those times. I hope everyone who speaks about Martial have their own personal and not hearsay accounts or biased, because of their personal relations with people who were ‘victims’ of the law. I can also say that the so-called leaders and politicians before the Martial Law proclamation simply didn’t do their ‘obligations’ or rightful duties to prevent such declaration. (I can detail the ocurrences I have experienced which convinced me that Martial Law declaration was ‘justified’).
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MARK on SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 9:12 AM
I agree, those who are complaining now are really the enemies of the state, and rightfully imprisoned. My parents always told me, Martial law era was the most peaceful time, they felt very safe. Only law abiding citizens feel this way.

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MANILA TIMES COMMENTARY

PART 2: What Marcos prisons were really like BY RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO ON SEPTEMBER 25, 2016 ANALYSIS AND COMMENTARY

What they were like was completely different from what a crackpot writer, who has never seen even a picture of a single detention center, recently depicted in a rabidly anti-Marcos book, which is simply a huge money-making project if it is adopted as a textbook in our schools, as the Yellow Cultists are lobbying for now.

I can speak of only five Marcos detention centers where I was incarcerated, together with my late wife Raquel, from 1973 to 1974: the Philippine Constabulary’s (PC) 5th Constabulary Unit in Camp Crame; that of the Intelligence Service of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (ISAFP) in Camp Aguinaldo; that of the National Intelligence Coordinating Authority in its headquarters at V. Luna Road in Quezon City (where it still is); as well as the Ipil Youth Rehabilitation Center and the maximum security Youth Rehabilitation Center, both in Fort Bonifacio—these latter two being the biggest during the Martial Law period.


PHOTO APPENDED BY PHNO: FROM I'n Memory of Raquel Edralin Tiglao' blog

For me and most other political prisoners of that time, the horror part of our saga, from which much of the tales of “torture” emanated, was our “processing period”—the weeks after our arrest when Marcos’ intelligence services raced against time to extract from us information that could lead to the capture of our other comrades, especially the big fish.

ARRESTED

I was arrested in July 1973, together with nearly all of the Communist Party’s Manila-Rizal Regional Committee, which I headed. Several of the committee’s members would, three decades later, constitute the core of the revolution’s leadership, among them the party’s chairman, now Benito Tiamzon, his wife Wilma, and secretary-general Adelberto Silva.

We were jailed for several weeks at the 5th Constabulary Security Unit’s headquarters in Camp Crame, all 20 of us in a cell roughly half the size of a regular classroom. A bucket at a corner was our urinal, so small that you had to kneel to piss in it and which got to be so stinky in the morning. The cell was so cramped that we got into each other’s nerves: I once lunged at Tiamzon for making fun of me meditating in the lotus pose, which I credited for my keeping my sanity.

Such cells shocked our middle-class comrades, especially writers romanticizing themselves as glorious heroes of a Revolution, as they, of course, had seen nothing like those circumstances in their cloistered lives.

I, and my lower-class comrades, knew better. The PC cell was actually much better than the horrific bug-infested and crowded Marikina City Jail, where I spent three nights in 1970 when I was arrested, together with several other Atenean activists, for joining a labor strike at the Goya Chocolate factory in Marikina.

Detention cells the same

Detention cells during Martial Law and after Martial Law are the same, with many of those now even much worse, as shown by TV news footages of crowded prisons in Quezon City and elsewhere.

Our society’ class system, of course, was followed at the 5th CSU jail, and every other prison. After several punches at my solar-plexus and liver by soldiers who, I learned later, routinely slug a bottle of gin to fight off fear in operations against communists, I wasn’t touched again, other than through a truth-serum session later at the headquarters of the army’s intelligence services. However, my bodyguard and other staff who were from the poorer classes were beaten up badly, sometimes just for fun by these soldiers to relieve their tension.

Again middle-class political prisoners are shocked by such beatings, which however, routinely occur today in detention cells in police precincts.

IPIL


IPIL DETENTION CENTER, FORT BONIFACIO 1973: BY JUN VERZOSA FROM HIS FACEBOOK JAIL ART PAGE June 17, 2011  PHOTO APPENDED BY PHNO.

After a month, when the military felt they couldn’t get any useful information from us, we were taken to join about 2,000 other detainees to the Ipil Rehabilitation Center at Fort Bonifacio, which was the regime’s biggest detention center. As I entered Ipil, with its huge grounds, and seeing our other comrades, I think I heard choirs of angels singing hallelujah.

Ipil was nothing like the terrible detention centers ignorant anti-Marcos writers describe. I think this is the reason why the Yellow Cult, even with their absolute power in 1986, had not preserved—in the manner they have done with Ninoy’s cells in Fort Magsaysay in Laur, Pangasinan—any detention centers during Martial Law as these would conflict with their horror tales. I haven’t found even a single photo of these centers.

Ipil was converted from a training school for non-commissioned officers, and consisted of five buildings, two of which where our barracks, another for the women detainees (which was separated by a gate from our barracks, closed in the evening). The fifth building, which had an elevated stage (for graduation ceremonies mainly), was our dining hall.

It reminded me of the Ateneo High School complex, with the desks, of course, replaced with two-level bunk beds. What would be a more familiar analogy would be that Ipil looked like public elementary schools in the provinces, but with higher ceilings. And like these schools, Ipil had vast grounds, which we tilled into huge vegetable plots encircled by a jogging path. There was a regulation-size basketball court, the scene of not a few fisticuffs between detainees’ and the guards’ teams.

The bunk beds were in high-ceilinged halls of the three buildings. It wasn’t really so bad, after one has gotten used to sleeping deaf to the orchestra of snores from several people around.

Not a few comrades decided to bring in their children into Ipil — as my wife and I did with my daughter Andrea, who stayed at the women’s quarters for months. A comrade of ours we called Dolphy, from a poor area of Tondo, set up in one corner of the hall his very own territory, surrounded by two bunk-beds covered by banigs, where he, his wife, and child lived.

Revolutionary government

We were left mostly on our own, and we set up our own covert “revolutionary government” of sorts, which I led being the highest ranking communist there, until I resigned form the party. We had communal vegetable production, a store, a cultural group, a medical group (which, unfortunately administered bad acupuncture) even our own security unit, which on one occasion beat up a detainee whom we suspected was a mole.

We set up a library, which I volunteered to run with the sickly writer Ricky Lee, as this had the privilege of living with private space in the quonset hut were the library was housed.

Ipil’s warden was a grandfatherly Master Sergeant we called “Master.” He often practically begged us not to do anything that would mar his service record, since he was to retire soon. His two main assistants were young army privates from some distant provinces who were so self-conscious like awkward teenagers and apologetic when they held the morning assembly to check if no one had escaped.

The food was bad, of course, especially if you came from the middle or upper classes that accounted for probably 70 percent of the detainees. But I later learned it was the same chow distributed to all soldiers in Fort Bonifacio. Our relatives brought the best food they could every time they visited, and we shared these with our poorer comrades.

I was transferred to the Youth Rehabilitation Center (YRC), also in Fort Bonifacio, where I stayed for a few months, for leading (with a priest) a hunger strike at Ipil for reasons in hindsight so trivial I forget now what it was.

YRC was supposed to be a higher-security prison, where well-known communist leaders like Nilo Tayag and NPA commanders were detained, together with rich people Marcos thought were financing the movement to oust him, such as the Araneta brothers, Antonio and Enrique. YRC was in an old castle-like building and had fewer detainees, perhaps about 100.

After a week in a solitary cell like you see in the movies—the worst episode in my detention—I was “released” to join the other detainees. While YRC was dreary, and didn’t have the vast open spaces of Ipil, detainees had more privacy, with most of them living in two-person cells, which in my entire stay there I never saw locked. YRC was run in practically the same way Ipil was by the AFP, which Fidel Ramos supervised.

It is understandable for those detained during Martial Law, who are now in their 60s, to try to give meaning and drama in their lives through narratives that they heroically fought dictatorship, and suffered terribly under it in detention.

Communist cadres

What isn’t mentioned at all in such narratives is that many, if not most, of them were cadres of the Communist Party, which would have tried to overthrow any government.

In my case, I not only headed the Party’s organization in metropolitan Manila, but was also organizing the first armed group intended to operate in the metropolis, the prototype of which would later be the dreaded Alex Boncayao Brigade. Why shouldn’t the state arrest and detain me?

How many of the political prisoners during Martial Law, who spent years in detention centers, were cadres of the Party, or instead were – as a common Filipino joke always says of innocent young victims of circumstances, which was popular in detention camps – merely sent out by their mothers on an errand to buy vinegar from the store, when they were arrested?

We dramatically portrayed ourselves as freedom fighters, a concept which our non-communist supporters – especially gullible clerics looking for some meaning in their otherwise empty lives – fell for, hook, line, and sinker. Yes, we were fighting a dictatorship, but we were also fighting to install a dictatorship of the proletariat, represented, of course, by the Communist Party.

We were waging, as Party Chairman Jose Maria Sison repeatedly wrote, a people’s war. For Marcos’ military at that time, they were waging a war against Communists and Moro secessionists.

There were, of course, torture, rape, and summary executions by Marcos’ military. But what war has there ever been in the world in which there were no atrocities by the sadists, the cruel rogue elements from both protagonists? Even the Communist Party, in the 1980s committed such atrocities, even against their own comrades, in their paranoia that the revolution had been massively infiltrated by spies and moles.

The crucial questions are whether there was a Marcos policy to undertake such horrific human rights abuses and if these occurred in such scale as the Suharto regime’s genocide of at least 500,000 Chinese-Indonesians in 1965 or the institutionalized torture by the Chilean state under Pinochet in the 1970s.

That Filipinos voted Fidel Ramos as President and Juan Ponce Enrile as senator for several terms—the two men who supervised the military and the police during Martial Law—implicitly provides us with a resounding answer to those questions.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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