PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



HEADLINES NEWS THIS PAST WEEK...
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

NINOY AQUINO 33rd DEATH ANNIVERSARY REMEMBERED BY FAMILY
[RELATED:  (Look) NAIA commemorates Ninoy Aquino on 33rd death anniversary]
[RELATED(2):‘Perhaps the dream didn’t die with him’]


AUGUST 21 -Image from Senator Bam Aquino's Twitter account (@bamaquino)
Simple ceremonies were held to commemorate the 33rd death anniversary of former Senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, Jr., according to a radio report on Sunday, August 21. At the Manila Memorial Park, former President Benigno Aquino III attended ceremonies with siblings Maria Elena, Aurora Corazon, and Victoria Elisa, and nephews Joshua and James. Former Interior Secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas II and former Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman were also present. Former President Aquino chose not to comment, when asked about President Rodrigo Duterte’s plan to give deposed dictator Ferdinand Marcos a hero’s burial. Meanwhile, Senator Paolo Benigno “Bam” Aquino IV led a separate wreath-laying ceremony at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. READ MORE...RELATED, (Look) NAIA commemorates Ninoy Aquino on 33rd death anniversary... RELATED(2)
‘Perhaps the dream didn’t die with him’...

ALSO: SC issues 20-day SQA (Status Quo) order vs Marcos burial
[RELATED: Hero’s burial for Marcos still possible – House Minority Leader Suarez]


AUGUST 24 -
Will the late President Ferdinand Marcos Sr. finally be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB) in time for his birth anniversary on September 11? Not likely on this date, since the 20 days Status Quo Ante (SQA) order will go over the September 11 date of the burial. However, if the SC lifts the SQA, Marcos Sr. and rule against the petitoners Marcos Sr. may still be buried in September or October, barring a motion for reconsideration from the petitioners who are against the burial of the former late president at the LMNB. The SC yesterday issued a 20 day SQA stopping in the meantime the implementation of a memorandum of the Department of National Defense (DND) for the burial of former strongman Ferdinand Marcos to the Libingan ng mga Bayani. SC spokesman Theodore Te said the SQA will remain in effect starting today (Wednesday) and was issued following the plea of several groups and individuals to enjoin the orders of the Department of National Defense and Armed Forces of the Philippines on Marcos’ interment at the LNBM. The order was directed to DND Secretary Delfin Lorenzana and AFP chief-of-staff Gen. Ricardo Visaya. Te also said the Court decided to move the oral arguments from August 24 to August 31 owing to the new petitions filed in connection with the issue.The Court has accepted two more petitioners and ordered their consolidation with the four petitions earlier filed assailing Marcos’ burial a the LNMB.The latest petitions were filed by groups of martial law victims led by former Bayan Muna party-list Rep. Satur Ocampo, Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman and former Commission on Human Rights chair Etta Rosales; a group led by former senator Heherson Alvarez; a group of University of the Philippines students; and former Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao human rights chair Algamar Latiph. The petitioners say the planned burial of the late dictator is “illegal and contrary to law, public policy, morals and justice.”They argued that allowing the burial of the former leader would violate Republic Act No. 289 (law regulating the Libingan ng mga Bayani) and R.A. 10368 (Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act) and argued that the burial would also violate constitutional provision on state policies.The DND and AFP as well as Marcos family already answered the petitions last Tuesday and asked the High Court to dismiss the petitions.Solicitor General Jose Calida insisted that burying Marcos’ remains at the LNMB will promote national healing, which was President Duterte’s battlecry during his campaign.The OSG insisted that the Constitution as well as the Administrative Code give the President the power to order the interment of the remains of a former President and soldier at the LNMB. READ MORE...RELATED, Hero’s burial for Marcos still possible – Suarez ...

ALSO:
Duterte defends stance on Marcos Libingan burial

[RELATED: Rally at Capitol against Marcos’ Libingan burial scheduled for Monday]


AUGUST 26 -President Duterte stood by his decision to allow the burial of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani days after the Supreme Court provided relief to groups opposed to the burial. “This issue has divided the nation,” Duterte said in a press conference in Davao City. “It’s a nation that refuses to heal a wound.” But Duterte vowed to comply with whatever decision the SC would render and insisted that he was just following the law. “The law says that Marcos is qualified to be buried there, as a soldier. They are contesting whether Marcos was a hero. I don’t care. Whether he was a hero or not, he was a soldier… (With regard to the term) hero, politics is involved,” he said. Duterte said Ilocanos were hurt by the refusal of previous administrations to inter Marcos at the heroes’ cemetery. “All Ilocanos are Filipinos too. They are hurting because of what happened. Yellows like my mother refused (to bury him). My mother is dead. It’s over. It’s about politics,” the President said. Duterte’s mother Soledad was a leader of the Yellow Friday Movement in Davao City. The movement backed the presidential bid of the late Corazon Aquino, who assumed power after Marcos was ousted by the historic 1986 People Power Revolution. The SC has issued a 20-day status quo ante order on the Marcos burial, which has remained a controversial issue decades after the former president’s death. The decision means that there can be no Marcos burial at the heroes’ cemetery for 20 days or until Sept. 12. The high court’s order will lapse six days before the scheduled burial on Sept. 18. The oral arguments on the case will be held on Aug. 31. Six petitions challenging the legality of the Marcos burial have been filed before the SC. FULL REPORT. RELATED, 
Rally at Capitol against Marcos’ Libingan burial scheduled for Monday...

