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NEW TOURISM SLOGAN NEXT YEAR: THEME - DU30 ADMIN's REFORM THRUST
[RELATED: DOT dropping ‘It’s More Fun in the Philippines’]
[
The government has been using the slogan “It’s More Fun in the Philippines” since it was introduced in 2012. Teo said the new catchphrase would most likely be launched in mid-2017 and not immediately after the country hosts the Miss Universe pageant in January. “We have a new Philippines. So, the slogan will focus more on ‘change’,” she added.]


SEPTEMBER 1 -The many faces of the country’s colorful festivals can be seen in the Department of Tourism’s It’s More Fun in the Philippines billboard in Manila’s Rizal Park. VAL RODRIGUEZ, File There is no stopping the Department of Tourism (DOT) from changing its tourism slogan: "It's More Fun in the Philippines." Tourism media director Ina Zara-Loyola said Wednesday that the "direction" of the DOT is to come up with a new slogan that would reflect President Rodrigo Duterte's thrust to institute reforms in the country. Loyola made the statement after several tourism stakeholders in Cebu City expressed concern about the plan of Tourism Secretary Wanda Corazon Teo to change the present tourism slogan. Cebu Association of Tour Operators (CATO) president Edilberto Mendoza Jr. has appealed to Teo to reconsider her decision, saying it would be difficult for the country to start introducing another slogan to the international market again. "We appreciate everyone's opinion on the matter, most especially our stakeholders and movers like CATO," Loyola said. "The direction of DOT is to work on a new marketing slogan, one that will reflect the new administration's thrust and the changes happening under the leadership of President Rodrigo Duterte," she added. She assured that all stakeholders would be consulted in coming up with the new brand. "Our partners may rest assured that we will have consultations to acknowledge their valuable inputs," she said. In her recent visit to Cebu, Teo revealed plans to introduce a new campaign slogan next year. READ MORE...RELATED, DOT dropping ‘It’s More Fun in the Philippines’...

ALSO: P328B cost of PH child malnutrition
[ALSO: With population of 100.9M PHL population density up 32% in past 15 years]


Newsclip®: [Health] P328B cost of PH child malnutrition | Inquirer News. Child malnutrition cost the Philippines P328 billion, about 3 percent of its gross domestic product, in one year in terms of education spending and lost productivity amid the rising hunger-related stunting, a global aid agency said on Tuesday. The hardest hit area remains conflict-plagued Mindanao, where 40 percent of children are stunted—an average seen in sub-Saharan Africa, said Ned Olney, Save the Children Philippines country director. In a report, “Cost of Hunger: Philippines,” Save the Children found that the combined losses, calculated with data from 2013, were more than triple the cost of damage inflicted by 15 natural disasters that hit the Philippines last year. “Stunting costs are a drag on the economy and impacts all of us, not just the child and the family. It keeps the Filipino economy poorer by 3 percent. If you add that up over time—it’s an anchor to progress,” Olney said in Manila. Stunting is defined as low height for age and is measured by comparing the height of a child against the international benchmark for a child of the same age.
Irreversible Caused by a poor diet in a child’s first 1,000 days of life, stunting has severe, irreversible consequences on physical health and cognitive functioning. One of those too small and thin for her age is 4-year-old Chanel of Navotas City. She frequently scratches her forehead, picking on rashes, scabs and her flaky dry skin. Diagnosed with severe acute malnutrition, Chanel’s family fears that she won’t be able to make it past her fifth birthday. Chanel is not the only one suffering from such condition in their community. Her two siblings and her playmates all have manifestations of malnutrition—they have poor hair and skin. Others have bloated stomach, decaying teeth and are too short, thin, even both, for their age. READ MORE...RELATED, With population of 100.9M PHL population density up 32% in past 15 years...

ALSO: Duterte ready to face Obama
[‘American leader must understand first PH’s drug problem before talks on human rights’]
[RELATED: Duterte to remind Obama - Clean up your own backyard]


