PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org



PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

16th CONGRESS ENDS: 8 SENATORS LED BY JPE, 75 SOLONS BOW OUT
[RELATED: Senate report on PDAF archived, proves political vendetta, waste of people"s time and money]


JUNR 7 -After working in government for 50 years, Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile bowed out of the service on the last session day yesterday, ending a career that spanned six presidents, from the late dictator up to the son of the heroes of the 1986 people power revolution. File Photo
Seventy-five lawmakers including eight senators led by the most senior, nonagenarian Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile, bade Congress goodbye yesterday as they headed for the end of their terms.
After working in government for 50 years, Enrile bowed out of the service on the last session day yesterday, ending a career that spanned six presidents, from the late dictator up to the son of the heroes of the 1986 people power revolution. Paraphrasing the words of the late American Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Enrile said old politicians never die. Enrile, 92, and out on bail on plunder charges, said he is retiring with his head held high. He ends his final term on June 30. “Like what MacArthur said, old soldiers never die, they just fade away. I would say today, my last appearance in this chamber, old politicians never die, they will just fade away. My head was bloodied but never bowed. Thank you Mr. President,” he said. Apart from Enrile, Sens. Pia Cayetano and Sergio Osmeña III also bid their colleagues goodbye during the last session day yesterday before the chamber went on sine die adjournment. Cayetano, who won as Taguig representative, also stood up to thank her colleagues and staff for assisting her during her term. Osmeña, who failed in his re-election bid, pitched for amendments to the Anti-Money Laundering law but he did not deliver a valedictory speech. Other senators on their last day were Teofisto Guingona III, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Jinggoy Estrada and Ramon Revilla Jr. Guingona was in his room but did not attend the session. 16th Congress ends Meanwhile, the 16th Congress ended last night as its leaders cited the significant contribution of the legislative branch to the country’s growth. READ MORE...RELATED, Senate report on PDAF archived, proves political vendetta, waste of people"s time and money...[The document had been routed for signature of 17 of its panel members, 13 affixed their signatures with the inclusion of Guingona, as early as 2014, yet it was managed to be filed only last June 6 at 6:30 p.m., an hour after the Senate had announced its adjournment sine die, meaning it’s no longer in session. As such, the document is useless and will effectively be archived as it failed to be reported out on the floor. Based on the explanation given by Senate President Franklin Drilon, the coming 17th Congress cannot adopt the report, including the other blue ribbon committee report on the laundering of $81 million Bangladesh funds....READ ALL...]

ALSO: UNA emerging as House minority
[RELATED: Retirement far from Binay’s mind]


JUNE 7 -“My personal stand is that I want UNA to pursue the minority leadership. But whatever decision UNA makes should be based on a consensus among the members,” said party president Navotas Rep. Toby Tiangco. Philstar.com/AJ Bolando
DAVAO CITY, Philippines – With the once ruling Liberal Party joining the coalition to create a “super majority” in the House of Representatives, the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) may lead the opposition or minority party in the incoming 17th Congress.
“My personal stand is that I want UNA to pursue the minority leadership. But whatever decision UNA makes should be based on a consensus among the members,” said party president Navotas Rep. Toby Tiangco. Tiangco was not able to provide the actual number of UNA members and its allies in the House, saying that the numbers could still change when voting for the next leadership is held on July 4. “I want to give time to members to check their options and evaluate what is best for their constituents and how to best pursue their advocacies,” he added. UNA fielded Vice President Jejomar Binay in the presidential race. He placed fourth behind president-elect Rodrigo Duterte, former interior secretary Manuel Roxas II and Sen. Grace Poe. Asked whom they would field in the race for speakership should the party decide to lead the minority, Tiangco said the decision would be based on who the party members would choose. READ MORE...RELATED, Retirement far from Binay’s mind...

ALSO: Duterte secures ‘super majority’ in House
[RELATED: Duterte mouthpieces avoid media]


JUNE 7 -Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez, a member of the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban), said more than 200 lawmakers are joining the bloc and would also support his bid to become House speaker. Youtube DAVAO CITY, Philippines – With Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. coming here to express the Liberal Party’s support for the incoming administration, president-elect Rodrigo Duterte has secured a “super majority” in the House of Representatives, giving him leverage to push his agenda, an ally said yesterday. Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez, a member of the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban), said more than 200 lawmakers are joining the bloc and would also support his bid to become House speaker. Alvarez said Liberal Party (LP) members are among those who support his bid for the speakership. “With the support of Speaker (Feliciano) Belmonte, we will have a super majority,” Alvarez told reporters in a chance interview here. There are about 290 members of the House of Representatives. Alvarez said about 60 members of the super majority belong to PDP-Laban, while the rest are from the Nacionalista Party of businessman Manuel Villar, the Nationalist People’s Coalition of tycoon Eduardo Cojuangco Jr., the National Unity Party, Lakas of detained former president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and LP. He added that the Makabayan bloc, which consists of militant party-list representatives, has also signified intention to join the majority. Belmonte, confirmed that Alvarez is poised to succeed him as Speaker. “He’s got it in the bag,” Belmonte said. “I think it’s common sense that the leading party should have the biggest (number of members). Even with my own experience, I saw that it was necessary that we’d be the biggest party in the coalition. I think that is a reasonable requirement.” READ MORE...RELATED, Duterte mouthpieces avoid media...

ALSO: Drilon concedes - Koko is next Senate president
[RELATED: Super Senate majority forming — Lacson]


JUNE 7 -Senate President Franklin Drilon (left) and Senator Aquilino ‘Koko’ Pimentel are seeing eye-to-eye in the leadership of the incoming Senate. Drilon said he and 16 other senators agreed Wednesday night to elect Pimentel as the next Senate president. INQUIRER FILES Senate President Franklin Drilon has conceded the chamber’s leadership to Senator Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III in the 17th Congress, saying he did it “for the sake of unity and stability.” “I wish to announce that last night major political parties have agreed to have an alliance, principally the LP (Liberal Party) and its allied parties — we have six LP, one Akbayan — with the PDP-Laban, plus the NPC (Nationalist People’s Coalition) and the other allied political groups,” Drilon himself said during the Kapihan sa Manila Bay on Wednesday. READ: Cayetano as Senate head gets Duterte nod | READ: Cayetano says 15 senators backing his presidency in Senate “Last night, we met and had that agreement. The president of the incoming Senate will be Koko Pimentel III. I will be the Senate President Pro Tempore and (Senator Vicente) Tito Sotto will be the Majority Leader,” he said. Drilon said Pimentel, president of PDP-Laban now being headed by President-elect Rodrigo Duterte, had the support of about 16 to 17 senators. READ: 17 senators back Koko for Senate presidency “We maintain the independence of the Senate but at the same time we will support in general the legislative agenda of President Duterte,” the incumbent Senate leader said. “As the committees are still being discussed, we have agreed that Koko Pimetel is our next president, the only PDP-laban in the Senate but has the support of both my group and Tito Sotto’s group,” he said, adding that Pimentel was “very qualified” for the post. READ MORE...RELATED, Super Senate majority forming — Lacson...

