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SEPTEMBER 5, NOONDAY UPDATE - MOTHER TERESA DECLARED SAINT BEFORE HUGE CROWDS IN THE VATICAN


SEPTEMBER 4 -Mother Teresa, a Catholic nun who devoted her life to helping India's poor, has been declared a saint in a canonization Mass held by Pope Francis in the Vatican. Pope Francis delivered the formula for the canonization of the Albanian-born nun -- known as the "saint of the gutters" -- before huge crowds of pilgrims gathered in St. Peter's Square in Vatican City on Sunday morning. Applause broke out before he completed the formula of canonization, in which he declared "Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a saint." India renamed the city of Calcutta to Kolkata in 2001 to match the Bengali pronunciation. But the church uses the spelling of Calcutta in its references to Mother Teresa. READ MORE...WATCH VIDEOS...

ALSO: The hidden agony of Mother Teresa’s spiritual life


VATICAN CITY—For nearly 50 years, Mother Teresa endured what the church calls a “dark night of the soul.” Mother Teresa's old religious order the Missionaries of Charity is stepping up preparations for a host of celebrations to mark her canonisation in Rome. When Pope Francis canonizes Mother Teresa on Sunday, he’ll be honouring a nun who won admirers around the world and a Nobel Peace Prize for her joy-filled dedication to the “poorest of the poor.” He’ll also be recognizing holiness in a woman who felt so abandoned by God that she was unable to pray and was convinced, despite her ever-present smile, that she was experiencing the “tortures of hell.” For nearly 50 years, Mother Teresa endured what the church calls a “dark night of the soul” — a period of spiritual doubt, despair and loneliness that many of the great mystics experienced, her namesake St. Therese of Lisieux included. In Mother Teresa’s case, the dark night lasted most of her adult life — an almost unheard of trial. READ MORE...

ALSO: Mother Teresa of Calcutta


Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu, the future Mother Teresa, was born on 26 August 1910, in Skopje, Macedonia, to Albanian heritage. Her father, a well-respected local businessman, died when she was eight years old, leaving her mother, a devoutly religious woman, to open an embroidery and cloth business to support the family. After spending her adolescence deeply involved in parish activities, Agnes left home in September 1928, for the Loreto Convent in Rathfarnam (Dublin), Ireland, where she was admitted as a postulant on October 12 and received the name of Teresa, after her patroness, St. Therese of Lisieux. Agnes was sent by the Loreto order to India and arrived in Calcutta on 6 January 1929. Upon her arrival, she joined the Loreto novitiate in Darjeeling. She made her final profession as a Loreto nun on 24 May 1937, and hereafter was called Mother Teresa. While living in Calcutta during the 1930s and '40s, she taught in St. Mary's Bengali Medium School. READ MORE...

ALSO: Mother Teresa’s Postulator: "Saint of Darkness"


Fr. Brian Kolodiejchuk is Postulator for the Cause for Sainthood of Mother Teresa of Calcutta whose canonization is celebrated 4 September 2016 - AP
(Vatican Radio) Tens of thousands of faithful are expected to turn out for the canonization Sunday 4 September of Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta. Founder of the religious order, Missionaries of Charity, Mother Teresa dedicated her life to helping the poorest of the poor, the sick, the dying and unloved. She received numerous awards for her work, including the Nobel peace prize in 1979. Mother Teresa died on September 5th, 1997 at the age of 87. She was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 2003. Missionaries of Charity Fr. Brian Kolodiejchuk is postulator for her cause for Sainthood. He told Vatican Radio’s Tracey McClure “She was very gifted humanly speaking. She was intelligent, very practical, a born teacher, organizer… she sang, had a beautiful voice; she played the instrument, she wrote poetry. She had many gifts” He added that Mother Teresa expected the four thousand sisters who now make up the order to be devoted to Jesus and to live a life of simplicity: “the sisters who joined were very talented doctors, nurses and others – but they were supposed to live simply as all the other sisters. And she herself did it.” READ MORE...

