PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

NOY BIDS FAREWELL TO AFP OFFICERS, MEN
[RELATED: P-Noy sure Ninoy, Cory will give him thumbs up]


JUNE 28 -President Aquino troops the line with acting AFP chief Lt. Gen. Glorioso Miranda during the testimonial parade and review at Camp Aguinaldo in Quezon City yesterday. KRIZJOHN ROSALES With only two days left in office, President Aquino yesterday bid goodbye to officers and men of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), saying he was proud to leave behind a modernized military. The AFP leadership, led by Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin and acting AFP chief of staff Glorioso Miranda, expressed their gratitude to the outgoing Chief Executive for looking after the soldiers’ welfare and providing a P65.8-billion modernization fund. Aquino noted that the AFP has come a long way, pointing out that during his predecessor’s term, the government could hardly purchase a second-hand C-130 plane. Now, the AFP has four brand-new C-130s, with another one coming. At the same time, the AFP is now equipped with frigates – the most recent of which was the BRP Tarlac, the largest in its fleet – so that the government would be able to defend its territory in the face of maritime encroachments by China, a military superpower. In his speech at Camp Aguinaldo, where a testimonial parade and review was held in his honor, Aquino said that for the first time, the Philippines now has a sea vessel that can be transformed into a hospital and command center in times of disaster or calamity. READ MORE...RELATED,
P-Noy sure Ninoy, Cory will give him thumbs up...WATCH VIDEO MAMASAPANO 1 YEAR AFTER DOCUMENTARY...

ALSO:
Malacañang official - Economic performance, return of global respect are Noy accomplishments
[RELATED: Goodbye to all that? -By Ninez Cacho-Olivarez]


JUNE 28 -A Malacañang official claimed that while deep-rooted bureaucratic corruption has not been totally eradicated, the six-year administration of President Aquino is bowing out with the economy at its strongest in decades. Jun Acculador/CC BY-ND A robust economy and renewed respect from the international community highlight the accomplishments of the Aquino administration. A Malacañang official claimed that while deep-rooted bureaucratic corruption has not been totally eradicated, the six-year administration of President Aquino is bowing out with the economy at its strongest in decades. The Philippines has also gained the respect of the international community, according to Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. of the Presidential Communications Operations Office. Coloma pointed out Manila’s significant and substantial improvement in the Economic Freedom Index in 2010. He disclosed in his weekend interview over state-run radio dzRB that the Philippines used to be ranked 115th, but after five years of good governance, the country is now at 70th place. He added that the Global Competitiveness Index of the World Economic Forum of 2010 the country was at 85, but rose to 47 in 2015. “We have surpassed almost half,” he said, highlighting how other countries now view the Philippines with regard to the problem of corruption. Coloma explained further that in the Global Enabling Trade Index of the World Economic Forum, the Philippines jumped to 64 in 2015 from 92nd in 2010. Major accomplishments in the economy include the 6.2 percent average annual Gross Domestic Product growth, the highest in the last 40 years. The country also strengthened consumer prices and achieved steady inflation at an average of 1.4 percent at the end of 2015. Coloma reported that the Aquino administration increased the employment rate from 92.7 percent in 2010 to 94.2 percent in January 2016. The Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, Coloma said, lifted 7.7 million Filipinos out of poverty. The unemployment rate of 5.8 percent is the lowest that the country has posted in the last several decades, according to him. READ MORE...RELATED, Goodbye to all that?...

ALSO:
THURSDAY IN MALACAÑANG - Only diplomats allowed to bring cars at Duterte inauguration


JUNE 28 -President-elect attends the flag raising ceremony at the Davao City Hall. Philstar.com/AJ Bolando
Only members of the diplomatic corps may bring their own vehicles for the inauguration of President-elect Rodrigo Duterte on Thursday. Malacañang Inaugural Committee chief Ambassador Marciano Paynor Jr. said that even with a limit of 500 guests, the incoming president's inauguration will create a traffic jam. "In order that their cars will not create traffic jam, we asked for all of the guests to proceed to (Philippine International Convention Center and that's where we will do the security check but that's also where we will provide them with ample breakfast," Paynor said in an interview with ANC's Talkback. Paynor noted that the diplomats will not be allowed to bring their spouses due to limited space. "Only diplomats are invited, not their spouses," Paynor said. The guests will also not be allowed to take photos during the ceremony in keeping with the request of Duterte to keep the inauguration simple and meaningful. At 11 a.m. on Thursday, Duterte will meet with outgoing President Benigno Aquino III for his send-off and final departure honors at the Malacañan Palace grounds. READ MORE...