ALSO: Noy - There’s life after presidency, but…
[ALSO: CBCP WEIGHS IN ON MAY 9 POLLS - ‘Most vicious and divisive’]


JUNE 9 -Asked what was next for him, the outgoing President shared his desire to lead a quiet life after his term and after 44 years of being part of the country’s political dynamics, being the only son of two democracy icons – former senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. and ex-president Corazon. Philstar.com file
– There is life after the presidency, President Aquino said, but he’s not ruling out involvement in politics again if the need arises. Asked what was next for him, the outgoing President shared his desire to lead a quiet life after his term and after 44 years of being part of the country’s political dynamics, being the only son of two democracy icons – former senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. and ex-president Corazon. For Aquino, the turning point was martial law. “I was all of 12 years old, I’m 56 now, 44 years of being in public life,” he said. Speaking to Rappler’s Maria Ressa in a live interview on Tuesday, Aquino said one of his first thoughts that day was when his mother was advising one of her successors that “there’s life after the presidency.” “So in politics this is the penultimate job (and) going through all of the BS (bulls**t) to get here and all the BS while in here, unless there is really that need I can fulfill, I’d like to look forward to a quiet life,” Aquino said. READ MORE...ALSO, CBCP WEIGHS IN ON MAY 9 POLLS - ‘Most vicious and divisive’...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

16th CONGRESS ENDS: 8 senators, 67 House members bow out


After working in government for 50 years, Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile bowed out of the service on the last session day yesterday, ending a career that spanned six presidents, from the late dictator up to the son of the heroes of the 1986 people power revolution. File Photo

MANILA, JUNE 13, 2016 (PHILSTAR) June 7, 2016 - 12:00am - Seventy-five lawmakers including eight senators led by the most senior, nonagenarian Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile, bade Congress goodbye yesterday as they headed for the end of their terms.

After working in government for 50 years, Enrile bowed out of the service on the last session day yesterday, ending a career that spanned six presidents, from the late dictator up to the son of the heroes of the 1986 people power revolution.

Paraphrasing the words of the late American Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Enrile said old politicians never die.

Enrile, 92, and out on bail on plunder charges, said he is retiring with his head held high. He ends his final term on June 30.

“Like what MacArthur said, old soldiers never die, they just fade away. I would say today, my last appearance in this chamber, old politicians never die, they will just fade away. My head was bloodied but never bowed. Thank you Mr. President,” he said.

Apart from Enrile, Sens. Pia Cayetano and Sergio Osmeña III also bid their colleagues goodbye during the last session day yesterday before the chamber went on sine die adjournment.

Cayetano, who won as Taguig representative, also stood up to thank her colleagues and staff for assisting her during her term. Osmeña, who failed in his re-election bid, pitched for amendments to the Anti-Money Laundering law but he did not deliver a valedictory speech.

Other senators on their last day were Teofisto Guingona III, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Jinggoy Estrada and Ramon Revilla Jr. Guingona was in his room but did not attend the session.

16th Congress ends

Meanwhile, the 16th Congress ended last night as its leaders cited the significant contribution of the legislative branch to the country’s growth.

READ MORE...

Senate President Franklin Drilon said the Senate did more than enough in the past three years.

In a speech delivered at the close of session, Drilon said his colleagues could hold their heads up high with what they have achieved.

“How would the nation and our people remember the 16th Congress? How would history judge us? I can say with conviction that this Senate did more than enough,” Drilon said.

“With strong political will, this Senate cleared the hurdle of passing difficult but landmark measures that previously languished in the legislative mill for decades. Thus, we need not be afraid to face the verdict of our people and history. We have fared well.”

Drilon pointed out that the Senate was able to work on the approval of several laws aimed at strengthening the economy, promoting social justice and transforming the country into one of the strongest and fastest growing economies in the world.

Among the many bills approved by the Senate is the GOCC (government-owned and controlled corporations) Governance Act, which Drilon said “made state- owned enterprises instruments of national progress, instead of being milking cows.”

“Since 2013, or for the last three years, the GOCCs remitted a total of over P100 billion in dividends to the national coffers,” Drilon said.

The other economic bills approved by the Senate were the Philippine Competition Act, the amendment of the Cabotage Law, the full entry of foreign banks in the country, the amendment of the foreign investment negative list and the Tax Incentives Monitoring and Transparency Act.

A number of laws aimed at introducing structural changes in government agencies were also passed including the Customs Modernization and Tariff Act, the creation of the Department of Information and Communications Technology and the amendments to the charter of the Philippine Deposit Insurance Corp.

Remarkable legacy

On the other hand, Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. thanked his “band of brothers and sisters” in Congress – 67 of them ending their terms – who supported the passage of various landmark and socio-economic measures.

“Inspired by significant growth of our economy, we passed laws which enhanced our competitiveness as an investment destination,” Belmonte said.

“I am confident that history will show that we have conducted ourselves creditably. The 16th Congress will leave behind a remarkable legacy,” he said.

Belmonte also pointed out that in the last six years, Congress passed the annual budget on time.

“We raised the budget for social services to provide more direct assistance to the impoverished sector,” he said.

For education, Congress also passed reform measures such as the K-12 program, the Ladderized Education Program, the Open Distance Act and the Iskolar ng Bayan Act.

He said Congress also enacted the mandatory coverage of senior citizens in the Philippine Health Insurance program, and exempting persons with disabilities from the value-added tax.

The adjournment proceedings were briefly disrupted by the ejection of former Northern Samar representative Harlin Abayon from the floor by the sergeant-at-arms.

Abayon was about to take the floor and deliver a speech but it was pointed out that he lost the electoral protest to his rival, who took over his post last March.