ALSO: St. Teresa of Calcutta - A model of mercy


SEPTEMBER 5 -OBJECT OF REVERENCE – Resident priest Rey Paglinawan holds an ‘ex capillis’ relic of Mother Teresa, which is now on display at the Most Holy Redeemer Church in Masambong, Quezon City. The relic consists of a strand of hair from Mother Teresa, who was canonized by Pope Francis at the Vatican yesterday. (Camille Ante / Manila Bulletin)
Vatican City — Thousands of pilgrims thronged to St. Peter’s Square on Sunday for the canonization of Mother Teresa, the tiny nun who cared for the world’s most unwanted and became the icon of a Catholic Church that goes to the peripheries to tend to lost, wounded souls. Pope Francis declared Mother Teresa a saint at a morning Mass, making her the model of his Jubilee Year of Mercy and in some ways his entire papacy. For Francis, Mother Teresa put into action his ideal for the church to be a merciful “field hospital” for the poorest of the poor, those suffering both material and spiritual poverty. Throughout the night, pilgrims prayed at vigils in area churches and flocked before dawn to the Vatican under heavy security to try to get a good spot for the Mass that was expected to draw more than 100,000 people. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Mother Teresa declared a saint before huge crowds in the Vatican

VATICAN CITY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2016 (CNN WORLD) By Juliet Perry, Tim Hume and Livia Borghese, CNN Updated 11:26 AM ET, Sun September 4, 2016 - Mother Teresa, a Catholic nun who devoted her life to helping India's poor, has been declared a saint in a canonization Mass held by Pope Francis in the Vatican.

Pope Francis delivered the formula for the canonization of the Albanian-born nun -- known as the "saint of the gutters" -- before huge crowds of pilgrims gathered in St. Peter's Square in Vatican City on Sunday morning.

Applause broke out before he completed the formula of canonization, in which he declared "Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a saint."
India renamed the city of Calcutta to Kolkata in 2001 to match the Bengali pronunciation. But the church uses the spelling of Calcutta in its references to Mother Teresa.

Mother Teresa declared a saint
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https://youtu.be/Gt2wDI_IAfA
Holy Mass and Canonization of Mother Teresa of Calcutta - 2016.09.04 - Original sound vatican vatican Subscribe155,875 Add to Share More 33,699 views Published on Sep 4, 2016 Pope Francis presides over Holy Mass and the Canonization of Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, followed by the Marian prayer of the Angelus. - Original sound

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Speaking in Latin, Francis said that "after due deliberation and frequent prayer for divine assistance, and having sought the counsel of many of our brother bishops, we declare and define Blessed Teresa of Calcutta to be a saint, and we enroll her among the saints, decreeing that she is to be venerated as such by the whole church."

Catholics -- including hundreds of blue- and white-robed nuns from the Missionaries of Charity sisterhood founded by Mother Teresa -- had gathered from around the world to attend the canonization of the church's newest saint, just 19 years after her death.

A huge portrait of Mother Teresa, whom the church credits with having performed two miraculous cures of the sick, hung from St. Peter's Basilica during the colorful ceremony.


An image of Mother Teresa hangs from the facade of St. Peter's in the Vatican.

Francis: 'May she be your model of holiness'

Pope Francis then delivered a homily, in which he praised Mother Teresa -- "this emblematic figure of womanhood and of consecrated life" -- for her charitable work.

"Mother Teresa, in all aspects of her life, was a generous dispenser of divine mercy, making herself available for everyone through her welcome and defense of human life, those unborn and those abandoned and discarded," he said.

"She bowed down before those who were spent, left to die on the side of the road, seeing in them their God-given dignity. She made her voice heard before the powers of this world, so that they might recognize their guilt for the crime of poverty they created."


Pope Francis praised Mother Teresa as a model of compassion to Catholics worldwide.

For the newly-sainted Teresa, he said, "mercy was the salt which gave flavor to her work, it was the light which shone in the darkness of the many who no longer had tears to shed for their poverty and suffering."

She was an example to volunteers around the world, he said. "May she be your model of holiness."

In a departure from his scripted remarks, he noted that people "may struggle" to refer to her as "Saint Teresa." "With great spontaneity, I think we will continue to call her Mother Teresa," he said.

Prayers were then delivered in a number of languages, including Albanian, Mother Teresa's native tongue, and Bengali, the language of Kolkata, where a special Mass was celebrated at the Missionaries of Charity Sunday. A prayer was delivered in Chinese for persecuted Christians around the world.

About 1,500 homeless people from across Italy were bused into the Vatican to be given seats of honor at the Mass -- and be served a pizza lunch by nuns afterward.

Speeding up sainthood

Most of the Catholic Church's saints or blessed people are honored decades, if not centuries, after their deaths. Traditionally, there is a mandatory five-year waiting period before formal evaluation of a candidate for beatification can begin.

Mother Teresa's devotees began pressing the Vatican soon after her death to speed up the nun's sainthood cause, saying her holiness was clear to many around the world. Pope John Paul II granted the special dispensation in 1999, and the procedure began.

The pope waived the waiting period in part, some believe, because of her fame and reputation.

John Paul II further paved the way for her beatification in 2002, when he approved a miracle attributed to Mother Teresa after her death.
 


In Photo: Pope John Paul II (left) talks with Mother Teresa, the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, after he celebrated a Mass for her in his private chapel .

The approved miracle involved Monica Besra, a 30-year-old Kolkata woman who said praying to the nun cured a stomach tumor. The Vatican committee said in October 2002 that it could find no "scientific explanation" for the woman's recovery.

"I took doctors' medicines, threw up and was in a lot of pain. But when I prayed to Mother Teresa from my heart, Mother Teresa blessed me and now I am healthy," Besra told CNN last week.

"My entire village and I am very happy that she is being made a saint."

Pope Francis formally announced that Mother Teresa would be declared a saint in March 2016, when he recognized a second miracle attributed to her.

A Brazilian man with multiple brain tumors was healed after loved ones prayed to Mother Teresa to heal him, according to Avvenire, a newspaper affiliated to the Catholic Church.


Nuns of the Missionaries of Charity wait in St. Peter's Square.

'Saint of the gutters'

Born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in 1910, Mother Teresa set up her Missionaries of Charity in the slums of Kolkata in 1950 and made her headquarters in the Indian city for nearly half a century.

When a legendary photographer met an iconic missionary

Her small figure, often in a white-and-blue sari and sandals, became familiar around the world. She died in Kolkata in 1997 at age 87.

Growing up with Mother Teresa

Earning global recognition for her unending work and compassion for the poor, Mother Teresa was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee said her spirit and the respect she had for the worth and dignity of human beings inspired constructive efforts to do away with hunger and poverty.

Mother Theresa quote



However, Mother Teresa's legacy has been criticized. Her critics say her charity isn't financially accountable and volunteers aren't properly trained. And some doctors claim Besra was healed by modern medicine, not by prayer.

READ: Mother Teresa, my mom

The nuns and priests from the Missionaries of Charity continue her work around the world, including some ex-communist countries where she was banned. Her order has offices in Europe, Africa, the Americas and Australia, as well as Hong Kong and Russia.

A group of nuns will travel to the Vatican for the canonization ceremony, and those who remain in Kolkata will mark the day with prayers of thanks.

CNN's Juliet Perry reported and wrote from Hong Kong, Tim Hume reported and wrote from London and Livia Borghese reported from the Vatican. Joseph Netto reported from Atlanta.


THE TORONTO STAR (CANADIAN PRESS) AP

The hidden agony of Mother Teresa’s spiritual life By NICOLE WINFIELDThe Associated Press Wed., Aug. 31, 2016

For nearly 50 years, Mother Teresa endured what the church calls a “dark night of the soul.”

Mother Teresa's old religious order the Missionaries of Charity is stepping up preparations for a host of celebrations to mark her canonisation in Rome.


Mother Teresa prays at the Missionaries of Charity in East Beirut,

VATICAN CITY—When Pope Francis canonizes Mother Teresa on Sunday, he’ll be honouring a nun who won admirers around the world and a Nobel Peace Prize for her joy-filled dedication to the “poorest of the poor.” He’ll also be recognizing holiness in a woman who felt so abandoned by God that she was unable to pray and was convinced, despite her ever-present smile, that she was experiencing the “tortures of hell.”

For nearly 50 years, Mother Teresa endured what the church calls a “dark night of the soul” — a period of spiritual doubt, despair and loneliness that many of the great mystics experienced, her namesake St. Therese of Lisieux included. In Mother Teresa’s case, the dark night lasted most of her adult life — an almost unheard of trial.

READ MORE...

No one but Mother Teresa’s spiritual directors and bishop knew of her spiritual agony until her correspondence came to light during her beatification cause. The letters were then made available to the general public in a 2007 book, 'Come Be My Light'.

For the Rev. Brian Kolodiejchuk, the Canadian priest who published the letters and spearheaded Mother Teresa’s saint-making campaign, the revelations were further confirmation of Mother Teresa’s heroic saintliness. He said that by canonizing her, Francis is recognizing that Mother Teresa not only shared the material poverty of the poor but the spiritual poverty of those who feel “unloved, unwanted, uncared for.”

“That was her experience in her relationship with Jesus,” Kolodiejchuk said in an interview. “She understood very well when people would share their horror stories, their pain and suffering of being unloved, lonely. She would be able to share that empathy because she herself was experiencing it.”

Tens of thousands of people are expected for the canonization ceremony Sunday for the tiny, stooped nun who was fast-tracked for sainthood just a year after she died in 1997.

St. John Paul II, who was Mother Teresa’s greatest champion, beatified her before a crowd of 300,000 in St. Peter’s Square in 2003.

As Pope Francis prepares to canonize Mother Teresa Sunday, Sept. 4, her "dark night" of spiritual agony is coming to light.


Mother Teresa with Pope John Paul II in 1986. As Pope Francis prepares to canonize Mother Teresa Sunday, Sept. 4, her "dark night" of spiritual agony is coming to light. (ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO)

Francis has made the canonization the high point of his Jubilee of Mercy, a yearlong emphasis on the church’s merciful side. Francis has an obvious interest in highlighting Mother Teresa’s mercy-filled service to outcasts on the periphery, given that her life’s work exemplifies the priorities of his own pontificate.

But Francis is also sending a more subtle message to the faithful through the canonization of the ethnic Albanian nun: That saints can be imperfect — they can suffer as Mother Teresa did and even feel unloved by God, said Ines Angeli Murzaku, a professor of church history at Seton Hall University in New Jersey and herself a native Albanian.

“That existential periphery which is suffering and being marginalized, he wants to bring that to the attention of the world,” she [Murzaku] said in a telephone interview. Mother Teresa “is so real. She’s not remote. She’s not a perfect, perfect saint.”

That said, her blind faith in enduring the “darkness,” as she called it, and persevering through it seems almost superhuman to outsiders.

Take the Feb. 28, 1957 letter she wrote the then-Archbishop of Kolkata, Jesuit Archbishop Ferdinand Perier.

“There is so much contradiction in my soul. Such deep longing for God, so deep that it is painful, a suffering continual, and yet not wanted by God, repulsed, empty, no faith, no love no zeal,” she wrote. “Souls hold no attraction. Heaven means nothing, to me it looks like an empty place. The thought of it means nothing to me and yet this torturing longing for God.”

“Pray for me please that I keep smiling at him in spite of everything.”

In another letter, she acknowledged that her smile was “a big cloak which covers a multitude of pains.”

Revelations that the smile was a mask to inner doubts about God’s presence fuelled criticism of Mother Teresa — spearheaded most famously by the late Christopher Hitchens — that the Balkan nun was something of a fraud.

Kolodiejchuk, though, says she was no hypocrite. He said that the smile was a genuine and heroic attempt to hide her private sufferings, even from God, and prevent others from suffering more.

“You can be joyful even if you’re suffering because you are accepting, and you are working and acting with love that gives meaning to the suffering,” he said in the courtyard of one of the Missionaries of Charity houses on the periphery of Rome.

The revelations nevertheless shocked even Mother Teresa’s closest confidants and friends, the original sisters who joined her Missionaries of Charity after she was inspired to found the order in 1946. Kolodiejchuk said several sisters wept when he first read them her letters after he acquired them in 1998 from the archives of the Jesuits and archbishop in Kolkata.

Sister Prema, the current superior general of the Missionaries of Charity, recalled being in awe of the revelation and not being able even today to fully understand the depth of Mother Teresa’s pain.

“It took me some time, and it still takes me time, to reflect about it and to understand it more deeply,” she said in an interview. “I think a soul who has not experienced it (the darkness) will not be able to understand what it is about. This is some mystery of the spiritual life which souls who know about it can connect with and associate with, but souls who do not know, we stand before a mystery.”

Asked if she was in that latter group, the German nun paused and said quietly: “Yes.”

Kolodiejchuk, the postulator for the cause, says that in retrospect, Mother Teresa’s “darkness” was actually a critical part of her vocation, kept hidden from the world that only saw a firm but loving mother superior who was the first in the chapel each morning and often worked herself to exhaustion at night tending to society’s most unloved.

“We assumed at least she was enjoying this wonderful consoling union and love from Jesus,” he said. “But we discover, no it’s even the opposite. For me, this darkness is the single most heroic aspect of her life.”


CATHOLIC ONLINE

Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu, the future Mother Teresa, was born on 26 August 1910, in Skopje, Macedonia, to Albanian heritage.

Her father, a well-respected local businessman, died when she was eight years old, leaving her mother, a devoutly religious woman, to open an embroidery and cloth business to support the family.

After spending her adolescence deeply involved in parish activities, Agnes left home in September 1928, for the Loreto Convent in Rathfarnam (Dublin), Ireland, where she was admitted as a postulant on October 12 and received the name of Teresa, after her patroness, St. Therese of Lisieux.

Agnes was sent by the Loreto order to India and arrived in Calcutta on 6 January 1929. Upon her arrival, she joined the Loreto novitiate in Darjeeling. She made her final profession as a Loreto nun on 24 May 1937, and hereafter was called Mother Teresa. While living in Calcutta during the 1930s and '40s, she taught in St. Mary's Bengali Medium School.

READ MORE...

On 10 September 1946, on a train journey from Calcutta to Darjeeling, Mother Teresa received what she termed the "call within a call," which was to give rise to the Missionaries of Charity family of Sisters, Brothers, Fathers, and Co-Workers.

The content of this inspiration is revealed in the aim and mission she would give to her new institute: "to quench the infinite thirst of Jesus on the cross for love and souls" by "labouring at the salvation and sanctification of the poorest of the poor." On October 7, 1950, the new congregation of the Missionaries of Charity was officially erected as a religious institute for the Archdiocese of Calcutta.

Throughout the 1950s and early 1960s, Mother Teresa expanded the work of the Missionaries of Charity both within Calcutta and throughout India.

On 1 February 1965, Pope Paul VI granted the Decree of Praise to the Congregation, raising it to pontifical right. The first foundation outside India opened in Cocorote, Venezuela, in 1965. The Society expanded to Europe (the Tor Fiscale suburb of Rome) and Africa (Tabora, Tanzania) in 1968.


Pope Paul VI meeting with Mother Teresa of Calcutta

From the late 1960s until 1980, the Missionaries of Charity expanded both in their reach across the globe and in their number of members. Mother Teresa opened houses in Australia, the Middle East, and North America, and the first novitiate outside Calcutta in London. In 1979 Mother Teresa was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. By that same year there were 158 Missionaries of Charity foundations.

The Missionaries of Charity reached Communist countries in 1979 with a house in Zagreb, Croatia, and in 1980 with a house in East Berlin, and continued to expand through the 1980s and 1990s with houses in almost all Communist nations, including 15 foundations in the former Soviet Union. Despite repeated efforts, however, Mother Teresa was never able to open a foundation in China.


Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, with Mother Teresa, leader of the Order of the Missionaries of Charity, in the Bronx Borough of New York City. 14 June 1997

Mother Teresa spoke at the fortieth anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly in October 1985. On Christmas Eve of that year, Mother Teresa opened "Gift of Love" in New York, her first house for AIDS patients.

In the coming years, this home would be followed by others, in the United States and elsewhere, devoted specifically for those with AIDS.

From the late 1980s through the 1990s, despite increasing health problems, Mother Teresa travelled across the world for the profession of novices, opening of new houses, and service to the poor and disaster-stricken. New communities were founded in South Africa, Albania, Cuba, and war-torn Iraq.

By 1997, the Sisters numbered nearly 4,000 members, and were established in almost 600 foundations in 123 countries of the world.

After a summer of travelling to Rome, New York, and Washington, in a weak state of health, Mother Teresa returned to Calcutta in July 1997. At 9:30 PM, on 5 September, Mother Teresa died at the Motherhouse.

Her body was transferred to St Thomas's Church, next to the Loreto convent where she had first arrived nearly 69 years earlier. Hundreds of thousands of people from all classes and all religions, from India and abroad, paid their respects. She received a state funeral on 13 September, her body being taken in procession - on a gun carriage that had also borne the bodies of Mohandas K. Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru - through the streets of Calcutta. Presidents, prime ministers, queens, and special envoys were present on behalf of countries from all over the world.