SEPTEMBER 1 -WELCOME HOME – President Duterte (center), flanked by Foreign Affairs Secretary Perfecto Yasay Jr. (to his right) and Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello (to his left), is joined in executing his trademark ‘Duterte Fist’ by Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) who arrived yesterday at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) after their repatriation from Saudi Arabia. The President gave each of the 128 OFWs P5,000 and promised them more government assistance, including education for their children. (Richard V. Vinas / Manila Bulletin)
President Duterte said yesterday that he is prepared to discuss any issue with United States President Barack Obama, including the contentious human rights concerns, provided the American leader listens to him first about the enormity of the country’s drug problem. “He could wish any topic at all. I am ready to talk to him,” the President said in a press conference after welcoming Filipino workers repatriated from Saudi Arabia at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 2. The two leaders are among the world leaders attending the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit and related meetings in Laos from September 6 to 8. The White House had earlier said Obama was likely to raise human rights concerns with Duterte in relation to his tough anti-drug campaign during their meeting on the sidelines of the summit. Asked if he was willing to discuss the human rights concerns with Obama, Duterte said: “It depends to what degree because they must understand the problem first before we talk about human rights.” “I would insist ‘Listen to me, this is what the problem is,’ then we can talk about human rights. No problem,” Duterte added. The President has drawn flak here and abroad for the surge in drug-related killings since he came to power last June. People were killed in police shootouts and summary executions supposedly carried out by vigilantes. But the President has rejected allegations of committing crimes against humanity such as genocide, insisting he is not a mass murderer like Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. “You must be crazy,” the President told his critics during the National Heroes Day celebration at the Libingan ng mga Bayani in Taguig City last Monday. “Genocide, bakit sino ba ang pinatay ko? Wala naman akong pinatay na bata, I did not drop barrel (bombs) just like Al Assad. I do not burn women because they refuse to have sex,” he added. Police data released Tuesday showed that the number of drug-related killings since Duterte took office now stands at around 2,000, nearly half of them in police operations and the rest in shootings by unidentified gunmen. READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte to remind Obama: Clean up your own backyard...

ALSO: Duterte has no time to meet with UN chief
[Manila, Philippines - 'He’s fully booked.']
[RELATED: Philippine president snubs UN secretary general amid rancour over drug war]


SEPTEMBER 3 -President Rodrigo Duterte has turned down the request of United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for a meeting on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Laos next week. AP File Photo
MANILA, Philippines - He’s fully booked. President Duterte has turned down the request of United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for a meeting on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Laos next week. The reason, Manila insisted, was not because Ban had earlier issued a strong statement of concern over the spate of drug-related killings in the Philippines since Duterte assumed power. Duterte has also questioned what he said was the UN’s silence on mass killings in other countries, and recently issued harsh words against the UN special rapporteur for human rights, who wants to visit the Philippines. Assistant Secretary Ma. Hellen dela Vega yesterday confirmed that the UN had requested for a meeting between Ban and Duterte. But she explained that the President’s schedule at the summit is tight and he cannot accommodate the request. About nine heads of state, including US President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin, have been scheduled so far for bilateral meetings with Duterte. “I think the President has a very tight schedule and there are very clear priorities,” Dela Vega said. Duterte challenges BBC journalist Duterte remains unmoved by the growing international criticism of his bloody campaign against drugs. Yesterday, he invoked national sovereignty in his fight to rid the country of the drug menace. “I am the president of the Republic of the Philippines. And I must solve decisively this problem or else the 3.7 million (drug users) will compromise the next generation of Filipinos. That is the thing that worries me, not the international community. They can always talk and talk. I am invoking sovereignty. No interference. We never interfered in anybody’s business,” he said in a press conference in Davao City. Asked by BBC journalist Mathew Sullivan if he was concerned about the clamor to address human rights violations, Duterte reiterated that there is a crisis that needs to be addressed to prevent drugs from destroying the next generation. “No, not at all. Not a bit because there is a crisis,” he said at a briefing last night during the inauguration of the Davao International Container Port. “I stake my life, my honor and the presidency, any time. Any time, they can impeach me. They can kill me. I am 71 years old. I have to protect the nation, with the sheer number of people (of drug users) without money,” he added. Duterte also challenged Sullivan to work in Davao to see for himself the peace and order situation in the city. In Manila, Duterte told Sullivan to just give him a call and he would have the journalist escorted to join anti-drug operations, to negate reports that police are violating human rights. “If you want, if there is an operation against drugs, you bring your camera and go with them, and you will see the truth,” Duterte said. READ MORE...RELATED,
Philippine president snubs UN secretary general amid rancour over drug war...

ALSO:
Cayetano to join Duterte, PH delegation in Asean Summit Sept 5

[RELATED: Duterte makes his debut in international scene]


SEPTEMBER 4 -DUTERTE AND CAYETANO / NOVEMBER 11, 2015 Rodrigo Duterte listens intently to Senator Alan Peter Cayetano during the 23rd AFAD Defense and Sporting Arms Show at the SM Megatrade Hall, SM Megamall on Wednesday, November 11, 2015. INQUIRER PHOTO / GRIG C. MONTEGRANDE
Senator Alan Cayetano will join President Rodrigo Duterte and the rest of the Philippine delegation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) Summit this week in Laos, Malacañang said on Sunday. In a short statement, Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella said, “Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano, in his capacity as the Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will be part of the Philippine delegation to attend in the bilateral and sideline meetings at the Asean Summit and related summits.” Cayetano was Duterte’s running mate in the 2016 elections and was among the contenders for the Senate presidency. He lost the vice presidency to then Camarines Sur Representative Leni Robredo and the Senate presidency to Senator Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III, who is also president of political party PDP-Laban. Cayetano remained with the Senate majority and was assigned to chair the foreign relations committee. The Philippines will host the Asean and related summits in 2017. Duterte will accept the country’s 2017 chairmanship of the Asean this week. He will also meet with at least nine heads of state. The Asean is a regional bloc of Southeast Asian states that promotes intergovernmental cooperation and economic integration. The Philippines is among its founding member states./rga THE FULL REPORT RELATED, Duterte makes debut in international scene... [
NOTE: The Philippines is due to take over the chair of Asean from Laos in 2017]


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

New tourism slogan to reflect Duterte admin's reform thrust - tourism official


The many faces of the country’s colorful festivals can be seen in the Department of Tourism’s It’s More Fun in the Philippines billboard in Manila’s Rizal Park. VAL RODRIGUEZ, File

MANILA, SEPTEMBER 5, 2016 (PHILSTAR) By Jill Russel Beltran September 1, 2016 (Philippines News Agency) — There is no stopping the Department of Tourism (DOT) from changing its tourism slogan: "It's More Fun in the Philippines."

Tourism media director Ina Zara-Loyola said Wednesday that the "direction" of the DOT is to come up with a new slogan that would reflect President Rodrigo Duterte's thrust to institute reforms in the country.

Loyola made the statement after several tourism stakeholders in Cebu City expressed concern about the plan of Tourism Secretary Wanda Corazon Teo to change the present tourism slogan.

Cebu Association of Tour Operators (CATO) president Edilberto Mendoza Jr. has appealed to Teo to reconsider her decision, saying it would be difficult for the country to start introducing another slogan to the international market again.

"We appreciate everyone's opinion on the matter, most especially our stakeholders and movers like CATO," Loyola said.

"The direction of DOT is to work on a new marketing slogan, one that will reflect the new administration's thrust and the changes happening under the leadership of President Rodrigo Duterte," she added.

She assured that all stakeholders would be consulted in coming up with the new brand.

"Our partners may rest assured that we will have consultations to acknowledge their valuable inputs," she said.

In her recent visit to Cebu, Teo revealed plans to introduce a new campaign slogan next year.

READ MORE...

She noted that it is normal to change the tourism brand when a new administration takes over.

While her pronouncement did not sit well with some, other tourism advocates support Teo's move, hoping that the new branding would be better than the old one.

"Maybe the new administration has fresh ideas they want to try out and launch. Whatever it will be, we hope it will be impactful and reflective of the beauty and brand of our country," Cebu Chamber of Commerce and Industry (CCCI) president Melanie Ng said.

"It’s More Fun in the Philippines" is arguably the most effective campaign slogan of the DOT.

It was launched by former Tourism Secretary Ramon Jimenez in 2012 and has gained recognition both in the domestic and global market.

 
https://youtu.be/ADNgEHFDYzo
It's More Fun in the Philippines | DOT Official AVP DOT Philippines DOT Philippines Subscribe15,909 Add to Share More 1,498,846 views 7,426 147 Published on Oct 3, 2012 It's 7,107 times more fun in the Philippines. Watch the official Philippine Department of Tourism AVP to find out why :) Enjoy the video! October 2012 For more fun, visit us at: www.itsmorefuninthephilippines.com

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

DOT dropping ‘It’s More Fun in the Philippines’ By Giovanni Nilles (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 2, 2016 - 12:00am 1 3 googleplus0 0


Tourism Secretary Wanda Corazon T. Teo said yesterday her office is now working with several advertising companies to conceptualize the new catchphrase that should have something to do with President Duterte’s “change” theme. JOY TORREJOS

MANILA, Philippines - To make it more in tune with the government’s campaign for change in the country, the Department of Tourism will come up with a new slogan next year to replace the current theme, “It’s More Fun in the Philippines.”

Tourism Secretary Wanda Teo said yesterday her office is now working with several advertising companies to conceptualize the new catchphrase that should have something to do with President Duterte’s “change” theme.

The government has been using the slogan “It’s More Fun in the Philippines” since it was introduced in 2012.

Teo said the new catchphrase would most likely be launched in mid-2017 and not immediately after the country hosts the Miss Universe pageant in January.

“We have a new Philippines. So, the slogan will focus more on ‘change’,” she added.

On the need to change the slogan, Teo emphasized that it has to be more attuned to the current administration’s promise of change by ridding the government of corruption, eradicating the drug problem, maintaining peace and order and other programs.

Advertising companies, she added, were asked to submit their ideas and concepts.

Asked if the anti-illegal drugs war of the Duterte administration would also affect tourist arrivals in the country, Teo said it would not impact greatly.

“The European ambassadors also raised that concern. If they (foreign tourists) are not committing any crime, why should they be afraid to come to the Philippines?” Teo stressed in yesterday’s press briefing in Malacañang.

She said tourist arrivals in the country, as of July, have reached about three million.

Her office targets six million tourist arrivals by yearend and 12 million by 2022.

“We must shoot for the stars and maintain an upward trend in terms of visitor arrivals and revenues for the benefit of all stakeholders,” Teo added.

International tourist arrivals in the country generated P127.37 billion as of June 2016, a 14.7 percent increase compared to the same period in 2015.

For June alone, the number of Koreans visitors reached 686,118 while 454,170 came from the US.

Visitors from China reached 340,958 while those from Japan numbered 260,656.


INQUIRER

P328B cost of PH child malnutrition By: Tina G. Santos @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:38 AM September 1st, 2016


Newsclip®: [Health] P328B cost of PH child malnutrition | Inquirer News. "

Child malnutrition cost the Philippines P328 billion, about 3 percent of its gross domestic product, in one year in terms of education spending and lost productivity amid the rising hunger-related stunting, a global aid agency said on Tuesday.

The hardest hit area remains conflict-plagued Mindanao, where 40 percent of children are stunted—an average seen in sub-Saharan Africa, said Ned Olney, Save the Children Philippines country director.

In a report, “Cost of Hunger: Philippines,” Save the Children found that the combined losses, calculated with data from 2013, were more than triple the cost of damage inflicted by 15 natural disasters that hit the Philippines last year.

“Stunting costs are a drag on the economy and impacts all of us, not just the child and the family. It keeps the Filipino economy poorer by 3 percent. If you add that up over time—it’s an anchor to progress,” Olney said in Manila.

Stunting is defined as low height for age and is measured by comparing the height of a child against the international benchmark for a child of the same age.

Irreversible

Caused by a poor diet in a child’s first 1,000 days of life, stunting has severe, irreversible consequences on physical health and cognitive functioning.

One of those too small and thin for her age is 4-year-old Chanel of Navotas City. She frequently scratches her forehead, picking on rashes, scabs and her flaky dry skin.

Diagnosed with severe acute malnutrition, Chanel’s family fears that she won’t be able to make it past her fifth birthday.

Chanel is not the only one suffering from such condition in their community. Her two siblings and her playmates all have manifestations of malnutrition—they have poor hair and skin. Others have bloated stomach, decaying teeth and are too short, thin, even both, for their age.

READ MORE...

The report, citing government data, said that after 25 years of steady improvement, the prevalence of stunting among Filipino children under 5 years old increased to 33 percent in 2015 from 30 percent in 2013.

“That’s a 10-percent increase in a two-year period, so that is devastating. We’re going in the wrong direction,” Olney said in a press conference launching the study.

Skeletal kids

Urban poverty and hunger are also worsening, Olney said. In the past, Save the Children had focused feeding programs on rural areas but this year started providing emergency food therapy for “starving, skeletal children” in urban areas.

Breaking down the lost income, Save the Children said a total of P166.5 billion was a result of lower level of education achieved by the working population, which suffered from childhood stunting; P160 billion lost due to premature deaths among children, who would have been members of the current working-age population; and P1.23 billion from additional education costs to cover grade repetitions linked to undernutrition.

The report said that of the estimated 49,000 students who had to repeat a grade level in school, 15 percent repeated as a result of under-5 stunting.

Olney said children, who were stunted in the first two years of life, were more likely to repeat grade levels, drop out of school and delay school entry.

“Save the Children is raising the alarm on the nutrition crisis, and is calling the national and local government, private sector and the donors to end the appalling state of malnutrition in the Philippines,” Olney said.

The study showed that an estimated 32.6 million Filipino members of the workforce had suffered from undernutrition before the age of 5.

“Filipinos, who were stunted before 5 years old, are more likely to earn less than those who are not stunted because of lower educational achievement and fewer work opportunities,” Olney said.

In addition, the study showed that 838,000 people, who would have been members of the work force, died due to childhood undernutrition.

“If not for the undernutrition-related child deaths, the Philippines would have boosted its productivity,” Olney said.

Poverty, access to food

But what caused the increase in stunting rates? “I think the easiest answer is that poverty rates also went up,” he said.

Olney noted that while the economy was humming along at 6-7 percent a year, “you have an increase in poverty from 24 to 25 percent of all families, and you haven’t addressed the issue of access to food.”

Chanel’s 26-year-old mother Desiree, who solely supports the family of five, admitted that Chanel, as well as her two siblings, suffered from stunting because they often did not prioritize food.

“Sometimes, we really have nothing and we can’t do anything about it,” said Desiree, who earns P100 a day as a food server in a canteen.

Desiree also linked her children’s poor health to her poor diet during pregnancy. “When I was pregnant, we had financial problems. I wasn’t able to eat regularly. Sometimes there’s really no food for a day,” she said.

Desiree said her husband, who used to work as a porter in a nearby fish market, had to stop working due to asthma and health complications.

Invest in nutrition

“If stunting rates continue to rise, it would be difficult for families to break free from poverty. It is the poor and neglected sectors of society that carry the burden of stunting. Any investment in reducing childhood undernutrition will reduce suffering and poverty, and will ultimately stimulate economic growth for all Filipinos,” Olney said.

The report found that Philippine investment in nutrition programs was very low at only 0.52 percent of general government expenditures compared with the global average allocation of 2.1 percent.

Citing the report’s findings, Save the Children highlighted the need to invest in nutrition programs during the child’s first 1,000 days, from pregnancy up to the second birthday, which is considered a critical period of care to avert stunting.

Olney urged the government to address issues such as water and sanitation, agriculture, education and investment in overall productivity.

“Malnutrition is seen as a disease burden to be handled by the Department of Health. We know that doesn’t work,” he said.

“That’s treating the sick child, rather than understanding why the child is malnourished. Countries that address poverty and access to food have made progress in reducing malnutrition.”

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Philippine population density up 32% in past 15 years By Czeriza Valencia (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 2, 2016 - 12:00am 0 6 googleplus0 0


Metro Manila remains the most densely populated among the country’s 18 administrative regions with a population density of 19,988 persons living per sq. km. of land, 60 times higher than the density at the national level.

MANILA, Philippines - Population density in the Philippines – the number of people residing per square kilometer of land – has risen by 32 percent in the past 15 years, the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) reported yesterday.

Using a population count of 100.98 million people as of the August 2015 census, Philippine population density was seen to have risen to an average of 337 persons per square kilometer from 255 per sq. km. in 2000. This was a 9.4 percent increase from the population density of 308 persons per sq. km. in 2010.

Metro Manila remains the most densely populated among the country’s 18 administrative regions with a population density of 19,988 persons living per sq. km. of land, 60 times higher than the density at the national level.

This was higher by 8.6 percent from the density of 18,402 persons per sq. km. in 2010 and by 30 percent from 15,417 persons in 2000.

On the other hand, the most sparsely populated region in the country as of 2015 is the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) with 84 persons living per sq. km. of land.

Among cities, Manila is the most densely populated with 42,628 persons per sq. km. in 2015.

Equally congested are the cities of Mandaluyong and Caloocan with 41,580 persons and 28,387 persons per sq. km., respectively.

Other cities in Metro Manila also surpassed the regional population density. These were: Makati (27,010 persons per sq. km.), Malabon (23,267), Pasay (23,038), Navotas (22,845) and San Juan (21,102).

The municipality of Pateros was the least densely populated city in the region with 6,138 persons per sq. km. of land.

Among the country’s 81 provinces, Cavite was the most densely populated while Apayao was the most sparsely populated.

READ MORE...

In Cavite, 2,455 persons reside per sq. km. of land. The population density is almost the same in the provinces of Rizal with 2,311, Laguna with 1,567, Pampanga (excluding Angeles City) with 1,111 and Bulacan with 1,107 persons per sq. km.

In contrast, Apayao had the least density level of 26 persons per sq. km. Other provinces with thin distribution of residents were Abra with 56, Palawan (excluding Puerto Princesa City) with 58, Mountain Province with 59 and Kalinga with 61 persons per sq. km.

Among highly urbanized cities outside of Metro Manila, Mandaue City was the most densely populated with 14,402 persons living per sq. km. of land. Others with similar distribution of population were: Lapu-Lapu City with 7,024 persons per sq. km. and Angeles City with 6,496; Baguio City with 6,004 and Iloilo City with 5,719.

Puerto Princesa City, on the other hand, was the most sparsely populated outside Metro Manila with 107 persons living per sq. km. of land.

The measurement of population density is particularly important in monitoring human settlement conditions and trends, particularly in densely populated urban areas.


MANILA BULLETIN

Duterte ready to face Obama
[‘American leader must understand first PH’s drug problem before talks on human rights’]
 by Genalyn Kabiling September 1, 2016


WELCOME HOME – President Duterte (center), flanked by Foreign Affairs Secretary Perfecto Yasay Jr. (to his right) and Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello (to his left), is joined in executing his trademark ‘Duterte Fist’ by Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) who arrived yesterday at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) after their repatriation from Saudi Arabia. The President gave each of the 128 OFWs P5,000 and promised them more government assistance, including education for their children. (Richard V. Vinas / Manila Bulletin)

President Duterte said yesterday that he is prepared to discuss any issue with United States President Barack Obama, including the contentious human rights concerns, provided the American leader listens to him first about the enormity of the country’s drug problem.

“He could wish any topic at all. I am ready to talk to him,” the President said in a press conference after welcoming Filipino workers repatriated from Saudi Arabia at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 2.

The two leaders are among the world leaders attending the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit and related meetings in Laos from September 6 to 8.

The White House had earlier said Obama was likely to raise human rights concerns with Duterte in relation to his tough anti-drug campaign during their meeting on the sidelines of the summit.

Asked if he was willing to discuss the human rights concerns with Obama, Duterte said: “It depends to what degree because they must understand the problem first before we talk about human rights.”

“I would insist ‘Listen to me, this is what the problem is,’ then we can talk about human rights. No problem,” Duterte added.

The President has drawn flak here and abroad for the surge in drug-related killings since he came to power last June. People were killed in police shootouts and summary executions supposedly carried out by vigilantes.

But the President has rejected allegations of committing crimes against humanity such as genocide, insisting he is not a mass murderer like Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

“You must be crazy,” the President told his critics during the National Heroes Day celebration at the Libingan ng mga Bayani in Taguig City last Monday.

GENOCIDE?

“Genocide, bakit sino ba ang pinatay ko? Wala naman akong pinatay na bata, I did not drop barrel (bombs) just like Al Assad. I do not burn women because they refuse to have sex,” he added.

Police data released Tuesday showed that the number of drug-related killings since Duterte took office now stands at around 2,000, nearly half of them in police operations and the rest in shootings by unidentified gunmen.

READ MORE...

Police have also arrested over 10,000 drug dependents and registered over 600,000 surrenderers as the result of Duterte administration’s aggressive war on illegal drugs.

With over three million Filipino drug dependents, President Duterte vowed to finish the fight until the last drug apparatus is destroyed.

Duterte, nicknamed “The Punisher,” has been unapologetic over unleashing the police on drug users and dealers and has responded robustly to criticism from the United Nations and other countries over his campaign.

Recently he lashed out at Washington’s ambassador to the Philippines.

The former mayor of Davao City, who promised to suppress drugs within the first six months in office, has publicly advocated the killing of drug criminals, authorizing policemen to shoot suspects if they resist arrest. He also renewed his pledge to protect the police and military doing their jobs but warned them against joining criminals.

At the recent National Heroes Day celebration, he even asked persons caught in possession of illegal drugs to just kill themselves.

Before attending the regional summit in Laos, the President will travel to Brunei for a meeting with government leaders and the Filipino community on September 4 and 5. He will also visit Indonesia on September 8 and 9.

Duterte said he would also hold talks with China, which will be represented at the Laos meeting by Premier Li Keqiang. Media reports said he would also meet Russian President Vladimir Putin. (With reports from Reuters and PNA)

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Duterte to remind Obama: Clean up your own backyard By Alexis Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 2, 2016 - 12:00am 2 2205 googleplus1 1


President Rodrigo Duterte has said he is ready to talk to US President Barack Obama about any topic but maintained the US leader should first understand the drug situation in the Philippines before they can tackle the issue of human rights. AP/Carolyn Kaster, Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines - After telling US President Barack Obama to listen to him on the Philippines’ drug problem, President Duterte reminded his American counterpart that he also has some mess to clean up in his backyard.

Duterte said African Americans are being killed by police in the US while Washington is criticizing his war on drugs.

“They are threatening me because Obama wants to talk to me. Then? He will talk to me. What’s your problem? In your place, black people are being shot even if they are already lying down,” the President told a gathering of the Jesus Anointed One Church in Davao City late Wednesday.

Duterte also claimed the US has a “crazy community” as almost all people in Hollywood are using cocaine.

He also claimed that Obama, just like his critic Sen. Leila de Lima, keeps on raising the issue of human rights even if the Philippines is facing a serious drug problem.

“My number one critic keeps on yakking about human rights. Even Obama does. But we just learned that she has a series,” the President said, referring to De Lima’s alleged illicit affair with her former driver Ronnie Dayan.

Duterte claimed Dayan is De Lima’s link to drug lords at the New Bilibid Prison in Muntinlupa.

He also claimed Dayan had collected money from drug personalities to fund De Lima’s senatorial campaign. De Lima has denied the allegations.

Duterte and Obama are set to meet on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations summit in Laos on Sept. 6.

The US leader is expected to raise the human rights issue during the bilateral meeting.

Duterte has said he is ready to talk to Obama about any topic but maintained the US leader should first understand the drug situation in the Philippines before they can tackle the issue of human rights.

“He (Obama) can raise any topic at all. I am ready to talk to him,” Duterte said in a press conference Wednesday.

“They must understand the problem first before we talk about human rights,” he added.

The US has expressed “deep concern” over the Philippine government’s anti-drug campaign that has seen over 2,000 people killed so far.


PHILSTAR

Duterte has no time to meet with UN chief By Christina Mendez (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 3, 2016 - 12:00am 0 1 googleplus0 0


President Rodrigo Duterte has turned down the request of United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for a meeting on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Laos next week. AP File Photo

MANILA, Philippines - He’s fully booked.

President Duterte has turned down the request of United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for a meeting on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit in Laos next week.

The reason, Manila insisted, was not because Ban had earlier issued a strong statement of concern over the spate of drug-related killings in the Philippines since Duterte assumed power.

Duterte has also questioned what he said was the UN’s silence on mass killings in other countries, and recently issued harsh words against the UN special rapporteur for human rights, who wants to visit the Philippines.

Assistant Secretary Ma. Hellen dela Vega yesterday confirmed that the UN had requested for a meeting between Ban and Duterte. But she explained that the President’s schedule at the summit is tight and he cannot accommodate the request.

About nine heads of state, including US President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin, have been scheduled so far for bilateral meetings with Duterte.

“I think the President has a very tight schedule and there are very clear priorities,” Dela Vega said.

Duterte challenges BBC journalist

Duterte remains unmoved by the growing international criticism of his bloody campaign against drugs.

Yesterday, he invoked national sovereignty in his fight to rid the country of the drug menace.

“I am the president of the Republic of the Philippines. And I must solve decisively this problem or else the 3.7 million (drug users) will compromise the next generation of Filipinos. That is the thing that worries me, not the international community. They can always talk and talk. I am invoking sovereignty. No interference. We never interfered in anybody’s business,” he said in a press conference in Davao City.

Asked by BBC journalist Mathew Sullivan if he was concerned about the clamor to address human rights violations, Duterte reiterated that there is a crisis that needs to be addressed to prevent drugs from destroying the next generation.


Michael Sullivan Photo: BBC

“No, not at all. Not a bit because there is a crisis,” he said at a briefing last night during the inauguration of the Davao International Container Port.

“I stake my life, my honor and the presidency, any time. Any time, they can impeach me. They can kill me. I am 71 years old. I have to protect the nation, with the sheer number of people (of drug users) without money,” he added.

Duterte also challenged Sullivan to work in Davao to see for himself the peace and order situation in the city.

In Manila, Duterte told Sullivan to just give him a call and he would have the journalist escorted to join anti-drug operations, to negate reports that police are violating human rights.

“If you want, if there is an operation against drugs, you bring your camera and go with them, and you will see the truth,” Duterte said.

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He pointed out that in one region alone, there are 100 policemen in the drug pushers’ list with their brains shrunk by drug abuse.

The President also noted that unlike the United States, which can afford to bring drug users to rehabilitation, the Philippine government does not have enough funds to address the magnitude of the crisis, with over 600,000 drug users so far surrendering to the police.

“I said, do not f**k with me. Do not f**k with our children. We cannot afford the rehab centers of America given free. We do not even have the materials… Just don’t f**k with the next generation,” he added.

Duterte almost lost his temper as his press briefing wound down and asked the audience to be quiet.

“At the end of the day, you listen, do not let me shout, God damn it, I will shoot all of you. At the end of the day, it will be your love for your country and it will be for the generation of Filipinos,” he said.

Anti-drug pamphlets

At least 500 pamphlets explaining the anti-drug war of the Duterte administration will be distributed to journalists covering the 49th ASEAN summit in Laos next week.

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said the production of the 40-page pamphlet is an effort to make the international media “understand” the war on drugs that Duterte is waging.

The pamphlet, entitled “Winning the First Phase of the Drug War,” was launched in Davao City yesterday. Abella and Communications Secretary Martin Andanar have yet to show a copy of the pamphlet to the President.

Andanar said the pamphlet was Abella’s “baby,” following consultations with various groups and sectors.

THE PAMPHLET

The pamphlet contains the following sections: Introduction, The Drug Menace, Drug-Affected Barangays, The Role of Local Government Units, Anti-Illegal Drugs Campaign of the Philippine National Police, Assessment by the PNP, and Conclusion.

According to the pamphlet, there are 42,065 drug-affected barangays in the country.

Also featured are statistics on shabu, cocaine and Ecstacy tablets seized by authorities as well as the number of extrajudicial killings and the number of policemen killed in the war on drugs. – With Edith Regalado

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RELATED FROM REUTERS

Philippine president snubs UN secretary general amid rancour over drug war Reuters
Friday 2 September 2016 05.20 BST


Rodrigo Duterte turns down meeting with Ban Ki-moon at Asean summit in wake of UN criticism of extra-judicial killings

The president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, has turned down a meeting with the UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, after threatening to quit the organisation last month over criticism of his war on drugs.

Ban had requested the bilateral meeting in Laos, which is hosting a summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) leaders next week, but officials from Duterte’s office said he could not fit it into his schedule.

Ban’s spokesman, Stephane Dujarric, said: “A meeting was requested but we could not agree on a time.”

A second UN official said the request for a meeting was rejected because of a “scheduling incompatibility”.

A third UN official, who declined to be identified, said it was “basically unheard of” for a leader to be too busy to meet the secretary general. “Drug policy and human rights would have been top of the UN’s list at the meeting,” the official said.


Philippines police chief echoes president's call to kill drug traffickers


Two UN human rights experts last week urged Manila to stop a wave of extra-judicial executions and killings that escalated after Duterte won the presidency on a promise to wipe out drugs, drawing an angry response from Manila.

Philippine presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella confirmed Duterte would not be meeting Ban, but declined to comment on whether that was connected to his criticism of the UN.

“PRRD has his own reasons for not meeting up with some leaders,” he said, using the initials for President Rodrigo Roa Duterte. “This is no reason to speculate about the Philippines’ relationship with the community of nations.”

Following the criticism of the surge in killings that has accompanied his anti-drugs campaign, Duterte railed against the UN in a news conference on 21 August, suggesting he might pull out and invite China and African nations to form an alternative global organisation.

The following day his foreign minister, Perfecto Yasay, said the Philippines remained committed to the UN and would not be leaving, “despite our numerous frustrations with this international agency”.

The Philippines is due to take over the chair of Asean from Laos in 2017.


INQUIRER

Cayetano to join Duterte, PH delegation in Asean Summit SHARES: 489 VIEW COMMENTS By: Kristine Angeli Sabillo @KSabilloINQ INQUIRER.net 05:48 PM September 4th, 2016


DUTERTE AND CAYETANO / NOVEMBER 11, 2015 Rodrigo Duterte listens intently to Senator Alan Peter Cayetano during the 23rd AFAD Defense and Sporting Arms Show at the SM Megatrade Hall, SM Megamall on Wednesday, November 11, 2015. INQUIRER PHOTO / GRIG C. MONTEGRANDE

Senator Alan Cayetano will join President Rodrigo Duterte and the rest of the Philippine delegation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) Summit this week in Laos, Malacañang said on Sunday.

In a short statement, Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella said, “Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano, in his capacity as the Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will be part of the Philippine delegation to attend in the bilateral and sideline meetings at the Asean Summit and related summits.”

Cayetano was Duterte’s running mate in the 2016 elections and was among the contenders for the Senate presidency. He lost the vice presidency to then Camarines Sur Representative Leni Robredo and the Senate presidency to Senator Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III, who is also president of political party PDP-Laban.

Cayetano remained with the Senate majority and was assigned to chair the foreign relations committee.

The Philippines will host the Asean and related summits in 2017. Duterte will accept the country’s 2017 chairmanship of the Asean this week. He will also meet with at least nine heads of state.

The Asean is a regional bloc of Southeast Asian states that promotes intergovernmental cooperation and economic integration. The Philippines is among its founding member states./rga

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Duterte makes debut in international scene by Genalyn Kabiling September 4, 2016 Share2 Tweet0 Share0 Email1 Share7

President Rodrigo Duterte makes his debut in the international stage when he attends a regional summit in Laos this week.

The President is scheduled to depart Davao City on Monday afternoon for Vientiane and has designated Executive Secretary Salvador Medialdea as government caretaker, according to Presidential Communications Secretary Martin Andanar.

“The President will push through with his visit to Laos on Monday,” Andanar said in Filipino over government radio.

“Executive Secretary Bingbong Medialdea will be the caretaker office while the President is away,” he said.

Duterte is expected to join other world leaders for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit and related meetings in Vientiane on September 6 to 8.

It will be the first international journey of the President since his assumption to office last June.

Senator Alan Cayetano will be part of the President’s official delegation to Laos, according to Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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