He, however, said he was able to obtain a stay from the Supreme Court.

There was also a debate between Senior Deputy Minority Leader Neri Colmenares and Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II over the move of President Aquino to veto the P2,000 increase in pension for Social Security System retirees.

Colmenares wanted the House to override the veto but Gonzales said the chamber cannot conduct such kind of legislative work as the Senate has already adjourned session. – Christina Mendez, Marvin Sy, Paolo Romero

---------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

Senate report on PDAF archived, proves political vendetta Written by Angie M. Rosales Friday, 10 June 2016 00:00


SENATE BLUE RIBBON CHAIR GUINGONA

All those hearings of the 16th Senate were not only a waste of people’s time and money, but were also clearly all done for political vendetta and a trial and conviction by publicity against the political foes of outgoing President Aquino.

The committee report, which was never brought before the plenary but dated as early as 2014, was released only on the last day of the Senate.

Final and full committee report on the Senate’s probe on highly controversial pork barrel scam was filed shortly after the upper chamber went on sine die adjournment Monday, effectively putting to naught the panel’s findings and recommendations.

Aside from the three upper chamber members who have been indicted for plunder and other serious charges — Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile, Senators Jinggoy Estrada and Ramon “Bong” Revilla Jr. — no other lawmaker, despite numerous names that have been reported in the past to have also misused their respective Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) allotments, have been recommended for possible prosecution, proving that it was all done in the name of vendetta politics of the worst kind.

80% OF PDAF LOST TO CORRUPTION

This, despite the committee noting that “approximately 80 percent of the PDAF have been probably lost to corruption.”

The panel noted that only a handful of senators were involved, even as it said that there has been an apparent alleged conspiracy – a well-orchestrated and systematic scheme in raiding taxpayers’ money.

Based on the signature page of the document, the final report was accomplished as early as 2014, the same year when then blue ribbon committee chairman Teofisto “TG” Guingona presented his partial committee report to the public.

The document had been routed for signature of 17 of its panel members, 13 affixed their signatures with the inclusion of Guingona, as early as 2014, yet it was managed to be filed only last June 6 at 6:30 p.m., an hour after the Senate had announced its adjournment sine die, meaning it’s no longer in session.

As such, the document is useless and will effectively be archived as it failed to be reported out on the floor.

Based on the explanation given by Senate President Franklin Drilon, the coming 17th Congress cannot adopt the report, including the other blue ribbon committee report on the laundering of $81 million Bangladesh funds.

“It has to be re-filed, a new resolution would have to be filed. We have to go though hearings. Of course, in the hearings, you can adopt the testimonies of the resource persons and call for additional resource persons if the committee wishes to do it. But the technical problem is that there was no more Senate when it was filed,” he pointed out.

Blue Ribbon's Chair Senator Guingona and Vice Chair Sergio Osmeña lll

But even if the blue ribbon committee managed to have the report submitted on time or before the sine die adjourment, where it will be numbered, there’s no assurance that it can be taken up on the floor in 17th Congress because its chairman, Senator Guingona and vice chairman Sergio Osmeña lll are no longer members of the upper chamber.

Those who signed Guingona’s report include Senators Osmeña, Chiz Escudero, Antonio Trillanes, Miriam Defensor Santiago, Grace Poe, Koko Pimentel, Loren Legarda, Bam Aquino, JV Ejercito, Pia Cayetano, Alan Peter Cayetano and Cynthia Villar.

The said report, covering nine public hearings, merely glossed over the formal appeal made by Sen. Nancy Binay, a month after Guingona presented the draft report, to secure the Commission on Audit (CoA) special audit report on PDAF and various infrastructure projects including local projects (VILP) releases from 2007 to 2009.

BINAY'S LETTER

“I would like to believe that the Honorable Chairman was motivated by good intentions in acting with expedience in coming up with a final report. However, given the serious allegations and counter-allegations of the parties involved in the controversy, I find it more imperative for the committee and for each of its members to act in a more judicious and comprehensive manner by obtaining and reviewing pertinent government records and expanding the coverage of the inquiry to include not only three senators but all persons identified in the CoA Special Audit report. Our deliberate and calculated approach is required all the more considering the numerous conflicting statements, positions and claims submitted to or uttered during the hearings by the resource persons and the senators allegedly involved,” Binay said in her letter to Guingona dated May 12, 2014 and attached to the submitted report.

The same was called by Sen. JV Ejercito, in pursuing further investigation the matter even as the draft panel report was presented to the public.

“I think that the blue ribbon report is partial and incomplete as it only focused and narrowed down on Janet Lim Napoles-related NGOs (non-government organizations). In view of this, it is my belief that the investigation has to continue to include all other anomalous transactions related to PDAF as well as the Malampaya Fund scam and for the committee report to cover all CoA identified suspected bogus NGOs as indicated in the Senate resolutions,” Ejercito said in his letter to Guingona when he signed the report with reservation on May 6, 2014.

It can be recalled that Guingona hastily called a press conference to present the “draft” committee report in April 1, 2014 despite the fact that he had yet to secure the signatures or approval of majority of his colleagues.

Aside from the three senators, alleged brains behind the scam, Janet Lim Napoles was also recommended to be charged with plunder and other serious charges alongside former National Agribusiness Corp. president Allan Javellana and former Technology Resource Center (TRC) director general Antonio Ortiz are being recommended to be charged with plunder and other serious charges.

Lawyer Jessica Lucila “Gigi” Reyes and Pauline Labayen, resigned chief of staff of Enrile and Estrada’s alleged “agent”, respectively, were also being called to be similarly charged.

Besides the three senators, no other lawmaker, despite news reports on the alleged numerous names coming from the ranks of both Houses as allegedly similarly situated were being indicted by the blue ribbon.



They are merely subjected to further investigation by the Ombudsman since the committee was unable to summon at least four members of the House of Representatives being implicated with Napoles’ scheme.

“Further investigation is needed regarding the propriety of filing charges against them. Nevertheless, we take notice of the fact that they are presently being investigated by the Ombudsman based on the complaints and evidence provided by the DoJ (Department of Justice).

“These persons are former Rep. Rizalina Seachon-Lanete and her agent Jose Sumalpong, former Rep. Edgar Valdez, former Rep. Rodolfo Plaza, former Rep. Samuel Dangwa and former Rep. Constantino Jaraula. We leave this matter to the wisdom of the Ombudsman,” the report said.

A number of other names were also being called for inidctment, practically all of Napoles’ family members, some relatives including some members of her household and some staff members of the three embattled senators.

Of the number of so-called whistleblowers who appeared before Senate probers, respondents-turned whistleblowers - Ruby Chan Tuason and Dennis Cunanan who is TRC director general on-leave – the committee is leaving their “fate” in the hands of the Ombudsman and the DoJ.

Both Tuason and Cunanan have applied to be state witnesses and the former, the report said, is seriously considered by the prosecution based on the value of her testimony and the extent of her cooperation.

The weight of her testimony cannot be downplayed as established in the hearing on her admission that she allegedly personally delivered purported kickbacks of some cohorts, including Estrada, the report said.

“Tuason’s voluntary surrender and admission of guilt constitutes critical information that identifies two legislators as recipients of kickbacks sourced from simulated government projects. Being an admission against interest, her statements deserve serious consideration by the court. She would not have implicated herself in these crimes if it was not true,” the report said.

In the case of Cunanan, the committee noted that his testimony supports the case theory that there was direction by the lawmakers involved in the stealing of public funds and that the TRC was used only as a conduit for the whole operation.

Cunanan’s testimony is largely supported by the testimonies of the whistleblowers, except as to whether or not he received kickbacks from the transactions.

“This committee leaves this matter up to the DoJ and the Ombudsman to decide upon Cunanan’s fitness to be granted immunity from prosecution,” the report said.

The whistleblowers who were mostly former employees of Napoles, admittedly provided critical information to help the prosecution prevent similar scams in the future.

“These whistleblowers, through technically considered participants of Napoles’ operations, were not included in the complaint filed by the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI), for their immeasurable value as witnesses for the prosecution and because they were probably not considered the most guilty.

“In these cases, the whistleblowers were able to clearly and convincingly explain how bogus NGOs (non-government organizations) were set up, under the direction of Napoles, in order to access and appropriate the PDAF of certain legislators for personal use,” the report said.

“Against the general denials of Napoles and the government officials quetioned, the whistleblowers gave specific and categorical details, with conviction, about their racketeering activities and how Napoles worked closely with legislators and their agents, in order to overcome, if not contravene, the procedural requirements for successful fund releases,” the report added.

“The committee’s findings would show that there have been reckless disregard of standard operating procedures, a cavalier violation of laws, rules and regulations and other government issuances and a systematic, endemic and orchestrated pillaging of the national treasury in the use of the PDAF,” the 122-page report said.


PHILSTAR

UNA emerging as House minority By Janvic Mateo (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 8, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


“My personal stand is that I want UNA to pursue the minority leadership. But whatever decision UNA makes should be based on a consensus among the members,” said party president Navotas Rep. Toby Tiangco. Philstar.com/AJ Bolando

DAVAO CITY, Philippines – With the once ruling Liberal Party joining the coalition to create a “super majority” in the House of Representatives, the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) may lead the opposition or minority party in the incoming 17th Congress.

“My personal stand is that I want UNA to pursue the minority leadership. But whatever decision UNA makes should be based on a consensus among the members,” said party president Navotas Rep. Toby Tiangco.

Tiangco was not able to provide the actual number of UNA members and its allies in the House, saying that the numbers could still change when voting for the next leadership is held on July 4.

“I want to give time to members to check their options and evaluate what is best for their constituents and how to best pursue their advocacies,” he added.

UNA fielded Vice President Jejomar Binay in the presidential race. He placed fourth behind president-elect Rodrigo Duterte, former interior secretary Manuel Roxas II and Sen. Grace Poe.

Asked whom they would field in the race for speakership should the party decide to lead the minority, Tiangco said the decision would be based on who the party members would choose.

READ MORE...

But in Davao City yesterday, UNA member and Quezon Rep. Danilo Suarez already offered himself as the possible option for minority leader.

“I would volunteer to head the minority in the house,” he said. “We offered UNA as the minority on a position of constructive and cooperative minority.”

Suarez stressed the need to have a cooperative minority as the incoming administration would undertake a massive amount of rebuilding.

The minority leader will be the lawmaker who will get the second highest number of votes in the race for speakership.

Duterte’s choice, Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez, is expected to clinch the speakership.

Several lawmakers led by outgoing Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. flew to Davao yesterday to meet with Duterte.

Belmonte said the ruling Liberal Party is negotiating for possible inclusion in the majority coalition being formed by Alvarez, a member of the Duterte’s PDP-Laban.

Alvarez said confirmed members of the majority are the Nacionalista Party, Nationalist People’s Coalition, Lakas, National Unity Party and most party-list groups.

He said they are currently in talks with the Makabayan bloc, which has also expressed intention to join the majority.

Sought for comment on the possibility of UNA leading the minority, Alvarez said it is beyond PDP-Laban’s control.

“It’s anybody’s choice, whatever they want,” he said.

-----------------------------

ALSO FROM THE TRIBUNE

Retirement far from Binay’s mind Written by Tribune Wires Friday, 10 June 2016 00:00



The issue of retirement is out of the question for Vice President Jejomar Binay as a public servant and a politician.

Despite losing in the recently concluded May 9 presidential race, his chief of staff, Benjamin Martinez Jr., yesterday said the Vice President has no plans of retiring from politics.

“He lost but that doesn’t mean that he is retiring,” he told reporters when asked on Binay’s plan after his term ends on June 30.

He added the 73-year-old veteran politician is bound to strengthen his political party, the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) and its members.

“VP Binay is an institution when it comes to politics, government service, governance. Maybe it’s time to start training new leaders,” Martinez stressed.

Moving on from defeat, the outgoing Vice President is now going to be a grandfather not only to his grandchildren but also to younger generation of aspiring public servants as well as, he added.

“He is okay. He has been receiving guests, well-wishers almost every day (at the Coconut Palace) especially on afternoons. He is going back to his own routine which is walking in the morning,” Marquez said.

According to him, the Vice President also wanted to be active in his foundation, JCB Foundation, which was formed in 2005 to help support his philanthropic and charitable projects.

VP leaves more than 80% of budget to Robredo

Meanwhile, the Office of the Vice President will be the Aquino administration’s exact opposite, which has almost gobbled up more than 80 percent of the 2016 national budget, as Binay’s office had barely touched its allocation for this year, leaving his successor, Vice President-elect Leni Robredo, a huge chunk of the OVP fund.