VATICAN RADIO

Mother Teresa’s Postulator: "Saint of Darkness"


Fr. Brian Kolodiejchuk is Postulator for the Cause for Sainthood of Mother Teresa of Calcutta whose canonization is celebrated 4 September 2016 - AP

(Vatican Radio) Tens of thousands of faithful are expected to turn out for the canonization Sunday 4 September of Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta. Founder of the religious order, Missionaries of Charity, Mother Teresa dedicated her life to helping the poorest of the poor, the sick, the dying and unloved. She received numerous awards for her work, including the Nobel peace prize in 1979. Mother Teresa died on September 5th, 1997 at the age of 87. She was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 2003.

Missionaries of Charity Fr. Brian Kolodiejchuk is postulator for her cause for Sainthood. He told Vatican Radio’s Tracey McClure “She was very gifted humanly speaking. She was intelligent, very practical, a born teacher, organizer… she sang, had a beautiful voice; she played the instrument, she wrote poetry. She had many gifts”

He added that Mother Teresa expected the four thousand sisters who now make up the order to be devoted to Jesus and to live a life of simplicity: “the sisters who joined were very talented doctors, nurses and others – but they were supposed to live simply as all the other sisters. And she herself did it.”

READ MORE...

“She disguised the profundity of her holiness by the exterior simplicity of her life and of her words, even.”

“If I ever become a saint, I will surely be one of Darkness”

“If I ever become a saint, I will surely be one of Darkness,” Mother Teresa once said. She also believed she would be “absent from heaven.” Asked what she meant by this, Fr. Brian explained:

“I think it was Mother Teresa’s ‘mission statement’ of what she will be doing when she, as she used to say, ‘goes home to God.’

From the letters that we discovered [after her death] when we began collecting the documents that were published in “Mother Teresa Come Be My Light: The Private Writings of the Saint of Calcutta,” to the surprise, if not shock of everyone, even the sisters closest to Mother Teresa, we discovered that her interior experience was what she called “the Darkness” and that she is a woman passionately in love with Jesus.”



The shock was greatest because Mother Teresa’s seemingly never-ending energy and organizational skills had led everyone to believe she lived with the consoling knowledge of Jesus’ love for her.

Yet the letters revealed “that she is feeling unloved, unwanted by Jesus,” noted Fr. Brian. “She feels that she cannot love Jesus as she wants to love him: as he’s never been loved before - which is a daring resolution to even make if you’re taking it seriously.”

Fr. Brian recalled reading some of her correspondence to the sisters in the mother house in Calcutta, India who knew her well. “They were really crying because you were reading them and you know Mother, it’s your mother, and then you’re hearing this and you have a sense of how she’s suffering…”

Some of the most revealing of her letters were addressed directly to Jesus, to whom she described her agony over doubts about the strength of her faith and Jesus’ love for her.

She wrote, ‘I am willing to go through this for all eternity even if this is for your pleasure or if others can benefit from this, if it were possible’ explained Fr. Brian. “The magnanimity, the great soul in this is just tremendous: ‘I want to satiate your thirst with every drop of blood that you can find in me.’ So that’s why when you are reading this or hearing this, the sisters were crying in the mother house. If that’s not love for God, then I don’t know what is.”

Did Mother Teresa know she would be made a saint?

Asked what Mother Teresa would have said if she knew that she would indeed be made a saint, Fr. Brian answered:

“I think that she was innocent and pure but she wasn't stupid or naive. So I think that she had a sense that…. You know, at a news conference, a journalist would ask: ‘Well Mother Teresa, why do you think people call you a living saint?’ And then, she would say, … ‘you or we shouldn’t be surprised if you see Jesus in me because it’s an obligation for all of us to be holy.’”

“I think she must have had some sense that she would be (made a saint) but that said, I think one of her other outstanding virtues is humility,” continued Fr. Brian. “Because she was one of the most admired women in the twentieth century – not just in the Church – not since St. Francis of Assisi has someone had that echo outside the Church. Of course we have other great saints but (who) has that echo? … Even in the culture, you’ll see in a movie or in a book or something, someone will say, ‘who do you think I am, Mother Teresa?’ There’s a sense that they just identify Mother Teresa with goodness, kindness, charity….”

The Miracle

The miraculous healing of Marcilio Haddad Andrino in 2008 in Brazil has been attributed to Mother Teresa’s intervention. Fr. Brain notes that Marcilio was “diagnosed as having a bacterial brain infection that led to multiple abscesses which led to hydrocephaly – water in the brain … his wife Fernanda began a novena to pray for his recovery.”

She kept praying through December 9th, recounted Fr. Brian, when “he was in such extreme pain from all the pressure of water on the brain that he went into a coma. Basically, on that day he was dying. So they kept praying – a doctor wanted to do an operation to drain the liquid and they couldn’t do it the normal way because there was a problem in the throat and the anesthesiologist was afraid to do it. Around 6:00, Marcilio was in the operating room, and around 6.10 pm the doctor left to try to find I think the endocrinologist or someone to do it in another way.”

When the doctor returned to the operating room at about 6:40 pm, Fr. Brian explained, “Marcilio who was already in a deep coma, 3 on the Glasgow scale – 15 is conscious and 3 is like near death – and then [suddenly], Marcilio is awake, no pain, and he looks around the operating room and says, ‘what am I doing here?’ At that time, his wife was also praying intensely.”

Neurosurgeons in Brazil and Rome who examined Marcilio’s before and after brain scans were dumbfounded: they “said there’s no way you can go from here to here,” Fr. Brian added. The doctor who treated Marcilio said of the thirty patients in his care for the same condition, Marcilio is the only one to have ever survived.

The “side” miracle, Fr. Brian says, is the fact that Marcilio and his wife, who had been told they would never be able to have kids, discovered that Fernanda was pregnant and would have two children.


MANILA BULLETIN

St. Teresa of Calcutta: A model of mercy by AP September 5, 2016 Share141 Tweet0 Share0 Email1 Share195


OBJECT OF REVERENCE – Resident priest Rey Paglinawan holds an ‘ex capillis’ relic of Mother Teresa, which is now on display at the Most Holy Redeemer Church in Masambong, Quezon City. The relic consists of a strand of hair from Mother Teresa, who was canonized by Pope Francis at the Vatican yesterday. (Camille Ante / Manila Bulletin)

Vatican City — Thousands of pilgrims thronged to St. Peter’s Square on Sunday for the canonization of Mother Teresa, the tiny nun who cared for the world’s most unwanted and became the icon of a Catholic Church that goes to the peripheries to tend to lost, wounded souls.

Pope Francis declared Mother Teresa a saint at a morning Mass, making her the model of his Jubilee Year of Mercy and in some ways his entire papacy. For Francis, Mother Teresa put into action his ideal for the church to be a merciful “field hospital” for the poorest of the poor, those suffering both material and spiritual poverty.

Throughout the night, pilgrims prayed at vigils in area churches and flocked before dawn to the Vatican under heavy security to try to get a good spot for the Mass that was expected to draw more than 100,000 people.

READ MORE...

“I think most of all we are thankful to her (Mother Teresa) for the message, for really changing our lives with her example, humility, being close to the poorest of the poor,” said Simone Massara as he prayed with his wife at a vigil at the Basilica of Sant’Andrea della Valle before the Mass.

While Francis is clearly keen to hold Mother Teresa up as a model for her joyful dedication to the poor, he is also recognizing holiness in a nun who lived most of her adult life in spiritual agony sensing that God had abandoned her.

According to correspondence that came to light after she died in 1997, Mother Teresa experienced what the church calls a “dark night of the soul” – a period of spiritual doubt, despair and loneliness that many of the great mystics experienced. In Mother Teresa’s case, it lasted for nearly 50 years – an almost unheard of trial.


Father Brian Kolodiejchuk of the Missionaries of Charity Fathers, postulator for the cause of Blessed Teresa of Kolkata, poses for a photo in the chapel of the Missionary of Charity Fathers’ house in Rome Aug. 19. (CNS photo | Robert Duncan).

For the Rev. Brian Kolodiejchuk, the Canadian priest who spearheaded Mother Teresa’s saint-making campaign, the revelations were further confirmation of Mother Teresa’s heroic saintliness. He said that by canonizing her, Francis is recognizing that Mother Teresa not only shared the material poverty of the poor but the spiritual poverty of those who feel “unloved, unwanted, uncared for.”

“What she described as the greatest poverty in the world today (of feeling unloved) she herself was living in relationship with Jesus,” he said in an interview on the eve of the canonization.

Sunday’s festivities honoring Mother Teresa weren’t limited to Rome: In Kolkata, where Mother Teresa spent a lifetime dedicated to the poor, a special Sunday Mass was held at the order’s Mother House. Volunteers and admirers converged on Mother House to watch the canonization ceremony, which was being broadcast on giant TV screens in Kolkata and elsewhere.

Sisters of Charity sisters planned to distribute food to the poor nearby after the ceremony, and community meals were being served across Catholic parishes in India on Sunday – a symbolic reference to Mother Teresa’s lifetime of service to humanity, said the Rev. Savarimuthu Sankar of the archdiocese of New Delhi.


August 30 -TORONTO, Martyrs’ Shrine mass to celebrate sainthood of Mother Teresa --An outdoor mass will be held Sunday at the Martyrs’ Shrine in celebration of the canonization of Mother Teresa. TAY TOWNSHIP, ONTARIO – The Martyrs’ Shrine will hold an outdoor mass Sunday at noon in celebration of the canonization of Mother Teresa. The gathering will coincide with the annual Albanian community pilgrimage to the Tay Township religious site. Cardinal Thomas Collins of the Archdiocese of Toronto will lead the mass. Mother Teresa will be canonized Sunday in Rome in recognition of her work as the founder of the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic congregation operating in more than 133 countries. The group’s work includes operating soup kitchens, providing programs and services to women and families, and operating hospices for people suffering from HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis. In 1979, Mother Teresa received the Nobel Peace Prize for her humanitarian work. She died in September 1997 and was beatified in October 2003. In December 2015, Pope Francis recognized a second miracle attributed to Mother Teresa, clearing the way for her to be canonized as a saint. Metroland file photo Midland Mirror

19TH DEATH ANNIVERSARY

Devotees of Saint Mother Teresa in many parts of the world including the Philippines commemorate today her 19th death anniversary following her much awaited canonization by Pope Francis yesterday.

Known during her lifetime as the ‘living saint,’ thousands of representatives and pilgrims from the Missionaries of Charity in different parts of the world, which she founded in 1950, witnessed first-hand Mother Teresa’s elevation into sainthood on the eve of her death anniversary during rites held at the St. Peter’s Square in Rome, Italy.

Today, thousands more are expected to gather from dawn at her gravesite in Calcutta, India for the special thanksgiving masses and prayers, as well as to offer flowers, candles and sing hymns.


Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle gestures while speaking during the mass in honour of Mother Teresa, newly declared saint of the Catholic Church. (BERNARD WEIL)

Thanksgiving masses will also be held in more than 256 countries across the world, including the Philippines, which she visited in 1977, 1978, and in 1984. Novena prayers were offered in her honor from August 27 to September 4. The United Nations has declared September 5 of every year as the International Day of Charity in memory of Mother Teresa.

Mother Teresa was an Albanian Roman Catholic nun with Indian citizenship. She became popular as a humanitarian and advocate for the poor and the helpless. She was a pro-life advocate as she described abortion as “the greatest destroyer of peace in the world.”


India celebrates canonisation of Mother Teresa -The canonisation ceremony of Mother Teresa has now paved way for renaming of the Mother Teresa Church in Kolkata to St Teresa Church, possibly the first such church in India.(Express photo by Partha Paul)

Born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in 1910, she took her religious vows in 1931 and chose the name Teresa after St. Therese of Lisieux, the patron of missionaries. Through divine inspiration, she founded the Missionaries of Charity in 1950 and guided its expansion until it was operating in 256 countries ministering to the poor, the sick, orphaned, and the dying.

She was accorded several awards and recognition including the Ramon Magsaysay Award for International Understanding in 1962, the first Pope John XXIII Peace Prize in 1971, the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, and India’s highest civilian honor, the “Bharat Ratna” (Gem of India) in 1980.

Mother Teresa died in 1997 at the age of 87 and was granted a state funeral by the Indian government in recognition of her services to the poor of all religions in India. She was beatified by Saint John Paul II in 2003. (With a report from Christina I. Hermoso)


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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