ALSO SolGen on Marcos LNMB burial: Path to national healing
[RELATED: 7 Marcos ministers to attend burial]


AUGUST 24 -Solicitor General Jose Calida
State lawyers yesterday echoed Malacañang’s position to push hrough with the burial with military honors of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. In an 86-page consolidated comment, Solicitor General Jose Calida said burying Marcos’ remains at the site reserved for heroes, including war veterans and former heads of state will promote national healing.“The President’s determination to have the remains of former President Marcos interred at the Libingan was spurred by his desire for national healing. President Duterte’s call for a unified nation was his battlecry in the campaign for the presidency, and his election to the post resonates this call. Verily, there is no higher public purpose compared to a nation at peace,” the OSG said.The comments were filed in response to three petitions filed last week by different groups of martial law victims led by former Bayan Muna party-list Rep. Satur Ocampo, Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman and former Commission on Human Rights chairman Etta Rosales.Two more petitions were filed also seeking to stop Marcos’ burial filed by a group led by former senator Heherson Alvarez and a group of University of the Philippines students. The OSG insisted that the Constitution as well as the Administrative Code gives the President the power to order the interment of the remains of a former President and soldier at the LNMB.The Solgen explained that Duterte had validly exercised his executive powers under the Administrative Code to set aside lands of the public domain for public use, and his power of control over the Philippine Veterans Affairs Office (PVAO), the agency tasked to administer military shrines.“As a military shrine, the development and maintenance of the Libingan is vested in the PVAO, an agency under the supervision and control of the Secretary of National Defense, the alter ego of the President,” the OSG added.The OSG said petitioners’ claim that the Palace and officials of the AFP and Department of National Defense violated the Republic Act No. 289 (An Act Creating National Pantheon for Presidents, National Heroes and Patriots) which gives their board the power to order the interment of those qualified to be buried therein, has no basis. Calida explained that LNMB is not the National Pantheon referred to under R.A. No. 289.READ MORE...RELATED, 7 Marcos ministers to attend burial...

ALSO: Aquino classmate to handle Marcos burial suit — sources

[ALSO:
Why did young Filipinos vote for Bongbong Marcos?]


AUGUST 23 -Sources yesterday said a classmate of former President Aquino in the Supreme Court (SC) will be handling the petition seeking to stop the burial of the late strongman President Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB).
SC Associate Justice Alfredo Benjamin Caguioa was the same justice who is now handling the election protest filed by Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. against Vice President Leni Robredo. Caguioa and Aquino were classmates from elementary to college at the Ateneo Law School. He was nominated to the Judicial and Bar Council by UP College of Law Dean Danilo Concepcion and Ateneo Law Dean Sedfrey Candelaria for the SC post vacated by SC Justice Martin Villarama Jr. on Jan. 16, 2016. Caguioa was also the former classmate of Liza Araneta-Marcos, wife of Bongbong Marcos, during their stint at the Ateneo College of Law. It will be recalled that two separate petitions were filed before the SC, first by the martial law victims and activists who sought refuge from the High Court to halt the government’s plan to bury the remains of former President Ferdinand Marcos at the LNMB. The petition was filed by the martial law victims led by former Bayan Muna Reps. Satur Ocampo, Neri Colmenares and Bonifacio Ilagan who accused the government of grave abuse of discretion for allowing the burial. The second petition was filed by the families of victims of enforced disappearances during martial law have joined former political detainees seeking the same relief from the High Tribunal. READ MORE...rALSO, Why did young Filipinos vote for Bongbong Marcos?...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Ninoy Aquino 33rd death anniversary remembered by family


Image from Senator Bam Aquino's Twitter account (@bamaquino)

MANILA, AUGUST 29, 2016 (NEWSCENTRAL.PH) By Abbie Escarilla August 21 2016 7:57 PM - Simple ceremonies were held to commemorate the 33rd death anniversary of former Senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, Jr., according to a radio report on Sunday, August 21.

At the Manila Memorial Park, former President Benigno Aquino III attended ceremonies with siblings Maria Elena, Aurora Corazon, and Victoria Elisa, and nephews Joshua and James.

Former Interior Secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas II and former Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman were also present.

Former President Aquino chose not to comment, when asked about President Rodrigo Duterte’s plan to give deposed dictator Ferdinand Marcos a hero’s burial.

Meanwhile, Senator Paolo Benigno “Bam” Aquino IV led a separate wreath-laying ceremony at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport.

READ MORE...

Benigno Aquino, Jr., an opposition leader against the Marcos regime, was shot on August 21, 1983, upon returning from the United States after three years of exile. His wife, Corazon Aquino became president after the EDSA Revolution in 1986. His son Benigno III was elected President in 2010.

FROM THE MANILA TIMES:


NINOY REMEMBERED 1 BY THE MANILA TIMES ON AUGUST 21, 2016 TODAY'S HEADLINE PHOTOS Former president Benigno Aquino 3rd stands near the tomb of his father as he and his sisters and supporters marked the 33rd death anniversary of Benigno Aquino Jr. at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City. Aquino Jr. was assassinated on August 21, 1983 upon his arrival the Manila International Airport. PHOTO BY DJ DIOSINA Former president Benigno Aquino 3rd stands near the tomb of his father as he and his sisters and supporters marked the 33rd death anniversary of Benigno Aquino Jr. at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City. Aquino Jr. was assassinated on August 21, 1983 upon his arrival the Manila International Airport. PHOTO BY DJ DIOSINA

------------------------------

MANILA BULLETIN

(Look) NAIA commemorates Ninoy Aquino on 33rd death anniversary by MB Online August 21, 2016 (updated) Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share7

The Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) held a program to commemorate the death of its namesake, Benigno Simeon ‘Ninoy’ Aquino Jr, reported DZMM TeleRadyo.

It has been over three decades since the assasination of Ninoy at the then Manila International Airport on August 21, 1983. The airport was eventually renamed as a tribute to his leadership, especially his contribution in the dark hours of the Martial Law.

A wreath-laying ceremony was held at the departure area of NAIA terminal 1 this morning. In the same area, a life-sized photo of Ninoy’s marker was mounted; while, the Lakbay Himig band sang “Ninoy songs”, other persons with disability also performed in the program.

A few words were offered in remembrance to the role he played in fighting for democracy, followed by a thanksgiving mass.

Meanwhile, netizens have also offered tribute to the late Ninoy, alluding to his quote, they asked, “Are we [Filipinos] still worth dying for?”

(Look) NAIA commemorates Ninoy Aquino on 33rd death anniversary

FROM GMANEWS


Former Secretary Heherson Alvarez (right) leads the wreath-laying ceremony at the NAIA on August 21, 2016, the 33rd anniversary of Aquino's assassination. Photo: Danny Pata


Rebecca Quijano, a passenger on Aquino's plane who witnessed his assassination, stands next to Alvarez. Photo: Danny Pata


Members of the August 21 Movement (ATOM) and the Ninoy Aquino Movement lay a wreath on the spot where Aquino fell. Photo: Danny Pata


Senator Bam Aquino and other Aquino relatives observe the wreath-laying at a bust of Ninoy in the airport's Terminal 3. Photo: Danny Pata


Aquino's relatives pose in front of his bust. Photo: Danny Pata


Plants in NAIA's Terminal 1 were decorated with yellow ribbons in honor of the event. Photo: Danny Pata

------------------------------

RELATED(2) FROM PHILSTAR PEOPLE SECTION

‘Perhaps the dream didn’t die with him’ PEOPLE By Joanne Rae M. Ramirez (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 23, 2016 - 12:00am 0 6 googleplus0 0


Ninoy Aquino at the Grand Hotel in Taipei on Aug. 21, 1983. At high noon on the same day, he was assassinated at the Manila International Airport.

The heroism of Ninoy Aquino, who was gunned down at high noon at the Manila International Airport 33 years ago, transcends politics. He isn’t a trend, to be honored only during certain political climes. He is a hero for all seasons.

To have openly declared that the Filipino is worth dying for, to have walked his talk in order to help free the Filipino people from the grip of a dictatorship and the curtailment of their rights — things today’s youth can only imagine — were acts only the brave dared to do. And Ninoy did.

Fr. Catalino Arevalo, SJ, who met Ninoy’s widow Cory in Boston after Ninoy was assassinated in Manila and became her spiritual adviser ever since, once said, “I think why we honor them (Ninoy and Cory) ultimately…why their contribution and their lives matter is because they gave their lives. There’s nothing more that we can give.”

The first time I saw Ninoy Aquino was through the glass partition of his coffin. I joined the throngs, formerly silenced but suddenly emboldened, that lined up to pay their last respects to him at the Sto. Domingo Church in Quezon City. I thought I would be crushed in the surge of people, who suddenly, reverently paused when they saw the bloodied and bruised remains of Ninoy in his coffin. Forever silenced now.

Because I didn’t know Ninoy, I learned more about him through his widow, former President Cory Aquino, and their children, Ballsy, Pinky, former President Noynoy Aquino, Viel and Kris.

I asked private citizen Noynoy Aquino his thoughts on his father’s 33rd death anniversary, and he said, “I continue to draw inspiration from (my parents’) lives.”

Recently, an SWS survey showed that in his last weeks in power, Noynoy had the approval still of 66 percent of Filipinos. His administration’s net approval rating of 50 percent is the highest of an exiting administration since 1989, besting all other previous administrations. “For this, I am grateful to the Filipino people. They made everything possible,” he said when I asked for his reaction.


Cory Aquino during Ninoy Aquino’s funeral Mass in Sto. Domingo Church.

* * *

Three years ago, on his father’s 30th death anniversary, I sat down with then President Noynoy Aquino at Malacañang Palace to talk about both the man and the hero that was his father. Excerpts:

Joanne Rae Ramirez (JRR): What does Aug. 21, 1983 mean to you — as President, as a Filipino and as Ninoy Aquino’s only son?

Noynoy Aquino: I remember CNN had this ad, “The power of one.” When I look at Aug. 21, my dad’s fight against the martial law regime, it was really as some would say, David vs. Goliath. When you see representations of that fight, David at least had a sling, was free to move around. The main difference was during my dad’s time, David was tied tightly to a post and still, he overcame the giant. So, somehow, that ad resonated with me, “the power of one.” It was my mom who said something like, “Courage, like cowardice, is infectious.”

JRR: How did you think the struggle would end?

Noynoy Aquino: I really thought it would be a bloody revolution. When somebody grabs absolute power, had the tiger by the tail, not being able to let go would always have been the challenge. Assuming that person wanted to let go. And the way it looked, hindi lang for him not to let go, but for him to continue even after his demise. And for everyone else who was benefiting, to continue to perpetuate the status quo. I’ll share this with you. I asked somebody who would know people in the criminal underworld and I asked them, “How difficult would it be to get somebody to assassinate somebody like my dad?” I wondered, “What are the sums involved, etc.?” The answer I got was that the only thing that had to be told to these individuals is, “Pag nakauwi ‘to, tapos na tayo…”

JRR: You asked these questions after the assassination…

Noynoy Aquino: Yes. When he was coming back home, I asked my dad, “Why would you come home in that manner? You’re putting your whole life, your whole faith into the hands of a person who never did anything right by us.” That’s when he answered, “Who wins in a civil war? It’s just a question of who suffers less. Some people will die sooner than others, nobody wins in a civil war.” And I took it to mean...how do you profess love of country and not doing everything you can to prevent it from falling into the abyss?

JRR: So Aug. 21 is “the power of one” to you…

Noynoy Aquino: “How do you fight?” I asked him at some point. And I think he quoted the Bible. Something like, “If the time is right, not a single prophet is needed. But if it’s wrong, a thousand prophets won’t make a difference.” And that actually stuck, because after he died,…he was the leader who possessed all knowledge and had all the directions and suddenly, he is no longer here and how do you proceed? The dream dies with him? Then suddenly people going to Times, braving the wrath of the martial law regime. The line stretching endlessly. What a change.

JRR: That must have been great consolation to the family in your grief.


Ninoy Aquino’s funeral procession on Aug. 31, 1983. Ninoy’s only son Noynoy (with black armband, center) stands guard over his father’s coffin.

Noynoy Aquino: At the very least, we thought, perhaps the dream didn’t die with him. Perhaps there was still a possibility that we could achieve the change Dad sought through peaceful means.

Dad had this concept of not having enough time to be able to do the things that he wanted to do. He had this stride. Everybody wanted to catch up with him, they had to jog or run just to keep pace with him. Then I guess it was my mother who would explain, he really felt that he wouldn’t have the time that he needed to be able to accomplish all the things that he wanted to do. So he was always in a rush. Any time that was wasted, you’re wasting something you can never recover.

When he died, suddenly, we lost our captain, we lost the rudder of our ship, we lost everything. Suddenly, he was no longer here…

(You may e-mail me at joanneraeramirez@yahoo.com.)


TRIBUNE

SC issues 20-day SQA order vs Marcos burial Written by Benjamin B. Pulta Wednesday, 24 August 2016 00:00

Will the late President Ferdinand Marcos Sr. finally be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB) in time for his birth anniversary on September 11?

Not likely on this date, since the 20 days Status Quo Ante (SQA) order will go over the September 11 date of the burial.

However, if the SC lifts the SQA, Marcos Sr. and rule against the petitoners Marcos Sr. may still be buried in September or October, barring a motion for reconsideration from the petitioners who are against the burial of the former late president at the LMNB.

The SC yesterday issued a 20 day SQA stopping in the meantime the implementation of a memorandum of the Department of National Defense (DND) for the burial of former strongman Ferdinand Marcos to the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

SC spokesman Theodore Te said the SQA will remain in effect starting today (Wednesday) and was issued following the plea of several groups and individuals to enjoin the orders of the Department of National Defense and Armed Forces of the Philippines on Marcos’ interment at the LNBM. The order was directed to DND Secretary Delfin Lorenzana and AFP chief-of-staff Gen. Ricardo Visaya.

Te also said the Court decided to move the oral arguments from August 24 to August 31 owing to the new petitions filed in connection with the issue.

The Court has accepted two more petitioners and ordered their consolidation with the four petitions earlier filed assailing Marcos’ burial a the LNMB.

The latest petitions were filed by groups of martial law victims led by former Bayan Muna party-list Rep. Satur Ocampo, Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman and former Commission on Human Rights chair Etta Rosales; a group led by former senator Heherson Alvarez; a group of University of the Philippines students; and former Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao human rights chair Algamar Latiph.
The petitioners say the planned burial of the late dictator is “illegal and contrary to law, public policy, morals and justice.”

They argued that allowing the burial of the former leader would violate Republic Act No. 289 (law regulating the Libingan ng mga Bayani) and R.A. 10368 (Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act) and argued that the burial would also violate constitutional provision on state policies.

The DND and AFP as well as Marcos family already answered the petitions last Tuesday and asked the High Court to dismiss the petitions.

Solicitor General Jose Calida insisted that burying Marcos’ remains at the LNMB will promote national healing, which was President Duterte’s battlecry during his campaign.

The OSG insisted that the Constitution as well as the Administrative Code give the President the power to order the interment of the remains of a former President and soldier at the LNMB.

READ MORE...

It explained that President Duterte merely exercised his executive powers under the Administrative Code to set aside lands of the public domain for public use, and his power of control over the Philippine Veterans Affairs Office (PVAO), the agency tasked to administer military shrines.

The impending interment of former President Marcos at the Libingan would affect the search for the latter’s ill-gotten wealth.
It argued that petitioners’ claims for compensation are “distinct and separate from, and cannot in any way be connected to, the intended burial” and petitioners cannot also insist that Marcos’ burial at the Libingan would affect their search for his “ill-gotten wealth.”

Calida further argued that the decision to allow Marcos’ burial at the Libingan is not contrary to public policy, does not contravene the principles and policies enshrined in the Constitution and does not violate the country’s obligations under international laws.

The solicitor general explained that President Duterte is not bound by the 1993 agreement between then President Fidel Ramos and the Marcos family to have the remains of former President Marcos interred at Batac, Ilocos Norte, which was invoked by petitioners.
OFW group welcomes SC’s SQA

The United Overseas Filipinos Worldwide (U-OFW), an advocacy group of Filipinos abroad, has welcomed the order issued by the Supreme Court to stop the government from proceeding with the interment of the late President Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani in Taguig City.

“Let the oral arguments be heard by the people; the pros and cons on the issue of allowing former President Marcos be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani — though ultimately, it is the SC that will decide,” said John Monterona, convenor of U-OFW.

He also said that the decision of the SC to livestream the audio of the oral arguments would help the Filipinos, including OFWs, to become clear and fully informed of the issue.

Monterona added that he is certain the audio livestream of the SC oral arguments will be followed by the millions of Filipinos abroad.
He, however, admitted that their group is against the burial of the former President at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

“It is not simply an issue of burying Marcos. It is an issue of whether we allow to bury the historical facts of the cruelties and atrocities committed by the Marcos regime against its own people. We won’t allow distortions of our history as a nation as we learned valuable lessons from the past to become a great nation of the future,” he said.

There were four petitions filed in the SC questioning the legality of the order issued by the Duterte administration allowing the burial of Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

-----------

RELATED FROM THE MANILA TIMES

Hero’s burial for Marcos still possible – Suarez BY THE MANILA TIMES ON AUGUST 26, 2016 NATION


House Minority Leader Danilo Suarez. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

The Supreme Court (SC) can still rule in favor of a hero’s burial for former President Ferdinand Marcos despite its issuance of a 20-day status quo ante order that stopped the interment at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

House Minority Leader Danilo Suarez of Quezon made the pronouncement on Friday, or a day after President Rodrigo Duterte said the trauma from martial law during Marcos’ rule is gone.

“I would say [the SC]just issued that ruling to ventilate more issues but it could still turn to favor the hero’s burial. Come to think of it, most of the people today, majority of them young, know nothing about Marcos,” Suarez said in a phone interview.

“The President is right. The votes for Marcos Jr. are a manifestation that [the elder]Marcos is out of the picture now,” he added.

Suarez was referring to Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., who is contesting results of the race for Vice President in the May 2016 elections.

Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman, whose brother Hermon disappeared during military rule and is still missing earlier welcomed the High Court ruling.

“We truly appreciate this favorable development. That means to say that the Supreme Court will look very keenly at the arguments proffered by the petitioners [against the hero’s burial for Marcos],” Lagman said.

Suarez said the SC issuance of the status quo ante order snagging the hero’s burial for the former president that was earlier set for September 18, 2016 as ordered by President Duterte was just a temporary setback.

According to the Quezon lawmaker, the SC in issuing the ante order just gave the petitioners the opportunity to present their arguments.

It did not mean that “the SC is against the burial at the moment, the decision was intended to give the complainants the chance to present their side as part of the judicial process,” he explained.

Deputy Speaker and Capiz Rep. Fredenil Castro welcomed the SC order “as part of the judicial process.”

Deputy Speaker and Batangas Rep. Raneo Abu said the public should support the statement that the President made before the High Court issued the order that he would respect whatever decision the tribunal handed down.

Ako Bicol party-list Rep. Rodel Batocabe, president of the Party-List

Coalition, said the SC’s order is “a good respite from all the wrangling and heated debates brought about by a highly divisive issue like the Marcos burial.”

The SC rescheduled for August 31 oral arguments on six consolidated petitions against the hero’s burial for the former leader


PHILSTAR

Duterte defends stance on Marcos Libingan burial By Alexis Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 26, 2016 - 12:00am 1 12 googleplus0 0

MANILA, Philippines - President Duterte stood by his decision to allow the burial of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani days after the Supreme Court provided relief to groups opposed to the burial.

“This issue has divided the nation,” Duterte said in a press conference in Davao City. “It’s a nation that refuses to heal a wound.”

But Duterte vowed to comply with whatever decision the SC would render and insisted that he was just following the law.

“The law says that Marcos is qualified to be buried there, as a soldier. They are contesting whether Marcos was a hero. I don’t care. Whether he was a hero or not, he was a soldier… (With regard to the term) hero, politics is involved,” he said.

Duterte said Ilocanos were hurt by the refusal of previous administrations to inter Marcos at the heroes’ cemetery.

“All Ilocanos are Filipinos too. They are hurting because of what happened. Yellows like my mother refused (to bury him). My mother is dead. It’s over. It’s about politics,” the President said.

Duterte’s mother Soledad was a leader of the Yellow Friday Movement in Davao City. The movement backed the presidential bid of the late Corazon Aquino, who assumed power after Marcos was ousted by the historic 1986 People Power Revolution.

The SC has issued a 20-day status quo ante order on the Marcos burial, which has remained a controversial issue decades after the former president’s death.

The decision means that there can be no Marcos burial at the heroes’ cemetery for 20 days or until Sept. 12. The high court’s order will lapse six days before the scheduled burial on Sept. 18. The oral arguments on the case will be held on Aug. 31.

Six petitions challenging the legality of the Marcos burial have been filed before the SC.

------------------------------

RELATED FROM CEBU DAILY NEWS (INQUIRER)

Rally at Capitol against Marcos’ Libingan burial scheduled for Monday SHARES: New VIEW COMMENTS By: Carmel Loise Matus @cebudailynews 10:44 PM August 27th, 2016

SEVERAL groups against the burial of former President Ferdinand Marcos Sr. at the Libingan ng mga Bayani are expected to attend an “educational and protest gathering” at the Capitol grounds tomorrow.

The protest action organized by the Citizen’s Assembly against the Marcos burial at the Libingan ng mga Bayani will coincide with the celebration of the National Heroes Day on Monday. It will be held from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Noel Tabasa, spokesman of the Anti-Bongbong Coalition, said that it is not to celebrate former president Ferdinand Marcos Sr. as a hero, rather it is to remind the public that he is not (a hero).

Tabasa said that they would be sending this message on National Heroes Day.

“The group is determined to pursue the protest despite the 20-day suspension order of Supreme court on Marcos burial at the Libingan ng mga Bayani,” he added.

Tabasa said there would be exhibits, petition signing, local bands performing and solidarity speeches from both martial law survivors and young generations.

The petition to be signed will be addressed to President Rodrigo Duterte asking him not to bury the remains of Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

A hard copy of the petition will be sent to Malacañang.

He said they would be expecting at least 100 people to attend the protest gathering.

The other groups expected to attend on Monday include Sanlakas, Akbayan, Free Legal Assistance Group Central Visayas (Flag-7), Pagtambayayong communities and school-based student groups.

Tabasa said if the high court’s TRO would lapse, then they would hold simultaneous nationwide rallies expressing their strong opposition to the planned burial.


TRIBUNE

SolGen on Marcos LNMB burial: Path to national healing Written by Benjamin B. Pulta Tuesday, 23 August 2016 00:00


AUGUST 24 -Solicitor General Jose Calida

State lawyers yesterday echoed Malacañang’s position to push hrough with the burial with military honors of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

In an 86-page consolidated comment, Solicitor General Jose Calida said burying Marcos’ remains at the site reserved for heroes, including war veterans and former heads of state will promote national healing.

“The President’s determination to have the remains of former President Marcos interred at the Libingan was spurred by his desire for national healing.

President Duterte’s call for a unified nation was his battlecry in the campaign for the presidency, and his election to the post resonates this call. Verily, there is no higher public purpose compared to a nation at peace,” the OSG said.

The comments were filed in response to three petitions filed last week by different groups of martial law victims led by former Bayan Muna party-list Rep. Satur Ocampo, Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman and former Commission on Human Rights chairman Etta Rosales.

Two more petitions were filed also seeking to stop Marcos’ burial filed by a group led by former senator Heherson Alvarez and a group of University of the Philippines students.

The OSG insisted that the Constitution as well as the Administrative Code gives the President the power to order the interment of the remains of a former President and soldier at the LNMB.

The Solgen explained that Duterte had validly exercised his executive powers under the Administrative Code to set aside lands of the public domain for public use, and his power of control over the Philippine Veterans Affairs Office (PVAO), the agency tasked to administer military shrines.

“As a military shrine, the development and maintenance of the Libingan is vested in the PVAO, an agency under the supervision and control of the Secretary of National Defense, the alter ego of the President,” the OSG added.

The OSG said petitioners’ claim that the Palace and officials of the AFP and Department of National Defense violated the Republic Act No. 289 (An Act Creating National Pantheon for Presidents, National Heroes and Patriots) which gives their board the power to order the interment of those qualified to be buried therein, has no basis.

Calida explained that LNMB is not the National Pantheon referred to under R.A. No. 289.

READ MORE...

He noted that the National Pantheon was supposed to be erected at East Avenue in Quezon City pursuant to Proclamation No. 43193 issued by President Quirino on December 23, 1953.

The OSG, however, noted that efforts on the part of President Quirino to create the National Pantheon failed to push through.

Congress, according to the OSG has not appropriated any funds for the establishment of the National Pantheon or for the operations of the Board of National Pantheon in the 2016 General Appropriations Act.

“The absence of appropriation of funds for the Board of National Pantheon in the present general appropriations law is indicative that the legislative branch would not pursue the establishment of a singular burial place for ‘the mortal remains of all Presidents of the Philippines, the national heroes and patriots,’ and an unequivocal abandonment of R.A. No. 289 altogether,” the OSG explained.

Likewise, the OSG also dismissed the claim of the petitioners the impending interment of former President Marcos at the Libingan would affect the search for the latter’s ill-gotten wealth.

It argued that petitioners’ claims for compensation are “distinct and separate from, and cannot in any way be connected to, the intended burial” and that petitioners cannot also insist that Marcos’ burial at the LNMB would affect their search for his “ill-gotten wealth.”

The top government lawyer assured that the burial would not affect claims for compensation under RA No. 10368 (An Act Providing for Preparation and Recognition of Victims of Human Rights Violations During the Marcos Regime), since the P10-billion funds for the reparation remain intact and will be released upon approval of the Human Rights Victims’ Claims Board (HRVCB).

Calida further argued that the decision to allow Marcos’ burial at the Libingan is not contrary to public policy, does not contravene the principles and policies enshrined in the Constitution and does not violate the country’s obligations under international laws.

The solicitor general explained that President Duterte is not bound by the 1993 agreement between then President Fidel Ramos and the Marcos family to have the remains of former President Marcos interred at Batac, Ilocos Norte, which was invoked by petitioners.

In a separate comment, the Marcos family, in its pleading, also asked the High Court to dismiss for lack of merit the petitions filed the various groups including victims of human rights abuses and families of victims of enforced disappearances during martial law.
The heirs of Marcos supported the government’s defense of his interment at the military shrine reportedly scheduled on Sept. 18.

The Marcos heirs, through lawyer Hyacinth Rafael-Antonio, pointed to the failure of petitioners to cite clear and unmistakable rights or grave injury they would suffer as a result of the interment.

“Allegations of violations of human rights personally experienced by petitioners and of others, in general, after declaration of martial law on September 21, 1972, are denied.

Apart from being irrelevant to the issue at hand, the allegations may not be assumed as facts but need to be established with competent evidence,” they claimed.

The Marcos family suggested that the petitioners should have instead filed petitions for writ of habeas corpus in insisting on reparations for supposed violations of their human rights.

Millenials file plea to declare unsconstitutional Marcos burial

Often blamed for the return of the Marcoses in power, members of the youth collectively referred to as “millenials” filed a petition for certiorari and prohibition before the Supreme Court Monday to prohibit the burial of the late President Marcos Sr. at the LNMB.

The petition asked the High Court to declare the Memorandum issued by the Secretary of the Department National Defense last August 7 and the interment of the deposed dictator at the LNMB as ultra vires for being without legal basis and unconstitutional.

Republic Act 289 stipulates that the power and authority to allow Marcos Sr. to be buried can only emanate from the Board of National Pantheon, of which Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana is not included.

They claim that that Secretary Lorenzana may have abused his authority and must be ordered by the Supreme Court to cease from implementing his own memorandum.

The petitioners, Zaira Baniaga, John Arvin Buenaagua, Joanne Lim and Juan Antonio Magalang, all students of the University of the Philippines were accompanied by their counsel, Atty. Jesus Falcis III.

They also argued that the deposed dictator is disqualified from being buried at the 103-hectare Heroes’ Cemetery as he falls under the category of those “dishonorably separated or discharged from the service” and was witnessed by the whole world on February 25, 1986 and that a LNMB burial for Marcos Sr. would place him in the same category as other Presidents who are already buried in the LNMB, such as Presidents Elpidio Quirino, Carlos Garcia, and Diosdado Macapagal, all of whom were not ousted from office or found to be guilty of atrocities and ill-gotten wealth.

Petitioners claim that to allow Marcos Sr., an internationally recognized tyrant and plunderer to lie beside certified heroes shall create that irreconcilable repugnancy with the declaration of State policy under R.A. No. 10368 or the Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act of 2013.

“We cannot with a clear conscience accept that Marcos the tyrant lie beside the nation’s genuine freedom fighters. Malacañang cannot insist its will when laws have been enacted recognizing the human rights violations during the Marcos regime. The government must be consistent,” declared Baniaga.

Meanwhile Lim, also a petitioner against the curfew ordinances of the cities of Manila, Quezon and Navotas said, “May this petition symbolize our eternal gratefulness to the freedom fighters of the previous generation by their unspeakable sacrifices and collective struggle we millenials enjoy what was denied them in their youth”.

They also called out on his fellow “millenials” to “step up and not content themselves with social media rants”.

“For us long as civil liberties and human rights are being threatened or being trampled upon, the idealistic youth must lend its intellect, its talent and time in order to achieve social justice with social progress, Lim concluded.

-----------------------------

RELATED FROM THE MANILA TIMES

7 Marcos ministers to attend burial BY JAIME PILAPIL AND JOMAR CANLAS ON AUGUST 23, 2016 TOP STORIES


EX-MINISTERS Former Senators Juan Ponce Enrile and Francisco “Kit” Tatad argue in favor of the burial of former President Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. PHOTO BY LAARNI

FORMER senator Juan Ponce Enrile on Monday said the late President Ferdinand Marcos has the right to be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani in Taguig, as he announced that he and seven other living former Cabinet members of the late dictator would join the funeral next month.

“I am wondering why this has become an issue as to where he should be buried. As far as I know, the law has no exception that says he could not be buried there. He was a former president and former soldier. No one is denying that he was once a military man. Many were buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani who were not heroes, no medals. Why should he be excluded in that piece of land. Some of them are staff officers but Marcos fought the Japanese,” Enrile told a forum at Manila Hotel organized by members of Samahang Plaridel, a group of journalists.

“He fought during the war and that was the only major war we were involved in, why deny him the privilege of being buried there. That is why I don’t understand why we even have to litigate the burial of president Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani because if you study what Marcos did over the time that he was president, I don’t think anyone, with due respect for those that followed him, could equal his record except that he declared martial law to save this country,” he said.

The former Defense secretary of Marcos said he and six other former Cabinet members would join the funeral slated next month.

“I was invited to the funeral on Sept. 18 and I will go there together with [six]living former ministers of Marcos,” he said referring to Cesar Virata (finance), Jaime Laya (education), Gerardo Sicat (socioeconomic planning), Francisco Tatad (press), David Consunji (public works), and Roberto Ongpin (trade and industry).

On the issue of human rights abuses, torture, disappearances and rapes committed during Martial Law, Enrile said none of them were proven in court because none of the victims filed a case before the Philippine courts even during the time of the late President Corazon Aquino.

Govt defends planned burial

Government lawyers on Monday defended before the Supreme Court the Duterte administration’s decision to allow the interment of the late strongman Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

The Office of the Solicitor General (OSG) invoked the executive powers of President Rodrigo Duterte under the law that allows honors and burial at the Heroes’ Cemetery for the late strongman.

In an 86-page comment, the OSG stressed that the decision of President Duterte to allow a hero’s burial for Marcos was a valid exercise of his prerogative power under the Constitution and the Administrative Code.

The comment was filed in reaction to three petitions filed last week by different groups of Martial Law victims led by former Bayan Muna party-list Rep. Satur Ocampo, Albay Rep. Edcel Lagman and former Commission on Human Rights chairwoman Etta Rosales.

Alvarez files petition
A fourth petition was filed on Monday by former senator Heherson Alvarez and other personalities.

Allowing the burial would be “a mockery and repudiation of all the efforts of the past three decades, not only to find restitution for his victims, but to unshackle this nation from the burden of corruption which the dictator spawned and allowed to fester,” said the petition.

Alvarez’s group sought a temporary restraining order or a writ of preliminary injunction to stop the burial.

The former senator said in a statement President Duterte should draw a line between his friendship with the Marcoses and his duty, and “this is an act of fine statesmanship on Digong’s part.”

The high court is set to hear the case in oral arguments on Wednesday.

‘Rights violations not related’

The OSG, in it comment, belittled the claims of human rights violations and corruption under the Marcos regime, saying they had no connection at all to the case.

The Marcos family supported the government’s defense.

In a 13-page comment lodged before the high court on Monday, the Marcoses questioned the legal standing of petitioners and the injury that would be caused with the said burial.

The Marcos family, represented by lawyer Hyacinth Rafael-Antonio, noted the failure of the petitioners to cite clear and unmistakable rights or grave injury that they would suffer as a result of the interment.

“Allegations of violations of human rights personally experienced by petitioners and of others, in general, after declaration of Martial Law on Sept. 21, 1972, are denied. Apart from being irrelevant to the issue at hand, the allegations may not be assumed as facts but needs to be established with competent evidence,” the Marcoses said.


TRIBUNE

Aquino classmate to handle Marcos burial suit — sources Written by Benjamin B. Pulta Saturday, 20 August 2016 00:00



Sources yesterday said a classmate of former President Aquino in the Supreme Court (SC) will be handling the petition seeking to stop the burial of the late strongman President Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB).

SC Associate Justice Alfredo Benjamin Caguioa was the same justice who is now handling the election protest filed by Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. against Vice President Leni Robredo.

Caguioa and Aquino were classmates from elementary to college at the Ateneo Law School. He was nominated to the Judicial and Bar Council by UP College of Law Dean Danilo Concepcion and Ateneo Law Dean Sedfrey Candelaria for the SC post vacated by SC Justice Martin Villarama Jr. on Jan. 16, 2016.

Caguioa was also the former classmate of Liza Araneta-Marcos, wife of Bongbong Marcos, during their stint at the Ateneo College of Law. It will be recalled that two separate petitions were filed before the SC, first by the martial law victims and activists who sought refuge from the High Court to halt the government’s plan to bury the remains of former President Ferdinand Marcos at the LNMB.

The petition was filed by the martial law victims led by former Bayan Muna Reps. Satur Ocampo, Neri Colmenares and Bonifacio Ilagan who accused the government of grave abuse of discretion for allowing the burial.

The second petition was filed by the families of victims of enforced disappearances during martial law have joined former political detainees seeking the same relief from the High Tribunal.

READ MORE...

These are the Families of Victims of Involuntary Disappearance which asked the SC to issue a temporary restraining order on the planned burial in September because the petition would be rendered moot with the interment of Marcos at the heroes’ cemetery.

Among the respondents named in the petition were Rear Adm. Ernesto Enriquez, Armed Forces of the Philippines chief of staff Gen. Ricardo Visaya, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana and the heirs of the late President represented by his spouse, Ilocos Norte Rep. Imelda Marcos.

Petitioners are crying foul over the planned burial approved by President Duterte violates Republic Act 289, which only allows the burial of a president or soldier worthy of public inspiration and emulation.

They cited that it is also against public policy under the law (Republic Act 10638) that recognizes the massive human rights violations under the Marcos regime and is against the 1993 deal between the Philippine government and the Marcos family that the former leader’s remains should be buried in his home province of Ilocos Norte.

------------------------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Why did young Filipinos vote for Bongbong Marcos? SHARES: 4010 VIEW COMMENTS By: Ruel S. De Vera
@inquirerdotnet Inquirer Lifestyle 03:58 AM August 21st, 2016


BONGBONG MARCOS AND FAMILY

The Marcos name is either the greatest gift or the worst disadvantage for an aspiring politician. It could either mean a shining legacy or a dark burden, owing either to the gains of the Marcos years or the consequences of martial law and the dramatic 1986 ouster from Malacañang.

Yet Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. walked through those flames to regain his footing in Philippine politics after returning from exile in Hawaii. Marcos survived the post-Edsa years with a career rebuilt in the solid Marcos north (he served as representative for the second district of Ilocos Norte and then governor of Ilocos Norte).

In 2010, Marcos won a seat as a Senator of the republic, with his 12,372,118 votes representing the seventh largest number of votes in the Senate race that year. This victory indicates that Marcos had a wider popularity than just the north, something that outraged anti-Marcos activists.

This outrage rose to new heights when Marcos announced he was running as vice president with Miriam Defensor-Santiago. Marcos remained nonplussed, and his campaign fully utilized the internet and social media—and appealed to younger voters.

In the months before the May 9 election, mock polls in universities showed that Marcos was a popular choice among students, finishing second at Ateneo de Manila University and De La Salle University, even topping the polls at University of Santo Tomas and Arellano University. This happened despite protests and warnings against “revisionist history.”

True enough, Marcos performed very well during the actual election, finishing a very close second to Liberal Party candidate Leni Robredo with 14,155,344 votes, just over 250,000 less than the winning number. Marcos’ camp claimed the Robredo margin was the result of cheating, and last June 29, filed an electoral protest, stating that the certificates of canvass were not authentic.

Acting as the Presidential Electoral Tribunal, the Supreme Court on Aug. 2 asked Robredo to respond to the protest in 10 days, while issuing a Precautionary Protection Order for the Commission on Elections (Comelec) to preserve all election returns being questioned for manual recount, judicial revision and technical examination. With Robredo stating the protest is “baseless,” the case rolls on.

18-34 Voting population

With over half the voting population between the ages of 18 and 34, Marcos has indeed proved popular among the younger voters.

John, a 22-year-old college senior, stated a common sentiment: Marcos was not to blame for what his father did. “I voted for Bongbong Marcos, because I don’t believe that he would end up like his father.”

READ MORE...

YLA, a 21-year-old student, said Marcos’ performance during the televised presidential debate convinced her: “He handled and expressed himself well, from the issues hurled at him regarding his family to his plans for the country.”

Cali, a 30-year-old product manager, said, “I thought he had the best qualities as vice president for the 2016 elections as compared to the other candidates.” JD, a 23-year-old government employee, said, “I feel him, unlike the other candidates.”

All four were born after 1986, and they all acknowledge that terrible things happened during the Marcos era, something they learned from school and their family. But it wasn’t all bad, they said.

“I didn’t experience it first-hand, but I honestly think that during that time people had no freedom of speech, since everything was controlled by the government,” Cali said. “I pity those who fell victim to martial law,” added YLA. “Also, I pity the Marcoses, because they were forced to steal government property. What happened was too much.”

JD had the strongest opinion: “What I know is during their era, the Philippines was next to Japan in terms of power and money in Asia. A strong government was formed, many projects were built, the gross national product of the country was high, the people of the republic were secure compared to today, many individuals were employed, less people were starving.

“These were the good things President Ferdinand Marcos did that I know about, but the sad reality is that he abused his authority, and many people died with no conclusive evidence that they were guilty of their crime or actions.”

Despite what they heard from their family, media and school, the four didn’t agree that Marcos shared the blame for what his father did. YLA explained, “What’s in the past is in the past. BBM’s term would have been an opportunity to prove himself and to show that his family is not plain evil.” John added, “The things his father did should not be passed on to Bongbong Marcos. He was a better choice, and his family history will not change my perviews on him.”

Positive things

In fact, some of these young people actually associate the name “Marcos” with positive things. “I feel positive because I know there is a descendant who might bring back the glory days of our country,” JD said. Cali agreed: “Positive because of their achievements, and the recognition they gave our country.” YLA said she felt differently, depending on what aspect of the Marcos legacy was being referenced.

JD argued passionately that many people believe in Marcos, as shown by his performance in the polls. “For those who open their minds to the reality that no other president has lifted this country that high, I believe that the people of our nation were united in this previous election, where the new president is Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, known for his wrong choice of words, but also for the good things he did in Davao.

“I believe that people realize the good things Marcos’ family did, and that’s why Bongbong almost won. If the people of this country didn’t believe in the Marcos family, how come Bongbong Marcos almost became vice president?”

They also state a willingness to let the former President Marcos be buried in the Libingan ng Bayani. “I am not against it,” YLA said. “I think Marcos still deserves to be buried there. Warts and all, his life had its merits.” JD prefaced his answer by saying those who can’t forgive the elder Marcos for martial law won’t agree with him. “But dead people deserve a proper burial, and people shouldn’t condemn him forever. Although it was awful in some ways, let us admit that Marcos really did something good in the past.”

They believe Marcos has a bright political future, and they would consider him for a political post if he should run again.

These youngsters may have spoken, but Marcos’ extraordinary vote total could not have been the result of just the youth vote. According to political analyst and University of the Philippines assistant professor Dr. Clarissa David, “Based on the commentary of those who deal with the data, support for Marcos was higher among older people. It is a bit of a misconception to say that he gets a lot more support from the young.

Regionality

“He has high support among those 35 and over. The bigger story here, I think, is not the age divisions, but the regionality.” After all, Marcos won Regions I, II, III, VIII, XI, XII, and most notably, the National Capital Region.

David added that this result does indicate a disconnect with what should have been learned from the martial law years: “It is not only a forgetting, it is a rewriting of history. There are photos circulating on social media of school books that shows Ferdinand Marcos as a president who ruled for 20 years over a progressive nation, and ‘stepped down’ in 1986. It was probably not hard to rewrite; after all, we don’t have definitive, readily available texts that depict real events.

“In order to really understand this support for the Marcoses, we must understand the support as it is now,” said Dr. David. “Not connecting it to the father, but asking, what is the relationship of these regions to the family, how do Filipinos connect families with politics, and what is it that this family symbolizes?”

Karina Bolasco, former publishing manager at Anvil Publishing and now director of Ateneo de Manila University Press, worked on the private school textbooks before the K-12 program. She noted that Philippine history and government was taught in the first year of high school, and, with the need to cover all the presidents up to the present, only six to eight pages are devoted to each presidency.

“Many classes never get to finish the last unit,” said Bolasco. “With just achievements, challenges and major events per presidency mentioned, it is very possible that Marcos years come out glorious for peace and order and numerous infrastructures. Martial law may have been mentioned as just an event,” Bolasco said, adding that there is a need to include more about martial law in textbooks.

More than just a specific Marcos phenomenon, it would be a matter of accurately recounting Philippine history. “It’s not about raw pieces of information, or isolated stories of the disappeared that circulate on Facebook,” said David. “We need the narrative, the whole history, what happened in those years and what were the long-term ramifications on the country’s politics, economics and development.”

If there is anything to be taken from May 9 and its aftermath, the story of Ferdinand Marcos Jr.—and the ultimate legacy of his controversial, powerful family name—has many unpredictable chapters left to be told. TVJ

RELATED STORIES

Bongbong Marcos is right: Why should he say ‘Sorry?’

The luck of Bongbong Marcos

Bongbong: ‘I’m thankful I’m a Marcos’


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2016 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE 
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE