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(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

THE DRUG WAR: 6 MAYOR'S MEN DIE IN LEYTE
[RELATED: Incumbent, former Lanao del Sur mayors surrender to PNP]


AUGUST 4 -TO DIE FOR. Mayor Rolando Espinosa arrives at the CIDG office in Camp Crame to face investigation on his alleged drug-dealing activities while six of his men guarding the family compound lie dead a few hours earlier after a shootout with Leyte policemen. Mel Caspe and Lino Santos
Six men working for Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. were killed in a shootout with police outside the mayor’s house, the Leyte Provincial Police Office said Wednesday. The encounter took place at 5:30 a.m. at Sitio Tinago, Barangay Binulho, Albuera, Leyte, inside the compound of the Espinosa residence, said Senior Supt. Franco Simborio.Police seized 13 high-powered firearms and four .45 caliber pistols after the shootout.
“The situation is still dangerous because the mayor’s men might still be lurking around the area,” Simborio told the Manila Standard in Filipino. “According to our men on the ground, the mayor has about 50 men who are still be hunted.”  President Rodrigo Duterte had earlier called on the mayor and his son Kerwin to surrender or be shot dead. Duterte issued the warning after Espinosa’s two bodyguards and three employees were arrested in a buy-bust operation that netted P1.9 million worth of shabu. Mayor Espinosa surrendered Tuesday after being linked to the illegal drug trade. Philippine National Police chief Ronald dela Rosa said Espinos was on Duterte’s list of local officials who protect the illegal drug trade. Espinosa’s son, Kerwin, is still at large and is wanted on illegal drug charges. Dela Rosa said Kerwin, whom he identified as the “No. 1 drug lord in Eastern Visayas,” to surrender “or he will really be killed.” The younger Espinosa is said to have flown to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on June 21, more than two weeks before Duterte assumed the presidency.READ MORE...RELATED, Incumbent, former Lanao del Sur mayors surrender to PNP...

ALSO: Duterte blasts Roxas' ally; slams 'oligarchs' anew
[RELATED: Ongpin daughter quits; Rody tags Mar Roxas backer]


AUGUST 6 -MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte has fired another broadside at "oligarchs" and vowed to go after them during his term.  "I will destroy oligarchs," the President told a crowd of soldiers at the Camp Lapu Lapu in Cebu City on Friday evening. An oligarch is defined as a person who belongs to a small group of people who govern or control a business enterprise. Duterte said oligarchs are those who "make money at the expense of the poor." Duterte earlier tagged business tycoon Roberto Ongpin as among the oligarchs on his list. Duterte named another alleged oligarch in his speech -- Eric Gutierrez, a mining company owner and ally of defeated presidential candidate Mar Roxas. "Tingnan mo itong si Gutierrez, isa pa iyang oligarch," Duterte said. "Nagpasok ng eroplano, walang bayad. Nagpasok ng chopper, walang bayad. Nagmina doon sa Agusan, sinira 'yun." "Kayong mga manloloko sa Pilipino ang mga oligarch. Kayong mga Pilipinong hindi nagbabayad ng buwis," he added. Gutierrez owns the jets Roxas used during his campaign. The former interior secretary clarified that he paid for the use of the jets, but admitted that he is friends with Gutierrez. Gutierrez reportedly is part owner of SR Metals Inc. (SRMI), and its subsidiaries San R Minin and Galeo Mining Equipment Corp. which operate nickel quarries in Tubay, Agusan del Norte. WAR AGAINST OLIGARCHS Duterte on Wednesday started his tirades against these so-called oligarchs, singling out Ongpin. Gutierrez was the next to be named. “I’ll give you an example, publicly, Ongpin, Roberto. Malakas kay [Ferdinand] Marcos noon, trade minister, I think. Malakas sa succession: [During] Ramos he was a hanger on and kay Gloria [Arroyo], PNoy. Now he owns the online [gambling],” he said. “These are the guys na umuupo lang sa eroplano nila, umuupo lang sa mga mansion nila kung saan-saan yung pera nila nagpapatak, parang metro ng taxi. READ MORE...RELATED, Shoot-to-kill order out for narco-pols... RELATED(2): Ongpin daughter quits; Rody tags Mar backer...

ALSO: After his cousin on drug list, Drilon tells Duterte: Observe due process
[Duterte: “Iyong due process has nothing to do with my mouth. No proceedings dito, no abogado,” (watch video)
[RELATED: LIST Duterte names officials allegedly involved in drug trade]


AUGUST 7 -After a close relative appeared on the list of suspected illegal drugs personalities named publicly by President Rodrigo Duterte, Senate President Pro Tempore Franklin Drilon on Sunday urged the chief executive to observe due process and the rule of law.
In a statement, Drilon said: “I strongly support President Duterte's anti-drug campaign but due process and the rule of law must be dutifully upheld.”  “I urge the President that if there is evidence that these officials were involved in the drug trade, he should immediately charge them administratively or in court,” Drilon said. But Drilon stressed that “there should be no shortcuts.”  “Charges must be filed if evidence warrants it, so that the accused will be given the opportunity to defend themselves and clear their names. Let the chips fall where they may,” he said.  While in Davao City visiting the wake of soldiers killed fighting communist insurgents, Duterte read out a list of judges, mayors, congressmen, and both retired and active police officers allegedly involved in drug trade. President Duterte said while “it might be true, it might not be true” that the more than 150 personalities he named were linked to drugs, it was his duty to tell the truth to the Filipino people. Duterte said he read the list publicly because his “mouth has no due process.” “Iyong due process has nothing to do with my mouth. Walang proceedings dito, walang abogado,” he said. READ MORE...VIDEO....RELATED, LIST Duterte names officials allegedly involved in drug trade...

ALSO: Duterte assured public he's looking into drug deaths
[RELATED: Duterte acknowledges abuses in drug war]


AUGUST 4 -MALACAÑANG on Wednesday assured the public President Rodrigo Duterte is looking into the spate of extrajudicial killings involving alleged drug suspects. Speaking to reporters, presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said Duterte is “aware” of these killings and is in touch with law enforcement agencies.“He is actually in touch with the hierarchy of authority and he communicates exactly where he stands. He is ensuring the process is duly carried out by being personally in touch with those in charge,” Abella said in a new conference.Abella issued the statement after Sen. Leila de Lima filed a resolution to investigate the killing of drug suspects nationwide.De Lima, in her first privilege speech as senator on Tuesday, blasted the Duterte administration’s “do-it-yourself justice system” and for portraying her as a coddler of drug lords.President Duterte himself welcomed a possible Senate probe on extrajudicial killings. In a speech in Malacañang, Duterte said de Lima could go ahead and investigate.“I do not blame Senator de Lima, it’s her job,” Duterte said. Two Senate committees, including the justice and human rights committee chaired by de Lima, are scheduled to conduct the investigation in mid-August. READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte acknowledges abuses in drug war...

ALSO LOOK: Arsenal of guns found outside 'narco' mayor's house.
[RELATED, DU30: ‘Killer President’ better than video games junkie]


AUGUST 3 -Weapons found outside the house of Albuera, Leyte mayor Rolando Espinosa. Photo by Ranulfo Docdocan, ABS-CBN News. Six people were killed in an encounter between policemen and men believed to be hired by Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa. Espinosa, accused of coddling drug rings, surrendered Tuesday, following President Rodrigo Duterte's order. The Philippine National Police (PNP) confirmed that all six fatalities were Espinosa's men, who supposedly exchanged gunfire in Sitio Tinago, Barangay Binolho at around 5:30 a.m. Espinosa, meanwhile, denied that the fatalities were his men. Here are the weapons found in the site of the encounter: MORE PHOTOS...RELATED, DU30: ‘Killer President’ better than video games junkie...

ALSO: Mexican drug cartel using PH as transshipment point – Duterte
[“I am not fighting a crisis, I am fighting a war,” Duterte said.]
[RELATED: AFP: Military personnel on Duterte's drug list ordered relieved]


AUGUST 5 -President Duterte said the Mexican drug cartel Sinaloa has made inroads in the country, establishing a transshipment point for its global network. “Is Mexico into us? Yes. The Sinaloa drug cartel of Mexico,” Duterte said in a speech on Wednesday before members of the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV) in Malacañang.
He said the drug syndicate is shifting focus away from its main market, the United States, because of intensified anti-narcotic operations there. “Tayo ang transshipment. Kasi ini-interdict sila ng Amerika,” the President said. Duterte first confirmed the presence of the Mexican cartel in the country when he visited Camp Guillermo Nakar in Lucena, Quezon, last week. The Sinaloa is one of the biggest drug trafficking organizations in Mexico. It is involved in the importation of marijuana, heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine or shabu. “I am not fighting a crisis, I am fighting a war,” Duterte said. He said he is willing to put his “honor, life and the presidency” in waging war against drugs. The only way to win the war is by denying narcotics syndicates their market, the President said, “and before I can do that, I have to exterminate the apparatus… kung mapatay ko na lahat tong mga tinyente (if I get all these lieutenants killed) then the business of shabu would no longer be viable.” Amid the growing outcry against the spate of extrajudicial killings of users and small drug dealers, the President stressed that “poverty and whatever cannot be used” as an excuse to go into the drug trade “because it is already the nation that you are trying to destroy by being a member of that apparatus.” The President said he has ordered that areas in military camps be set aside for the building of rehabilitation centers for the thousands of drug dependents who have surrendered to the authorities. READ MORE...RELATED, AFP: Military personnel on Duterte's drug list ordered relieved...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Drug war: 6 mayor’s men die in Leyte


TO DIE FOR. Mayor Rolando Espinosa arrives at the CIDG office in Camp Crame to face investigation on his alleged drug-dealing activities while six of his men guarding the family compound lie dead a few hours earlier after a shootout with Leyte policemen. Mel Caspe and Lino Santos

TACLOBAN CITY, AUGUST 8, 2016 (MANILA STANDARD) posted August 04, 2016 at 12:01 am by Mel Caspe - Six men working for Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. were killed in a shootout with police outside the mayor’s house, the Leyte Provincial Police Office said Wednesday.

The encounter took place at 5:30 a.m. at Sitio Tinago, Barangay Binulho, Albuera, Leyte, inside the compound of the Espinosa residence, said Senior Supt. Franco Simborio.

Police seized 13 high-powered firearms and four .45 caliber pistols after the shootout.

“The situation is still dangerous because the mayor’s men might still be lurking around the area,” Simborio told the Manila Standard in Filipino. “According to our men on the ground, the mayor has about 50 men who are still be hunted.”

President Rodrigo Duterte had earlier called on the mayor and his son Kerwin to surrender or be shot dead.

Duterte issued the warning after Espinosa’s two bodyguards and three employees were arrested in a buy-bust operation that netted P1.9 million worth of shabu.

Mayor Espinosa surrendered Tuesday after being linked to the illegal drug trade.

Philippine National Police chief Ronald dela Rosa said Espinos was on Duterte’s list of local officials who protect the illegal drug trade.

Espinosa’s son, Kerwin, is still at large and is wanted on illegal drug charges.

Dela Rosa said Kerwin, whom he identified as the “No. 1 drug lord in Eastern Visayas,” to surrender “or he will really be killed.”

The younger Espinosa is said to have flown to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on June 21, more than two weeks before Duterte assumed the presidency.

READ MORE...



A spokesman for the Foreign Affairs Department, Charles Jose, said his passport had not been canceled and that he was free to travel because no court has ordered the documents revoked.

“Only the courts can instruct the DFA to cancel a Philippine passport. There must be a case first,” Jose said in a text message.

The Bureau of Immigration said that Espinosa was allowed to leave the country since there was no court order to include him on the bureau’s hold departure list.

The mayor, in police custody, has admitted having knowledge of his son’s illegal drug activities.

Hundreds of suspected drug users and pushers have been killed in an aggressive nationwide anti-drug campaign since Duterte took power with a pledge to wipe out lawlessness.



The rising body count has alarmed human rights groups, which called on the United Nations to condemn Duterte’s anti-crime policies.

Dela Rosa, in a live news conference with Espinosa, addressed the mayor’s son directly.

“If you’re listening now Kerwin, your father has already surrendered so you should follow your father,” he said.

“If you don’t surrender you will die so better surrender because your life is really in danger.”

The mayor was the second high-profile drug suspect to turn himself in after being accused of drugs-related crimes by Duterte.

Last month, in a meeting also aired on national television, the President told a businessman he would “finish [him] off” unless he stopped dealing in drugs. The businessman denied the allegations.

Police said more than 100,000 other people have also surrendered to the local authorities and pledged to stop using illegal drugs.

Senator Panfilo Lacson, a former police chief, said he sees the eradication of illegal drugs if the administration maintains its momentum.

“At the rate our law enforcement agencies are going in their anti-drugs operations, a drug-free Philippines has now become a possibility,” Lacson said in a text message sent to reporters.

But Lacson said the growing number of vigilante killings was alarming.

“I implore the PNP to conduct appropriate investigations in relation to these killings. Certainly, the more than 200 cases of salvaging and summary executions by vigilantes in a period of one month alone should alarm our citizenry,” Lacson said.

He said the police must show that they are not tolerating the vigilantes by building up the evidence against them so they can be charged in court.

Lacson also said the police “should be presumed to be performing their duties with regularity and should not be unduly accused of violating due process without basis.”

The Senate committee on justice headed by Senator Leila de Lima will investigate the spate of killings involving alleged drug pushers and users. With Macon Ramos-Araneta, Vito Barcelo, PNA

-------------------------------

RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Incumbent, former Lanao del Sur mayors surrender to PNP By Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) | Updated August 5, 2016 - 5:08pm 1 77 googleplus0 0


Philippine National Police chief Director General Ronald "Bato" dela Rosa said that more mayors allegedly involved in the illegal drug trade are expected to surrender. File photo

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATE 2 5:42 p.m.) — An incumbent and a former mayor of separate municipalities in Lanao del Sur surrendered to the Philippine National Police (PNP) on Friday in connection with their involvement in the illegal drug trade.

PNP chief Director General Ronald "Bato" Dela Rosa said that Maguing Mayor Mamaulan Molok and former Marantao Mayor Mohammadali Abinal surrendered after finding out that their names were included in President Rodrigo Duterte's drugs watch list.

"They come in peace, gusto nila tumulong. Nag-surrender sila," Dela Rosa said in a televised press conference.

Molok and Abinal both admitted that they have been involved in the narcotics drug trade in various areas in the country including Quiapo in Manila, Caloocan City and Cavite from 2000 to 2002.

The two "narco-politicians" clarified that they are no longer involved in the illegal drug trade and volunteered to head the war against drugs.

"According to them right now they are no longer involved but before they have been involved... They promised to me that they will spearhead the anti-drug campaign. They will be the ones leading the war against drugs in their respective municipalities," Dela Rosa said.

"Willing ako pumunta dito. Suportahan ko yung programa ng presidente na si Rodrigo Duterte at si Chief PNP General Bato," Abinal told members of the press.

Meanwhile, Molok vowed to encourage drug users and dealers in his own municipality to surrender to the police.

The Lanao del Sur local executives will be turned over to the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group of the PNP and will undergo custodial investigation.

Dela Rosa said that more mayors allegedly involved in the illegal drug trade are expected to surrender on Monday.

Duterte earlier issued a shoot-on-sight order for "narco-politicians" included in his watch list who would refuse to surrender.

Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella defended Duterte's order and stressed that it was part of the president's policy of maintaining peace and order in the country.


PHILSTAR

Duterte blasts Roxas' ally; slams 'oligarchs' anew ABS-CBN News Posted at Aug 06 2016 12:54 AM | Updated as of Aug 06 2016 01:20 AM

MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte has fired another broadside at "oligarchs" and vowed to go after them during his term.

 "I will destroy oligarchs," the President told a crowd of soldiers at the Camp Lapu Lapu in Cebu City on Friday evening. An oligarch is defined as a person who belongs to a small group of people who govern or control a business enterprise. Duterte said oligarchs are those who "make money at the expense of the poor."

Duterte earlier tagged business tycoon Roberto Ongpin as among the oligarchs on his list. Duterte named another alleged oligarch in his speech -- Eric Gutierrez, a mining company owner and ally of defeated presidential candidate Mar Roxas.

"Tingnan mo itong si Gutierrez, isa pa iyang oligarch," Duterte said. "Nagpasok ng eroplano, walang bayad. Nagpasok ng chopper, walang bayad. Nagmina doon sa Agusan, sinira 'yun." "Kayong mga manloloko sa Pilipino ang mga oligarch.

 Kayong mga Pilipinong hindi nagbabayad ng buwis," he added. Gutierrez owns the jets Roxas used during his campaign. The former interior secretary clarified that he paid for the use of the jets, but admitted that he is friends with Gutierrez.

Gutierrez reportedly is part owner of SR Metals Inc. (SRMI), and its subsidiaries San R Minin and Galeo Mining Equipment Corp. which operate nickel quarries in Tubay, Agusan del Norte. WAR AGAINST OLIGARCHS Duterte on Wednesday started his tirades against these so-called oligarchs, singling out Ongpin. Gutierrez was the next to be named.


Mar Roxas and Rep. Edgar Erice, business partner of billionaire miner Eric Gutierrez -HEADLINE: ROXAS ADMITS TIES WITH BILLIONAIRE ILLEGAL MINER February 24, 2016 · by topnewsnow! ·

“I’ll give you an example, publicly, Ongpin, Roberto. Malakas kay [Ferdinand] Marcos noon, trade minister, I think. Malakas sa succession: [During] Ramos he was a hanger on and kay Gloria [Arroyo], PNoy. Now he owns the online [gambling],” he said. “These are the guys na umuupo lang sa eroplano nila, umuupo lang sa mga mansion nila kung saan-saan yung pera nila nagpapatak, parang metro ng taxi.

READ MORE...

Sabi ko, destroy,” he added. Ongpin has since resigned his post as top executive of PhilWeb Corp. on Thursday, following Duterte's speech and a plunge on the online gaming company's shares. READ: Ongpin resigns from PhilWeb after Duterte blasts 'oligarchs' PhilWeb shares plunged by as much as 50 percent, before closing 36.88 percent lower to P8.95. It was the stock's steepest decline on record according to Bloomberg. Ongpin, a trade minister during the Marcos dictatorship, announced his resignation as company chairman and director in a disclosure to the stock exchange. He did not give a reason for his decision.

Before his tirade on Wednesday, Duterte said in June that he would stop online gambling and since then, regulators have renewed the company’s license on a per-month basis. On Friday's speech, Duterte criticized Ongpin once more, but commended his resignation from PhilWeb.


GMA NEWS

COUSIN INCLUDED IN L DRUG LIST Drilon tells Duterte: Observe due process Published August 7, 2016 3:03pm By KATHRINA CHARMAINE ALVAREZ, GMA News


After a close relative appeared on the list of suspected illegal drugs personalities named publicly by President Rodrigo Duterte, Senate President Pro Tempore Franklin Drilon on Sunday urged the chief executive to observe due process and the rule of law.

In a statement, Drilon said: “I strongly support President Duterte's anti-drug campaign but due process and the rule of law must be dutifully upheld.”

“I urge the President that if there is evidence that these officials were involved in the drug trade, he should immediately charge them administratively or in court,” Drilon said.

But Drilon stressed that “there should be no shortcuts.”

“Charges must be filed if evidence warrants it, so that the accused will be given the opportunity to defend themselves and clear their names. Let the chips fall where they may,” he said.

While in Davao City visiting the wake of soldiers killed fighting communist insurgents, Duterte read out a list of judges, mayors, congressmen, and both retired and active police officers allegedly involved in drug trade.

President Duterte said while “it might be true, it might not be true” that the more than 150 personalities he named were linked to drugs, it was his duty to tell the truth to the Filipino people.

Duterte said he read the list publicly because his “mouth has no due process.” “Iyong due process has nothing to do with my mouth. Walang proceedings dito, walang abogado,” he said.

READ MORE...

Included in the list was Iloilo City Mayor Jed Mabilog, a second cousin of Drilon.

Mabilog has denied the allegation.

On the other hand, Drilon said he feels “saddened” that the perception that some local officials of Iloilo are involved in the drug trade could become the basis of a sweeping description of the province.

“Whatever these officials may have allegedly done are their individual acts, and cannot be the collective guilt of the Ilongos,” he said.

Also named by Duterte from Iloilo are Mayors Sigfredo Betita of Carles, Alex Centena of Calinog, and Mariano Malones of Maasin; Judge Savillo of Regional Trial Court Branch 13; Vice Mayor Francis Ansing Amboy of Maasin; Attorney Antonio Pesina; and Erwin “Tongtong” Plagata. — LBG, GMA News

 
https://youtu.be/YNRzuyFErXk

-------------------------------

RELATED FROM GMA NEWS ONLINE

LIST Duterte names officials allegedly involved in drug trade Published August 7, 2016 6:05am


President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday named current and former officials allegedly involved in the drug trade. Listed below are all the officials as read by Duterte.

-Judge Mopas of Dasmarinas Cavite Judge Reyes (only known)
-Baguio City Judge Savilo
- RTC branch 13 Iloilo City Judge Casiple
- Kalibo, Aklan Judge Rene Gonzales
- MTC Judge Navidad
- RTC Calbayog City Judge Exequiel Dagala
- MTC Judge Dapa
- Siargao Mayor Reynaldo Flores
- Naguilian, La Union Mayor Dante Garcia
- Tubao, La Union Mayor Martin De Guzman
- Bauang, La Union Mayor Marjorie Apel Salazar
- Lasam, Cagayan Mayor Goto Violago
- San Rafael, Bulacan Mayor Marino Morales
- Mabalacat, Pampanga Mayor Felix Castillo
- Langiden, Abra Ex-Mayor Eufranio Eriguel
- Agoo, La Union Mayor Jesus Celeste "Alias Boying"
- Bolinao, Pangasinan Mayor Jose "Pepe" Miranda
- Santiago City, Isabela Mayor Vicente Amante
- San Pablo City, Laguna Mayor Ryan Dolor
- Bauan, Batangas Vice Mayor Edgardo Trinidad
- El Nido, Palawan Mayor Alex Centena
- Calinog, Iloilo Mayor Julius Ronald Pacificador
- Hamtic, Antique Mayor Jed Mabilog
- Iloilo City Mayor Sigfredo Betita
- Carles, Iloilo Mayor Mariano Malones
- Maasin, Iloilo Ex-Mayor Michael Rama
- Cebu City Mayor Hector Ong
- Laoang, Northern Samar Mayor Rolando Espinosa
- Albuera, Samar Mayor Beda Canamaque
- Basay, Negros Oriental Ex-Mayor Madeline Ong
- Laoang, Northern Samar Vice Mayor Francis Ansing Amboy
- Maasin, Iloilo Fralz Sabalones
- San Fernando Cebu Antonio Pesina
- Iloilo City Erwin "Tongtong" Plagata
- Iloilo City Ex-Congressman JC Rahman Nava
- Guimaras Party-list Rep. Jeffrey Celis
-Ex-Mayor Abubakar Abdul Karim Afdal
- Labangan, Zamboanga del Sur Mayor Gamar Ahay Janihim
- Sirawai, Zamboanga del Norte David Navarro
- Pagadian City, Zamboanga del Sur Bobby Alingan
- Kolambugan, Lanao del Norte Yusofa Monder Bugong Ramin
- Iligan City, Lanao del Norte Jessie Aguilera
- Alegria, Surigao del Norte Mayor Fahad Salic
- Marawi City Mayor Mohammad Ali Abenal
- Marantao, Lanao del Sur Jamal Dadayan
- Buadiposo-Buntong, Lanao del Sur Sabdullah Macabago
- Saguiaran, Lanao del Sur Muslim Aline Macadatu
- Lumbatan, Lanao del Sur Rasul Sangki
- Ampatuan, Maguindanao Montaser Sabal
- Talitay, Maguindanao Vicman Montawal
- Datu Montawal, Maguindanao Samsudin Dimaukom
- Datu Saudi Ampatuan, Maguindanao Norodin Salasal
- Datu Salibo, Maguindanao Ex-Mayor Benahar Tulawie
- Talipao, Sulu Reynaldo Parojinog
- Ozamiz City Nova Princess Parojinog Echavez
- Ozamiz City Mayor Omar Solitario Ali
- Marawi City Vice Mayor Abdul Wahab Sabal
- Talitay, Magundanao Otto Montawal
- Datu Montawal, Maguindanao Nida Dimagkon
- Datu Saudi Ampatuan, Maguindanao Arafat Salic
- Marawi City Rasmiyah Macabago
- Saguiaran, Lanao del Sur Congressman Guillermo Romarate, Jr.
- 2nd District, Surigao del Norte Former board member Ricardo Parojinog - Misamis

The following active and retired law enforcement officers were mentioned (list as read by Duterte:

P/Insp. Rolando Batulayan (ret.) P/Supt. Maristelo Manalo
- PNP-CIDG PCI Roberto Palisoc
- Station 7 MPD P/Supt. Ciceron Ada (ret.) PCI Eric Buenaventura
- Navotas PO2 Geraldine Bautista Manuel
- PNP PRO2 SPO3 Ronald Calap
- Isabela PPO PO3 Rodel Samboledo
- Lal-lo Police Station (Cagayan) PO3 Cecilio Domingo
- Nueva Ecija CIDT PO2 Ryan Mendoza
- Tarlac Police Station Jeffrey Serafica
- Butuan PPO PO1 Norman Adarlo
- Puerto Galera NPS Mark Canete
- RSRPSB MIMAROPA PO1 Mark Christian Catalina
- PNP Camarines Norte PO2 Alan Carpio PCP
- 8 Pasay City PO3 Eric Lazo
- QCPD Station 6 PO3 Alexander Macabeo
- PCP 3 Paranaque City PO3 Johnny Mahilum
- QCPD Station 6 Batasan PO2 Celito Melendrez
- Binangonan Police Station Gen. Vicente Loot (ret.) Gen. Valerio (ret.)
- Santa Barbara, Iloilo Gen. Bernardo Diaz
- Region 6 Gen. Idio
- RTC of Calbayog City P/Supt. Floro (ret.)
- Antique City PNP P/Supt. Kashmir Disomangcop
- COP of Iloilo Base Commander P/Supt. Delia Paz
- Chief RDIDM P/Supt. Genepa
- RIU Intelligence P/Supt. Ipil Duenas P/Supt. Condag P/Supt. Eugenio Malic
- PNP Maritime Group Lamsis
- former chief Antique anti-drug P/Supt. Gomboc P/Supt. Lebin PCI Maymay PSI Kenneth Militar
- Iloilo PSI Donasco P/Insp. De Jose
- SOG PNP Region 6 P/Insp. Duarte
- former PCOP of Arevalo, Iloilo P/Insp. Vicente Vicente
- COP Banate P/Insp. Romeo Santander
- Former chief intel Cebu PO2 Michael Cortez
- Barile Police Station SPO1 Jen dela Victoria
- PS5 Cebu CPO SPO1 Onel Nabua - Barile Police Station PO2 Jomar Ibanez
- Lapu-Lapu Police Station PO3 Ryan Martus Kiamco
- Cebu Provincial Office PCI Ibrahim Jabiran
- Zamboanga CPO PCI Perfecto Abrasaldo Awi Jr.
- Misamis Oriental P/Insp. Roy Montes
- Iligan PRO P/Supt. Ricardo Gando Pulot
- COP Quezon Bukidnon P/Insp. Martin Plaza
- former Panabo chief intel PO1 Pierre Dizo
- Zamboanga del Sur PO3 Omar Juani
- Zamboanga City Public Safety Rommel Mansul
- PRO9 PO3 Daryl Page
- Tabasan Municipal Station SPO1 Totong Joe Valdez
- 9th RNG SPO4 Rodrigo Ramos
- Bukidnon PRO SPO1 Reynaldo dela Victoria
- CDO SPO3 Emilio Mendoza
- Lozaria PP5 Iligan City Marlo Espinosa
- Bukidnon SPO3 Richie Mat
- CIDG Mati Davao Oriental SPO3 Rosell Iliviera
- CIDG Tagum Davao del Norte PO3 Jessie Balabag
- Region 11 PO3 Filomeno Toronia
- Digos Police Station PO1 Glenn Alicarte
- PRO 12 PO1 Philip Pantarolia
- Tacurong City Police Office SPO1 Gerry dela Rosa
- SCPPO PO3 Bebot Ruiz - GSCPO PO3 Estelito Solanio
- Malongon MPS Sarangani PO1 Jerebel Ocsio
- PRO RMN SPO1 Ernesto Billones
- NCR JS1 Lito Montemayor
- Roxas District Jail Aparri PO1 Vicente Reynaldo Celis
- NCR PG Drexel Saet
- MIMAROPA SPO1 Felix Tubil
- Region 3 SPO3 Nicolas Ponce Angeles
- Region 3 SPO2 Rod Erseni
- Marinduque BFP FO1 Reynaldo Valencia
- Claveria Police Station SSgt. Vic dela Cruz
- MIMAROPA B/Gen. Leoncio Daniega
- NCR SPO3 Gerry Mendoza
- NCR Reymante Dayto
- Region 5 Reymar Dayto
- Region 5 Renato Gumaro Zamora
- Region 6 JO1 Alan Coca Manatad
- Region 7 SPO3 Christie Cielo Tingad
- Region 7 RSAD Casimiro Castro
- CAFGU 38IB 6ID ARMM RSAD Pfc. Philip Miro
- 40IB 6ID ARMM Cpl. Cusinan Lopez
- 52IB ARMM Pfc. Mamadali Ipad
- 64IB 6ID Yasin Abolgalib JO1 Alfredo Galis Ogacho FO1 Nicolas Ponce Ablaca
- ARMM FO3 Ricardo Villaris Ibanez
– Region 9 Marine Corporal Alfrenz Gurias Abedin
– Western Mindanao Jimmy Manlangit - Region 12 -


PHILSTAR

Shoot-to-kill order out for narco-pols By Alexis Romero (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 6, 2016 - 12:00am 0 2 googleplus0 2


Duterte, who has vowed to end the narcotics trade and criminality within six months, accused the politicians of destroying lives and of enriching themselves at the expense of the people. Presidential Broadcast Staff/Released

MANILA, Philippines - President Duterte issued yesterday a “shoot-to-kill” order against politicians involved in illegal drugs, saying their unforgivable acts have plunged the country into a crisis.