ALSO: Aquino urged to take lead, probe spate of cops killings of drug suspects
[RELATED: Gatchalian vows push for free higher education]


JUNE 28 -INCOMING Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian Nestor Corrales/INQUIRER.net
INCOMING Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian on Monday urged the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) and the Philippine National Police’s internal affairs department to look into the spate of police killings of drug suspects. And he wants President Aquino, who is still Chief Executive, to “take the lead” in the investigation despite the fact that Mr. Aquino is stepping down on Thursday. “They should see if there is a violation of the law and due process,” Gatchalian insisted. Gatchalian said the deaths of drug suspects which he noted now numbered 51 since May should all be investigated. “We just can’t say (the drug suspects) fought (and then were killed by the police) and that is the end of that,” Gatchalian told reporters at the Senate where he attended an orientation for new senators. He said the investigation should proceed and “put closure to what has happened.” People should not accept their deaths this way, according to Gatchalian, who underscored the need for the respect of due process and the law. As a deterrent Gatchalian had said during the election campaign that he favored the reimposition of the death penalty for big-time syndicate leaders to serve as a deterrent for foreign drug lords to come here and operate. READ MORE...WATCH RELATED VIDEO...ALSO,
Gatchalian vows push for free higher education...

ALSO: 35 mayors linked to drugs


JUNE 28 -Duterte to Mayors: I will not assign to you a chief of police of your choice Davao City – Incoming President Rodrigo R. Duterte revealed that 30 to 35 mayors are players in the illegal drugs trade. Without mentioning names, Duterte said these local chief executives with links to the illegal drugs business cannot pick their chief of police. “I will not assign to you a chief of police of your choice. I would even amend that law… sila sila mismo naglalaro diyan (they are the ones playing there),” said Duterte, who added that he would ask for the amendment of the law giving mayors the operational supervision and control of the police. Republic Act 8551, an act establishing the Philippines National Police under a re-organized Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), gives the mayors the power to direct employment and deployment of units or elements of the PNP through the station commander. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Noy bids farewell to AFP officers, men


JUNE 28 -President Aquino troops the line with acting AFP chief Lt. Gen. Glorioso Miranda during the testimonial parade and review at Camp Aguinaldo in Quezon City yesterday. KRIZJOHN ROSALES

MANILA, JUNE 30, 2016 (PHILSTAR) By Delon Porcalla June 28, 2016 - With only two days left in office, President Aquino yesterday bid goodbye to officers and men of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), saying he was proud to leave behind a modernized military.

The AFP leadership, led by Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin and acting AFP chief of staff Glorioso Miranda, expressed their gratitude to the outgoing Chief Executive for looking after the soldiers’ welfare and providing a P65.8-billion modernization fund.

Aquino noted that the AFP has come a long way, pointing out that during his predecessor’s term, the government could hardly purchase a second-hand C-130 plane.

Now, the AFP has four brand-new C-130s, with another one coming.

At the same time, the AFP is now equipped with frigates – the most recent of which was the BRP Tarlac, the largest in its fleet – so that the government would be able to defend its territory in the face of maritime encroachments by China, a military superpower.

In his speech at Camp Aguinaldo, where a testimonial parade and review was held in his honor, Aquino said that for the first time, the Philippines now has a sea vessel that can be transformed into a hospital and command center in times of disaster or calamity.

READ MORE...

Meanwhile, Aquino thanked Gazmin, who also served as the guard of his late father, former senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. when he was jailed by former president Ferdinand Marcos during martial law.

Gazmin, a retired Army general, was appointed chief of the Presidential Security Group (PSG) when Aquino’s mother Corazon was catapulted to power in the late ’80s – after the Marcoses were forced into exile.

Aquino said that when he appointed Gazmin, the latter requested that he would only serve for one to two years.

“Pasensiya ka na, Secretary Gazmin. Nakalimutan ko iyung usapan nating iyon, three days to go na lang, isagad mo na (Sorry, Secretary Gazmin. I forgot our agreement. It’s just three days to go, please stretch it a little bit more),” a smiling Aquino said.

The President also gave credit to Rear Admiral Raul Ubando of the PSG, who dedicated his all in securing him amid major crises like the Zamboanga siege, Bohol earthquake and the onslaught of Super Typhoon Yolanda, all in 2013.

This was apart from securing Pope Francis during his visit in January last year, as well as delegates to the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit held in Manila last November.

----------------------------

RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

P-Noy sure Ninoy, Cory will give him thumbs up By: Nikko Dizon @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:51 AM June 30th, 2016


President Benigno Simeon Aquino lll. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/JOAN BONDOC

BENIGNO “Noynoy” Aquino III knows that when steps down from office today (Thursday), his parents, democracy icons Ninoy and Cory, will be smiling.

Mr. Aquino told the INQUIRER he is certain to get one today, as their stamp of approval for the job he has done as the 15th President of the Republic of the Philippines.

A smile, he said, was the “highest compliment” his parents gave to him and his siblings.

“Yes, I think both of them are smiling right now,” said Mr. Aquino, their only son.

Mr. Aquino has always worn the yellow ribbon on his barongs – some actually have the ribbon embroidered on them – a symbol of his parents’ legacy, which he has strove hard to preserve.

It is not easy to be the son in a brood of five, where your family struggled to survive much like the hundreds of other families who defied the dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

Mr. Aquino’s tendency to steel himself was something he had learned early on in life – not by choice, but more by circumstance – to allow himself to make sound decisions. But while he was President, people interpreted it as lack of empathy.

When you listen to Mr. Aquino tell his life story, you will realize that his father had twice given him – 10 years apart – the monumental task of taking care of his mother and sisters, and by extension, the country.

The first time was when he was a 13-year-old boy and his father was in jail. This, President Aquino had narrated many times.

The second time was a story Mr. Aquino had not spoken much about, at least publicly.

It was in Boston, the moment father and son were getting ready to ride the car to the Logan Airport for the elder Aquino’s final trip back to the Philippines.

“The extent of all his habilin was just a nod of his head. With that one nod, (he seemed to say) ‘Alam mo na lahat ng inaasahan ko sa ’yo, lahat ng mga obligasyon sa pamilya…’ Parang napaka-pregnant (with meaning) with that one nod. I am not sure if naki-nod ako or sinabi ko ‘Oo, dad.’ Yung ‘Oh’ (the sound a Filipino makes when he nods his head)… andun na lahat,” Mr. Aquino said.

Noynoy Aquino, 56, never planned or aspired for the presidency. But he was prepared for it, even if many insist he was not.

He may have had a less than stellar career as a legislator, but his personal journey as the son of Ninoy and Cory, the child who preferred to stay in the background, yet absorbed every bit of the country’s struggles, honed him for the presidency.

He was ready to become President in 2010 when he won with the biggest percentage vote in history.

ROUGH ROAD

The straight path President Aquino promised the Filipino people turned out to be a rough road.

But in all, he brought stability to the country, in great contrast to the tumultuous nine years of Gloria Arroyo and the truncated term of Joseph Estrada.

Come to think of it, it was an entire generation between the presidencies of Fidel Ramos and Noynoy Aquino – the only times, post martial law, where there had been no military intervention amid a political crisis.

While his administration was far from perfect and critics insisted he had a lackluster performance, President Aquino had the most consistently high trust ratings, ending his term with a 49 percent rating in March 2016, according to Pulse Asia.

Mr. Aquino will leave office with the highest net satisfaction rating compared to his predecessors, including his own mother, Corazon Aquino.

SWS figures showed that Mrs. Aquino had a +7 net satisfaction rating in April 1992; Ramos with +19; Estrada, +9; and Arroyo, -17.

Mr. Aquino has a +27 net satisfaction rating in April 2016.

Except for the Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) debacle and the pork barrel scam where some of his allies were implicated, there was hardly any corruption issue against the President himself.

But Mr. Aquino had a penchant for taking the bullet for his men, which earned him the ire of the people who wished he just fired incompetent government officials, especially those responsible for the lousy metro train system and horrendous traffic.

That the President was largely untainted by graft, and with such high credibility, the economy surged at a 6.2 percent growth rate, the fastest since the late 1970s.

Even as his administration was hit for its underspending that led to a slower growth rate, the Philippines was christened Asia’s Rising Star.

If Filipinos were difficult to please, it was a different story on the global stage.

Mr. Aquino’s high esteem can largely be credited to the reputation of his revered parents. But he stepped out of their shadows and made the world take the Philippines seriously.

He received standing ovations abroad; the country took center stage at the biggest global environment summit in Paris last year.

President Aquino will certainly be remembered at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), where he fought for the Philippines’ national interests amid China’s aggression in the South China Sea.

He led the campaign for the adoption of a legally binding Code of Conduct among claimant parties, despite it being an uphill battle. The Philippines stood up to China quite a number of times – whether at sea with a brilliantly executed Ayungin shoal mission or bringing China to court for arbitration.

