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PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

RODY GOVT PROMISES 'CONVERSATION' OVER DEATH PENALTY
[A total of 140 nations, including the Philippines, have abolished death penalty. This may change soon.The revival of capital punishment is a priority of the incoming Duterte admin, which vowed to suppress crime in 3 to 6 months]
[RELATED: 12 HOTLINES, OPEN 24 HOURS People may call Duterte to report corruption ]


JUNE 24 -President-elect Rodrigo Duterte, who claims to be a believer of God but not of religion, said the death penalty is more of a retribution for criminals rather than a deterrent. (Office of the City Mayor Davao City via AP) The call for the restoration of the death penalty by president-elect Rodrigo Duterte would likely spark a debate on the morality and practicality of imposing extreme punishment, incoming presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said yesterday. Abella, a former pastor, said he expects critics and supporters of capital punishment to have a “conversation” about the issue. When asked how Duterte intends to push for the death penalty in a predominantly Catholic country, Abella said: “I’m sure there will be conversation regarding that. The conversation has to go through a process. “Definitely there is a goal and the law must be imposed and implemented to its full powers, to its full limits,” he added. “There is law and it is a deterrent. But if the law is broken, there should be order.”  Abella noted the statements made by Pope Francis regarding capital punishment. READ MORE.. RELATED, 12 HOTLINES, OPEN 24 HOURS People may call Duterte to report corruption...

ALSO: Duterte Cabinet clash looms over mining policies
[RELATED: Responsible mining is a key to growing the economy – Duterte spokesperson]


JUNE 24 -Incoming finance chief Carlos Dominguez II maintained “responsible” mining would remain part of the next government, even saying it will not ask for the bigger revenue share opposed by the industry. Philstar.com/File photo
Trouble could be brewing between the departments in charge of mining and of revenues under the Duterte administration. Incoming finance chief Carlos Dominguez II maintained “responsible” mining would remain part of the next government, even saying it will not ask for the bigger revenue share opposed by the industry. “Responsible mining plays a key role in the Philippines. The key word here is ‘responsible’ and our president has made his position very clear: ‘You have to do it right...’,” Dominguez said in an e-mail. “I (also) see no problem with the revenue sharing as specified in the current law,” he told The STAR.
NOT ACCEPTABLE But incoming Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) secretary Gina Lopez, an anti-mining advocate, said even “responsible mining” is not acceptable. “How can it be responsible to do open pit mining in the (country that is) most vulnerable to climate change? How it can be responsible to put the lives and future of our farmers and fishermen at stake for the money foreigners and rich people want to make?” Lopez argued. READ MORE...READ MORE...RELATED, Responsible mining is a key to growing the economy – Duterte spokesperson...

ALSO: Rody govt urged by Bishop: Live up to the trust of your electorate


JUNE 26 -“I hope that the next or those who will inherit (the government) will also strive (to address the country’s problems),” Tagle said in the CBCPNews, the official news service provider of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP). AP file
With less than a week before the new administration takes over, Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle yesterday expressed hope that president-elect Rodrigo Duterte and his officials would work toward solving the country’s problems. “I hope that the next or those who will inherit (the government) will also strive (to address the country’s problems),” Tagle said in the CBCPNews, the official news service provider of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP). Tagle had also called on the incoming government officials to live up to the trust they received from the electorate. The incoming administration and other newly elected leaders should also be living examples in improving ways to serve the people, he said. When asked to assess the six years of the Aquino presidency, Tagle only said there is no perfect government anywhere around the world. He said that like past administrations, the Aquino government had its share of accomplishments, however, there were other things that required attention. READ MORE...

ALSO: At Ateneo U grad rites - ‘Graduating’ Noy: I’m not going anywhere
[NOY EAGER TO GO HOME TO TIMES ST. HOME: During a farewell lunch he hosted for journalists on June 17, Aquino said he has not been to his newly renovated house on Times street. He said he would go back there with his assistants “Yolly, Ivy and Apollo,” his 3 German Shepherds.]


JUNE 26 -
President Aquino receives a commemorative silver medal from officials of the Ateneo de Manila University led by ADMU president Fr. Jose Ramon Villarin (right) after delivering a speech during the school’s graduation rites yesterday. For President Aquino, the most common question thrown his way nowadays is what he intends to do on June 30, the day he steps down from office, and the days after that. While suggestions to hold a party or any celebration for and with Aquino abound, a Palace source said the President shuns the idea. The President would rather go home quietly to Times street, Quezon City after the inauguration of his successor, president-elect Rodrigo Duterte. Another aide told The STAR that Aquino appears more relaxed as the end of his term nears, often listening to the reggae version of “Love Generation” and original Pilipino music. The aide said the President still has a busy schedule this week, his last few days as president. And because of this, he would most likely still be skipping meals. During a farewell lunch he hosted for journalists on June 17, Aquino said he has not been to his newly renovated house on Times street. READ MORE...

ALSO: From Noy to Rody, nation in between
[The transition from Mr. Aquino’s liberal rule to Mr. Duterte’s autocratic tendencies is one that will be keenly watched, not only by their constituencies but also by the international community, given the two leaders’ distinctly different politics and styles of governance within a democratic system of government. Both campaigned on a platform of change—the single, most powerful word in any Philippine election.]


JUNE 26 -FROM LIBERAL RULE TO AUTOCRATIC TENDENCIES......GOD BLESS OUR COUNTRY AND ITS PEOPLE WITH PEACE, NO MORE HATRED, ONLY LOVE, SERVICE AND CARING FOR EACH OTHER.....
As President Aquino completes his six-year term and incoming President Rodrigo Duterte begins his, this article looks into their respective brands of leadership through the lens of international relations theories, explaining how their belief systems translate to policies and pronouncements that will define their presidencies. TWO WEEKS ago, outgoing President Aquino admitted that he toyed with the idea of imposing martial law in Sulu to allow state security forces to go after Abu Sayyaf bandits. But in deciding against it, he said: “There’s no guarantee that there would be positive results. There might even be negative results. It might win more sympathy for the enemy.” With these three sentences spoken in the final days of his term, Mr. Aquino demonstrated that his liberal thinking often outweighed the moments he entertained a realist approach. Dogma of liberalism The President’s almost predictably consensus approach to resolving internal security reflects the Kantian dogma of liberalism, emphasizing on the impact of behavior and the protection of people from excessive state regulation. It is a paradigm that assumes the application of reason in paving a way for a more orderly, just and cooperative world, restraining disorder that can be policed by institutional reforms. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Rody gov’t promises ‘conversation’ over death penalty


President-elect Rodrigo Duterte, who claims to be a believer of God but not of religion, said the death penalty is more of a retribution for criminals rather than a deterrent. (Office of the City Mayor Davao City via AP)

MANILA, JUNE 27, 2016 (PHILSTAR) By Alexis Romero June 24, 2016 - The call for the restoration of the death penalty by president-elect Rodrigo Duterte would likely spark a debate on the morality and practicality of imposing extreme punishment, incoming presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella said yesterday.

Abella, a former pastor, said he expects critics and supporters of capital punishment to have a “conversation” about the issue.

When asked how Duterte intends to push for the death penalty in a predominantly Catholic country, Abella said: “I’m sure there will be conversation regarding that. The conversation has to go through a process.

“Definitely there is a goal and the law must be imposed and implemented to its full powers, to its full limits,” he added.

“There is law and it is a deterrent. But if the law is broken, there should be order.”

Abella noted the statements made by Pope Francis regarding capital punishment.

READ MORE...

Pope Francis said in a video message on Tuesday that capital punishment is an offense to life, contradicting God’s plan and serves no purpose for punishment.

Francis sent a video message to an anti-death penalty congress in Norway, expressing his opposition to the death penalty.

Abella, however, believes the pope was not singling out the Philippines when he issued the statement against the restoration of the death penalty.

“I don’t know if it is in direct reference to the government’s position. Is it? I don’t think it was,” he said.

“In general, as you very well heard RRD (Duterte) in his speech in Sarangani, he did say his view on death penalty is that it is retribution. It is clear where he stands,” he added.

Pope Francis maintained that the death penalty goes against God’s plan and applies to both the guilty and the innocent.

The leader of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics also stressed that capital punishment promotes vengeance rather than justice.

“It must not be forgotten that the inviolable and God-given right to life also belongs to the criminal,” the pope said in a video message sent to delegates of the sixth World Congress against capital punishment in Oslo.

“Indeed, nowadays, the death penalty is unacceptable, however grave the crime of the convicted person,” the pontiff added.

A total of 140 nations, including the Philippines, have abolished the death penalty. This may change soon, however, as the revival of capital punishment is a priority of the incoming Duterte administration, which has vowed to suppress crime in three to six months.

The death penalty was scrapped in 1987 during the presidency of Corazon Aquino but was revived six years later under her successor Fidel Ramos. Crimes that were punishable by death include kidnapping, murder, drug trafficking and rape.

Capital punishment was abolished anew in 2006 under then president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, a devout Catholic.

Duterte, who claims to be a believer of God but not of religion, said the death penalty is more of a retribution for criminals rather than a deterrent.

“Death penalty to me is the retribution. It makes you pay for what you did,” he said.

Duterte will have at least two former preachers in his Cabinet. They are Abella, who founded the religious group The Jesus Fellow Inc., and former rebel priest turned mayor Leoncio Evasco, who will serve as secretary to the Cabinet.

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RELATED FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

12 HOTLINES, OPEN 24 HOURS People may call Duterte to report corruption Published June 26, 2016 8:24am People may be able to directly report corrupt practices of government officials to President-elect Rodrigo Duterte.

During his speech at the thanksgiving party in Cebu on Saturday night, Duterte said he will set up 12 phone lines where people can directly report corruption.

"Makakatawag kayo kung sinoman [kayo]," Duterte said, adding that the phone lines will be open 24 hours.

He said that subordinates can report through the phone lines their corrupt bosses.

"Ngayon kayong mga subordinate, kung ang inyong hepe pipilitin kayo sa pagpirma. Checker kayo o ano, tawagan n'yo ako walay seremonya, ang inyong superior gawin kong checker," he said.

Duterte added that he will not think twice in humiliating corrupt government officials in public.

"Para magtanda... Pahihiyain ko kayo. You better stop it because I will humiliate you. Ganun talaga gawin ko. 'Ikaw, ano ka? Maliit lang ako dito. Halika, utusan mo 'yan (corrupt official),'" he said.

He reiterated that among the government agencies that he is targeting to rid of corruption are the Bureau of Internal Revenue and the Bureau of Customs.

He had also said that among the corrupt government agencies are the Department of Transportation and Communications and the Department of Public Works and Highways.

During his speech, which lasted for more than 40 minutes, Duterte said he would feel accomplished as a president if he is able to rid the government of corruption, reduce criminality by ridding illegal drugs and sign peace deals with the Communist Party of the Philippines, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF).

He also expressed determination to work for the government's shift to a federal system.

"If I could talk to the [MILF, MNLF] tapos makakuha ako ng garantiya na in the meantime na magsisige pa tayong magsisikap para sa federal system, tigil muna tayo ng giyera... Kung mapaplantsa ko lang 'yan, tapos masolusyonan ko droga and corruption, OK na ako," Duterte said.

He also reiterated during the speech that he intends to neutralize as many drug dealers during his six-year term to solve the drug problem in the country. —ALG, GMA News


PHILSTAR

Cabinet clash looms over mining policies By Prinz Magtulis and Louise Maureen Simeon (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 24, 2016 - 12:00am 0 20 googleplus0 0


Incoming finance chief Carlos Dominguez II maintained “responsible” mining would remain part of the next government, even saying it will not ask for the bigger revenue share opposed by the industry. Philstar.com/File photo

MANILA, Philippines - Trouble could be brewing between the departments in charge of mining and of revenues under the Duterte administration.

Incoming finance chief Carlos Dominguez II maintained “responsible” mining would remain part of the next government, even saying it will not ask for the bigger revenue share opposed by the industry.

“Responsible mining plays a key role in the Philippines. The key word here is ‘responsible’ and our president has made his position very clear: ‘You have to do it right...’,” Dominguez said in an e-mail.

“I (also) see no problem with the revenue sharing as specified in the current law,” he told The STAR.

NOT ACCEPTABLE


GINA LOPEZ

But incoming Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) secretary Gina Lopez, an anti-mining advocate, said even “responsible mining” is not acceptable.

“How can it be responsible to do open pit mining in the (country that is) most vulnerable to climate change? How it can be responsible to put the lives and future of our farmers and fishermen at stake for the money foreigners and rich people want to make?” Lopez argued.

READ MORE...

She added, “If there is responsible mining, why is it that wherever there is mining, there is poverty? The poorest sites in the country are mining areas. What is responsible about the benefit of a few to the detriment of the majority? That doesn’t sound good to me at all.”

Lopez stressed that mining only benefits a few rich people and puts agriculture and fisheries at a delicate level.

Outgoing Environment Secretary Ramon Paje believes that all existing mining contracts will be safe under the incoming Duterte administration, even if it has an anti-mining advocate as environment chief.

“Under the Aquino administration, we respected all existing mining contracts... What we stopped was issuing new ones. I believe they will do the same,” Paje said in a phone interview.


PAJE

Lopez, current chairperson of the ABS-CBN Lingkod Kapamilya Foundation and the Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission, told The STAR that she remains firm on her stand against mining in the Philippines as she said “an economic paradigm that puts people at risk is not the way to realize the country’s potential.”

“I am not keen on mining in this country because we are the most vulnerable to climate change and we are in a geo-hazard zone. Any kind of mining is putting our people’s lives at risk because we are an island ecosystem with an intricate network of eco functions which rely on each other,” Lopez said.

“We haven’t even begun to explore the potential of our bio-diversity. Why will we sacrifice all of that for the wealth of a few,” Lopez said as she stressed that her dictum on existing mine sites in the Philippines should cause “zero suffering to nearby communities, agricultural lands and bodies of water.”

“Sadly, I don’t know of even one mine that has been able to do that, precisely because we live in a geo-hazard zone,” Lopez added.

But president-elect Rodrigo Duterte views the mining industry as a key player in the Philippine economy, his spokesman said yesterday, as investors see a tougher regulatory environment due to his designation of an anti-mining advocate for an environment chief.

A day after Duterte announced his offer to Lopez, mining and oil stocks fell by more than four percent, a development attributed to investors’ anxiety over the next administration’s policies.

Duterte’s spokesman Ernesto Abella, however, maintained that the next president is not anti-mining.

“The Duterte administration is committed to promoting a robust and dynamic economy, with every sector contributing to its growth. Responsible mining plays a key role in the Philippines,” Abella said in a press conference in Davao City.

Abella said Duterte wants the standards of responsible mining in developed countries like Canada and Australia applied in the Philippines “to ensure the protection of the environment.”

“He (Duterte) supports each and every venture that contributes to the health of the economy, but he is clear that for whatever venture we go into, it should be in a responsible manner. He is not anti-mining. Definitely not,” the incoming presidential spokesman said.

When asked how he can reconcile his pronouncement with the potential appointment of Lopez, who has been a critic of mining, Abella said: “The fact that she accepted it means that she is willing to adjust her positions.”

Lopez said in an earlier interview that she is willing to dialog with mining firms and to cleanse the DENR ranks.

On Wednesday, Duterte announced that there would be a “comprehensive review” of all mining concessions to ensure that their operations are not destroying the environment.

He also asked mining firms to plant trees and wash away the chemicals they leave behind to avoid destroying the environment.

“If you don’t do it, I will cancel the permit,” Duterte said. “When you’re spoiling the land, I’ll cancel it (permit) without hesitation. That’s the bottom line.”


Duterte announced that there would be a “comprehensive review” of all mining concessions to ensure that their operations are not destroying the environment.

The incoming president stressed that the mining players “have to do it right because the precious metals belong to the Filipino people.”

In 2012, President Aquino issued Executive Order 79 that stopped the issuance of new mining permits until the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 was amended.

This was supposed to be done through a mining fiscal regime bill, which would have given the government higher revenue share from mining proceeds.

But Paje, who co-chairs the interagency Mining Industry Coordinating Council (MICC), said the bill did not even pass in the House of Representatives.

“But it was Congress’ call. We cannot meddle with them,” Paje said.

He added that the MICC has the minutes of deliberations on the bill, which Lopez may review when she assumes office on June 30.

Paje and Lopez will meet on June 28 for the transition.

“We welcome Gina Lopez’s entry to the department. Her ties with the civil sector will improve the agency,” Paje said.

Karla Espinosa, national coordinator of the Philippine Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), said her office, which is attached to the Department of Finance, is willing to work with Lopez as it continues with its mandate to improve transparency and monitor mining revenues.

EITI data showed that the government received P40.7 billion from miners.

Separate MGB from DENR

Amid the controversy stirred by Lopez’s appointment, incoming Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Ernesto Pernia recognizes the possibility of creating a division in the DENR which exercises regulations for the protection of the environment and the direct management of industries that make use of natural resources, including mining.

The department’s Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) specifically takes care of the permitting process for the mining industry.

“These are large responsibilities and separating them would be more tractable,” said Pernia.

Pernia, however, still has no firm position on the matter.

“This is just on top of my head because of the controversy,” he said. “I haven’t cleared this yet (with the incoming president).”

Lopez’s appointment has spooked the industry, caused mining stocks to tumble.


PANGILINAN

During the special joint meeting of the Makati Business Club and the US Philippines Society in Makati City yesterday, Philex Mining Corp. chairman Manuel V. Pangilinan reiterated his earlier proposal to separate the regulatory functions of the DENR and the industry management and promotion function of the MGB.

Pangilinan said he respects Lopez’s appointment and would cooperate with the DENR.

In a statement yesterday, Philex Mining said it is committed to work with the new administration.

“The president-elect has every right to appoint whoever he deems fit to become the next secretary, not just on a matter of competence, but also on a matter of trust and confidence as a member of his official family,” said Philex.

“Philex has committed to support president Duterte and his drive against illegal and irresponsible mining. We are open to sitting down and working with the new DENR secretary to further the president’s call, to stamp out the illegal and irresponsible miners who give the industry a bad name,” it added.

Groups welcome Lopez

The Pambansang Lakas ng Kilusang Mamamalakaya ng Pilipinas (Pamalakaya) welcomed the appointment of Lopez to the DENR but added a word of caution on her support for eco-tourism projects in coastal areas.


Cesar Lanos of the Mansaka tribe of Davao and Midsuburan Datu Jimid Pinayao Masayagan of the Lumad Mindanaw People’s Federation are also hoping for the appointment of a fellow lumad (native) to both the environment and the agriculture agencies.

Indigenous peoples (IPs) allied to the Katribu (Kalipunan ng Katutubong Mamamayan ng Pilipinas) also urged Lopez to support the Novo Vizcayano and other peoples’ call to stop mining operations and cancel the permit of Oceana Gold Philippine Inc. (OGPI) in Nueva Vizcaya.

The non-government organization Alyansa Tigil Mina supported Lopez’s view on mining and hopes for the delivery and implementation of no-go zones against mining.

“We can’t afford to lose more forests from mining projects. While we believe that minerals have a role to play in our industrialization, the current mining law is inadequate and not enforced diligently,” Alyansa Tigil Mina national coordinator Jaybee Garganera said.

A week ago, indigenous peoples put up barricades in an attempt to stop the operations of the OGPI in Nueva Vizcaya province.

The IPs affected by destructive mining also called on Lopez to thoroughly pursue president-elect Duterte’s promise to heed the people’s demand to end large-scale and destructive mining throughout the country.

“This promise can now be realized with the immediate termination of the mining permit and a stop of the operations of OGPI,” members of the Katribu said, adding that this would bring relief to the communities affected by mining in Nueva Vizcaya.

Igorot woman leader Piya Malayao, speaking in behalf of Katribu, said Lopez is fully aware that the Filipino people, specially the IPs, have not benefited and have even suffered from the previous regimes’ implementation of a liberalized mining policy.

Katribu said almost 60 percent of approved mining are inside IP territories and have resulted in the destruction of IP land and livelihood.

It added that the Indigenous Peoples Agenda recommends the re-orientation of domestic mining industry, repeal of the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 and enactment of a pro-people, pro-environment law.

Lopez is set to hold a press conference on June 29 to elaborate on her plans for the DENR. – With Alexis Romero, Ding Cervantes, Artemio Dumlao, Rhodina Villanueva, Janvic Mateo, Czeriza Valencia, Edith Regalado

----------------------------

RELATED FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

Responsible mining is a key to growing the economy – Duterte spokesperson Published June 23, 2016 5:08pm WANT TO SEE THE E16 LOCAL RESULTS FOR DAVAO CITY, DAVAO DEL SUR? CLICK FOR LOCATION. The incoming administration of President-elect Rodrigo Duterte is committed to promoting a robust and dynamic economy, with every sector contributing to its growth including mining, Ernie Abella, the incoming presidential spokesperson, said on Thursday.

"Responsible mining plays a key role in the Philippines," Abella told reporters at a briefing in Davao City.

"The key word here is responsible. And our President has made his position very clear: 'You have to do it right. If you cannot do it right, then get out of mining'," he added.

Abella noted that the President-elect Duterte has emphasized the application of responsible mining standards similar to those of Canada and Australia to ensure that the environment is protected.

Capping a two-day business meeting on Tuesday, the President-elect issued a no-nonsense warning against irresponsible mining.

"For I will require you to go to Canada or Australia... Learn how to mine the precious metals... In making money out of the earth...you have to do it right. If you cannot do it right then get out."

However, Abella emphasized on Thursday that Duterte is not anti-mining.

"... He supports every venture that contributes to the health of the Philippine economy. However, he is very clear that whatever venture we go into it must be in a responsible manner. But he is not anti-mining, definitely not," Abella said. Abella noted that responsible mining is taking care of the environment.

"Mga punong kahoy... that is supposed to be replanted. That is the responsible way of doing it, but irresponsible mining will just leave it like that. The other one is when they extract precious metals, they usually use toxic chemicals. These toxic chemicals go into the water... and eaten by the fish – that is very irresponsible," he said.

"What the President is demanding is that all those who do that must be very clear that they do not leave toxic materials around, ganun po ang responsible mining," he added.

On splitting the Department of Environment and Natural Resources into two departments, with one handling regulation over geosciences and mining, Abella noted it would be taken into consideration by the Cabinet.

"I'm sure they will take note of that suggestion," he said. – Ted Cordero/VDS, GMA News


PHILSTAR

Rody government urged: Live up to the trust By Evelyn Macairan (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 26, 2016 - 12:00am 0 2 googleplus0 0


“I hope that the next or those who will inherit (the government) will also strive (to address the country’s problems),” Tagle said in the CBCPNews, the official news service provider of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP). AP file

MANILA, Philippines - With less than a week before the new administration takes over, Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle yesterday expressed hope that president-elect Rodrigo Duterte and his officials would work toward solving the country’s problems.

“I hope that the next or those who will inherit (the government) will also strive (to address the country’s problems),” Tagle said in the CBCPNews, the official news service provider of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP).

Tagle had also called on the incoming government officials to live up to the trust they received from the electorate.

The incoming administration and other newly elected leaders should also be living examples in improving ways to serve the people, he said.

When asked to assess the six years of the Aquino presidency, Tagle only said there is no perfect government anywhere around the world.

He said that like past administrations, the Aquino government had its share of accomplishments, however, there were other things that required attention.

READ MORE...

“All administrations may have strived and worked hard but all administrations as well left things that still need to be addressed. That’s life!” Tagle said.

“No one or group can claim that they were able to solve everything,” he added.

Tagle recently issued an oratio imperata or obligatory prayer for government officials and called on the faithful to pray for the country’s next leaders.

The oratio is being recited in masses since June 21 and would continue until June 29, or nine consecutive days before the country’s newly elected leaders assume their posts on June 30.

Various groups, on the other hand, are gearing up for the “National People’s Summit,” a day before Duterte’s inauguration.

The summit is being convened by the umbrella group Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (Bayan), the Makabayan Coalition, Pagbabago People’s Movement for Change, peace advocate Kapayapaan and the UP Office of the Student Regent. It will be held at the University of the Philippines-Diliman Film Center.

Bayan secretary-general Renato Reyes said the multi-sectoral event hopes to put together the People’s Agenda for the first 100 days of the Duterte presidency as well as a program for nationalist and progressive change.

The summit will give proposals on the economy, social policy, peace and human rights, anti-corruption, governance and foreign policy. –Rhodina Villanueva


PHILSTAR

‘Graduating’ Noy: I’m not going anywhere By Aurea Calica (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 26, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


President Aquino receives a commemorative silver medal from officials of the Ateneo de Manila University led by ADMU president Fr. Jose Ramon Villarin (right) after delivering a speech during the school’s graduation rites yesterday.

MANILA, Philippines - For President Aquino, the most common question thrown his way nowadays is what he intends to do on June 30, the day he steps down from office, and the days after that.

While suggestions to hold a party or any celebration for and with Aquino abound, a Palace source said the President shuns the idea.

The President would rather go home quietly to Times street, Quezon City after the inauguration of his successor, president-elect Rodrigo Duterte.

Another aide told The STAR that Aquino appears more relaxed as the end of his term nears, often listening to the reggae version of “Love Generation” and original Pilipino music.

The aide said the President still has a busy schedule this week, his last few days as president. And because of this, he would most likely still be skipping meals.

During a farewell lunch he hosted for journalists on June 17, Aquino said he has not been to his newly renovated house on Times street.

READ MORE...

He said he would go back there with his assistants “Yolly, Ivy and Apollo,” his German Shepherds.

“I’ve only seen pictures of the renovation being done,” Aquino said.

The President also talked about the times he and his officials missed breakfast, lunch and dinner because they needed to attend to a lot of things.

He joked and laughed heartily at some of the anecdotes he shared, including about family and food trips.

He revealed that he is taking maintenance medicine for hypertension, and Vitamin B complex when asked about the pills he took after eating.

The President yesterday keynoted the commencement exercises of the Ateneo de Manila University, his alma mater.

He took the opportunity to spend time with his former classmates and friends, including Ateneo president Fr. Jose Ramon Villarin, who told him to take a vacation after June 30.

Now that he is about to “graduate” from Malacañang, Aquino said he initially thought that all those “what after June 30” questions were only out of curiosity.

But some turned out be serious, like the cadet engineer from the Department of Public Works and Highways, who asked what they could expect from him after he steps down from office.

A president of a prominent business organization had told Aquino that he’s still young and could do many things, like run for an elective post in 2019.

“Deep inside, I said: wait, were the things I did and went through in the past six years not enough?” Aquino said.

“I also wonder why people are saying: ‘We will miss you.’ Sometimes I am forced to reply: ‘Wait, I’m still here. Why are you missing me? After my term, I will only be staying in Times street. I am not going anywhere,” Aquino said, laughing.

He cited an instance at a mall on the eve of Father’s Day, when people dining in a row of restaurants applauded him as he was having dinner.

“Several restaurants were on that floor. In one table, the customers greeted me and shook my hand, others were clapping, including those from nearby establishments,” the President said.

“It made me ask myself: Are they applauding because they were grateful to me? Or they were happy that I am leaving? I suppose they were happy with me, judging from the many people who wanted to have their photos taken with me,” Aquino said.

He said it has been 35 years since he graduated from the Ateneo and had missed his own graduation rites because of martial law.

Seeking Villarin’s advice on what to say during the graduation rites, the priest told Aquino to just speak from his heart about the things that inspired and sustained him.


INQUIRER

From Noy to Rody, nation in between SHARES: 47 VIEW COMMENTS By: Nikko Dizon and Chester B. Cabalza @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:01 AM June 26th, 2016


FROM LIBERAL RULE TO AUTOCRATIC TENDENCIES......GOD BLESS OUR COUNTRY AND ITS PEOPLE WITH PEACE, NO MORE HATRED, ONLY LOVE, SERVICE AND CARING FOR EACH OTHER.....

As President Aquino completes his six-year term and incoming President Rodrigo Duterte begins his, this article looks into their respective brands of leadership through the lens of international relations theories, explaining how their belief systems translate to policies and pronouncements that will define their presidencies.

TWO WEEKS ago, outgoing President Aquino admitted that he toyed with the idea of imposing martial law in Sulu to allow state security forces to go after Abu Sayyaf bandits.

But in deciding against it, he said: “There’s no guarantee that there would be positive results. There might even be negative results. It might win more sympathy for the enemy.”

With these three sentences spoken in the final days of his term, Mr. Aquino demonstrated that his liberal thinking often outweighed the moments he entertained a realist approach.

Dogma of liberalism The President’s almost predictably consensus approach to resolving internal security reflects the Kantian dogma of liberalism, emphasizing on the impact of behavior and the protection of people from excessive state regulation.

It is a paradigm that assumes the application of reason in paving a way for a more orderly, just and cooperative world, restraining disorder that can be policed by institutional reforms.

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Parents’ influence

As Chief Executive and Commander in Chief, Mr. Aquino has described himself as a leader who seeks consensus, espousing a largely liberal thinking that almost certainly was the influence of his parents—democracy icons Ninoy and Cory Aquino.

In dealing with the overlapping claims in the South China Sea, the President’s state of mind urges him to champion a rules-based approach under the facets of idealism, magnifying moral value and virtue by asserting that our sovereign state and its citizens should be treated as ends rather than means.

The moral ascendancy the Philippines has gained from the arbitration case proves the centrality of a collective power.

Building alliances

Building alliances with other nations, Mr. Aquino recognized that while his administration pushed for the modernization of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, it remains one of the weakest in Asia after decades of neglect.

Mr. Aquino’s economic reforms can be construed by the principles empowered by neoliberals. The currency of economic liberalization, international trade, cross-border capital flows and regional integration somehow flirts with the language of increased investment, technology transfer, innovation and responsiveness to consumer demand that was achieved during his term.

By the time he steps down from office, the Philippines has become Asia’s rising star.

Concern for others

The social services pushed by the Aquino administration reflected liberal thinking adhered to by the outgoing President. The vision of widening equitability among the Filipino people in the hope of unleashing the fundamental human concern for others’ welfare makes progress feasible.

While naysayers of the paradigm agree that our world is anarchic and state interests are fundamental for survival, still, security reforms can be inspired by a compassionate ethical concern for the welfare of the people.

Whole-of-nation approach

As commander in chief, Mr. Aquino adopted the “whole-of-nation approach”—in which government and communities work together—to address the communist insurgency.

Notably, he defied protocol and met with rebel chief Murad Ebrahim to jumpstart the stalled peace negotiations with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front.

The self-sacrificing act a leader may embody naturally coincides with the Kantian behavior of peaceful, consultative and cooperative virtues of Mr. Aquino.

He also showed belief in the justice system by hauling erring public officials to court, but ironically, he appeared to have undermined the judiciary at times.

He spearheaded the impeachment of the late Chief Justice Renato Corona, viewing the appointee of former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo as a possible obstacle to his campaign to make the Arroyo administration accountable for its alleged corruption.

Mr. Aquino also openly criticized Supreme Court decisions that he felt impaired his own governance.

However, his appointment of Ma. Lourdes Sereno as Corona’s successor was trailblazing for all intents and purposes for she will sit as Chief Justice for two decades.

Wendtian tendencies

Nonetheless, this can also be overshadowed by Mr. Aquino’s Wendtian tendencies to construct his own choices by relying too much on plausible stories without actual tests on anecdotal evidence.

For example, when the people, whom he famously called his “bosses,” wanted him to sack government officials for their ineptitude, he defended his men, pushing many of his supporters in 2010 to abandon him by midterm.

And even until the last months of his presidency, Mr. Aquino heaped blame on his predecessor for the country’s woes, which has become a turnoff for many.

At noon of June 30, Mr. Aquino hands over the country’s reins to incoming President Rodrigo Duterte. With it comes a change in styles of governance and belief systems.

Similarities

Indeed, the two Presidents share similarities: their devotion to their mothers, closeness and loyalty to friends, aversion to unsolicited advice and the ability to command an army of staunch believers.

They both walk the talk, albeit taking different approaches.

As the country embarks on a new journey in our transformative process as a young nation-state previously ruled by a dictator, a housewife, a general, an actor and two subsequent economist Presidents in contemporary period, the Philippines has yet to morph into an economic and military power in the region.

Now that a new driver takes the front seat of the presidency in the country’s roller coaster ride through democracy, is the country ready for another shift from a liberal to a realist?

The just concluded national elections have brought us to the smoothest transition we have seen in recent history.

Return of oligarchy

The narratives in Philippine contemporary period saw the effects of ironclad dictatorship and cronyism but also the return of oligarchy in a softhearted leadership.

People power uprising paved the way for unseating corrupt leaders but also installed successors who fell short of expectations.

The selective forgiving culture inherent in Filipinos has resulted in a people power fatigue.

Our contemporary Presidents’ rule mirrored the kind of leadership and reactive political culture we mustered during their respective terms.

Machiavellian realist rule

But six administrations of ups and downs—from martial law to the restoration of an immature democracy in the Philippines—gave us a picture of a Machiavellian realist rule and Kantian altruistic ideals.

After more than three decades of seeking the right kind of leader—mixing realist-, liberal- and constructivist-thinking Presidents from Marcos to the second Aquino—coming up with the best formula to make our country more secure and progressive remains elusive.

Now comes Mr. Duterte.

Campaigning for the presidency, the 71-year-old grandfather said he wanted to use Army Rangers to help the police force crackdown on drug syndicates, and then upon his election, announced he wanted armed civilian auxiliaries to take on the drug menace at the barangay level.

His draconian measures are hugely popular in Davao City, where he ruled as mayor for decades. People justified their allegiance to him and his ways by claiming they felt safe and such security made their businesses and livelihood thrive.

He has pledged to replicate his ruthless methods to eradicate criminality nationwide while his aides have backtracked on his campaign promise to do so in three to six months.

Death to criminals

A week before his inauguration, Mr. Duterte said that death to criminals was not deterrence to crime. It was retribution.

The thought of brutality in exchange for security has become a cause for great concern for human rights advocates.

Exuding power

This Hobbesian tradition of exuding power can best exemplify the type of governance that the incoming administration may possess.

The struggle to pursue consolidated national interests amid the country’s internal and external insecurities could result in realist-leaning statecraft for the administration to survive in a hostile environment.

The realist paradigm assumes that states are rational actors playing in their national interest.

Given the humongous responsibility bestowed upon Mr. Duterte, as he incessantly advocated restoring peace and order, presumed to lead to progress and development, his game plan would strongly resonate with his philosophical and ethical consideration.

The action is neither good nor bad as long as it will pave the way for the pursuit of his national self-interest.

Among other things, Mr. Duterte has promised to push for federalism, the restoration of the death penalty, peace with communist rebels and the passage of the freedom of information bill. Ironically, he declared he would use only state-run media, thus undermining the country’s free press.

Alliance with Marcos Jr.

Most alarming to those who fought for democracy three decades ago is Mr. Duterte’s alliance with losing vice presidential candidate Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., promising the latter a Cabinet position by next year and the burial of his father, the dictator Ferdinand Marcos, at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

The incoming Cabinet is a hodgepodge of personalities from the Right and the Left to industry leaders and relative unknowns.

So far, only Mr. Duterte’s economic team brings some confidence to the rest of the nation that has now become an outsider in the former city mayor’s clique.

His security cluster is not exactly a formidable team for the heightened tensions in the Asia-Pacific region.

He himself has shown disdain for regional and international cooperation, judging by the remarks he made in his infamous postelection press conferences.

Beyond his being antiestablishment, Mr. Duterte was not to be disturbed from his slumber during the early morning Independence Day rites on June 12, raising the question whether traditions that make a nation might even be disregarded in the next six years.

Waltzian neorealism

The parsimonious and enduring persona the incoming President tries to paint before the people, whether consciously or unconsciously, is an astute personification of Waltzian neorealism.

This favors a systemic approach that asserts pragmatic, realistic and actual execution of relative power in a similar rational manner with outcomes falling within the expected range to ensure the leader’s own survival and that of the state he will be ruling.

Different styles

The transition from Mr. Aquino’s liberal rule to Mr. Duterte’s autocratic tendencies is one that will be keenly watched, not only by their constituencies but also by the international community, given the two leaders’ distinctly different politics and styles of governance within a democratic system of government.

Both campaigned on a platform of change—the single, most powerful word in any Philippine election.

But whether it is a collective change or personal change, personal interest or national interest, is something only the Filipino electorate can answer and define.

(Nikko Dizon is a defense and political reporter of the Inquirer. She holds a master’s degree in National Security Administration from the National Defense College of the Philippines (NDCP). Cabalza teaches national security administration at the NDCP and political anthropology at the University of the Philippines Diliman.)

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