Duterte, who has vowed to end the narcotics trade and criminality within six months, accused the politicians of destroying lives and of enriching themselves at the expense of the people.

“P***ng i** ninyo. Did you not think about where this problem would lead us? It’s good that I am the President now. I will have you killed. Have you seen what you’ve done to the Philippines? And then I will forgive you?” the President said in an interview in Davao City.

“My order is shoot to kill. I don’t care about human rights. Believe me. I don’t give a s**t about what they will say. This war is against drugs and we have a crisis,” he added.

“Shoot to kill will remain until the last day of my term,” he added.

Duterte, who had vowed to wage a “bloody” war against crime and illegal drugs, did not identify the politicians covered by the order.

READ MORE...

The President told editors and reporters of The STAR last Wednesday that he had to carefully validate the involvement of politicians in the narcotics trade before revealing their names.

The President issued the order four days after he demanded the surrender of Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. of Albuera, Leyte, and his son Kerwin, who were accused of drug trafficking and coddling drug lords.

He threatened to issue a “shoot on sight” order against the Espinosas if they do not surrender to law enforcers.


LEYTE MAYOR. Albuera Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr has beat the 24-hour surrender deadline RAPPLER.COM

Mayor Espinosa has surrendered to authorities but his son Kerwin has remained at large.

Duterte said he would have forgiven the so-called narco-politicians if they were involved in other illegal activities like smuggling.

“Don’t give me b*llsh*t. You better find another sin but not that (illegal drugs). You will surely die,” he added.

Asked to clarify his ‘shoot-to- kill’ order, Duterte said: “Shoot to kill is to shoot and kill him. Do not waste the bullet.”

Duterte said based on his experience, paranoid people usually carry guns, so it was not likely that they were planted by policemen.

He reiterated that he is ready to protect soldiers and policemen who would face charges in connection with the intensified anti-drug campaign.

“For as long as it is done in the performance of duty by the soldier and the police, that’s mine. That is my official and personal guarantee. I will answer for the deed,” Duterte said.

“If a policeman figured in an encounter, do not investigate that anymore. That’s my order.”

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said Duterte’s statement is “congruent with government policy on maintaining and protecting peace and order in the nation.”

“He has given due and ample notice that the clear and present danger of drugs engulfing the nation will be addressed and law enforcers will neutralize those who resist or endanger the lives of arresting officers,” Abella said.

More than 400 persons have been killed in anti-drug operations while more than 5,000 others have been arrested, according to latest police data.

More than 560,000 drug personalities have surrendered to authorities.

Human rights advocates are worried that the administration’s crackdown on drugs would result in extrajudicial killings and abuses.

Sen. Leila de Lima, a critic of Duterte, said last Tuesday that the methods employed by law enforcers bring Filipinos to their “collective descent into impunity, fear and ultimately, utter and complete inhumanity.”

De Lima called for a Senate investigation of the killings that she described as “do-it- yourself justice” employed by those involved in the war on drugs.

Duterte started to shame officials with supposed links to narcotics last July 5 when he named five retired and active police officers who are allegedly coddling drug lords.

Accused of shielding drug syndicates were retired police deputy director general Marcelo Garbo Jr., retired police general and newly elected Daanbantayan, Cebu mayor Vicente Loot, former National Capital Region Police Office head Director Joel Pagdilao, former Quezon City Police District director Chief Supt. Edgardo Tinio and Western Visayas regional director Chief Supt. Bernardo Diaz.

The five have denied any links with narcotics and believe that the President was fed wrong information.

Last month, Duterte revealed that he has a matrix of local executives and police officials who are connected to drug lords.

Presidential communication secretary Martin Andanar said in an earlier interview that the matrix was “unbelievable” and enough to make one vomit.

Early this week, chief presidential legal counsel Salvador Panelo said Duterte would soon reveal the names of 27 local executives who are benefitting from the drug trade.

“My God, you will be shocked,” Panelo said, referring to the list.

Duterte visits wounded cop

Duterte visited yesterday Senior Insp. Ricky Boy Remoroza, the police chief of Magsaysay, Davao del Sur who was wounded while serving a warrant of arrest against a suspect drug pusher.

Remoroza was surprised when Duterte visited him at the Southern Philippines Medical Center in Davao City where the police officer is confined.

Remoroza was shot in the chest and abdomen while serving a warrant of arrest on suspected pusher Vicky Calago, also known as Kalag, who was shot dead during the shootout with the police officer.

In a short video over YouTube, Duterte was shown being led to the ward where Remoroza was confined.

A man in white shirt appeared to wake up the resting police officer saying, “Si Presidente nibisita gyud sa imo (The President is here to visit you).”

Duterte then said doctors had briefed him on Remoroza’s condition, assuring the latter that there is no problem.

“Your doctor said you are going to be okay. Your (Duterte gestures toward his heart) was not hit. The other one (Calago) was killed. So, there is no problem. Just keep on fighting,” the President said in Cebuano.

Remoroza was unable to speak but gave the President a thumbs-up.

Calago was reportedly the most wanted drug pusher in Magsaysay town.

The suspect was earlier charged with violating Article 2, Section 5 of Republic Act 9165 or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002.

The arresting officers recovered from the suspect a caliber .38 revolver and two small sachets of suspected shabu.

Meanwhile, the National Capital Region Police Office had neutralized 157 drug pushers, arrested 1,198 others and initiated the surrender of 22,156 drug users from July 3 to Aug. 3, NCRPO director Chief Supt. Oscar Albayalde said yesterday.

Albayalde said they also recorded the death of 76 drug pushers at the hands of suspected vigilantes in secluded areas in Metro Manila.

Despite their anti-drug campaign success, however, Albayalde ordered his five police districts to intensify their efforts to rid the metropolis of drug pushers to meet the six-month deadline of President Duterte.

“So far so good. But we have to raise to another level our anti-drug campaign for us to be able to eradicate the drug problem in Metro Manila to meet the deadline set by President Duterte,” said Albayalde. With Giovanni Nilles, Non Alquitran

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Ongpin daughter quits; Rody tags Mar backer By Alexis Romero and Iris Gonzales (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 6, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


The daughter of businessman and former trade minister Roberto Ongpin tendered yesterday her resignation as vice chairman and director of PhilWeb, a listed gaming company led by her father until his resignation last Thursday. STAR/Manny Marcelo

MANILA, Philippines - Another businessman has been added to the list of what President Duterte called oligarchs who are making money at the expense of poor Filipinos.

Duterte, who promised to “destroy” oligarchs, yesterday accused businessman Francis Eric Gutierrez of importing air assets without paying taxes and engaging in destructive mining in Agusan.

Gutierrez reportedly provided aircraft to the Liberal Party (LP) during the campaign of Mar Roxas and allegedly received favors for his mining firm in the previous administration.

The LP said the air assets were leased.

This developed as the daughter of businessman and former trade minister Roberto Ongpin tendered yesterday her resignation as vice chairman and director of PhilWeb, a listed gaming company led by her father until his resignation last Thursday.

Anna Bettina Ongpin said she decided to quit as she needed “to devote more time and attention to other business matters.”

Her father’s resignation came a day after President Duterte singled him out as among the oligarchs he wanted to destroy.

Speaking to election volunteers of the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV) on Wednesday, Duterte said Ongpin was one of the oligarchs “embedded in the government.”

“I’ll give you an example, publicly, Ongpin, Roberto. He was influential during the time of (Ferdinand) Marcos, trade minister, I think. He remained influential despite the succession. During the time of (Fidel) Ramos, he was a hanger on as well as during the time of Gloria (Arroyo) and P-Noy (Benigno Aquino III). Now he owns (an) online (gambling firm),” the President said.

At Camp Lapu-Lapu in Cebu City, Duterte told soldiers “Gutierrez is one of the oligarchs.”

“He brought in airplanes without costs. He brought in choppers without costs. His mining in Agusan is destructive.”

“You oligarchs fool the Filipinos and do not pay taxes,” he said.

Gutierrez is part owner SR Metals Inc. and its subsidiaries San R Mining and Galeo Mining Equipment Corp.

Meanwhile, Sen. Grace Poe denied reports Ongpin was one of the financiers of her campaign in the May presidetial elections.

“This is absolutely untrue. Senator Poe did not receive a single cent or even an iota of support from Mr. Ongpin,” Nelson Victorino, Poe’s chief of staff, said. -- With Paolo Romero


MANILA TIMES

Duterte looking into drug deaths August 3, 2016 10:51 pm by CATHERINE S. VALENTE AND JEFFERSON ANTIPORDA

MALACAÑANG on Wednesday assured the public President Rodrigo Duterte is looking into the spate of extrajudicial killings involving alleged drug suspects.

Speaking to reporters, presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said Duterte is “aware” of these killings and is in touch with law enforcement agencies.

“He is actually in touch with the hierarchy of authority and he communicates exactly where he stands. He is ensuring the process is duly carried out by being personally in touch with those in charge,” Abella said in a new conference.

Abella issued the statement after Sen. Leila de Lima filed a resolution to investigate the killing of drug suspects nationwide.

De Lima, in her first privilege speech as senator on Tuesday, blasted the Duterte administration’s “do-it-yourself justice system” and for portraying her as a coddler of drug lords.

President Duterte himself welcomed a possible Senate probe on extrajudicial killings.

In a speech in Malacañang, Duterte said de Lima could go ahead and investigate.

“I do not blame Senator de Lima, it’s her job,” Duterte said.

Two Senate committees, including the justice and human rights committee chaired by de Lima, are scheduled to conduct the investigation in mid-August.

READ MORE...

Based on reports, there have been 771 drug-related fatalities from May 10 to August 2.

Of the total number, 472 were killed during police operations, while 227 were killed by unidentified gunmen. At least 71 were victims of summary executions.

Unconvinced

But some senators were not convinced of the need to investigate the Philippine National Police (PNP) on suspicion that several drug-related killings were the result of summary executions in the guise of legitimate police work.



Senator Panfilo Lacson cited the failure of the de Lima to present in her privilege speech on Tuesday specific instances that would indicate the involvement of police in summary executions.

“Instead, she (de Lima) made sweeping statements. So I will maintain my position that there should be a presumption of regularity in the performance of duties of our police,” Lacson said.

Senator Richard Gordon, head of the Blue Ribbon Committee, said a Senate investigation could be premature. “When we accuse the police of something, we must be ready to present the evidence,” he added.

He maintained that the internal affairs service of the PNP, not the Senate, should conduct the investigation.
Vigilantes
Lacson however said he wants the Senate to look into the alleged summary executions carried out by vigilante groups.
The lawmaker said he had received information that the PNP had recorded a total of 600 summary killings for the month of July alone.
He said the police could be accused of tolerating these killings if they failed to act on the cases.
“Whether they (police) like it or not, that would be the perception. At the very least they are tolerating it and worst, they are sponsoring it,” Lacson said.

-------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

Duterte acknowledges abuses in drug war @inquirerdotnet Associated Press 03:27 PM August 5th, 2016


EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content / In this picture taken on July 8, 2016, police officers investigate the dead body of an alleged drug dealer, his face covered with packing tape and a placard reading "I'm a pusher", on a street in Manila. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte on July 1 urged communist rebels to start killing drug traffickers, adding another layer to a controversial war on crime in which he has warned thousands will die. / AFP PHOTO / NOEL CELIS / GRAPHIC CONTENT

President Rodrigo Duterte has acknowledged abuses in the battle against illegal drugs, which has left more than 400 suspects dead and alarmed rights activists, but is not backing down from a shoot-to-kill order for drug suspects.

The President said in a speech late Thursday that most drug dealers and addicts slain in gunbattles with police had put up a fight, but added that he was sure some were “salvaged,” a local term for extrajudicial killings usually by law enforcers.

In the case of illegal killings, Duterte said the government will investigate.

Early Friday, he said he gave “shoot-to-kill” orders against drug dealers including politicians involved in the illicit trade.

A legal expert, Jose Manuel Diokno, says such an order is, at the least, legally questionable.


ABS-CBN

LOOK: Arsenal of guns found outside 'narco' mayor's house ABS-CBN NEWS, 08/04/16 12:49 AM

Six people were killed in an encounter between policemen and men believed to be hired by Albuera, Leyte Mayor Rolando Espinosa.

Espinosa, accused of coddling drug rings, surrendered Tuesday, following President Rodrigo Duterte's order.

The Philippine National Police (PNP) confirmed that all six fatalities were Espinosa's men, who supposedly exchanged gunfire in Sitio Tinago, Barangay Binolho at around 5:30 a.m.

Espinosa, meanwhile, denied that the fatalities were his men.

Here are the weapons found in the site of the encounter:


Weapons found outside the house of Albuera, Leyte mayor Rolando Espinosa. Photo by Ranulfo Docdocan, ABS-CBN News.

-------------------------------------------------

FROM THE TRIBUNE

DU30: ‘Killer President’ better than video games junkie by Ted Tuvera Friday, 05 August 2016 00

The genocide in the war on drugs that claimed the lives of more than 700 drugs trade suspects since he assumed office was again rationalized by President Duterte as coming mostly from legitimate Philippine National Police (PNP) operations against those who have resisted arrests.

In a speech at the Ateneo de Davao University yesterday, Duterte also made light of allegations of his being a “killer President” saying that he would prefer the tag rather than a president whose hobby is...,” Duterte paused as he gestured, playing a video game that evoked laughter from the crowd.

Duterte obviously took a swipe at his predecessor, former Benigno Aquino who is believed to be a video game enthusiast even during his stay at Malacañang.


Sept 26, 2010 PHOTO -PRESIDENT NOY AQUINO ENJOYIING A VIDEO GAME FROM ELLEN TORDESILLAS BLOG

“I am sure that those who are being killed are resisting arrest. They are dangerous and are thus posing threats to the police because they are high due to shabu intake,” Duterte said.

Duterte, however, promised to look into alleged extrajudicial killings undertaken by vigilante groups.

“I know that there is salvaging or summary executions. I’ll have that investigated,” he said. Hundreds of people have died since Duterte won a landslide election in May, promising to rid society of drugs and crime in six months by killing tens of thousands of suspected criminals.

In one viral image summing up the human cost, a young woman howls in pain as she cradles her partner’s blood-soaked body under the glare of television lights as horrified bystanders look on from behind yellow police crime tape.

“My husband was innocent. He never hurt anyone,” Jennilyn Olayres said of her partner Michael Siaron, 30, a tricycle driver, refuting the crude cardboard poster left behind by the motorcycle-riding gunmen killers saying “drug pusher”.

Police figures showed this week that 402 drug suspects had been killed since Duterte was sworn in at the end of June. That figure does not include those slain by suspected vigilantes.

Sen. Panfilo Lacson, the other day, cited sources from the Philippine National Police (PNP) who revealed 600 cases of summary killings in a month, which average 20 deaths a day as a result of Duterte’s war on drugs aside from those who died from legitimate police operations.

Police raids of suspected drug dealers’ hideouts have led to near-nightly deaths. Most of the dead suspects, often found face-down in pools of blood, had pistols lying next to them in the act of resisting arrest, according to authorities.
Suspected sympathy killings by anti-drug vigilantes have also left a trail of death. One man was attacked as he drove his tricycle, his body left hanging from the vehicle as blood dripped onto the street.

Other people have simply turned up dead in deserted streets and vacant lots at night, their faces cocooned in packaging tape and with cardboard signs accusing them of being drug dealers hanging on their chests.

READ MORE...

At his first State of the Nation Address (Sona), Duterte defended his anti-crime campaign and described the scene at Siaron’s shooting as a parody of Michelangelo’s 15th century Pieta marble sculpture.

“And there you are, dead and portrayed in a broadsheet like Mother Mary cradling the dead cadaver of Jesus Christ,” the president said, describing the tableau as “drama.”

For an alleged drug dealer, Siaron did not have a lifestyle like Mexican or Colombian cartel kingpins.

The rented hovel that was home to him and his girlfriend, made of scraps of plywood and iron sheeting, was not much bigger than a pig pen. It stood precariously on stilts atop a smelly, garbage-choked open sewer.

“At times we slept until late on purpose so we only had to worry about lunch and dinner,” Olayres, a street vendor, told AFP at her partner’s wake.

Held in a hall at a local government office, two more of the dead were being mourned at the same time. Olayres said Siaron was among the more than 16 million Filipino voters who had catapulted Duterte to office.

The attacks have left wives and relatives crying and fainting at the carnage, but also driven drug users and small-time dealers into frantic mass surrenders to district officials. Police say a staggering 565,806 have turned themselves in.

Many of those who presented themselves with pledges to straighten out their lives wore rubber wristbands bearing Duterte’s name — materials used during his election campaign.

Before the bodies started piling up, Manila police also launched a campaign, codenamed Oplan Rody — the incoming president’s nickname — to rid the streets of drunks and shirtless men, who were made to do 40 pushups to avoid jail time.

A children’s night curfew was also imposed in some districts, with violators and their parents made to undergo counseling.
Ping yields to killings probe

Lacson is already amenable to the idea of having the Senate conduct an investigation on the alleged ongoing extrajudicial killings, if only to ascertain the existence of vigilante groups.

Lacson has been consistently against the Senate dipping its fingers into the spate of killings of drug suspects all over the country, a move initiated by Sen. Leila de Lima, citing the timing as being premature at this point.

Yet, he himself had recently noted the recorded incidence of supposed drug-related killings in the Philippine National Police (PNP) which showed over 600 cases in a month, a far cry from the more than 200 documented cases in the media.

“If only for vigilante killings, I think that’s reight. There is a necessity to look into (it). Has it become a policy now to just turn a blind eye to vigilante killings? We want to see what the police are doing,”he said.

Lacson said the conduct of the probe may also prove to be beneficial to the government especially in the light of reports where the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has expressed great concern on the rise of killings of suspected drug users and pushers in the country.

“At least the Philippine government through Congress and the Senate since we are part of the national government, we will show the international community particularly the UN (United Nations) that we’re doing something,” he said.

The senator said there’s really cause for alarm since the PNP has not given a report on the cases of killings being given a closure by the authorities.

Still, Lacson has skepticisms on the end-result of the Senate probe which De Lima said is in aid of legislation.

“What is not clear is what legislation will we pursue out of this investigation sought by De Lima. The investigation is the result of her resolution, in aid of legislation. But what are the bills filed so far that we can pursue on account of these hearings she will call in the coming days?” he asked. Angie M. Rosales, AFP

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FROM THE INQUIRER FLASHBACK REPORT

FULL TEXT: Interview with Ateneo de Davao’s Fr. Tabora on Duterte @inquirerdotnet
INQUIRER.net 01:55 PM June 28th, 2016


Ateneo de Davao's Fr. Tabora on Duterte | Inquirer News

Earlier this month, INQUIRER.net held a series of interviews with leaders of civil society and the academe based in Davao City. One of them is Fr. Joel Tabora, president of the Ateneo de Davao University, who discussed with us the prospects of a Duterte administration.

Below is the full transcript of the interview: (VIDEO ALSO AT END OF PAGE)

John Nery, INQUIRER.net Editor in Chief: Good afternoon and welcome to our live interview with the very influential president of the Ateneo de Davao University, Fr. Joel Tabora, SJ.


JOHN NERY

Good afternoon Father.

Fr. Tabora: Good afternoon, John. Good to see you here. Since you were in my classroom.

Nery: Back in your presence. Thank you for making time for us on a Sunday afternoon. We have a few questions to ask, and really, most of them have to do with how should we understand the Duterte presidency. Maybe we can start with the very basic question. Duterte is the first ever president from Mindanao. How does the Ateneo de Davao University see this historic achievement?

Fr. Tabora: I guess first of all we have to say that Ateneo de Davao university does not have an official position on this. Official positions in the university are governed by the Board of Trustees, etc. We have a process. But on the other hand, the Ateneo de Davao is very supportive of the newly elected president. Many of its professors and its students are very very active in the campaign for him, and as we have discussed matters after his election, many are very enthusiastic about wanting to be able to help him succeed as our national leader. And the reason I think is simple. Ateneo de Davao is in Mindanao and there are many hopes that Mindanao once had and they‘ve come to rest these hopes in Rodrigo Duterte.

Now, many of the…outside of the fact that many in this university shall support him in his campaign against crime and his campaign against drugs. Many of our people here are very, very committed to the peace process here. We are very disappointed that despite all the efforts that the Aquino administration made in this regard, which engaged many of us very, very deeply here at the Ateneo de Davao, we got very involved in the peace process under President Aquino, but I guess we were all just very disappointed that in the end, because of unfortunate errors that were made, that the, misunderstandings here and there, that the process did not end up in the peace agreement that we all hoped and prayed for.

We really believe that President Duterte can lead the country to a genuine peace agreement with the Muslims. Outside of the fact that he has Muslim blood, we are convinced that he understands the Muslim situation and that he can read, I mean, the political forces within the Muslim groups, better than most leaders, most national leaders in the country. So, we hope that he shall certainly be able to play a big part in bringing peace about. It will be complex and it will probably take a different shape than it took under Aquino because the president is sensitive to the MILF but also to the MNLF and we’ve heard that he is not close to discussing the possibilities of exploring the Sabah claim. So those are things I think that we hope can also be part of a peace agreement that could be more inclusive than it being more just, than it is presented…in the problems that we have in Sulu and Malaysia and Sabah area.

The other area where I think, very urgently, people are supporting him with great hope is because in this university, most of our students and our professors are very committed to the environment, you know? Our professors who are environmentalists are willing to risk their lives for the environment and they’ve conducted studies in the environment where they have put their life on the line. That sort of thing. So one of the things that have been very important for our people here is his commitment against large scale mining. Our environmentalists see large scale mining as a huge threat to the environment here, and our water studies have shown that if you have something like the SMI Tampakan Mines allowed here, then it could poison the entire water system of Mindanao because all of these rivers and water bodies are itner connected so we’ve been passionately anti-mining from this university, but it’s never really registered as an environmental issue under the Aquino administration. They’ve been cool on mining and large scale mining because of the returns that the 1995 Mining Act deprives the Philippines of. But they’ve never really said large scale mining is an environmental problem. And it is an environmental problem.

Nery: So we’re looking at a, you might say, definition of 4Ps that excites Mindanao. There’s the peace process, there’s the peace and order, there’s the planet, and then there’s also greater participation by Mindanaoans in national government. I’d like to discuss one or two of these Ps, is there anything else aside from this that has gotten Mindanaoans excited in a Duterte presidency?

FR: Tabora: He’s ours. In a sense, he’s ours. Because I think that’s what, you know, people from Mindanao are saying that we finally have a Mindanaoan president. He’s ours, but I think we all know he’s not ours in the sense that we don’t own him. And we know that we don’t, we cannot manipulate this guy. He has his own way, he has his own style, and he uses his own words, but many of Mindanaoans understand him to be ours, therefore, on our side. You know, to an extent, in Mindanao the so called Manila imperialism is felt over many years, we can say over centuries. The ruler from the north has come and has exploited conditions here, you know, when there was a social problem in Central Luzon, they sent the farmers here and they settled here in these lands. There were resettlement campaigns which were started in the American times, but was also carried over under the Filipino officials in the Commonwealth time and later, the resettlement issues which brought migrants from Luzon into Mindanao, displaced the Mindanaoans from their lands and often through loss they did not understand, and that was certainly very true with the Muslim people here in Mindanao, but was also true with the indigenous people in Mindanao.

So, the Mindanaoans feel, finally we have a national leader who can at least mediate this to people in Luzon and help them to understand that much of the poverty that we have here in Mindanao is because of the policy that was made in Manila. Even if you look at the statistics relative to poverty in the Philippines today, I think you have like, 70 percent poor in the Metro Manila area. In the Visayas, it becomes 30 percent. In Mindanao, it becomes 40 percent. But in Muslim Mindanao it becomes 60 percent. So the development has really begun to solve the problems well in Metro Manila, it it has really neglected Muslim Mindanao and Mindanao in general. But at the same time, Mindanaoans are aware that the resources in Mindanao have been exploited by people who eventually are in Manila. The timber resources have been depleted. And now that the timber is gone, they’re going after the mineral resources, you know. With no clear understanding of, if this exploitation takes place, how will Mindanao benefit? So there’s a social justice dimension, a very clear social justice issue here, where we’re going to have to look at the economy, how the economy has been run by the north, to the disadvantage of Mindanaoans and how politics has been played against the Mindanaoans, and even the use of the military and the perception of many Mindanaoans is that the military defends the interests of the north, rather than the interests of all. So, Mindanaoans are happy that they have now a president who loves Mindanao so much he doesn’t even want to go there. He wants to govern from here, which is an endearing sign for the Mindanaoans.

Nery: Father, you have also been president of Ateneo de Naga, and you taught many years in Ateneo de Manila, so you know what the sentiment is in Luzon. In what way is President Duterte not merely the first president from Mindanao, but truly, in fact, the 16th president of the Philippines, I mean to say, what, we can now understand what the Mindanao agenda would be, but what can the voters who voted for him in Luzon, what can they look forward to from President Duterte?

Fr. Tabora: Well, I think if you address the major problem of peace in Mindanao, you’re not just addressing a Mindanao problem. You’re addressing a national problem. This has really been a national problem with international (repercussions) for a long time. I think everybody will benefit if the problem of peace in Mindanao is addressed. I think everybody will benefit also if the problems of the indigenous peoples will also be addressed, because I think when we talk about the indigenous people, we are, to a great extent, talking about our national heritage, our national soul.

Where is it that we value being Filipino most? In our ability to acquire traits from the West or in our ability to be able to respect our traditions that are of old, and that form part of the richness of our Filipino heritage? The indigenous peoples, they are being decimated by what we consider to be development aggression. People want to put up a mine, and they hit the indigenous people. People want to put up a huge monocrop farm, they hit the indigenous peoples. And by hitting these indigenous peoples, they don’t just displace, they destroy cultures that belong to the national heritage. I think if president Duterte can address that, he would be addressing a national thing. If because of Duterte now people in universities and people who write histories and anthropologies can correct the writing of history relevant to Mindanao that would be a big gain for the country.

I think solving crime is a national concern, specially the drugs that affect interestingly enough, even and especially the poor. They are plagued by this problem. They are the ones affected and are being hit by this thing. And the drugs situation is very difficult because it’s underground and international. It begins with drugs and it ends with human trafficking and gun-running. So a president who is going to effectively move against this kind of crime, I think is national gain. So I think if he attacks poverty that is a national gain. I think, if you were to ask me this would be my opinion. Why is it that the Liberal Party lost so badly? You know, I think it was because they ran under the slogan “Let’s continue with this Daang Matuwid.” And people were saying “Continue with that, that has not benefited us?” From the viewpoint of the poor, the poor have heard of the improvement in the national economy. People are boasting how much, under the Aquino administration, the economy has grown, but they’re not feeling its effects. Well, people, as far as poverty is concerned, they don’t feel its effects. As far as the environment is concerned, once again, there was disappointment relative to mining. And as far as the peace process is concerned, it didn’t work, so why give me a continuation of this?

Kristine Sabillo, INQUIRER.net Chief of Reporters: Father Tabora, you mentioned a while ago that “Duterte is ours,” meaning of Mindanao, but not ours. You also mentioned that in your much talked about speech “The President and the King.” Everybody knows that no one can control Duterte. He has his own way of doing things. So how are we sure that he’s grounded enough to make the right decisions for the country? I mean, besides coming from Mindanao, what do you think is in his character that would make him grounded and a good president for this country?

Fr. Tabora: Many times, the comparison very badly has been made between Duterte and Trump because of the many similarities. Both of them speak their minds, both of them use expletives that are very colorful, and both of them are in a sense, icons that last, they are not afraid to strike at the idols of our civilization, our current civilization. But I think Trump is full of himself, and that’s not Duterte. I think Duterte is a person who is really concerned about the poor, and really concerned about reforms, understands what he wants to do, and is going to do what he says that he’s going to do, or what he means that he’s going to do. So my confidence in him is the experience we had with him in Davao. This is a good man. He has a lot of, he has a colorful way of presenting himself, but business is thriving in Davao. People are happy in Davao.

He’s not a dictator. If he were a dictator, he would be able to keep his children more in line. But you know, he has a political line, Sara has a political line, Paolo has a political line, and he allows it. You know, he says one thing and they do another thing. And he allows it. So, I think to answer your question, on the our basis of our experience here in Davao, where he has delivered well, I am confident that he would deliver well in the national scale. Duterte is also a man who does not like to have the headlines. I don’t know him to be that way in Davao. He works very quietly, very effectively, you know, And when there are problems, he comes. He fixes the problems. I remember once, we had a food poisoning incident here, and a good number of our students, including myself, ended up in the hospital. And uh, lo and behold, he was at my side. And he was on the side of the kids, taking care. So people know him for that, for that sort of personal care for people who are sick, who are disadvantaged.

Sabillo: Sir, they say that much of the controversies surrounding Duterte now with the national media is because he is misinterpreted, or the people are not yet used to how he does things or how he says things. Do you think that the national media and the rest of the population would be able to eventually understand him more, in the long run, and adjust to how he is, how he works?

Fr. Tabora: Sure, because the national media is also intelligent. I think the logic is, it’s like learning a new language, you know. You’re gonna have to learn how to decipher, we’re all gonna have to learn how to decipher. I’m also taken aback by all the things I hear. When I watched the Miting de Avance, I was also turned off by the rhetoric that he was using, you know. But it was rhetoric. And that’s why I do hope that he will metamorphose, like what he said, “I’m going to be different when I become president.” I do hope that he continues in his activity to bring reconciliation to the country and unity to the country. So I think it’s not good to push him against the wall, you know. Let him be. Let him act, as I think he will. And I think we’ll see surprising results.

Nery: Father, speaking of learning a new language, maybe you can help us make sense of what may be just seeming contradictions in the Duterte approach to policy and governance. I know that you’ve insisted that you are not limited to the way the mind thinks, you are not part of the inner circle, you don’t consider yourself an expert, but you run one of the leading educational institutions in Mindanao, that plays a key role in the Davao society. Maybe we can ask you to help us make sense of the following. Maybe I can start with the reputation which you have just reconfirmed, for reaching out to the poor. He has a lot of pro-poor policies in play, and yet he is also perhaps more famously known for insisting on the death penalty, which the Catholic Church recognizes as essentially anti-poor because of flawed judicial systems. How do you reconcile these two? So, a pro-poor approach, and yet, insistence on a policy that will, in fact, impact on the lives of the poor.

Fr. Tabora: Yes, it is a seeming contradiction, and I don’t know that it can be reconciled. I think president Duterte really wants to go after crime. He wants people to respect the law. As of now, he is convinced that getting people to respect the law can be done by death penalty, by the legislation of the death penalty. The Church has over and over again insisted that the death penalty is not the answer. I think the Church and a Catholic university like this will try to convince him that it is not the answer. But we will also understand that he will not decide this issue alone, he will go to Congress and Congress will decide on the basis of the Congress’ perception on the common good. The Church, I think, will make a stance, say, in so many cases the death penalty is anti-poor because it kills not the rich, but the poor. And sometimes, erroneously because many times, they cannot get legal assistance. But he will say, ‘I need some way of making people fear the law’. So he’ll go to Congress for that.

Nery: Davao has been booming for decades, as you said earlier business is thriving, and anyone can see that. Now he’s bringing in some of his friends from the national democratic front, or maybe in fact from the communist party, which might spur some apprehension on the part of businessmen even businessmen in Davao City. So he’s going to have a cabinet that will have at least three departments headed by people you might call our friend from the militant Left.

How do we understand that situation? Would we expect as in the first Corazon Aquino cabinet some internal struggles between let’s say businessmen who are there and then members of the left or should we expect something else from President Duterte.

Fr. Tabora: I don’t know. It’s a little bit too early. Within this week we will have a meeting …in order to be able to discuss. We really don’t know what this means. I’m just sympathetic to the national leader, who is saying this conflict has gone for too long. And, sometimes we don’t even know what is being fought about or what is being fought over. From my classes you know the Marxist movement, the communist movement relative to capitalism at heart is a social justice movement. Whether it works or not is another thing, but at heart it’s a movement that is trying to call forth optimum realizations of humanity within the productions scheme that we have versus a capitalism that has so often been dehumanizing in its exclusion of many from its benefits.

Our constitution, the way our 1987 constitution is framed, is really a social justice constitution. Sometimes I think it hasn’t been tried. They already want to change it but it hasn’t been tried. It’s a social justice constitution, and it’s trying to bring justice to the poor person, to the farmers etcetera.

So based on the constitution, there is a lot of room to come into dialogue with people who have been fighting for social justice. If the fight for social justice means that we’re going to have to talk to the lords of big business, to the policy makers, to the landlords, to those who are determining land distribution, etc. We’re going to have to talk because peace will depend on it.

I don’t think the CPP-NDF is just going to say now that Duterte’s here we’re going to give up the fight. I think we have to be able to say because of so many years of struggle, there is going to have some improvements among the farmers, some improvement among laborers that has not yet been achieved.

I don’t know what’s gonna happen in those negotiations. From the viewpoint of the Mindanaoans, the NPA leftist conflict has taken a life of its own that people don’t understand. Those are the NPAs, the ideology, the targets are not clear, what they’re fighting for is not clear. SO often it looks like they have become a set of bandits and are simply there for themselves.

Now in a dialogue this, it’s good that something like that would be clarified. What are they fighting for this time? We know what the Bangsamoro are fighting for, but in the case of the CPP-NPA, tackling the regime is so far away that it simply becomes fighting the local military or fighting the local businesses which people don’t understand.

So we have an opportunity with dialogue, try to understand one another, and I think representatives of a social justice constitution should be able to talk to representatives of a social justice revolution.

Nery: There are a lot of pro-women initiatives in the Duterte administration here in Davao City and Duterte has a lot of female supporters, and yet especially in the last few weeks, we have been witness to rather demeaning language regarding women. How do we start to make sense of this?

Fr. Tabora: I don’t want to speak for the women and where offence has been taken. We will simply have to accept that offence has been taken. I would simply counsel Rody Duterte in what he does, not what he says or how he whistles. I don’t mean to say his style is the best presidential style, but that’s his way of doing things. I know that in Davao the legislation that is pro-women is the best in the country and has been leading legislation in the country so there I have to say maybe wait to see what he does, rather than just take offense in how he behaves. I don’t want to excuse but I would be more comfortable if he stops the whistling and tempers his language.

But that’s not the substance of Duterte.

Nery: Your fellow Jesuit Archbishop Antonio Ledesma issued a pastoral letter just before the elections where among all the things he referred to the killings in Davao, supposedly by the Davao Death Squad. The contradiction I’m looking at is I don’t think that there is evidence to prove that these 1,200 or so killings did not happen. So, do we give credit to Duterte for this kind of, I’m not sure if the word is achievement, or as Archbishop Ledesma said, do we take into task for failing to stop these 1,200 killings since 1998 I think. So I guess the contradiction has to do with the price that Davao City pays for the peace that it enjoys. How do we approach this question of the Davao Death Squad.

Fr. Tabora: That’s a difficult question and I don’t mean to diminish its import. What Archbishop Ledesma said is true. There is a problem on the Davao Death Squads here. There has been no proof that it is linked to Duterte, but it’s also true that there has been no action against them.

The Ateneo de Davao took a survey; we do city-wide social surveys based on the methodology of the Social Weather Stations. So, we do this regularly. One of the questions we asked was “Do they accept the Davao Death Squads and what is said to have been done by them.” It is a matter of concern for us that the large majority said yes.

Another question that we asked was “What is your perception of the legal system, does it deliver justice.” And the large majority said no. They have been able to correlate the fact that there has been a failure in the justice system, with their approval of what seems to be a system that is delivering justice. Is it the best way that things should be? Certainly not. But that’s the empirical reality here that people are supportive of what seems to be delivering justice or delivering peace and order.

I know that it’s very dangerous and it’s subject to human rights abuse and subject to error, and people have no ability to defend themselves. But it seems that the people who are looking at this understand that.

It is a big price that has been paid. At the same time, the justice system, that is supposed to prevent this sort of thing seems not to be functioning. And people understand it not to be functioning.

Sabillo: You’re confident with Duterte but do you trust the people surrounding him, especially the ones he appointed to government positions because some of them are controversial as well or other people have concerns about their integrity or their links to cases of corruption so what can you say about that?

Fr. Tabora: As of now I’m not making judgments on his appointees. I feel, with many of my people here, let’s give him a chance. I felt that somebody else might have been a Department of Education Secretary, but he has made that choice; I respect it; I work with that person. So, let’s see what comes of this.

Nery: You said that the peace process might take a different shape, so you have a framework agreement on the Bangsamoro and the Comprehensive agreement on the Bangsamoro. Are you saying that perhaps it might not be the current shape of the Bangsamoro Basic Law that will be laid before congress?

Fr. Tabora: I hope that there will be success, there will be respect for the comprehensive agreement Bangsamoro. That’s a national commitment; I really hope that it will be respected. For that to be respected I think, I hope, that the Muslim community can get together and understand itself to be represented by the MILF, but we know that it’s challenging because not all feel that they are represented by the MILF. So, I hope that we can work things out as is prescribed by the comprehensive agreement Bangsamoro.

I hope that this happens before federal system of government can be legislated by a constitutional change. So, as I said, the Bangsamoro Basic Law therefore may take a different shape because Mr. Duterte may have access to more Muslim groups whom he may lead to a new agreement among themselves for the sake of the Bangsamoro. But I am hoping that it will still be within the framework of the comprehensive agreement Bangsamoro.

Nery: Talking about great participation by Mindanaoans in the national government, are you encouraging perhaps your professors some of your alumni, to join the Duterte administration?

Fr. Tabora: I think he’s taking a number of our alumni, but im very jealous of my people I hope he does not take my people. We will help as much as we can. We think we can help by convening people, we’ve done that in the past and we will continue to do it, like the National Democratic Front and the CPP-NPA that’s coming up June 8, and June 11 and 12 we’ll be convening a large number of indigenous people groups to be able to contribute to the whole discussion.

In these discussions, people may say what they want to say and we’ll just document it and goes out in the social media. Some of it becomes viral, but that’s the contribution I think we can make in the process.

Nery: But Father, I know that President-Elect Duterte is interested in constitutional change, would Ateneo de Davao, your law school, take the lead in maybe starting the discussion on how this change would take place? Will it be through a constitutional convention, what kind of amendments would be in play and so on?

Fr. Tabora: We will certainly be very active. We’ve talked about this already. Whether we’d be leading, I don’t think that we feel that we need to be leading it. There are law schools in Ateneo de Zambaoanga, in Xavier University, Ateneo de Manila. We are organized for our advocacy among the different Ateneos now so that we can bring a collective Ateneo name to suggestions for Constitutional change. So, I think we will be very interested, first in whether we would have a constitutional change at all. That’s an issue, I know that Mr. Duterte is very much for it and for federalism, but I’m also instructed by Christian Monsod who was the framer of the constitution, who really believes that many of the intentions of President-elect Duterte can be achieved simply by amending a local government code. You can bring about a constellation of provinces and bring them working together and de-imperializing Manila has simply by working with the local government code. It would therefore free us from the danger of the social justice provisions of the constitutions being tampered with. That’s something that president Duterte may have to consider because he is a social justice man. And the biggest friend of social justice is Article XIII of the Constitution. It sort of spells out where we want to go, and the last thing I want is for constitutional change to be done with respect to the international desires of our multinational companies who wish to force their agendas on us, and who therefore may make the social justice failures all the worse here. So, we will be interested in this and we will participate if there are social changes in the constitution that needed to be made, we would like to be able to participate, also to protect the social justice values there in the constitution.

Nery: Father Tabora, 2-3 weeks ago you gave him advice. A very nuance statement, but people remember “Don’t turn into a monster.” Maybe we can end with advice from you. I mean, if you were in a position to sit down with president Duterte, maybe you’re down with food poisoning and he’s sitting on the side of your bed, you have a chance to tell him, “It’s what, less than 3 weeks to your inauguration?” What should he be doing?

Fr. Tabora: I put this in one of my tweets, you know, and I remember how when Cory Aquino became president, you know, she came from the masses, from the people. She was the epitome of a simple person with, who represented people power in the country, a very powerful concept at that time. When she got to Malacanang, every Tom, Dick and Harry started saying, telling her, how to be presidential. So Cory Aquino became presidential. And I think she was taken away from the masses. She became presidential, you know, people began to understand, well she’s really fitting into Malacanang, you know, but I think it hurt her. I think everybody’s gonna try to tell Mr. Duterte how to be presidential. And my advice to him would be: just follow your heart, follow your people and remember your mother. That’s all.

READ: Duterte told: Follow your heart, your people

Nery: It would be interesting to know that his mother was a leader of the anti-Marcos struggle in Davao City, which was the reason why he was appointed Vice Mayor. Father thank you so much

Fr. Tabora: No, you remember that moving scene after he was elected, he cried on the grave of his mother because his mother does play a big part in his life, you know. And his highest ideals I think come to him from his mother.

Nery: Father, I think this will be for another interview, but there are many questions as to his willingness to bury Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani, his closeness to Bongbong Marcos, and all that, but maybe another time. Maybe we need to do more research into Soledad Roa Duterte. Father I want to thank you very much for giving your time this Sunday afternoon.

Fr. Tabora: You’re welcome John.

 
THE FULL INTERVIEW IN VIDEO
https://youtu.be/ATk-Ve13e1w 


MANILA BULLETIN

Mexican drug cartel using PH as transshipment point – Duterte August 5, 2016 Share3 Tweet1 Share0 Email0 Share77 By Elena L. Aben, Genalyn D. Kabiling, and Aaron B. Recuenco

President Duterte said the Mexican drug cartel Sinaloa has made inroads in the country, establishing a transshipment point for its global network.

“Is Mexico into us? Yes. The Sinaloa drug cartel of Mexico,” Duterte said in a speech on Wednesday before members of the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV) in Malacañang.

He said the drug syndicate is shifting focus away from its main market, the United States, because of intensified anti-narcotic operations there.

“Tayo ang transshipment. Kasi ini-interdict sila ng Amerika,” the President said.

Duterte first confirmed the presence of the Mexican cartel in the country when he visited Camp Guillermo Nakar in Lucena, Quezon, last week.

The Sinaloa is one of the biggest drug trafficking organizations in Mexico. It is involved in the importation of marijuana, heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine or shabu.

“I am not fighting a crisis, I am fighting a war,” Duterte said.

He said he is willing to put his “honor, life and the presidency” in waging war against drugs.

The only way to win the war is by denying narcotics syndicates their market, the President said, “and before I can do that, I have to exterminate the apparatus… kung mapatay ko na lahat tong mga tinyente (if I get all these lieutenants killed) then the business of shabu would no longer be viable.”

Amid the growing outcry against the spate of extrajudicial killings of users and small drug dealers, the President stressed that “poverty and whatever cannot be used” as an excuse to go into the drug trade “because it is already the nation that you are trying to destroy by being a member of that apparatus.”

The President said he has ordered that areas in military camps be set aside for the building of rehabilitation centers for the thousands of drug dependents who have surrendered to the authorities.

READ MORE...

He warned that if the drug menace is not stopped, seven years from now the number of drug addicts in the country would double and “we will have narcopolitics.”

He waxed philosophical, saying he is certain that once he dies, he would go to heaven, not to hell.

“Bakit ako mapunta ng hell? Hindi naman ko ‘yung, wala naman akong evil intent (Why would I go to hell? I don’t have any evil intent),” Duterte said.

But if ever he goes to hell, he said he will not be intimidated by Satan.

“If you send me to hell, I’ll kick out Satan, tell him ‘Get out of here. There is a new boss in town or else I’ll cut off your tail,” he said, drawing laughter from his audience.

Duterte has no qualms about naming government and police officials he says are involved in drug trafficking.

He has issued a shoot-on-sight order against Albuera, Leyte, Mayor Rolando Espinosa Sr. and his son, Kerwin, forcing the mayor to surrender and provide a statement to the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) supposedly detailing his involvement in the drug trade.

KERWIN, RICH SOURCE OF DRUG TRADE INFO

Meanwhile, Director General Ronald dela Rosa, Philippine National Police (PNP) chief, said Kerwin, who is on the run, could be a rich source of information on the government and police officials who act as his protectors.

Dela Rosa said Kerwin is just an alias of Espinosa’s son, whose real name is Rolan.

He said intelligence reports link Kerwin to retired police generals Marcelo Garbo and Vicente Loot, two of the five police officials linked by Duterte to illegal drugs.

Dela Rosa said some of the “narco-generals” were seen at the blessing of one of the mansions of the Espinosas in Albuera.

The reports tag Kerwin as the main supplier of drugs in Eastern Visayas. His father is reportedly his protector.

Kerwin is said to be an underling of convicted drug lord Peter Co who Mayor Espinosa admitted is his son’s source of illegal drugs.

“They have been operating for so long yet they could not be stopped. If they do not have protection from politicians and police officers, would they stay in their business that long?” Dela Rosa said.

He said one of the siblings of Mayor Espinosa, who is living abroad, called up the mayor to say Kerwin intends to surrender.

Kerwin is reportedly in Malaysia.

Dela Rosa also confirmed reports that Mayor Espinosa, his daughter and his common law wife are staying at the official residence of the PNP chief, the White House, in Camp Crame.

“I have to be humane because his wife is there, his daughter is there and they were crying. Where would I place them, inside a jail? It’s not possible because they still have no arrest warrant so they are enjoying the White House,” said Dela Rosa.

Part of Duterte’s anti-drugs campaign calls for the mandatory testing of military, police and government personnel for narcotics use.

13 SOLDIERS FOR DISCHARGE OVER DRUGS

On Thursday the spokesman of the Philippine Army said four of the 13 Army soldiers who failed the drug test conducted last July 5 also failed the confirmatory test and will be discharged from the service. Also dismissed were 20 employees of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) who tested positive for drugs.

Over 1,000 CAAP personnel from Manila, Davao, Dumaguete, Tuguegarao, Busuanga and Siquijor recently underwent drug tests.

Col. Benjamin Hao said three of the discharged Army troopers are corporals and the fourth is a staff sergeant.

Thirteen out of 2,500 Army personnel from post units and offices based in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City, failed the initial screening test and were underwent further confirmatory test.

“The Philippine Army is very serious with its anti-drug campaign,” said Hao. “Since we started this campaign, 204 soldiers nationwide have been discharged from the service because of cases related to illegal drugs.” (With reports from Francis T. Wakefield and Ariel Fernandez)

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

AFP: Military personnel on Duterte's drug list ordered relieved (philstar.com) | Updated August 7, 2016 - 4:21pm 12 150 googleplus1 0


Army troops listen to President Rodrigo Roa Duterte during his visit at the headquarters of 3rd Infantry Division in Camp General Macario Peralta Jr. in Jamindan, Capiz on August 5. Presidential Photographers Division/Ace Morandante

MANILA, Philippines (Philippines News Agency) – Military personnel identified by President Rodrigo Duterte as allegedly having links with the illegal drug trade have been immediately relieved from their posts.

This was disclosed by AFP public affairs office chief Col. Edgard Arevalo in a message to the PNA Sunday.

"The commander-in-chief has already ordered their relief from whatever positions the named AFP personnel are holding and directed them to report to the chief-of-staff (AFP head Gen. Ricardo Visaya)," he added.

During a press briefing in Davao City from Saturday night until Sunday dawn, the President released the names of politicians, members of the judiciary, law enforcement and military personnel with alleged links to the illegal drugs trade.

These personnel will undergo administrative proceedings and will be charged, heard and judgement rendered on them as part of the due process, Arevalo pointed out.

READ: LIST: Public officials Duterte said are involved in illegal drugs

Duterte to give ‘narco officials’ due process

"We reiterate the AFP chief-of-staff General Ricardo Visaya's unwavering commitment to the commander-in-chief's drive of ridding the country, including our ranks, of any undue involvements in prohibited drugs," he added.

Arevalo said the AFP will be unrelenting in its campaign against illegal drugs.

"The full force of applicable military, criminal, and civil laws will be applied without letup," he added. – PNA/Priam Nepomuceno


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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