Mr. Aquino does not like travelling, but chief diplomat, he made a total of 46 foreign trips in six years, which included 11 state visits, 10 official visits, four working visits, and 21 summits. The United States was his most visited country, going there seven times.

As commander-in-chief, President Aquino led the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) as it pivoted back to its original mandate of external defense.

The Defense Department spent P65.89 billion for the modernization program that at least gave the military a minimum defense capability after decades of neglect.

For the Philippine National Police (PNP), government in 2015 released a P2.83 billion fund for the facilities and equipment of the police force.

If there was one thing he learned about himself as a leader, President Aquino said he was now “more cognizant” of his limits.

But he held on to the “Filipino belief that God would not give you a burden that you cannot handle.”

The year 2013 might as well be the annus horribilis of the Aquino administration for all the natural and man-made calamities that it saw – from the Atimonan massacre to the revival of the Sabah claim by the Sultanate of Sulu; the severe weather disturbances that lashed at the country one after the other.

In September that year was the Zamboanga siege, and the next month, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck Bohol.

In November, supertyphoon “Yolanda,” the strongest typhoon ever to make landfall, killed over 6,000 people.

Mr. Aquino said that he felt many of the challenges his administration faced was to prepare them for Yolanda, which he considers his biggest test because of the sheer devastation it brought.

With less than two years left in office, Mamasapano happened and it was a tragedy that Mr. Aquino himself said he would carry to his grave.

It cost him the passage of the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), envisioned to finally bring peace and development in Central Mindanao.

In the legislative front, Mr. Aquino will be best remembered for signing the Reproductive Health Bill despite strong opposition from the Catholic Church and the Sin Tax, which levied higher taxes on tobacco and alcohol products, despite the strong lobby against it.

He vetoed a number of populist bills despite the backlash.

But he will also be remembered for his failure to push the Freedom of Information Act, a promise he made in 2010.

Mr. Aquino’s testy relationship with the judiciary brought some of the most exciting episodes in his term.

Despite all the challenges, the President said the six years were worth it. “I can shower you with statistics,” he said.

Perhaps a little known fact is that the number of negotiators for many trade agreements actually “quintupled” because, the President said government “received requests from our foreign trade partners to expedite the process.”

There were also low-key but successful programs that directly helped the people in the countryside, such as the sitio electrification projects meant to energize the countryside and the Trade Department’s Shared Service Facilities program to help micro-entrepreneurs.

The figures also include:

– 6.1 percent unemployment rate as of April 2016 compared to the 6.8 percent of the same period in 2010;

– 93.9 percent employment compared to the 92 percent in April 2010;

– 26.3 percent poverty incidence in the first semester of 2015, down from the 28.6 percent in the same period of 2009;

– six million foreign tourists;

– 55 million domestic tourists;

– an expected $6.3 billion foreign direct investment this year;

– a prediction to become a $1 trillion economy by 2030, bringing the country to First World status;

– nine million TESDA course graduates;

– 1.51 million of the 4.2 million households enrolled in the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) improved their status to “non-poor;

– 18,000 kilometers of national tourism roads and farm-to-market roads completed.

Ask him what government departments such as Health, Science and Technology, and Environment have done, President Aquino can bring out a list of accomplishments and discuss them in detail.

He was particularly happy with the trust people now have in the state weather bureau.

“PAGASA’s credibility is very high,” Mr. Aquino said.

With all the statistics as well as anecdotal testimonies, Mr. Aquino was obviously piqued by allegations that he had done nothing in the past six years, calling them “a generic claim.”

“I want to find out who these people are who say that they didn’t feel (the growth). I’d like to ask them, could you just put yourself in the first half of 2010? What were your concerns then? What are your concerns now? And if we went to a more thorough interview with these individuals, I think we can point out what the differences are for everybody. And we can go on and on,” Mr. Aquino said.

Does he think he would have a quiet life as citizen Noy?

“My motto has always been prepare for the worst and hope for the best. We did disturb a lot of rice bowls. Going through the philosophy that we just took turns riding the merry go round that led to nowhere, we should not have accepted this position,” Mr. Aquino said.

When he ran for President in 2010, the goal was “to effect changes in society.”

“And part and parcel of that is to do away with the culture of impunity. Some people think it is their right to do harm to our people while they are in office and to the extent that we could, based on the evidence we managed to unearth, we went after these people,” Mr. Aquino said.

And so the Aquino administration filed cases against an ex-president, three senators, and many other government officials – something that was unheard of before.

Mr. Aquino’s critics have been saying that cases would soon be filed against him as he finally loses his immunity from being charged in court.

But the outgoing President is confident he has done right by his country, saying: “If there is justice in this world, I believe we can defend everything that we did.”

Noynoy Aquino steps down from office with his head held high.

The son rose and soared, to dream the impossible dream, fight the unbeatable foe, bear with unbearable sorrow, and run where the brave dare not go.

On January 25, 2015, 44 members of the Philippine National Police’s Special Action Force (SAF) were killed in the hunt for Malaysian terrorist Zulkifli Abdhir, aka “Marwan,” in Mamasapano, Maguindanao province. Their mission may have succeeded, but one year later families of the slain SAF44 and affected civilians today continue to seek justice from a government which allegedly broke chain of command and poorly handled the mission. Visit the INQUIRER tribute site at inquirer.net/mamasapano.


PHILSTAR

Economic performance, return of global respect cited as Noy accomplishments By Delon Porcalla (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 28, 2016 - 12:00am 1 17 googleplus0 0


A Malacañang official claimed that while deep-rooted bureaucratic corruption has not been totally eradicated, the six-year administration of President Aquino is bowing out with the economy at its strongest in decades. Jun Acculador/CC BY-ND

MANILA, Philippines - A robust economy and renewed respect from the international community highlight the accomplishments of the Aquino administration.

A Malacañang official claimed that while deep-rooted bureaucratic corruption has not been totally eradicated, the six-year administration of President Aquino is bowing out with the economy at its strongest in decades.

The Philippines has also gained the respect of the international community, according to Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. of the Presidential Communications Operations Office.

Coloma pointed out Manila’s significant and substantial improvement in the Economic Freedom Index in 2010.

He disclosed in his weekend interview over state-run radio dzRB that the Philippines used to be ranked 115th, but after five years of good governance, the country is now at 70th place.

He added that the Global Competitiveness Index of the World Economic Forum of 2010 the country was at 85, but rose to 47 in 2015. “We have surpassed almost half,” he said, highlighting how other countries now view the Philippines with regard to the problem of corruption.

Coloma explained further that in the Global Enabling Trade Index of the World Economic Forum, the Philippines jumped to 64 in 2015 from 92nd in 2010.

Major accomplishments in the economy include the 6.2 percent average annual Gross Domestic Product growth, the highest in the last 40 years.

The country also strengthened consumer prices and achieved steady inflation at an average of 1.4 percent at the end of 2015.

Coloma reported that the Aquino administration increased the employment rate from 92.7 percent in 2010 to 94.2 percent in January 2016.

The Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, Coloma said, lifted 7.7 million Filipinos out of poverty.

The unemployment rate of 5.8 percent is the lowest that the country has posted in the last several decades, according to him.

READ MORE...

The country’s investment on infrastructure was also increased from 1.8 percent of GDP in 2010 to about 5 percent of GDP this year.

“Together with the active promotion of public-private partnerships or PPP, 12 contracts were awarded to private partners, more than the combined six solicited projects awarded during the past three administrations,” Coloma noted.

The government also intensified universal health care and heightened access to quality health care, including the Universal Health Care program of PhilHealth that now covers 93.45 million Filipinos.

In the education sector, he said 89,720 classrooms were constructed from 2010 to March 2016, with another 95,429 scheduled for construction.

This is coming from a shortage of 66,800 classrooms in 2010 and more than double the number of classrooms built from 2005 to 2009. The 1:1 ratio of textbook to students was also achieved. Furthermore, 170,000 additional teachers were hired, Coloma said.

Another category is the provision of technical assistance to more than 10 million youths now properly equipped with skills and certification to join the local and foreign workforce or put up their own business.

A recent study by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) showed that six out of 10 of the agency’s graduates find employment within six months to one year after completion of the program, according to Coloma.

--------------------------

RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE BY NINEZ CACHO OLIVAREZ

Goodbye to all that? Written by Ninez Cacho-Olivares Thursday, 30 June 2016 00:00



As the clock strikes 12 noon today, Benigno Aquino lll will be forever gone from Malacañang.

But while he no longer rules the Palace roost, the nation — save perhaps for the yellow devotees and the wealthy who became wealthier during his stay — so disenchanted and disappointed in him and his governance of six long years, may be wondering if we, the Filipino people, can say goodbye to all that.

Can we, the people, finally say goodbye to the political vindictiveness and selective justice that reigned during Noynoy’s six-year term, now that we have yet another President for another six years, in the person Rodrigo Roa Duterte?

AQUINO's SELECTIVE JUSTICE

It was political vindictiveness and selective justice that characterized Nonoy Aquino’s reign. It was clearly selective and misplaced punitive justice he had engaged in, because it was made only too clear that while he had his political foes, who were perceived by the Liberal Party’s electoral threats, Noynoy ensured the protection of his corrupt officials, all of whom, it should be pointed out, were also protected by Noynoy’s Ombudsman, Conchita Carpio-Morales, who never had all the complaints lodged before her office investigated with cases filed before the Sandiganbayan, or the complaints were dismissed, for her claimed lack of probable cause. This happens only in cases of Noynoy and his boys.

That selective and misguided punitive justice, coupled with Noynoy’s now infamous political vindictiveness can be easily noted in the case of former President Gloria Arroyo.

Breaching the law, Noynoy and his injustice Secretary Leila de Lima, ordered Gloria stopped from traveling abroad for medical treatment, despite not having the power to stop Gloria from boarding her flight since it is only the courts that can issue a hold departure order and despite the fact that Gloria had been given the clearance by the Supreme Court to seek medical treatment abroad.

And to ensure that she would be barred from traveling abroad during his term, Noynoy, De Lima and then poll chief Sixto Brillantes, in record time, slapped an electoral sabotage case against her in court and also in record time — on the same day the case was filed — the case against Gloria was accepted and an arrest order was issued, causing her detention.

But as the court eventually granted her bail, yet another case of a non-bailable offense of plunder was filed and she continues to remain in detention to this day.

And just a few weeks before Noynoy’s term was up, there came yet another plunder complaint against her, which is in the Ombudsman’s office, one filed by her field investigator. Imagine that kind of political vindictiveness and all those years, Noynoy grabbed all economic growth credit from her.

It was the same selective justice he had engaged in against the three opposition senators: Juan Ponce Enrile, Jinggoy Estrada and Bong Revilla, with the last two still languishing in detention.

It was under Noynoy that democratic institutions were prostituted — the courts and the legislature. The Ombudsman and her office. The Anti-Money Laundering Council, the National Bureau of Investigation, the police force. Even the Judicial and Bar Council and many more institutions that were prostituted by Noynoy and his LPs.

Will there be a repeat of this under a Duterte presidency?

Certainly, certain problems may well be solved under the Duterte presidency, especially if he is given emergency powers, and if he still has been left with enough funds to go ahead with his projects that have to do with solving the traffic problem, which, however, may not be solved in the next six months mainly because not even metro rail system can be fixed in such a short time, unless rails are fixed with speed and coaches a plenty are quickly purchased but not to forget, the entire rehabilitation process can take sometime.

But even if the metro rail system is fixed and ready to go in six months time, vehicular traffic in Metro Manila will continue to be the bane of Metro Manilans especially if major road projects and more constructions are to be done simultaneously.

To this day, not even the Manila Ninoy Aquino International Airport expressway is finished and may take an even longer time.
But that is Art Tugade and Dutrete’s problem now.

Duterte’s program of government, so it seems, is merely is peace and order, the easing of traffic and the drug problem whose solution, under Duterte, is summary execution.

Should he be able to deliver on his promises within the time frame he pledged, what then? What other programs does he, as well as his government, really have?

This, the Filipinos may know too late.

Still, the Tribune wishes Duterte the best of luck to do a lot better than his predecessor. The Filipinos deserve this from the next President, Rodrigo Roa Duterte after the nightmare that was Noynoy Aquino.

Duterte should ensure that we, the people, must be able to say, goodbye to all, that was Noynoy and his ways.


PHILSTAR

Only diplomats allowed to bring cars at Duterte inauguration By Patricia Lourdes Viray (philstar.com) | Updated June 28, 2016 - 3:59pm 5 326 googleplus0 0


President-elect attends the flag raising ceremony at the Davao City Hall. Philstar.com/AJ Bolando

MANILA, Philippines – Only members of the diplomatic corps may bring their own vehicles for the inauguration of President-elect Rodrigo Duterte on Thursday.

Malacañang Inaugural Committee chief Ambassador Marciano Paynor Jr. said that even with a limit of 500 guests, the incoming president's inauguration will create a traffic jam.

"In order that their cars will not create traffic jam, we asked for all of the guests to proceed to (Philippine International Convention Center and that's where we will do the security check but that's also where we will provide them with ample breakfast," Paynor said in an interview with ANC's Talkback.

Paynor noted that the diplomats will not be allowed to bring their spouses due to limited space.

"Only diplomats are invited, not their spouses," Paynor said.

The guests will also not be allowed to take photos during the ceremony in keeping with the request of Duterte to keep the inauguration simple and meaningful.

At 11 a.m. on Thursday, Duterte will meet with outgoing President Benigno Aquino III for his send-off and final departure honors at the Malacañan Palace grounds.

READ MORE...

Duterte will then go back inside the palace for his arrival honors and to deliver his speech.

The incoming president will ascend the Malacañang grand staircase for his first ceremonial entry into the palace.

Duterte will then go back to the palace after the ceremony for a diplomatic reception where officials will have an opportunity to convey the greetings of their respective heads of state.

Paynor described the diplomatic reception as an "in and out thing" as the diplomats will only be introduced to Duterte through their respective countries.

Duterte and Vice President-elect Leni Robredo will hold separate inauguration ceremonies on Thursday.


INQUIRER

Aquino urged: Probe drug killings By: Christine O. Avendaño @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer
12:24 AM June 28th, 2016


INCOMING Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian Nestor Corrales/INQUIRER.net

INCOMING Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian on Monday urged the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) and the Philippine National Police’s internal affairs department to look into the spate of police killings of drug suspects.

And he wants President Aquino, who is still Chief Executive, to “take the lead” in the investigation despite the fact that Mr. Aquino is stepping down on Thursday.

“They should see if there is a violation of the law and due process,” Gatchalian insisted.

Gatchalian said the deaths of drug suspects which he noted now numbered 51 since May should all be investigated.

“We just can’t say (the drug suspects) fought (and then were killed by the police) and that is the end of that,” Gatchalian told reporters at the Senate where he attended an orientation for new senators.

He said the investigation should proceed and “put closure to what has happened.”

People should not accept their deaths this way, according to Gatchalian, who underscored the need for the respect of due process and the law.

As a deterrent

Gatchalian had said during the election campaign that he favored the reimposition of the death penalty for big-time syndicate leaders to serve as a deterrent for foreign drug lords to come here and operate.

READ MORE...

Reminded of the all-out war against drugs by the incoming administration, he said the police should still follow the law and due process.

“It’s not because there is a new pronouncement that you change things and neglect the law,” Gatchalian said.

Last month, PNP officials attributed the intensified antidrug operations to the “motivation” and “policy direction” from President-elect Rodrigo Duterte to step up the war on narcotics.

The PNP had said that from Jan. 1 to May 9, there were 13,920 suspects arrested and 39 more killed in antidrug operations nationwide.

After the elections, from May 10 to June 15, there were 3,760 suspects arrested and 29 killed, he added.

The monthly average from the preelection period he cited was 3,480 for arrests and nine for kills.

RELATED VIDEO

 

--------------------------

RELATED FROM THE MANILA TIMES

Gatchalian vows push for free higher education June 29, 2016 9:52 pm by NEIL A. ALCOBER


GATCHALIAN

Passage of a law providing free education in all state universities and colleges or SUCs will be pushed by Senator-elect Sherwin Gatchalian.

The first bill–Free Higher Education Act–that he will file in the Senate, according to Gatchalian, will seek, among others, free tuition in the SUCs.

In pushing for free education and other items on his legislative agenda, the incoming senator said he would seek assistance and recommendations from local government units or LGUs.

When he was a congressman, he authored House Bill 5905 or the proposed Free Higher Education Act, which sought to allot P10.5 billion from the Presidential Social Fund to subsidize free education.

This bill, however, was not passed into law.

The 42-year-old senator served as representative of the First District of Valenzuela City (Metro Manila) from 2001 to 2004 and from 2013 to 2016.

He also served as the city’s mayor for three consecutive terms from 2004 to 2013.

Gatchalian took his oath of office as senator before Mandaluyong City (Metro Manila) Mayor Benjamin “Benhur” Abalos on Tuesday afternoon.

He was accompanied by his brother, Valenzuela City Mayor-elect Rex Gatchalian, city councilors and barangay [village] chairmen of the city when he took his oath of office at the Mandaluyong City Hall.


MANILA BULLETIN

35 mayors linked to drugs by AFp and PNA June 28, 2016 (updated) Share16 Tweet0 Share3 Email1 Share847

Duterte to Mayors: I will not assign to you a chief of police of your choice

Davao City – Incoming President Rodrigo R. Duterte revealed that 30 to 35 mayors are players in the illegal drugs trade.

Without mentioning names, Duterte said these local chief executives with links to the illegal drugs business cannot pick their chief of police.

“I will not assign to you a chief of police of your choice. I would even amend that law… sila sila mismo naglalaro diyan (they are the ones playing there),” said Duterte, who added that he would ask for the amendment of the law giving mayors the operational supervision and control of the police.

Republic Act 8551, an act establishing the Philippines National Police under a re-organized Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), gives the mayors the power to direct employment and deployment of units or elements of the PNP through the station commander.

READ MORE...


GOODBYE FOR NOW, DAVAO – President-elect Rodrigo Duterte delivers a farewell speech during the regular Monday flag-raising ceremony of Davao City employees, recalling the gains made during the 30 years he served the city as its mayor, vice mayor, and congressman. Duterte formally assumes the presidency Thursday. (Keith Bacongco)

The same law also gives local chief executives the authority to choose the chief of police from a list of five eligible recommended by the provincial police director, preferably from the same province, city or municipality.

Duterte said he would instead assign police officers that would look into the drug activities of local chief executives.

“We will not be able to improve this country… let us put a stop to this play,” he told police during the turnover of command at the Davao City Police Office (DCPO) last Friday, as he ordered police to apprehend drug pushers, dead or alive.

“If you encounter criminals – ask them to surrender. If he chooses to fight – and if you feel you will die unahan niyo na patayin mo (get them first kill them),” he said.

But he said it would be a different story if police kill criminals with hands tied. He told them not to kill criminals with hands tied otherwise “hindi lang ako ang kalaban niyo pati human rights… I will not be the only one against you but also the human rights…).”

He also vowed to stand for them “just don’t lie to me”. “You remain loyal to the Constitution and the Republic,” he said.

Duterte vowed to arrest high profile and valued drug pushers in the country. “In this fight I put at stake my life, honor, and my presidency. One of us will be sorry – it will be you,” he said referring to politicians into illegal drugs.

He asked the police to stick to the rules in the fight against criminality and illegal drugs, which are the centerpiece of his administration.

DUTERTE’S VISION

Addressing Davao City employees yesterday, Duterte outlined his vision for the country, reiterating his imminent war on criminality and his plan to restore death penalty as this is anchored in his belief for retribution.

“I believe in retribution. I follow the classical theory. Magbayad ka sa ginawa mo (You have to pay for your deed). I do not follow the belief that criminals can be redeemed,” Duterte said as he assailed human rights campaigners.

“These human rights (groups), congressmen, how stupid you are,” Duterte said, as he highlighted their criticism of his plans to impose late-night curfews on children being out on the streets and to reintroduce the death penalty.

NO TO DEATH PENALTY

But neophyte Senator Risa Hontiveros vowed to oppose any move to restore death penalty.

“If someone files a bill calling for the reimposition of the death penalty, I would oppose it, for the same reasons I had when I was part of the movement for restorative justice when death penalty was abolished years ago,” Hontiveros told reporters in an interview after the Senate’s orientation for newbie senators.

“Death penalty is a cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. It’s anti-poor and is never a deterrent against heinous crimes,” said the senator who is a former Akbayan representative.

Duterte, 71, won last month’s presidential elections in a landslide after campaigning largely on a platform of ending rampant crime, warning that the Philippines was in danger of becoming a narco-state.

He promised that tens of thousands of people would die, with security forces being given shoot to kill orders.

Since winning, Duterte has also promised to give bounties to police for killing drug dealers, and also encouraged ordinary citizens to kill or arrest suspects.

Last Friday, he pointed out that the Philippines is not financially “rich” that is why he wants to restore law and order to attract investors and spur the economy.

Duterte also vowed to also put some funds from which he can draw to help police for their medical and other needs through their city directors. Duterte also promised to double their salaries by the end of the year.

“Do not nurture loyalty to me. I don’t need it. I don’t need adulation. All I ask of you is to do your duty according to the law. According to the Revise Penal Code …if your life is in danger,” he said.

NEW PROTOCOL

During his brief address before Davao City employees, Duterte apologized for the changes that have unfolded in the days leading to his ascension into Malacañang on June 30.

He said he can no longer be as approachable as the protocol enforced by the Presidential Security Group (PSG) does not allow him to be approached by anyone without clearance.

“I cannot even approach you, myself,” he said.

Duterte said the unit has insisted that his security would have to come first, and that this was a mandate under the law.

“If I can go back in time, I would not have fun,” he said, still the reluctant president 16 million people voted for during the May 9 national elections. “If this is a bad dream, I hope it is.”

Duterte also revealed that he was pushed into the presidency not by people from Davao but those from Cebu and Metro Manila. (With reports from Yas D. Ocampo and Hannah L. Torregoza)


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2016 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE