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II: SENATE HEARING ON KILLINGS

'BATO': "WE [PNP COPS] ARE NOT BUTCHERS WHO KILL FOR NO REASON"
[RELATED: ‘Bato’ weeds out cops on drugs after exposé in Senate]


AUGUST 23 -'BATO': “We’re not butchers who arbitrarily kill people. “ -
Philippine National Police chief Dir. Gen. Ronald “Bato” de la Rosa on Tuesday made this strong statement before the Senate committee on justice and human rights during its inquiry into the spate of extrajudicial killings. Senator Gringo Honasan, a fellow Philippine Military Academy alumnus of De la Rosa, asked to explain the frustration the police chief showed on the first day of the hearing when he responded to Senator Antonio Trillanes IV’s suggestion to relieve commanders who would fail to stop the killings in their area. “Kami po ay tao lang. Nakaka-feel kami ng frustration. Gustong gusto po talaga naming gampanan ang papel dito sa mundo bilang pulis eh kami tao rin… Kami binuwis buhay namin, ‘yung mga pulis ko nagkakakaso. Mga tao rin kami, hindi kami perpekto, kaya sana naman po ‘yung treatment sa amin ibabalance lang din po,” de la Rosa said. (We are only human. We feel frustration. We really want to do our duty as policemen, but we are also human…We risk our lives, police face charges. We are also human and we are not perfect, so we ask that the treatment be balanced.) READ: Bato: Kill threat mere ‘rhetoric,’ part of ‘psy war’ De la Rosa said it saddens him that despite the apparent success of the PNP’s campaign against drugs, some sectors make it appear as if they were the enemies. “Kasi kapag ako pumunta sa mga barangay, ramdam na ramdam ko po ‘yung taong bayan na hahawak sa akin everywhere I go. Mahigpit, maramdaman ko ‘yung panginginig ng kalamanan at pagtulo ng luha at magsasabi sakin, ‘Sir, salamat sa ginagawa niyo. ‘Yung ginagawa niyo po ay para sa aking mga anak na,’ aalis na lang ‘yun. No further comment,” he said. “Ako ramdam na ramdam ko ang tuwa ng taumbayan sa ginagawa namin pero bakit may ibang sector na pinapalabas na kami masama? ‘Yan po sama ng loob namin. Hindi po kami mamamatay tao. Kami ay pulis. We are here to serve and protect. Hindi po kami butcher na pumapatay ng tao na walang karason rason.” READ MORE...RELATED, ‘Bato’ weeds out cops on drugs after exposé in Senate...

ALSO: Nothing will hamper war on drugs – Dela Rosa
[RELATED: PNP chief Bato to witnesses in drug killings: We will protect you]


AUGUST 23 -NOTHING TO HIDE — Director General Ronald ‘Bato’ dela Rosa raises both his hands as he faces yesterday’s Senate inquiry into supposed extrajudicial killings of drug suspects, saying he has nothing to hide. (Jansen Romero / mb.com.ph)
The Philippine National Police (PNP) has vowed there would be no let up on the war on drugs as allegations of police abuses and brutality became the highlight of the Senate’s first round of public hearings into purported extrajudicial killings and summary executions. PNP Chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa said law enforcement agencies would not allow its anti-drug operations to be hampered by the presence of “scalawags” within their ranks following the testimonies of the two witnesses Senator Leila De Lima produced yesterday, Aug. 22. “Lalaban pa rin kami. We will continue! Tuloy pa rin!” Dela Rosa told reporters after the hearing. Dela Rosa appeared once again at the Senate as a resource person at the Senate Committee on Justice and Human Rights’ probe into the alleged extra-legal killings headed by De Lima. But at the same time, the PNP chief promised they would not leave the anti-drug crusade in the dark as they are bent on prosecuting any uniformed personnel who would be found guilty of involvement in illegal drug operations. “Our Internal Affairs Services (PNP-IAS) is not slowing down in finding evidence to ensure these erring policemen are indicted…We will go after them,” Dela Rosa told senators during the investigation. READ MORE...RELATED,
PNP chief Bato to witnesses in drug killings: We will protect you...

ALSO: Int'l court may take over cases of killings, says CHR
[RELATED: Duterte to rights groups - Choose between safety of country or criminals' lives]


AUGUST 23 -Human Rights Commissioner Chito Gascon, right, gets a stare from Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa as he reads his statement at the start of the Philippine Senate probe on extra judicial killings related to President Rodrigo Duterte's "War on Drugs" Monday, Aug. 22, 2016 in Pasay City, Philippines. AP/Bullit Marquez
The International Criminal Court (ICC) may possibly assume jurisdiction over the extrajudicial and vigilante killings of suspected drug dealers if the Philippine government fails to address the issue, the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) said. "Failure of the government to address this situation currently prevailing of unexplained extrajudicial killings and providing remedies in terms of prosecution of perpetrators could result in the possibility of the ICC exercising jurisdiction over those matters if you fail to do so," CHR chairperson Chito Gascon told the Senate panel during its inquiry into drug-related killings. Gascon noted that the Philippines must first satisfy the principle of "complementarity" under the Roman Statute, the treaty that established the ICC. This means that the ICC is a court of "last resort" and may only assume jurisdiction in case a national government fails to address international crimes. "The ICC may only exercise jurisdiction where national legal systems fail to do so, including where they purport to act but in reality are unwilling or unable to genuinely carry out proceedings," the ICC said in its informal expert paper on the principle of complementarity in practice. The jurisdiction of the ICC is only limited to four types of cases: war crimes, genocide, aggression and crimes against humanity. Senators have opened an inquiry into the killings of more than 1,700 suspected drug dealers and users amid a crackdown spearheaded by Duterte, with witnesses accusing some policemen of killing suspects and being involved in the illegal drugs trade. READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte to rights groups: Choose between safety or criminals' lives...

ALSO: ‘How do you arrest someone who’s already in jail?
[RELATED: Senate hearing on drugs shows ‘working democracy,’ says priest]


AUGUST 24 -Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa gestures at the continuing Senate probe on the rising number of extrajudicial killings related to Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's "War on Drugs" Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016 in suburban Pasay city south of Manila, Philippines. Philippine senators have opened an inquiry into the killings of more than 1,700 suspected drug dealers and users amid a crackdown spearheaded by Duterte, with witnesses accusing some policemen of killing suspects and being involved in the illegal drugs trade. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez
MANILA, Philippines – Stopping convicted felons from doing business inside the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) is a big challenge in the government’s war against illegal drugs, Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa admitted yesterday. “All roads point to the Bilibid… How do you arrest one who is already in jail? How do you convict one who is already convicted?” Dela Rosa said when asked about the center of illegal drugs in the country. The question came from Sen. Richard Gordon during the second day of hearings on extrajudicial killings amid President Duterte’s war on drugs, presided over by Sen. Leila de Lima as chair of the committee on justice and human rights. De Lima was accused by Duterte of benefiting from protection money allegedly collected by her former driver-bodyguard and supposed lover, Ronnie Palisoc Dayan, from drug lords at the NBP. De Lima, who had supervision over the NBP when she was justice secretary, denied the allegations. But she was also put on the spot during the hearing when her track record in fighting illegal drugs as justice secretary of the Aquino administration was tackled. Dela Rosa said while stringent measures had been put in place at the NBP to suppress drug convicts, the PNP was not letting its guard down. READ MORE...RELATED, Senate hearing on drugs shows ‘working democracy,’ says priest...

ALSO: 756 who ‘resisted’ killed
[BATO: THEY ONLY HAVE THEMSELVES TO BLAME]

[RELATED: PNP Chief says 12 lawmen killed in drug campaign]


AUGUST 24 -PNP chief Director Gen. Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa with PO1 Alipio Balo, PO1 Michael Tomas during the hearing on extrajudicial killings at the Senate session hall, Pasay City. INQUIRER PHOTO/LYN RILLON

“IF THEY did not resist, they would still be alive.” That’s how Philippine National Police Director General Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa explained on Tuesday why 756 “drug personalities” had been killed since the war on illegal drugs was launched when President Duterte took office, fulfilling a campaign promise that catapulted him to the presidency. Sen. Leila de Lima, chair of the committee on justice and human rights, said: “Yes, there are cases when suspects resisted, or attempted to fight off arrest. But you’re telling us, you’re putting on record that in 756 deaths, the circumstances were such that they resisted?” Dela Rosa said, “Yes.” “Unless controverted by evidence, I presume my men are performing regularly,” he told De Lima on the second day of the Senate hearing she called to expose police “scalawags” involved in alleged extrajudicial killings that had accompanied Mr. Duterte’s drive to stamp out the narcotics trade in three to six months of his presidency. Dela Rosa said each incident was being investigated by the PNP Internal Affairs Service (IAS). Two women, wearing smoke glasses and shawls wrapped around their heads were called by De Lima on Monday to testify against policemen allegedly out to kill their drug pushers and dealers to cover their tracks in Mr. Duterte’s unprecedented crackdown on illegal narcotics. Officials said there were at least 1.3 million Filipino drug users. READ MORE...RELATED,
PNP Chief says 12 lawmen killed in drug campaign...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Bato: ‘We [PNP cops] are not butchers who kill for no reason’


BATO: “We’re not butchers who arbitrarily kill people. “

MANILA, AUGUST 29, 2016 (INQUIRER)  By: Julliane Love De Jesus @JLDejesusINQ 02:02 PM August 23rd, 2016 - Philippine National Police chief Dir. Gen. Ronald “Bato” de la Rosa on Tuesday made this strong statement before the Senate committee on justice and human rights during its inquiry into the spate of extrajudicial killings.

Senator Gringo Honasan, a fellow Philippine Military Academy alumnus of De la Rosa, asked to explain the frustration the police chief showed on the first day of the hearing when he responded to Senator Antonio Trillanes IV’s suggestion to relieve commanders who would fail to stop the killings in their area.

“Kami po ay tao lang. Nakaka-feel kami ng frustration. Gustong gusto po talaga naming gampanan ang papel dito sa mundo bilang pulis eh kami tao rin… Kami binuwis buhay namin, ‘yung mga pulis ko nagkakakaso. Mga tao rin kami, hindi kami perpekto, kaya sana naman po ‘yung treatment sa amin ibabalance lang din po,” de la Rosa said.

(We are only human. We feel frustration. We really want to do our duty as policemen, but we are also human…We risk our lives, police face charges. We are also human and we are not perfect, so we ask that the treatment be balanced.)

READ: Bato: Kill threat mere ‘rhetoric,’ part of ‘psy war’

De la Rosa said it saddens him that despite the apparent success of the PNP’s campaign against drugs, some sectors make it appear as if they were the enemies.

“Kasi kapag ako pumunta sa mga barangay, ramdam na ramdam ko po ‘yung taong bayan na hahawak sa akin everywhere I go. Mahigpit, maramdaman ko ‘yung panginginig ng kalamanan at pagtulo ng luha at magsasabi sakin, ‘Sir, salamat sa ginagawa niyo. ‘Yung ginagawa niyo po ay para sa aking mga anak na,’ aalis na lang ‘yun. No further comment,” he said.

“Ako ramdam na ramdam ko ang tuwa ng taumbayan sa ginagawa namin pero bakit may ibang sector na pinapalabas na kami masama? ‘Yan po sama ng loob namin. Hindi po kami mamamatay tao. Kami ay pulis. We are here to serve and protect. Hindi po kami butcher na pumapatay ng tao na walang karason rason.”

READ MORE...

(Because when you go to the barangays, I feel that they hold me everywhere I go. They hold on to me tightly and I feel the trembling in their body and their tears falling, telling me, “Sir, thank you for what you have done. What you are doing is for my children.” Then they just leave. No further comment.

(I really feel the joy of the people with what we are doing, but why are there sectors that make us appear as the bad guys. That pains us. We are not murderers. We are the police. We are here to serve and protect. We are not butchers who kill for no reason at all.)

De la Rosa added that filing charges against his men was difficult for him, citing the murder complaint the PNP filed against PO2 Alipio Balo Jr. and PO1 Michael Tomas, the cops who killed drug pusher Jaypee Bertes and his father Renato after the victims allegedly tried to grab the gun of the police last July 7.

“Itong dalawa, napatay ‘yung dalawa dun sa loob ng selda. Masakit sa loob namin na file-an namin murder case, otherwise, sasabihan nag-cover up kami ng tao namin. Masakit kasi tao namin pero kami nagfa-file ng kaso,” he said.

(These two killed those inside the jail cell. It hurts us to file a murder case against them, otherwise, we would be told we are covering our people up. It hurts because these are our people but we are the ones who file cases against them.) CDG/rga

VIDEO: Witness says Antipolo cops involved in illegal drug trade

 
https://youtu.be/t2p57lpE-Qw
INQUIRER.net Subscribe62,231 Add to Share More 7,175 views 6 12 Published on Aug 22, 2016 Another witness has testified at the Senate and implicated certain policemen in Antipolo in illegal drugs and possibly in the killings of her parents.

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

‘Bato’ weeds out cops on drugs after exposé in Senate By: Tarra Quismundo @TarraINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer 05:02 PM August 22nd, 2016


PNP Director General Ronald Dela Rosa addresses Sen. Leila de Lima at the hearing of the Senate Committees on Public Order, Dangerous Drugs, Civil Service, among others, about the spate of killings linked to the government’s war on drugs. The inquiry is chaired by Sen. Panfilo Lacson. Beside the PNP chief are Dangerous Drugs Board Sec. Felipe Rojas (R) and Chief Supt Oscar Albayalde (L). INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/LYN RILLON

MANILA, Philippines — PNP Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa immediately relieved on Monday the Antipolo City police officers whom a witness at a Senate inquiry had tagged as drug pushers.

The PNP chief vowed to bring to justice those in the force involved in the illegal trade.

Speaking to reporters after a four-hour inquiry into the spate of drug-related killings, Dela Rosa said he would readily order the police officers ‘restricted’ to police camp.

“We will restrict them in the camp or put them in Camp Crame to investigate them. We will summon them immediately,” said Dela Rosa.

If the investigation found that the entire Antipolo City police station was involved, Dela Rosa said he would relieve the entire roster of policemen.

Witness Mary Rose Aquino has said police officers were the ones who supplied drugs to her late parents, Rodelio and Rosalie Campos, who were killed in separate police operations in June.

She said her parents left their home on June 20 to remit P50,000 in cash to a group of police officers who have been supplying them drugs. She learned two days later that they were already dead.

Aquino, who appeared at the Senate inquiry wearing a hooded sweater, sunglasses and a hanky covering her mouth, said she knew of the involvement of at least 40 officers in the drug trade.

“They bring my Papa along in their raids.. The drugs they confiscate, they ask my Papa to sell,” she told an inquiry of the Senate committee on justice and human rights.

She testified seeing the police officers in pot sessions at their family home in Antipolo City.

“They bring drugs for my parents to repack. And then they go upstairs, my Mama asks us to come down. I see my Mama and Papa repack while the police do drugs,” Aquino said, adding that the police would be even be in uniform in their sessions. SFM/rga


MANILA BULLETIN

Nothing will hamper war on drugs – Dela Rosa by Hannah Torregoza August 23, 2016 Share4 Tweet0 Share1 Email0 Share127


NOTHING TO HIDE — Director General Ronald ‘Bato’ dela Rosa raises both his hands as he faces yesterday’s Senate inquiry into supposed extrajudicial killings of drug suspects, saying he has nothing to hide. (Jansen Romero / mb.com.ph)

The Philippine National Police (PNP) has vowed there would be no let up on the war on drugs as allegations of police abuses and brutality became the highlight of the Senate’s first round of public hearings into purported extrajudicial killings and summary executions.

PNP Chief Director General Ronald “Bato” Dela Rosa said law enforcement agencies would not allow its anti-drug operations to be hampered by the presence of “scalawags” within their ranks following the testimonies of the two witnesses Senator Leila De Lima produced yesterday, Aug. 22.

“Lalaban pa rin kami. We will continue! Tuloy pa rin!” Dela Rosa told reporters after the hearing.

Dela Rosa appeared once again at the Senate as a resource person at the Senate Committee on Justice and Human Rights’ probe into the alleged extra-legal killings headed by De Lima.

But at the same time, the PNP chief promised they would not leave the anti-drug crusade in the dark as they are bent on prosecuting any uniformed personnel who would be found guilty of involvement in illegal drug operations.

“Our Internal Affairs Services (PNP-IAS) is not slowing down in finding evidence to ensure these erring policemen are indicted…We will go after them,” Dela Rosa told senators during the investigation.

READ MORE...

FIRST DAY OF HEARING

Senators yesterday clashed on the first day of the Senate’s inquiry into the extra-judicial killings as those supportive of President Duterte’s anti-drug campaign expressed their disapproval of Senator De Lima’s move to conduct a probe and disrupt the ongoing anti-illegal drugs campaign.


At the start of the hearing, De Lima explained that the Senate probe is in aid of legislation to address the rampant summary executions of alleged drug suspects.

De Lima, a staunch critic of the Duterte administration’s war on drugs, was supposed to present 12 witnesses but managed to only introduce two as the senators debated on the relevance of holding the probe.

“It’s very important to know: who are the victims? Who are the killers? Where are all these happening? Are there investigations or cases filed after these incidents? What are the agencies conducting the probe? Where is this campaign leading to?” De Lima said in Filipino.

“I strongly believe: extrajudicial or extralegal killings, whether perpetrated by the State or by non-state actors must stop. Blatant disregard for human life has to stop,” she said.

“Let this be clear: The Senate is not a court of law or a quasi-judicial body. This Senate investigation is in aid of legislation where the technical rules of evidence are not strictly applied. Our focus here is on the criminal acts to be addressed, not on prosecution of alleged perpetrators,” added the senator.

ANTIPOLO POLICE IN HOT WATER

Meanwhile, to prove his sincerity, Dela Rosa ordered relieve the policemen involved in the alleged killing of the parents of one of the witnesses whom she said admitted acted as “assets” by the Antipolo police.

“Effective today, I will relieve those people and put them under the administrative holding unit and will order the IAS to conduct an investigation on them,” Dela Rosa said in an interview.

“If it would be proven that all the policemen in Antipolo are involved, I will remove everyone, even the police commander,” he promised.

The involvement of some Antipolo police was revealed during the hearing after the second witness identified only as “Mary Rose” said she sought the help of the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) after learning both her father and mother were killed in an “encounter” with policemen.

According to Mary Rose, both her parents received a call on June 20 from a certain PO3 Torres and another policeman named “Rabe.” They reportedly rushed to leave their house supposedly to remit the last of the money they earned from selling shabu or methamphetamine.

Mary Rose told Senate probers both her parents were already planning to surrender to the authorities in response to the government’s anti-illegal drugs campaign. They failed to return home; their bodies were later found in separate places. Her father’s body was found in Morong, Rizal while her mother’s body was found in Barangay Puting Bato, Antipolo.

But according to Mary Rose, they found the bodies at a morgue, already cleaned up. She said a certain police named “Gamad” informed her of the whereabouts of her parents’ cadavers.

She also mentioned a certain policeman named “Ong” as one of those who transacted with her parents.

REPACKED ILLEGAL DRUGS

Pressed by De Lima to describe her parents’ role in the drug operations, she said they “repacked” illegal drugs policemen recover from drug raids and sell them at a price.

A tearful Mary Grace also confirmed her parents have been in the business for about a year. She said 30 to 40 policemen would frequent their house and even held pot sessions at the second floor.

Since her parents’ death, Mary Grace said their family has left Antipolo and with her siblings – one suffering from epilepsy – had sought refuge with an uncle.

Asked why she did not report the incident to police, Mary Grace said: “Natatakot ako lumapit sa kanila, baka patayin na rin nila ako…Umalis na po kami doon, binuburol pa lang po (parents ko) umiikot-ikot na (sila sa bahay) (I am afraid to go near them, they might kill me. We have left the place. Even at the wake of my parents, they were going around our house).”

The PNP Chief admitted that based on the findings of police, the death of Mary Grace’s father was accounted as resisting during police operation, while her mother’s death is still “under investigation.”

“Ako mismo, naghahanap ako ng hustisya… I will not take this sitting down,” Dela Rosa told Sen. Paolo “Bam” Aquino IV.

Dela Rosa also said he is not at all surprised to hear some policemen are involved in the illegal drug trade. He also said he is even grateful that Mary Grace testified on the involvement of the Antipolo police.

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

PNP chief Bato to witnesses in drug killings: We will protect you By Rosette Adel (philstar.com) | Updated August 23, 2016 - 6:00pm 3 88 googleplus0 0


Witnesses attend the second day of the hearing on drug-related killings. Senate PRIB / Romy Bugante

MANILA, Philippines – Philippine National Police Director General Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa on Tuesday guaranteed the safety of witnesses who testified at the Senate on drug-related killings.

Dela Rosa particularly mentioned one of the witnesses, Mary Rose Aquino, who named Antipolo City police officers allegedly involved in drug trade. Aquino claimed her parents used and sold drugs, which they sourced from the police officers. The drugs sold were allegedly the same seized in raids.

READ: Two witnesses testify on extrajudicial killings

The PNP chief assured Aquino that the police officials named have already been ordered removed from the Rizal Police Provincial Office and will be confined in Camp Crame pending the results of investigations by the PNP Internal Affairs Service.

“Tinanggalan na po namin ng armas. Huwag po matakot sila Mary Rose. Hindi na po kayo under threat kasi iyong mga pulis na iyan, tinanggal na namin doon,” Dela Rosa said.

“Umuwi na po kayo sa inyo. Puwede niyo na tanggalin ang cover sa mukha, please. Andito kami. We're here to protect you. Huwag kayong mag-alala, iyong mga pulis na iyan, naka-confine na po,” he added.

Dela Rosa also offered the witnesses the 'White House', the PNP chief's official residence, which he said may serve as their safe house for the meantime.

Asked what will happen to police personnel proven to be involved in drugs, Dela Rosa controlled his temper and said he could not imagine officers sworn to serve and protect the public engaged in illegal drugs,

“Hindi ko sasabihin dahil masama, your honor, pero alam niyo na ang ibig kong sabihin. Gigil na gigil po ako, your honor,” Dela Rosa said.

Dela Rosa said he has already removed officers involved in drugs and have prohibited them from conducting Oplan Tokhang and Oplan High Value Target operations. He also allayed fears of some in the public, citing that some police officers even offer free rides and serenade the public to dismissed the negative perception of the police.

"Nilipat na po namin sila at hindi po namin ini-involve sa Oplan Tokhang at Oplan HVT kasi po, habang nakikita sila ng taumbayan, hindi maniniwala ang taumbayan na itong kampanya ng pulis laban sa droga ay seryoso dahil andiyan pa si PO1 at PO2 ganon kaya tinanggal namin,” the PNP chief said.

The PNP has intensified its Oplan Tokhang campaign, a door-to-door campaign to ask drug suspects in the police watch list to surrender to authorities.


PHILSTAR

Int'l court may take over cases of killings, says CHR By Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) | Updated August 23, 2016 - 5:08pm 34 649 googleplus0 0


Human Rights Commissioner Chito Gascon, right, gets a stare from Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa as he reads his statement at the start of the Philippine Senate probe on extra judicial killings related to President Rodrigo Duterte's "War on Drugs" Monday, Aug. 22, 2016 in Pasay City, Philippines. AP/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines — The International Criminal Court (ICC) may possibly assume jurisdiction over the extrajudicial and vigilante killings of suspected drug dealers if the Philippine government fails to address the issue, the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) said.

"Failure of the government to address this situation currently prevailing of unexplained extrajudicial killings and providing remedies in terms of prosecution of perpetrators could result in the possibility of the ICC exercising jurisdiction over those matters if you fail to do so," CHR chairperson Chito Gascon told the Senate panel during its inquiry into drug-related killings.

Gascon noted that the Philippines must first satisfy the principle of "complementarity" under the Roman Statute, the treaty that established the ICC.

This means that the ICC is a court of "last resort" and may only assume jurisdiction in case a national government fails to address international crimes.

"The ICC may only exercise jurisdiction where national legal systems fail to do so, including where they purport to act but in reality are unwilling or unable to genuinely carry out proceedings," the ICC said in its informal expert paper on the principle of complementarity in practice.

The jurisdiction of the ICC is only limited to four types of cases: war crimes, genocide, aggression and crimes against humanity.

Senators have opened an inquiry into the killings of more than 1,700 suspected drug dealers and users amid a crackdown spearheaded by Duterte, with witnesses accusing some policemen of killing suspects and being involved in the illegal drugs trade.

READ MORE...

Gascon said that if the number of extrajudicial killings in the country will continue to increase, it may be considered as a situation of crimes against humanity.

The CHR chief explained that crimes against humanity must have widespread or systematic attacks on the civilian population.

According to Gascon, the ICC has the capacity to have motu propio jurisdiction over the Philippines which means that a complaint is not needed for it to take action over the country.

Like the United Nations, the ICC has mechanisms of monitoring concerning issues around the world, Gascon said.

RELATED:

NUJP to Cayetano: Counting drug-related killings part of media’s duty

| Human Rights Watch: Drug killings demand accountability

"If these concerns are not adequately addressed then it is possible that the prosecutor will make a recommendation for assumption of jurisdiction," Gascon said.

Citing former UN special rapporteur for extrajudicial killings Philip Alston, Gascon clarified that casualties of crime suspects may also be considered as extrajudicial killings.

"Ang sabi po ni Philip Alston sa kanyang report ay ang extrajudicial killing ay any killing by government forces as well the killing by any other groups or individuals which the government failed to investigate, prosecute and punish when it is in a position to do so," the CHR chairperson said. — Video report by Efigenio Toledo IV

 
CHR explains how ICC can assume jurisdiction on... by philstarnews
CHR explains how ICC can assume jurisdiction on killings in Philippines RepostLike Philstar.com

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Duterte to rights groups: Choose between safety, criminals' lives By Alexis Romero (philstar.com) | Updated August 24, 2016 - 8:27pm 11 363 googleplus0 0


In this Aug. 17, 2016 photo, President Rodrigo Duterte urges the Philippine National Police to continue the fight against crime and illegal drugs in his speech during the 115th Police Service Anniversary celebration at Camp Crame on Aug.17, 2016. PPD/King Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines — The comfort and safety of the population? Or the lives of criminals?

President Rodrigo Duterte on Wednesday asked human rights advocates to choose between the two as he justified his relentless war against drugs, which has been criticized for supposedly encouraging extrajudicial killings.

In a speech delivered at Camp Capinpin in Tanay, Rizal, Duterte said his critics are talking "nonsense" while security forces are risking their lives to protect the country from drugs.

"Nothing is free in this life. There's always a price to pay. You choose: Is it the comfort and safety of the population? Or the lives of criminals?" the president said.

"When you face these human rights advocates, their mouths and heads inflate and they talk nonsense. We are supposed to protect the integrity of our republic and the safety of the citizens there," he continued.

"We are 104 million (people). You give me a shit about—how many?—1,600 being killed there? You're not even sure how many of them died in encounters, how many committed suicide and how many were killed by those who were angry with them," he added.

AVERAGE 2 COPS DIE EVERYDAY IN ANTI-DRUG OPERATIONS

Duterte said security forces are also suffering casualties in the war against narcotics. He claimed that an average of two policemen die everyday in anti-drug operations.

"You work your ass to death, staking your life there, and then this will happen?" the chief executive said.

"These people just want to complain. I take full responsibility. Do your work… If you think there is a crime, shabu and if you have to shoot them, then shoot them. Just tell the truth," he added.

Duterte also shrugged off the Commission on Human Rights' (CHR) claim that an international court may investigate the killings in the country.

"Bugok 'yan (They are stupid). They have lawyers who don't have brains," the president said.

"You know genocide is when you do something similar to what is being done in Africa. You bomb with wanton abandon and kill people with no reason at all, you massacre women, you burn women for refusing to have sex," he added.

Duterte said there is no wanton killing of civilians in the country. He also hinted that drug personalities may be killing each other as operatives have planted intrigues within syndicates.

The president also disputed claims that his campaign against drugs are targeting only the poor.

"Don't give me a drama that you are poor. Rich or poor, I don't give a sh*t," he said.

Duterte said many of the drug personalities are poor because there is a target market for narcotics in their area. He added that the big-time drug lords are operating from abroad and only their lieutenants are in the country.

On Wednesday, human rights group Amnesty International reminded the Philippine government that extrajudicial execution is a crime under international law.


PHILSTAR

‘How do you arrest someone who’s already in jail? By Paolo Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 24, 2016 - 12:00am 0 1 googleplus0 0


Philippine National Police Chief Ronald Dela Rosa gestures at the continuing Senate probe on the rising number of extrajudicial killings related to Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's "War on Drugs" Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016 in suburban Pasay city south of Manila, Philippines. Philippine senators have opened an inquiry into the killings of more than 1,700 suspected drug dealers and users amid a crackdown spearheaded by Duterte, with witnesses accusing some policemen of killing suspects and being involved in the illegal drugs trade. AP Photo/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines – Stopping convicted felons from doing business inside the New Bilibid Prison (NBP) is a big challenge in the government’s war against illegal drugs, Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald dela Rosa admitted yesterday.

“All roads point to the Bilibid… How do you arrest one who is already in jail? How do you convict one who is already convicted?” Dela Rosa said when asked about the center of illegal drugs in the country.

The question came from Sen. Richard Gordon during the second day of hearings on extrajudicial killings amid President Duterte’s war on drugs, presided over by Sen. Leila de Lima as chair of the committee on justice and human rights.

De Lima was accused by Duterte of benefiting from protection money allegedly collected by her former driver-bodyguard and supposed lover, Ronnie Palisoc Dayan, from drug lords at the NBP.

De Lima, who had supervision over the NBP when she was justice secretary, denied the allegations. But she was also put on the spot during the hearing when her track record in fighting illegal drugs as justice secretary of the Aquino administration was tackled.

Dela Rosa said while stringent measures had been put in place at the NBP to suppress drug convicts, the PNP was not letting its guard down.

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Gordon asked Dela Rosa whether he believed the drug problem in the country worsened because of inaction or failure of various government agencies in the last 10 years.

The senator cited several cases as well as admissions from government officials themselves that convicted drug lords were running their syndicates from the NBP and other jails while enjoying special treatment from guards.

“I think there was some failure of concerned agencies,” Dela Rosa said in Filipino.

“You have to tell us straight. What happened that we’ve reached the point that we have 3.7 million Filipinos affected (by illegal drugs)?” Gordon responded.

He also asked Dela Rosa whether he was aware that government was able to seize ill-gotten assets of drug convicts in the past years, and the PNP chief replied in the negative.

De Lima, who felt alluded to by the questions, defended her record in cleansing the NBP of illegal drugs and other contraband.

She maintained that she had personally led raids at the NBP to seize firearms and other contraband and to make sure convicted drug lords could not continue running their syndicates.

Dela Rosa said convicted drug lords like Peter Co saw their business crippled owing to the deployment of the PNP Special Action Force commandos at the NBP.

He said it would have been better if the deployment of the SAF was done much earlier.

“We thought of that but we had to consult our lawyers,” De Lima responded.

Meanwhile, whistle-blower Sandra Cam said she was willing to join De Lima even in “hell” as she asked the senator to be fair in the investigation.


SANDRA CAM, LEOLA DE LIMA

Cam, guest of the weekly forum “Newsbreak sa Cherry Blossoms” hosted by the Manila City Hall Press Corps, said the country’s problem on illegal drugs would not have deteriorated had the senators listened to her.

“Now, I really feel vindicated,” Cam said, noting she had long wanted to talk about the alleged involvement of De Lima in illegal drugs, but none of the senators listened to her.

According to Cam, she does not care about De Lima’s illicit affair but what she wants is to prove the senator’s involvement in the corruption inside the Bureau of Corrections (BuCor) and that of her driver.

Cam also challenged the senators who prevented her from speaking about the drug problem and corruption inside the BuCor to face her.

“I am just waiting for Congress and the Senate to call me. I want (it to be) fair and square. I will join them even in hell,” Cam said.

Cam said she would reveal more of what she knew about the BuCor anomalies on the first week of September.

She assailed Sen. Antonio Trillanes IV for questioning the PNP’s war against drugs where the lives of policemen were being placed in danger.

But “I support the proposal to subject to firing squad all the police scalawags,” Cam said. – With Jose Rodel Clapano

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Senate hearing on drugs shows ‘working democracy,’ says priest By: Yuji Vincent Gonzales
@YGonzalesINQ INQUIRER.net 04:35 PM August 25th, 2016


More witnesses face the Senate as the investigation on extrajudicial killings resumes. MAILA AGER/INQUIRER.net

A Catholic priest on Thursday called the Senate inquiry into the government’s bloody war on drugs as an indication of a “working democracy.”

Fr. Jerome Secillano, executive secretary of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines Permanent Committee on Public Affairs, expressed alarm that extrajudicial killings might be the “new normal” if institutions like the Senate did not push through with their investigation.


Fr. Jerome R. Secillano, executive secretary of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines

“I support the ongoing Senate investigation on extrajudicial killings because it shows that we have a working democracy. If other State institutions would do nothing about the spate of killings in the country, then killing extra-judicially would become the ‘new normal’ in our society especially with the public’s apparent acceptance of it,” Secillano said over church-run Radyo Veritas.

Led by Sen. Leila de Lima as chair of the committee on justice and human rights, the Senate committees on justice and public order started the hearing this week, amid a mounting body count in the Duterte administration’s relentless antidrug drive.

READ: De Lima denounces summary execution

Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano sought De Lima to inhibit from the investigation amid allegations of drug links and personal tirades from no less than the President himself.

Secillano said the Senate hearing was a first step in upholding human rights and due process for suspected drug perpetrators.

READ: Human rights is the ‘price to pay’ for safety–Duterte

“Although the investigation will not lead us to conclusive findings that extrajudicial killings are perpetrated by government operatives, at least this hearing will temper any attempt to railroad due process and the simple disregard for man’s basic right to life,” he said.

On Tuesday’s hearing, Philippine National Police chief Ronald de la Rosa said there had been 1,067 killings by unidentified individuals and 712 killings by police since July 1, when Duterte took office. The Inquirer’s “Kill List” counts 729 drug-related deaths from June 30 to August 22. IDL/rga

READ: THE KILL LIST


INQUIRER

756 who ‘resisted’ killed
[BATO: THEY ONLY HAVE THEMSELVES TO BLAME]
SHARES: 66 VIEW COMMENTS By: Tarra Quismundo @TarraINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:20 AM August 24th, 2016


PNP chief Director Gen. Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa with PO1 Alipio Balo, PO1 Michael Tomas during the hearing on extrajudicial killings at the Senate session hall, Pasay City. INQUIRER PHOTO/LYN RILLON

“IF THEY did not resist, they would still be alive.”

That’s how Philippine National Police Director General Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa explained on Tuesday why 756 “drug personalities” had been killed since the war on illegal drugs was launched when President Duterte took office, fulfilling a campaign promise that catapulted him to the presidency.

Sen. Leila de Lima, chair of the committee on justice and human rights, said: “Yes, there are cases when suspects resisted, or attempted to fight off arrest. But you’re telling us, you’re putting on record that in 756 deaths, the circumstances were such that they resisted?”

Dela Rosa said, “Yes.”

“Unless controverted by evidence, I presume my men are performing regularly,” he told De Lima on the second day of the Senate hearing she called to expose police “scalawags” involved in alleged extrajudicial killings that had accompanied Mr. Duterte’s drive to stamp out the narcotics trade in three to six months of his presidency.

Dela Rosa said each incident was being investigated by the PNP Internal Affairs Service (IAS).

Two women, wearing smoke glasses and shawls wrapped around their heads were called by De Lima on Monday to testify against policemen allegedly out to kill their drug pushers and dealers to cover their tracks in Mr. Duterte’s unprecedented crackdown on illegal narcotics.

Officials said there were at least 1.3 million Filipino drug users.

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About 26 percent of the nation’s 42,000 barangays, mostly in urban centers, had been classified as “drug-affected.”

Watch list

One woman said her partner and his father were tortured and killed under police custody. Another said policemen brought “shabu” (methamphetamine hydrocloride) to their Antipolo home for repacking and selling by her parents who disappeared after telling her they were going to hand over sales proceeds of P50,000 to the lawmen.

Dela Rosa said 301 police officers were on a watch list on suspicion of selling drugs confiscated in raids or protecting syndicates involved in the manufacture and distribution of narcotics.

He said 20 of them had been arrested, 11 killed in police operations, seven charged with criminal offenses and six slapped with administrative cases.

Chief Supt. Leo Angelo Leuterio, PNP-IAS chief, said 569 police operations involving the 756 deaths recorded from July 1 to Aug. 22, were already investigated and proven to be “legitimate.”

In an updated report, Dela Rosa said 1,160 other deaths had been recorded since July 1 other than those killed in police operations, putting the overall toll of lives at 1,916. He said these were not all drug-related. The others were shooting, stabbing, hacking and strangulation cases still under investigation.

‘Chilling effect’

“This has a chilling effect,” Sen. Franklin Drilon said. “We are all concerned about the number of deaths, by any language this is alarming.”

Sen. Panfilo Lacson, a former PNP chief, noted that as Dela Rosa had revealed, nine police officers had been killed and 18 wounded in antidrug operations from July 1 to Aug. 18. The military had also lost three men in action, while eight others were wounded.

“The fact that there were nine dead, it means there really was resistance. But it doesn’t follow that if no police officer was injured or killed in an operation where a suspect had died, there was really no resistance,” Lacson said.

‘We’re not butchers’

Responding to Sen. Francis Escudero’s question, Dela Rosa said the PNP was not in the business of summary executions. “We are not butchers,” he said.

The PNP chief dismissed as “rhetoric” Mr. Duterte’s threats that he would kill those involved in illegal drugs. “Perhaps the President just said that to scare drug personalities, so that they would surrender,” Dela Rosa said.

He said intensified operations against drug pushers and peddlers had driven down the crime rate.

“As we review the index crime volume of July this year, we see that there is a decrease of 31 percent from last year which is also an indication of the success of our antidrug campaign,” Dela Rosa said.

The figure represents a drop in cases such as robberies, rape, physical injuries, theft cases and car theft incidents.

Crime rate down

Zeroing in on the first month of the Duterte administration, he said the difference in crime figures was even more stark: a 49 percent decrease comparing the second half of 2015 and the first few weeks of the new government, covering July 1 to Aug. 7.

PNP figures on the antidrug operations are staggering: 673,978 users and pushers who surrendered to authorities, and 11,784 arrested users and pushers.

These include surrenders and arrests in the country’s drug hotbeds, including Metro Manila, where 94 percent of the 1,709 barangays are affected by drugs.

There were 38,766 recorded surrenders of drug suspects in Metro Manila from July 1 to Aug. 22, 2,927 arrests, and 230 slain in police operations.

After the five-hour hearing, De Lima said nine more witnesses were expected to testify at the inquiry, while several “feelers” from more witnesses were being verified.

 
https://youtu.be/fxEH67y4EWM
Bato: Kill threat mere ‘rhetoric,’ part of ‘psy war’
 INQUIRER.net INQUIRER.net Subscribe62,260 Add to Share More 337 views 4 0 Published on Aug 23, 2016 Video and editing by RYAN LEAGOGO

 
https://youtu.be/InBlBpdv6Go?list=PLz3YOVDOo1Uvo71Fg9pLOipvhsxzM6wlu
Bato: If suspects didn't resist arrest they would be alive INQUIRER.net INQUIRER.net Subscribe62,260 Add to Share More 314 views 5 0 Published on Aug 23, 2016 The more than 700 drug suspects killed during police operations are presumed to have resisted arrest, Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald “Bato” de la Rosa tells a Senate hearing.
Video and editing by RYAN LEAGOGO

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RELATED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

PNP Chief says 12 lawmen killed in drug campaign August 24, 2016 Share2 Tweet0 Share1 Email0 Share84 By Chito A. Chavez and Hannah L. Torregoza


MOMENT OF TRUTH — Director General Ronald ‘Bato’ dela Rosa, Philippine National Police (PNP) chief, looks at Police Officer 2 Alipio Balo Jr. straight in the eye as the Pasay City policeman and his colleague PO1 Michael Tomas explain themselves before the Senate hearing into extrajudicial killings yesterday. PO1s Balo and Tomas faced the investigative hearing over their involvement in the alleged summary execution case of father-and-son drug suspects in Pasay City, recently. (Jansen Romero / mb.com.ph)

The National Police Commission (Napolcom) has found probable cause to indict Director Joel Pagdilao and Chief Superintendent Edgardo Tinio – two of five police officers linked by President Duterte to the illegal drug trade.

Charges of serious neglect of duty, serious irregularity in the conduct of duty and conduct unbecoming of a police officer with penalties ranging from suspension to dismissal from the service were slapped against the two generals.

Pagdilao was the former director of the National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) while Tinio formerly headed the Quezon City Police District (QCPD). The two officials denied the allegations against them.

Lawyer Johnson Reyes, service director of Napolcom’s Inspection, Monitoring and Investigation Service (IMIS) said their findings would be forwarded and filed before the commission’s En Banc.

The IMIS recommended the filing of charges against Pagdilao and Tinio after circumstantial, testimonial and direct evidence gathered were deemed strong to charge the two generals administratively.

But Reyes said they found no evidence that the two generals “had a direct participation as protector of drug syndicates.”

Before filing the administrative case before the Commission En Banc, Reyes explained a Presidential Clearance must first be secured through the Executive Secretary as Pagdilao and Tinio are presidential appointees.

Two ad hoc committees will also be formed to receive and analyze the position papers that would be submitted by the two police officials before being coursed through the En Banc for resolution after a “trial type proceedings.”

He added that Pagdilao and Tinio may also file a motion for reconsideration (MR) if the commission En Banc upholds IMIS’ findings while the criminal charges against them will be filed through the Department of Justice (DoJ).

Interior Secretary Mike Sueno said they are still finalizing the case against Director Bernardo Diaz, the third active PNP official whom the President linked to illegal drugs.

Sueno said they “have the goods” against Diaz.

As for ex-PNP training service head Chief Superintendent Vicente Loot who is now Mayor of Daanbantayan town in Cebu, Sueno said his security detail has been removed and so is his supervision over the police. The PNP also cancelled his permit to own guns and currently undergoing a lifestyle check.

Meanwhile the PNP’s Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) is investigating the accusation against retired General Marcelo Garbo.

The Department of Justice has started its probe against the five narco-generals.

12 KILLED, 25 WOUNDED

At the resumption of the Senate hearing on extrajudicial killings, PNP Chief Director General Ronald Dela Rosa said law enforcers are also victims in the government’s intensified campaign against illegal drugs.

“Our own people are also victims, they are also killed. This is just to illustrate that there is indeed a clear danger on the lives of our men in the operations against illegal drugs,” Dela Rosa told senators.

Citing latest PNP figures, De la Rosa said nine police operatives and three soldiers have already been killed and an over-all 25 personnel wounded in anti-drug operations.

“This is just to illustrate that there is indeed a clear danger on the lives of our men in the operations against illegal drugs,” he emphasized using a Power Point presentation.

But as figures soar, Dela Rosa reported a 31 percent decrease in index crimes which indicates success in the government’s anti-illegal drugs campaign.

He said under the PNP’s “double barrel” campaign, the police were able to persuade a total of 673,978 drug personalities to surrender and undergo processing at the police stations. The total number of users and pushers arrested are now at 11,784 while those killed in legitimate police operations total to 756.

“And contrary to the perception of some sectors of the society, the Police Operations in Double Barrel would show that the focus is really on the Project Tokhang or in the conduct of house visitations in order to persuade users and pushers to stop with their illegal activity as there are more surrenders and arrested than killed Drug Personalities as a result of the police operations,” he said.

De la Rosa also said one high value target named Mico Tan was killed during the conduct of a police operation while 32 were arrested, nine of whom are Chinese nationals.

Of the 756 killed in legitimate operations, 569 are under investigation by the PNP-Internal Affairs Services (IAS). The lack of manpower has made it difficult for the agency to probe all cases.

The PNP Chief said the general public has expressed appreciation and strong support for the anti-drugs campaign.

NO ENCROACHMENT

Meanwhile, Sen. Joseph Victor Ejercito expressed strong reservations yesterday that the on-going Senate inquiry into alleged summary killings of persons linked to the illegal drug trade by law enforcement agents might encroach on similar investigations by the Commission on Human Rights (CHR).

Ejercito and Sen. Panfilo M. Lacson expressed their concern that the Senate probe may cause the government’s anti-illegal drugs campaign to lose momentum.

“I’m just worried and I am hoping that this would not hamper or stop the momentum of the Philippine National Police and other agencies in the war against drugs,” Ejercito said.

“You know, it’s only now. This is unprecedented because I have been a mayor myself for nine years, and this is the first time… that the PNP is gaining so much ground in its war against drugs,” he added.

Ejercito said he wants to make sure that there is no possible encroachment of jurisdiction by the Senate as the CHR and other agencies are already investigating the alleged extra-judicial killings.(With reports from Mario B. Casayuran and Jeffrey G. Damicog)


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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