Martinez said the incoming administration still has more than 80 percent of the P503-million OVP budget for 2016.

“As of end of May, we have spent only a total of P78 million. The budget of the OVP is P500 million,” he stressed.

“I think they will be happy. They will still have a lot to spend for in terms of their programs. Give it another P10 million by the end of June. Definitely, our expenditure is way, way below,” he added.

Martinez also bared revealed for the past six years, the OVP served 56,722 poor Filipinos seeking medical, burial and transportation assistance from July 2010 to March 2016.

The transition report, which was turned over to the team of Robredo, also highlighted the provision of relief assistance to 642,143 families, medical and dental check-up to 143,251 beneficiaries, educational support to 124,416 children of indigenous groups, and wheelchairs to 734 differently-abled individuals.

It also included the financial status of the office, pointing out that the Binay administration has spent around P78.8 million or 15.7 percent of the 2016 budget.

The 49-page report was formally turned over by OVP officials at the Coconut Palace yesterday.

“I have been given instruction by VP Binay to make the transition as smooth as possible,” said Martinez.

“We made sure that the office is ready for the new Vice President. We want to show them that we will leave the office in a good situation,” he added.

According to both camps, Binay and Robredo are set to meet personally before June 30.
By Ted Tuvera and Charlie V. Manalo


PHILSTAR

Duterte secures ‘super majority’ in House Share Alexis Romero (The Philippine Star) - June 8, 2016 - 12:00am


Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez, a member of the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban), said more than 200 lawmakers are joining the bloc and would also support his bid to become House speaker. Youtube

DAVAO CITY, Philippines – With Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. coming here to express the Liberal Party’s support for the incoming administration, president-elect Rodrigo Duterte has secured a “super majority” in the House of Representatives, giving him leverage to push his agenda, an ally said yesterday.

Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez, a member of the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban), said more than 200 lawmakers are joining the bloc and would also support his bid to become House speaker.

Alvarez said Liberal Party (LP) members are among those who support his bid for the speakership.

“With the support of Speaker (Feliciano) Belmonte, we will have a super majority,” Alvarez told reporters in a chance interview here.

There are about 290 members of the House of Representatives.

Alvarez said about 60 members of the super majority belong to PDP-Laban, while the rest are from the Nacionalista Party of businessman Manuel Villar, the Nationalist People’s Coalition of tycoon Eduardo Cojuangco Jr., the National Unity Party, Lakas of detained former president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and LP.

He added that the Makabayan bloc, which consists of militant party-list representatives, has also signified intention to join the majority.

Belmonte, confirmed that Alvarez is poised to succeed him as Speaker.

“He’s got it in the bag,” Belmonte said. “I think it’s common sense that the leading party should have the biggest (number of members). Even with my own experience, I saw that it was necessary that we’d be the biggest party in the coalition. I think that is a reasonable requirement.”

READ MORE...

Asked to react to critics of politicians who move from one party to another, Belmonte said: “I don’t want to say that it is a Philippine phenomenon because that happens also in other (countries), even in Europe.”

“We can see that the Republican-controlled Senate and House in the US are giving Obama a hard time in getting his program through. Here, I don’t think we can afford to be doing that. We don’t like stalemates. We have to keep moving,” Belmonte added.

He said Duterte, who was voted by more than 16 million people, should receive some help from Congress so that “his mandate becomes a reality.”

Alvarez said members of the Duterte economic team would also submit a list of bills they want to include in the legislative agenda.

When asked if he was leaving LP, Belmonte replied: “We’re talking coalition at the moment. We’ll never know what happens next.”

He said the PDP-Laban was his first party after the EDSA revolution, “but they started organizing all sorts of parties. For the first six years, I did not have a party. I was a known non-partisan guy.”

Belmonte met with lawmakers from different parties yesterday to discuss coalition building and the legislative agenda of the next Congress.

Among those present during the meeting were Reps. Rolando Andaya Jr. (Camarines Sur), Danilo Suarez (Quezon), Rodolfo Fariñas (Ilocos Norte), Fredenil Castro (Capiz), Aurelio Gonzales Jr. (Pampanga), Al Francis Bichara (Albay) and Rodel Batocabe (Ako Bicol party-list). Incoming finance secretary Carlos Dominguez III also attended the meeting.

The lawmakers met with Duterte later in the afternoon at the Malacañang of the South at the Department of Public Works and Highways Panacan Depot.

Fight for Senate presidency

For the Senate, the support of other political parties could also boost the chances of Sen. Aquilino Pimentel III of becoming the next Senate president, said PDP-Laban secretary general Ben Ranque.

He said that although Duterte, also the party chairman, is keeping his distance in the selection, it is proper to give the Senate leadership to someone from the party.

Ranque told The STAR that LP support for PDP-Laban runs counter to the claim of Sen. Alan Cayetano that he already has the support of at least 15 senators for his Senate presidential bid and that of Sen. Vicente Sotto III who said his group has 18 senators.

“As far as the PDP-Laban is concerned, only the Nacionalista Party and incoming senators Migz Zubiri (and) Manny Pacquiao had publicly announced their support for Cayetano,” Ranque said.

He added that the LP and PDP-Laban alliance dates back to the agreement between PDP-Laban founder and former senator Aquilino Pimentel Jr. and the late senator Jovito Salonga of LP.

“PDP-Laban and LP, who shared a common ideology, were the parties in power during the term of the late president Corazon Aquino, it’s just history repeating itself,” Ranque pointed out.

“It’s just coincidental that Sen. Koko Pimentel is the only PDP-Laban in the Senate and the party, including the newly accepted members, are now campaigning to their allies in the Senate for Pimentel,” Ranque said.

No rubber stamp

While Duterte’s allies have mustered enough numbers to become what they described as a super majority, Belmonte said the House would not be reduced to a mere rubber stamp of the Palace.

“It doesn’t mean that when you are in the majority, you are a ‘yes man.’ You have your own common sense and principles,” Belmonte stressed. – With Paolo Romero, Perseus Echeminada, Christina Mendez

------------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

Duterte mouthpieces avoid media Written by Ted Tuvera Friday, 10 June 2016 00:00



The camp of Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte seems to have taken to heart his decision to boycott media that even the Duterte’s spokesmen have been avoiding reporters’ queries.

Consistent with his boycott declaration, Duterte who was in Cebu for another thanksgiving celebration, avoided last Wednesday evening reporters from different publications and even the foreign media.

Only members of the state-run People’s Television Network (PTV4) were allowed to get near Duterte and were designated the exclusive source of information or statements from the incoming President.

His spokesmen lawyer Salvador Panelo and Peter Laviña have not responded to requests for interviews and clarifications or follow-up queries.

Duterte’s cold ties with the press began after a series of press briefings wherein the tough talking and foul-mouthed 71-year-old issued sweeping statements about journalists being corrupt and that victims of media killings supposedly deserved their fate.

He even cursed journalists who, in his perception, cannot read between the lines on his crude statements.

Since then, local media watchdogs, the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP) and the National Press Club (NPC), as well as foreign groups such as the Paris-based Reporters Without Borders (RSF) irked Duterte who then announced that he is boycotting media, which he said would last throughout his six-year term.

Worse, Panelo said that journalists brought it upon themselves to be boycotted by Duterte and that they should “study journalism again.”

Veteran lawyer Romulo Macalintal, however, said Duterte’s decision to confine his interaction with the government-owned media outlets will be contradictory to his promise of transparency under his government.

“It is difficult that our sources of information about the President is limited only to the state press as it undermines press freedom,” Macalintal said.

“Reports will be less credible as it might give the people an impression that stories are filtered and that there is no way for private practitioners to scrutinize issues given that they are deprived of access to the president,” he added.

Nokor experience

For a University of Santo Tomas (UST) journalism professor, who used to be a broadcast journalist, Duterte’s decision to control media coverage is similar to the situation of media in North Korea.

“If there’s a filtering of stories on the President, then it undermines the media’s role as watchdogs of government. If stories about the president are going through his discretion, we are becoming no different from North Korea where the government is glowingly infallible,” the media analyst who begged for anonymity told the Tribune.

“Journalists are not supposed to be merely loyal to the state because if they do, then the institution jeopardizes the credibility it sustains,” he added.

According to the 2015 Trust Index Survey, the media rank higher in terms of public trust than the government.

Furthermore, Macalintal said Duterte must accept the fact that journalists have the job of being critically observant of the President.

“The media are supposed to point out the good and the wrong in his presidency,” Macalintal said, adding that the challenge for private media firms is to see to it that they “are responsible enough in making efforts to report truthfully”.

Despite his apparent allergy to reporters, Duterte during his Cebu visit wanted to remain true to his portrayed image as the man of the masses by breaking protocols set for him.

Duterte was noticeably more refined in Cebu as his usual use of profanity was not heard.

Duterte, addressing some 300 people in his private party, said he is not used to the tight protocols made by the Presidential Security Group (PSG) after allowing 50 of his admirers to get near him and take selfies and photos and even to converse briefly with them.

Despite warnings coming from his anointed Philippine National Police (PNP) Director General Roland dela Rosa, Duterte said he is not bothered by assassination threats.

“If I want to die, I want to die alone. I don’t want to drag other people (with me),” Duterte said.


INQUIRER

Drilon: Koko is next Senate president SHARES: 7981 VIEW COMMENTS By: Maila Ager @MAgerINQ INQUIRER.net 10:15 AM June 8th, 2016


Senate President Franklin Drilon (left) and Senator Aquilino ‘Koko’ Pimentel are seeing eye-to-eye in the leadership of the incoming Senate. Drilon said he and 16 other senators agreed Wednesday night to elect Pimentel as the next Senate president. INQUIRER FILES

Senate President Franklin Drilon has conceded the chamber’s leadership to Senator Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel III in the 17th Congress, saying he did it “for the sake of unity and stability.”

“I wish to announce that last night major political parties have agreed to have an alliance, principally the LP (Liberal Party) and its allied parties — we have six LP, one Akbayan — with the PDP-Laban, plus the NPC (Nationalist People’s Coalition) and the other allied political groups,” Drilon himself said during the Kapihan sa Manila Bay on Wednesday.

READ: Cayetano as Senate head gets Duterte nod |

READ: Cayetano says 15 senators backing his presidency in Senate

“Last night, we met and had that agreement. The president of the incoming Senate will be Koko Pimentel III. I will be the Senate President Pro Tempore and (Senator Vicente) Tito Sotto will be the Majority Leader,” he said.

Drilon said Pimentel, president of PDP-Laban now being headed by President-elect Rodrigo Duterte, had the support of about 16 to 17 senators.

READ: 17 senators back Koko for Senate presidency

“We maintain the independence of the Senate but at the same time we will support in general the legislative agenda of President Duterte,” the incumbent Senate leader said.


CAYETANO

“As the committees are still being discussed, we have agreed that Koko Pimetel is our next president, the only PDP-laban in the Senate but has the support of both my group and Tito Sotto’s group,” he said, adding that Pimentel was “very qualified” for the post.

READ MORE...

Drilon said they also decided to support Pimentel “to provide stability in the leadership of the Senate.”

He said the support for Pimentel was already “cast in stone.”

“We have enough, we have more than the required majority,” the incumbent leader said.

A simple majority or 13 of the 24-man chamber is needed to elect a new Senate leader.

Asked why he did not fight to keep his post when the LP had the most number of members in the chamber, Drilon said: “For the sake of unity and stability…”

“Yes we’re big, it was a question of looking for five. But instead of wrangling, we said: Alright, we just assume the post of Pro Temp, we support the lone PDP-Laban senator and we have an alliance with Senator Sotto and the NPC.”

Pimentel confirmed the “agreement” reached among the major groups in the chamber.

In fact, he said, he would go to Davao to personally inform Duterte about the new development.

“But I’m not yet feeling that well to travel. Bad case of cough and colds,” Pimentel said.

Asked about the distribution of committees in the Senate, Pimentel said: “Ayos na among the 17 (senators).”

When the new Congress opens on July 25, Drilon would still be sitting as Senate President until a motion to elect a new leader is made on the floor.

“There will be a motion to organize the Senate… I open the session of the 17th Congress, after which there will be nominations for the leadership. As we go along, the committee chairmanships will be nominated on the floor,” he said.

------------------------------

RELATED FROM THE TRIBUNE

Super Senate majority forming — Lacson Written by Angie M. Rosales Wednesday, 08 June 2016 00:00


Ping Lacson

But Drilon claims no 13 votes he retains SP post

A “super majority” is what appears to be now emerging in the Senate with Sen. Aquilino “Koko” Pimentel getting installed as leader of the upper chamber when the 17th Congress opens on July 25.

Returning Sen. Panfilo Lacson yesterday dropped some broad hints on what to expect as far as leadership composition of the upper chamber is concerned.

In his twitter account @iampinglacson, the senator-elect implied that the incoming majority bloc will more or less be around 20 senators, possibly rallying behind Pimentel as Senate chief.

“16th Congress adjourned, getting ready for 17th: SP (Senate president) Pimentel, Pro Temp (pro tempore Franklin) Drilon, Majority Ldr (Leader Vicente) Sotto (III) plus a super majority of at least 20 (?),” Lacson tweeted.

Such statement implies the possible merging of Drilon’s group, composed of seven incumbent and incoming senators, to that of Sotto which is said to be around 11.

Reporters tried but could not reach Lacson for further comment while Sotto did not respond to queries on this matter.
Drilon, for his part, denied any knowledge of Lacson’s claims.

“(I have) no knowledge of circumstances behind Ping’s (Lacson) statement. When and only when the SP (Senate president) candidate has 13 votes, then the pro temp (tempore) post becomes one of the options. Being the minority leader is another option. Without anyone with 13 votes, I remain SP (Senate president),” he said in a text message to reporters. In a new Congress, unless Drilon has 13 votes for his retention, he cannot stay as Senate President. It is hardly a sure thing for a 16th Senate President to automatically retain his seat as SP in the 17th Congress, since there are 12 senators, including Drilon, who form the new members of the Senate.

Those who voted for Drilon as the 16th Senate’s leader, such as TG Guingona and Serge Osmeña are no longer part of the Senate, along with those senators who were on their last term.

But if what Lacson says is accurate, then it will be his groupmates who will be part of the super-majority.

Sotto has been consistently saying that his group, has a “solid” nine members that has swelled to 18.
Villar belittles Ping’s claims


VILLAR

Sen. Cynthia Villar, who is rooting for Majority Floor Leader Alan Peter Cayetano as the next Senate president belittled Lacson’s claims, insinuating that Cayetano is being pushed by President-elect Rodrigo Duterte to replace Drilon in the coming 17th Congress.

“That’s what he (Duterte) told us. So how would this be done? It’s their [Duterte’s camp] wish. Of course he (Duterte) expects our cooperation. But of course, let us see what happens,” Villar, in an interview with reporters, said, adding that the upper chamber, unlike the House of Representatives, is proving to be more independent when it comes to issues such as leadership composition.

Villar also claimed that Sotto, based on their recent conversation, is not keen on becoming a majority leader.
She also expressed doubts on the possibility of Drilon’s group coalescing with that of Sotto’s bloc to form a majority.

It’s too early, to assume the formation of a majority bloc, she said.

“But anyway, let’s leave them be,” she said.

As far as she’s concerned, Villar indicated that she has already committed her support for Cayetano’s bid.

“That’s because that is really a commitment. Its difficult to keep on changing your support,” she said.

Although Duterte is said to have taken a hands off policy when it comes to reorganizing the Senate, unlike in the lower house where his known staunch ally, Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon Alvarez, has his backing to be the incoming House speaker, Villar said the same cannot be discounted as far as the Senate is concerned, to ensure that the legislative agenda of the incoming administration will be realized.

“You know how it is in the Senate. Whatever is a good legislatve measure will be passed by the Senate. We are very logical here in the Senate. Then too, there are certain committees that have to support the President and he has to have his allies there,” she pointed out.

Villar also hinted at the possibility of Duterte exerting his influence to ensure that Cayetano will be elected Senate president.
But if such expectations fail to be realized, Villar said she’s open to the idea of being part of the minority bloc.

“It’s okay with me but I really want that committee on agriculture. That’s my wish and I don’t think I will lose it. Even if you are in the minority, you are entitled to (keep) your previous committee if you haven’t left it. That’s a tradition in the Senate that when you’re the one handling the committee, whether you are in the minority or majority, they give it to you especially those vacated by [retired members]. That’s normal [among us].

But I think I’m entitled to that committee on agriculture. That’s what I am only concerend about, because I think I can do a lot for agriculture,” she said.

Belmonte quits bid for Speaker of 17th Congress

Outgoing Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., on Tuesday said the remaining member of the Liberal Party (LP) in the House of Representatives is more interested to support the coalition of change in the 17th Congress rather than be part of the minority.
Belmonte, the vice chairman of LP said in a text message that he was no longer interested to run for the speakership against the personal choice of President-elect Rodrigo Duterte.

He said the LP has decided to support the incoming speaker, Davao del Norte Rep. Pantaleon “Bebot” Alvarez.


ALVAREZ

With this decision among his peers, Belmonte flew to Davao City yesterday morning to iron out joining the Coalition of Change spearheaded by PDP-Laban. The speaker said he was able to seek an audience with Duterte and Alvarez.

“I will meet with President Duterte together with Rep. Alvarez, the President’s chosen candidate for Speaker,” he said in a text message as he described his visit as “primarily a courtesy call” to the 16th president of the land. He said he will be discussing the possibility of coalescing with PDP-Laban.

“I confirm that LP and PDP-Laban are in coalition talks,” he said.

Belmonte earlier expressed his preference for a coalition to be formed between LP and PDP-Laban, similar to the arrangement it has with other parties such as the Nacionalista Party, Nationalist People’s Coalition, Lakas-CMD, and National Unity Party.
At least 70 of the 115 LP stalwarts in the House have expressed their intention to join the majority bloc and support Alvarez’s speakership bid.

The Davao del Norte lawmaker, for his part, said the LP was welcome to join the so-called “Coalition for Change” led by PDP-Laban as long as it supports the Duterte administration’s policies and programs.

Alvarez aims to garner the support of over 200 lawmakers in the 292-member chamber.
With PNA


PHILSTAR

Noy: There’s life after presidency, but… By Aurea Calica (The Philippine Star) | Updated June 9, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


Asked what was next for him, the outgoing President shared his desire to lead a quiet life after his term and after 44 years of being part of the country’s political dynamics, being the only son of two democracy icons – former senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. and ex-president Corazon. Philstar.com file

MANILA, Philippines – There is life after the presidency, President Aquino said, but he’s not ruling out involvement in politics again if the need arises.

Asked what was next for him, the outgoing President shared his desire to lead a quiet life after his term and after 44 years of being part of the country’s political dynamics, being the only son of two democracy icons – former senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. and ex-president Corazon.

For Aquino, the turning point was martial law.

“I was all of 12 years old, I’m 56 now, 44 years of being in public life,” he said.

Speaking to Rappler’s Maria Ressa in a live interview on Tuesday, Aquino said one of his first thoughts that day was when his mother was advising one of her successors that “there’s life after the presidency.”

“So in politics this is the penultimate job (and) going through all of the BS (bulls**t) to get here and all the BS while in here, unless there is really that need I can fulfill, I’d like to look forward to a quiet life,” Aquino said.

READ MORE...

The President explained the life of their family had not been easy while he was growing up, when Christmas time would arrive and they’d feel grateful to still be alive.

He said there was no way they could turn back the time, especially during martial law, and that some failed to live through it and enjoy the fruits of what they fought for.

“Now I was just talking to some friends. I was explaining to them after my mom stepped down (in 1992), about a year later I started working for the family farm in Tarlac and I had different lifestyle, probinsiyano na ako nu’n, which recharged me. If I did not get that I probably would not have ventured into politics by 1998,” said Aquino, who was Tarlac representative for nine years and senator for three years before he became President.

“So at the end of the day, if there‘s a need that has to be fulfilled and I think I can fulfill it, I will still adopt what my parents said – (if) there’s something I could have done but I chose not to do it, I would not be able to live with myself,” he added.

The President, however, stressed that part of his success would be how well he trained a successor that things would be going well and there would be no need to intervene and “we can have a different lifestyle.”

However, the President’s chosen successor, Manuel Roxas II did not win in the last elections.

Asked what he had become as a man after six years as President, Aquino noted how he managed to continue his parents’ legacy.

----------------------------

RELATED FROM THE MANILA TIMES

CBCP WEIGHS IN ON MAY 9 POLLS - ‘Most vicious and divisive’ June 10, 2016 12:42 am
by WILLIAM B. DEPASUPIL, REPORTER


Screen-Grab-CBCP1

THE recent May 9 elections may have set new records in terms of transmission speed, quick count and voter turnout, but it is also the most “vicious” and “divisive” in recent history, the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) said.

“The viciousness and division of the election campaign may be said to be initiated by the entire machinery of the ‘yellow’ administration of President Benigno Simeon Aquino 3rd that cast its absolute and massive support to the hierarchy of the Liberal Party, as if the entire government resources were an entitlement of the favored political party,” said an editorial posted on the CBCP news website.

The editorial was posted on June 2.

KRIS AND THE HELICOPTER ISSUE

It said it can be attributed to a number of factors, among them the use of government helicopter and military and other resources by the President’s youngest sister Kris Aquino when she campaigned for Administration presidential bet Manuel “Mar” Roxas 2nd .

“The most dramatic was Kris Aquino, the President’s sister who campaigned for Mar Roxas, the Administration’s candidate, using the government’s helicopter, military and sundry resources–with nary any respect for neither law nor propriety,” the editorial added.

The President earlier defended his sister on the use of the presidential chopper on one of the campaign sorties of the LP, saying Kris is among the biggest taxpayers in the country and qualifies as a guest of the President.

The editorial pointed out that the President, for always wearing the yellow color of the Liberal Party, promoted divisiveness as the Office of the President is supposed to be a symbol of unity and never an exclusive domain of one political party.



It said the May 9 elections were marred by widespread vote-buying, which it described as the “most massive” and the “most pervasive.”

The CBCP editorial cited a report from Msgr. Meliton Oso, archdiocesan coordinator of Church-based election watchdog Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV) in Iloilo, who said “candidates and party-list groups were giving out P500 per voter” and P3,000 per family in the guise of scholarship programs.

Aside from the cash doleouts on Election Day, it said the Aquino administration using P100 billion in government funds, through the so-called “Bottom-Up Budgeting (BUB),” in the run-up to last month’s polls was suspect.

“But then again the biggest vote-buyer, and therefore the biggest violator of the Omnibus Election Code, could be the Aquino administration. Aside from the cash shoved to voters on Election Day, the Bottom-Up Budgeting [BUB] program of the government was allegedly intended to buy the support of local government officials,” according to the CBCP editorial.

It cited a CNN Philippines report of the Duterte camp accusing the LP and Roxas of vote-buying through the BUB.

According to Peter Laviña, spokesman for incoming President Rodrigo Duterte and head of Duterte’s media team, the BUB was used as an official campaign kitty of the Administration.


AQUINO ADMIN CONTROVERSIAL BUB

The same sentiment was also aired earlier by opposition United Nationalist Alliance spokesman Ramon Ilagan, who said “this [BUB] is the biggest pork barrel in election history.”

The Aquino Administration has maintained, though, that the BUB was normal government assistance to local governments.

The CBCP editorial said the clamor for change has grown loudest since the May 9 elections, adding that “serious or not, Rodrigo Duterte has promised to answer that clamor.”
Share this:
Facebook117EmailPrintGoogleTwitter

4 Responses to ‘Most vicious and divisive’
To the Max says:
June 10, 2016 at 8:51 am
The biggest liberal party strategy was the destruction of VP Binay via Senate hearings and Senator Poe citizenship and residency issue. Both candidates are the frontliner 6 months before the election. One year ago VP Binay is unbeatable and unstoppable. Then is was Grace turn with 40 percentage trust rating. Her name was almost not included in the ballot. That is how influential the Liberal political machinery is. If LP took Grace as the presidential candidate , she should have been the new president. This is the Liberal party blunder.
Reply
fyi says:
June 10, 2016 at 5:37 am
What will be done about these violations of vote buying ?
What will be done about using the government resources to aid the liberal party ?
Reply
Victor Amor says:
June 10, 2016 at 4:39 am
Was it true that ballots were pre-marked with “ink” that was visible to the VCM scanner but invisible to the naked eye?
Reply
Keem Wong says:
June 10, 2016 at 1:37 am
And why don’t you say something or answer the charges of Duterte? Are you scared that someone in the person of Duterte has the courage to tell the truth of what you have asking some politicians of SUVs for your caprice and not for missionary work? Where is your vow of poverty? Its like you only have the courage to say something negative to some presidential candidates but not to Binay and Poe. What’s wrong with you guys?


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2016 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE