PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org


PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

ENRILE HITS AQUINO, DEFENDS MARCOS' YEARS
[Aquino was concerned that some people have forgotten EDSA and have thrown support for the late strongman’s son, Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., whom he claimed was likely to repeat the mistakes of his father.]


FEBRUARY 26 -“I am sorry to say this, [the President] is very strong in blaming others, pointing his fingers at others, and [blaming] them. But he’s very weak and poor in knowledge and understanding,” Enrile told the Inquirer by phone. SENATE Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile last night said President Aquino did not know what he was talking about in condemning the Marcos regime. “I am sorry to say this, [the President] is very strong in blaming others, pointing his fingers at others, and [blaming] them. But he’s very weak and poor in knowledge and understanding,” Enrile told the Inquirer by phone. Enrile was reacting to President Aquino’s statements during the 30th Edsa People Power anniversary celebration where the Chief Executive condemned the view of some people that the Marcos dictatorship was the golden years of the Philippines. The President also reiterated that Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. should apologize for the human rights abuses of the martial law regime of his father, the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos. Enrile said the plans being implemented by the Aquino administration were made during the Marcos years. He also said President Aquino was “inconsistent.” “Why are we still enforcing the laws made in the Marcos years if he was really that bad,” Enrile said, referring to the late dictator. He pointed out that the government was now using for its programs coco levy funds that were put up during the Marcos years. At one point, Enrile also asked President Aquino who was Commander Selman to his late father, Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. He said Commander Selman served as a bodyguard of the late senator but he was also a “principal” commander of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP). Asked whether he was saying that the late senator had links to the CPP, Enrile said, “I’m just starting facts, not conclusions.” On whether Senator Marcos should apologize for the past, Enrile said: “I don’t know if he has anything to be sorry for. You better ask him.”  FULL REPORT.

ALSO: ‘Edsa about right vs wrong’ - Aquino
[AQUINO: PEOPLE POWER WASN’T ABOUT AQUINO VS MARCOS]


FEBRUARY 26 -FAMOUS FVR's FREEDOM LEAP:  President Aquino joins former President Fidel V. Ramos, who led the military breakaway from dictator Ferdinand Marcos in February 1986 with then Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, and Bobby Aquino, son of the late former Sen. Agapito “Butz” Aquino, in reenacting the freedom leap during the celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Edsa People Power Revolution on Thursday. JOAN BONDOC  As if guided by his martyred father whose statue stood behind him at the People Power Monument, President Aquino led the celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Edsa People Power Revolution Thursday by countering attempts to revise history, saying martial law was “a painful chapter” and not a “golden age,” as The New York Times put it in a front-page article. The only son of democracy icons Ninoy and Cory Aquino, the President also took to the stage to warn people that Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. could replicate the iron-fist rule of his father, the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos. Yellow and white confetti rained on the crowd of several thousands who gathered at the People Power Monument to recall the glorious day when Filipinos drove away the Marcoses in 1986, but the prospect of Senator Marcos being elected Vice President, a doorstep away from Malacañang, hovered like a dark cloud. Around 500 protesters blasting the Aquino administration for purportedly allowing the Marcos resurgence briefly clashed with riot police on Edsa after the celebrations, but no injuries were reported. In his speech, President Aquino belied Senator Marcos’ claims that the Philippines saw its best years during his father’s rule. “As part of the generation who suffered under the dictatorship, I tell you just as directly: The time we spent under Mr. Marcos was not a golden age,” Mr. Aquino said. “It remains one of the most painful chapters of our history—it was why so many of our countrymen mustered the courage to gather at Edsa and in other places outside Metro Manila, armed only with their faith and their principles,” he said. READ MORE...

ALSO: Aquino deplores Marcos era; he urged voters to stop Bongbong’s surge; workers say they are worse off 30 years after EDSA ’86
[Workers statement: “While EDSA People Power promised change for all Filipinos, it actually signaled intensified attacks on workers, many of which continue to this day. The regimes that came to power after 1986 implemented neoliberal ‘free market’ policies that assaulted workers’ rights in order to increase the profits of big foreign and local capitalists,” KMU chairman Elmer Labog said in a statement for the 30th anniversary of the EDSA People Power Revolution.]


FEBRUARY 26 -SHOWER OF HOPE – A Philippine Air Force (PAF) chopper rains down confetti on a phalanx of soldiers and policemen marching on EDSA towards the People Power Monument in Quezon City.
The Marcos regime was not the golden age of the Philippines but the dark and abusive period that should never be repeated through the return of his family to national power, President Aquino declared on Thursday. Thirty years after the bloodless revolt that ousted the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos, the President reminded the public, especially the youth, about the atrocities during the martial law era and encouraged them to thwart the political resurgence of his unapologetic family. Aquino was concerned that some people have forgotten EDSA and have thrown support for the late strongman’s son, Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., whom he claimed was likely to repeat the mistakes of his father. “As part of the generation who suffered under the dictatorship, the regime of Mr. Marcos was not the golden age of the country. This was a painful chapter of our history,” the President said, adding the only freedom then was the freedom to praise the dictator. “I would like to emphasize, this is not fiction. This is not based on theory or opinion of the few. Martial law really happened. There was once a dictator, alongside his family and cronies, who gripped on power at the expense of the lives and freedom of Filipinos,” he added during the EDSA commemorative rise at the People Power Monument in Quezon City. If anyone enjoyed the country’s golden age during martial law, Aquino said this would be Marcos and his cronies who abused power and enriched themselves while the economy was spiraling down and civil liberties were curtailed. Aquino also pointed out that the Marcos era was the “golden age of the country’s debt” with the amount ballooning to P192.2 billion shortly before the dictator was ousted from office. The national debt was only P2.4 billion when Marcos assumed power in 1965. “And because the money did not go where it was supposed to go, they reaped the benefits while we continue to shoulder the debt payments,” Aquino said. READ MORE...

ALSO: Millennials speak up on what EDSA means to them


FEBRUARY 25 -(File photo) Maria Angela Villa (L) and Khenn Arquiza (R), millenials who spoke during the commemorative program on the 30th anniversary of the 1986 EDSA Revolution Metro Manila
(CNN Philippines) – A millennial’s question grabbed the attention of some Filipinos who witnessed the commemorative program of the 30th EDSA Revolution anniversary on Thursday (February 25): “What is the EDSA of the Filipino youth today?”  Without a speech guide in hand, Maria Angela Villa said she may not have been born in 1986, but she expressed joy that the People Power Revolution has given her the freedom to speak today without the fear of her life being threatened or her house raided. “Hindi kapansanan ng kabataang Pilipino ngayon na wala kaming karanasan sa EDSA ninyo noon. Kung iyon ang EDSA ninyo noon, ano ang EDSA ng kabataang Pilipino ngayon?” Villa asked in a speech that gained several applauses from the crowd at the People Power Monument in Epifanio delos Santos Avenue (EDSA) – White Plains. [Translation: “It is not a disability of the Filipino youth of today that we do not have a first-hand experience of your EDSA in the past? If that was your EDSA in the past, what is the EDSA of the Filipino youth today?”] Earlier during the program, Executive Sec. Paquito Ochoa said most of the millennials were deprived of the opportunity to understand the true meaning of EDSA, as he invited the youth to visit the experiential museum set up inside Camp Aguinaldo. But Villa summed up what EDSA means for millennials like her: The restoration of a nation’s dignity and the wholehearted service to others without asking for any position or money in return. “Gusto naming maglingkod dahil gusto naming maglingkod,” she said. [Translation: “We want to serve because we want to serve.”] Villa headed the project Milk Matters of the Phi Lambda Delta Sorority of the University of the Philippines Manila, a regular milk-letting activity which aims to ensure the safe and sustainable supply of breastmilk for newborns at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH). READ MORE...

ALSO: By Yen Makabenta - The transfiguration of President Aquino into King Canute


FEBRUARY 26 -by YEN MAKABENTA
FOR President Aquino’s bizarre transfiguration into King Canute at the 30th anniversary commemoration of the Edsa People power revolt, Filipinos should either credit or blame the New York Times. It was America’s most influential newspaper, with its report that “Filipinos are yearning for the Golden Age of Marcos,” that impelled the President to launch a tirade against the Marcos family, and caused him to ask our people not to vote for Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr for vice president in the May elections. Trying to prove to the world and his supporters that he can still control events in the Philippines, he committed himself to halting the rising tide of support for Bongbong’s candidacy. But like King Canute in the legend, Aquino will most likely get his feet wet. What the legend says In the legend and the chronicles, it is told that Canute, king of England and Denmark in the 12th century, went to the seashore joined by his courtiers. As narrated by Henry of Huntingdon, Canute with great vigor commanded that his chair be set on the shore, when the tide began to rise. And then he spoke to the rising sea, saying “You are part of my dominion, and the ground that I am seated upon is mine, nor has anyone disobeyed my orders with impunity. Therefore, I order you not to rise onto my land, nor to wet the clothes or body of your Lord.” But the sea carried on rising as usual without any reverence for his person, and soaked his feet and legs. Moving away, Canute declared: “All the inhabitants of the world should know that the power of kings is vain and trivial, and that none is worthy of the name of king but He whose command the heaven, earth and sea obey by eternal laws.”  Afterwards, King Canute never again placed the crown on his head, but placed it instead above a picture of the Lord nailed to the cross. Are we headed to the same denouement in BS Aquino’s frenzied effort to stop the election of Bongbong and his possible accession to the presidency? READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Enrile hits Aquino, defends Marcos years


SENATE Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile last night said President Aquino did not know what he was talking about in condemning the Marcos regime.

MANILA, FEBRUARY 29, 2016 (INQUIRER) By: Christine O. Avendaño @inquirerdotnet February 26th, 2016 - SENATE Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile last night said President Aquino did not know what he was talking about in condemning the Marcos regime.

“I am sorry to say this, [the President] is very strong in blaming others, pointing his fingers at others, and [blaming] them. But he’s very weak and poor in knowledge and understanding,” Enrile told the Inquirer by phone.

Enrile was reacting to President Aquino’s statements during the 30th Edsa People Power anniversary celebration where the Chief Executive condemned the view of some people that the Marcos dictatorship was the golden years of the Philippines.

The President also reiterated that Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. should apologize for the human rights abuses of the martial law regime of his father, the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

Enrile said the plans being implemented by the Aquino administration were made during the Marcos years.

He also said President Aquino was “inconsistent.”

“Why are we still enforcing the laws made in the Marcos years if he was really that bad,” Enrile said, referring to the late dictator.

He pointed out that the government was now using for its programs coco levy funds that were put up during the Marcos years.

At one point, Enrile also asked President Aquino who was Commander Selman to his late father, Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr.

He said Commander Selman served as a bodyguard of the late senator but he was also a “principal” commander of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP).

Asked whether he was saying that the late senator had links to the CPP, Enrile said, “I’m just starting facts, not conclusions.”

On whether Senator Marcos should apologize for the past, Enrile said: “I don’t know if he has anything to be sorry for. You better ask him.”  


INQUIRER

‘Edsa about right vs wrong’ SHARES: 1078 VIEW COMMENTS By: Nikko Dizon @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:37 AM February 26th, 2016


FAMOUS FVR's FREEDOM LEAP:  President Aquino joins former President Fidel V. Ramos, who led the military breakaway from dictator Ferdinand Marcos in February 1986 with then Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, and Bobby Aquino, son of the late former Sen. Agapito “Butz” Aquino, in reenacting the freedom leap during the celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Edsa People Power Revolution on Thursday. JOAN BONDOC

[AQUINO: PEOPLE POWER WASN’T ABOUT AQUINO VS MARCOS]


AQUINO AND THE PNP:  30th ANNIVERSARY OF EDSA CELEBRATION 'SALUBUNGAN'

As if guided by his martyred father whose statue stood behind him at the People Power Monument, President Aquino led the celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Edsa People Power Revolution Thursday by countering attempts to revise history, saying martial law was “a painful chapter” and not a “golden age,” as The New York Times put it in a front-page article.

The only son of democracy icons Ninoy and Cory Aquino, the President also took to the stage to warn people that Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. could replicate the iron-fist rule of his father, the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

Yellow and white confetti rained on the crowd of several thousands who gathered at the People Power Monument to recall the glorious day when Filipinos drove away the Marcoses in 1986, but the prospect of Senator Marcos being elected Vice President, a doorstep away from Malacañang, hovered like a dark cloud.

Around 500 protesters blasting the Aquino administration for purportedly allowing the Marcos resurgence briefly clashed with riot police on Edsa after the celebrations, but no injuries were reported.

In his speech, President Aquino belied Senator Marcos’ claims that the Philippines saw its best years during his father’s rule.

“As part of the generation who suffered under the dictatorship, I tell you just as directly: The time we spent under Mr. Marcos was not a golden age,” Mr. Aquino said.

“It remains one of the most painful chapters of our history—it was why so many of our countrymen mustered the courage to gather at Edsa and in other places outside Metro Manila, armed only with their faith and their principles,” he said.

READ MORE...

“We were able to unite as one people, and by the grace of God, we toppled the dictatorship without resorting to a bloody civil revolution,” he said.

“Today, if the surveys are right, then the son of the dictator who still cannot see the mistakes of the past has an increasing number of supporters,” Mr. Aquino said.

“If that is right, then does it also mean that we have forgotten what we once said, ‘Enough is enough; we have had it out with the lot?’” he said.

“Does this mean that, today, we are being asked, ‘Can we give the possibility of martial law taking power once more, and repeating all its crimes?’” he said.

“It is also true that the sins of the father should not be visited on the son,” Mr. Aquino went on.

“At the same time, what I cannot understand: The dictator’s own blood had all this time to say, ‘My father did the country wrong; give us the chance to make it right,’” he said.

“And yet, just think, this was what he said, ‘I am ready to say sorry if I knew what I have to be sorry for.’ If he cannot even see the wrong in what his family did, how can we be confident that he will not repeat the same?” he said.

“All I can say is, thank you, because you have at least been honest in showing us that you are ready to emulate your father,” the President said.

“Do not [get me wrong]: This is not about the Aquinos versus the Marcoses; it is clear to me that this is about right versus wrong,” he added.

Peace deal derailed

As an example of the likelihood of the senator doing as his father had done, Mr. Aquino said Marcos, along with Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile, derailed the proposed Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL).

“And is it not true these two surnames were the ones who pushed for a military solution against the Moros during the dictatorship?” Mr. Aquino said, pointing out that the late dictator tolerated land grabbing in Mindanao, which was one of the biggest injustices to the Moro people.

Acknowledging that the efforts at revisionism had partly succeeded in fooling a number of young Filipinos, the President devoted nearly a third of his speech to recounting the horrors of martial law that his family and others experienced as well.

Nearly half of those at the monument were the so-called millennials, young people born after 1986.

The theme of the 30th anniversary of the bloodless coup that inspired similar movements across the world was for them—about the passing of the torch, for them to continue the change that their elders began at Edsa.

The President said the young enjoyed “different kinds of freedom” today—from being able to travel without having to be watched by authorities, having no state-imposed curfews to being able to access information from smartphones.

Lucky to be alive

He said the young were now “enjoying the freedoms that were taken away from the generation that came before you—where, if you reached your 30th birthday while fighting against the dictatorship, you were already lucky to still be alive.”

“Now, at 30 years old, your professional life has just started. You have the freedom to earn and to save money, to love and to start a family—the freedom to dream,” Mr. Aquino said.

“You will benefit the most if we are able to protect our freedom so, God willing, you understand the responsibility you bear. God willing, we will all do our part so that darkness will never consume the Philippines once more. God willing, the freedom we so long dreamed of, will never, ever be taken away from us once more,” the President said.

He emphasized that the abuses of the dictatorship were neither “products of imagination” nor just the opinion of some.

“Martial law actually happened. There was a dictator who, along with his family and his cronies, abused his position, and the price for this was the lives and the freedom of Filipinos,” Mr. Aquino said.

The President said he expressed disappointment whenever he was told that there were those who say that the time of Marcos was the “golden age of the Philippines.”

In a lengthy article, “Yearning for the ‘golden age’ of Marcos, The New York Times said that fading memories were benefiting the dictator’s son in his vice presidential bid.

“In fact I have wondered: We have both been President—where might our country be today if he had just stayed true to his mandate during his time in office?” Mr. Aquino said.

The President said that under his administration that followed the “straight and righteous path,” 7.7 million Filipinos had been lifted from poverty.

More than 4 million indigent households benefited from the conditional cash transfer program.

Ninety-two percent of the 100 million Filipinos enjoyed universal health coverage;

The poorest 40 percent of the country receive free treatment from public hospitals.

The country has the lowest unemployment rate in a decade.

Mr. Aquino said infrastructure that took “decades in the making” had finally been completed under his term, such as the 180-meter Aluling Bridge in Ilocos Sur province that took 35 years to build.

“Let me ask: Is it right to play at being blind, especially now that we have a government that truly cares for the citizenry?” he said.

“I believe that it is not our fate to repeat the grim parts of our past; our fate is the sum of the decisions we make in the present,” the President said.

“I believe in the greatness of our people. I believe that, even if we are known for our patience, it has its limits—and if those limits are reached, then no one will be able to stop the wave of solidarity that will follow,” he added.

Loretta Ann Rosales, former chair of the Commission on Human Rights, Thursday said during a visit at the People Power Experiential Museum at Camp Aguinaldo, “Let us never allow the Marcoses to return. We should not let another Marcos again in Malacañang.”

Rep. Leni Robredo, the Liberal Party’s vice presidential candidate, told reporters: “If you don’t have acceptance of the wrongdoings done before, you are bound to repeat these once you are given power.” With a report from Julie M. Aurelio


MANILA BULLETIN

Aquino deplores Marcos era -voters urged to stop Bongbong’s surge;Workers say they are worse off 30 years after EDSA ’86 February 26, 2016 Share4 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share21 By Genalyn D. Kabiling and Samuel P. Medenilla


SHOWER OF HOPE – A Philippine Air Force (PAF) chopper rains down confetti on a phalanx of soldiers and policemen marching on EDSA towards the People Power Monument in Quezon City.

The Marcos regime was not the golden age of the Philippines but the dark and abusive period that should never be repeated through the return of his family to national power, President Aquino declared on Thursday.

Thirty years after the bloodless revolt that ousted the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos, the President reminded the public, especially the youth, about the atrocities during the martial law era and encouraged them to thwart the political resurgence of his unapologetic family.

Aquino was concerned that some people have forgotten EDSA and have thrown support for the late strongman’s son, Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr., whom he claimed was likely to repeat the mistakes of his father.

“As part of the generation who suffered under the dictatorship, the regime of Mr. Marcos was not the golden age of the country. This was a painful chapter of our history,” the President said, adding the only freedom then was the freedom to praise the dictator.

“I would like to emphasize, this is not fiction. This is not based on theory or opinion of the few. Martial law really happened. There was once a dictator, alongside his family and cronies, who gripped on power at the expense of the lives and freedom of Filipinos,” he added during the EDSA commemorative rise at the People Power Monument in Quezon City.

If anyone enjoyed the country’s golden age during martial law, Aquino said this would be Marcos and his cronies who abused power and enriched themselves while the economy was spiraling down and civil liberties were curtailed.

Aquino also pointed out that the Marcos era was the “golden age of the country’s debt” with the amount ballooning to P192.2 billion shortly before the dictator was ousted from office. The national debt was only P2.4 billion when Marcos assumed power in 1965. “And because the money did not go where it was supposed to go, they reaped the benefits while we continue to shoulder the debt payments,” Aquino said.

READ MORE...

Aquino also described the Marcos regime as the “golden age of brain drain” as Filipinos started to go abroad for work. “Today, it is the golden age of the return of the OFWs,” he added.

The New People’s Army (NPA) also grew from 60 to 25,000 in protest of the martial law regime, according to the President. He said the Marcos era was the the “golden age of Moro abuse,” citing the prevalence of land-grabbing in Mindanao.

Aquino likewise raised the human rights abuses during the Marcos regime, including the suffering endured by his father, the late Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr. He said the Marcos regime tolerated these rights abuses instead of helping the oppressed.

“In every corner of the Philippines, there are stories of abduction, torture, killing or cases of people missing whose bodies have not been found today,” he said.

RESURGENCE OF MARCOSES

In February, 1986, tens of thousands of Filipinos staged a revolution that ended the 20-year dictatorial rule of Marcos, restoring democracy in the country.


President Aquino (right), former President Fidel V. Ramos (left), and Bobby Aquino, representing the late former Sen. Butz Aquino, execute the traditional victory jump during the 30th anniversary of the 1986 People Power Revolution Thursday. (Ali Vicoy/Mark Balmores) President Aquino (right), former President Fidel V. Ramos (left), and Bobby Aquino, representing the late former Sen. Butz Aquino, execute the traditional victory jump during the 30th anniversary of the 1986 People Power Revolution Thursday. (Ali Vicoy/Mark Balmores)

But in the decades since Marcos was ousted and fled the country, the outrage has faded for many Filipinos. Despite the accusations of widespread corruption and human rights violations, none of the Marcos family members have been jailed.

The family has quietly returned to politics – former first lady Imelda Marcos is a now member of Congress, representing Ilocos Norte, while her daughter Imee Marcos is the province’s governor.

The family’s political resurgence is led by Marcos’ son, Bongbong, who is currently tied for first place in the vice presidential race for the May 9 national election, according to a recent survey.

Pollsters say a young electorate is likely to install the charismatic and unrepentant Bongbong as vice president in May elections.

MARCOS BELIEVERS

Many continue to believe in the Marcoses.

“I think Marcos was our best president,” said Richard Negre, a Manila resident who was born two years after the dictator was overthrown. “That was when the Philippines was the leader of Asia. We were respected.”

Imelda Orduña, a 70-year-old retired school teacher living in the city of Caloocan, north of Manila, who attended one of his recent political rallies, said she remembers well the time of the elder Marcos when there was no traffic, police officers did not extract bribes and criminals were on the run.

“Life was easier under Marcos,” she said. “We had peace and order and corruption was minimal. We have to tell our children and grandchildren about these times.”

Michelle Pulumbarit, 31, a customer service operator who lives north of Manila, said Marcos was putting forward a proposal for the future that will bring back the best of the Marcos years. She is not concerned about martial law and human rights violations, she said.

“For me, those are things of the past,” she said. “That was a time when our economy was booming. Even Imelda did a lot of good things. She shared our culture with the world. I can forgive her for having so many shoes.”

PNOY ASSAILS NON-APOLOGY

The President, however, slammed the Marcos family for refusing to apologize for the abuses during the martial law regime. He agreed that the children should not be blamed for the sins of the father but the Marcoses have not even acknowledged the mistakes during the martial law period.

“What am I to say sorry about?” Sen. Marcos in a TV interview in August, adding that under his father thousands of miles of roads were built, the country had one of the highest literacy rates in Asia, and it was an exporter of rice – the country’s staple food – not an importer, as it is now.

But, he noted during a Feb. 17 news briefing, the issue of martial law and his father’s human rights record does not come up that often on the campaign trail.

“People no longer ask about martial law,” he told reporters. “They are interested in the current problems of the country, such as jobs and traffic.”

If Senator Marcos could not see anything wrong in his father’s actions, Aquino said there was no guarantee he would not repeat such mistakes.

“Aquino, however, quickly made clear that the issue was not about the feud between his family and the Marcoses. “This is not about the Aquinos versus the Marcoses. It is clear to me that this is a fight between right and wrong,” he said.

WILL MARTIAL LAW RETURN?

“Does it mean that we are declaring today: Is there a possibility that martial law and other mistakes will happen again?” he asked.

Aquino lamented that Marcos loyalists are trying to revise history by deceiving young Filipinos that martial law regime was the golden age of the country.

He said Marcos supporters are using traditional and social media to manipulate the views of the people and insinuate that nothing has been achieved since EDSA 1986. Aquino then shared the achievements of his administration, such as 7.7 million Filipinos lifted out of poverty via the conditional cash transfer program, better social services and infrastructure development.

Towards the end of his speech, the President called on Filipinos especially the youth to know more about EDSA revolution that toppled the Marcos dictatorship.

He encouraged them to visit the EDSA experiential museum to know about the abuses of the Marcos dictatorship and treasure the democracy the nation is enjoying today. Unlike during martial law, Aquino said Filipinos nowadays are free to express their views, travel, even stay up late and party.

Among those who attend the EDSA anniversary celebration were former Fidel V. Ramos, Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., administration’s presidential tandem Mar Roxas and Leni Robredo.

WORKERS WORSE OFF

Meanwhile, the Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) said workers are worse off 30 years after the EDSA People Power of 1986 ended the dictatorial rule of former President Ferdinand Marcos.

KMU said that during the term of former president Cory Aquino, who was swept to power following the EDSA People Power 1, several anti-labor policies were implemented.

“While EDSA People Power promised change for all Filipinos, it actually signaled intensified attacks on workers, many of which continue to this day. The regimes that came to power after 1986 implemented neoliberal ‘free market’ policies that assaulted workers’ rights in order to increase the profits of big foreign and local capitalists,” KMU chairman Elmer Labog said in a statement for the 30th anniversary of the EDSA People Power Revolution.

He claimed this includes the Wage Rationalization Law and the Salary Standardization Law of 1989, which turned over the wage-fixing responsibility from the Congress to the regional wage boards.

“This destroyed whatever minimum wage private-sector workers and government employees were enjoying at the time. Now, the country does not have a minimum wage to speak of, because the latter has been thoroughly fragmented,” Labog said.

The labor leader also alleged Aquino’s term also pave the way to making contractual employment widespread through the passage of the so-called Herrera Law, which amended the Labor Code of 1974, turning labor export into a national policy, and creating special economic zones, “where most workers are contractual subjected to strict surveillance.” (With report from AFP and The New York Times)


CNN PHILIPPINES

Millennials speak up on what EDSA means to them By Eimor P. Santos, CNN Philippines Updated 13:15 PM PHT Thu, February 25, 2016 2622


(File photo) Maria Angela Villa (L) and Khenn Arquiza (R), millenials who spoke during the commemorative program on the 30th anniversary of the 1986 EDSA Revolution Metro Manila

(CNN Philippines) – A millennial’s question grabbed the attention of some Filipinos who witnessed the commemorative program of the 30th EDSA Revolution anniversary on Thursday (February 25): “What is the EDSA of the Filipino youth today?”

Without a speech guide in hand, Maria Angela Villa said she may not have been born in 1986, but she expressed joy that the People Power Revolution has given her the freedom to speak today without the fear of her life being threatened or her house raided.

“Hindi kapansanan ng kabataang Pilipino ngayon na wala kaming karanasan sa EDSA ninyo noon. Kung iyon ang EDSA ninyo noon, ano ang EDSA ng kabataang Pilipino ngayon?” Villa asked in a speech that gained several applauses from the crowd at the People Power Monument in Epifanio delos Santos Avenue (EDSA) – White Plains.

[Translation: “It is not a disability of the Filipino youth of today that we do not have a first-hand experience of your EDSA in the past? If that was your EDSA in the past, what is the EDSA of the Filipino youth today?”]

Earlier during the program, Executive Sec. Paquito Ochoa said most of the millennials were deprived of the opportunity to understand the true meaning of EDSA, as he invited the youth to visit the experiential museum set up inside Camp Aguinaldo.

But Villa summed up what EDSA means for millennials like her: The restoration of a nation’s dignity and the wholehearted service to others without asking for any position or money in return.

“Gusto naming maglingkod dahil gusto naming maglingkod,” she said.

[Translation: “We want to serve because we want to serve.”]

Villa headed the project Milk Matters of the Phi Lambda Delta Sorority of the University of the Philippines Manila, a regular milk-letting activity which aims to ensure the safe and sustainable supply of breastmilk for newborns at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH).

READ MORE...

She added the youth are the “new hope and the new EDSA,” asking those who took part in the 1986 EDSA Revolution to guide them.

Program hosts Sen. Bam Aquino and EDSA People Power Commissioner Ogie Alcasid expressed awe and accord to Villa’s speech saying the youth may no longer be toppling a dictator today but they are still fighting for relevant advocacies such as education, jobs and livelihood for the people.

Fight for education, freedom from poverty Likewise, Khenn Arquiza of the Zamboanga City-based nongovernment organization I CAN Make a Difference thanked the EDSA Revolution because the youth now has the freedom to express through social media without fears and worries.

“Tayo po ay pinagkalooban ng People Power ng pribelehiyo upang maging parte ng nation-building sa pamamagitan ng pagtataguyod ng ating mga adbokasiya”

[Translation: “The People Power gave us the privilege to be part of nation-building through fighting for our advocacies.”]

He added it is the youth’s turn now to fight for education and freedom from poverty.

#EDSA30 No. 1 trend on Twitter Some netizens took notice of Villa’s thought-provoking question.

One of them even kiddingly answered, EDSA means traffic.

The EDSA anniversary program also featured a re-enactment of 'Salubungan,' the coming together of the military and civilians during the EDSA Revolution.

While the Salubungan program was ongoing, the hashtag #EDSA30 became the number one Philippine trend on Twitter.


MANILA TIMES

The transfiguration of President Aquino into King Canute February 26, 2016 11:00 pm
YEN MAKABENTA


by YEN MAKABENTA

FOR President Aquino’s bizarre transfiguration into King Canute at the 30th anniversary commemoration of the Edsa People power revolt, Filipinos should either credit or blame the New York Times.

It was America’s most influential newspaper, with its report that “Filipinos are yearning for the Golden Age of Marcos,” that impelled the President to launch a tirade against the Marcos family, and caused him to ask our people not to vote for Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr for vice president in the May elections.

Trying to prove to the world and his supporters that he can still control events in the Philippines, he committed himself to halting the rising tide of support for Bongbong’s candidacy. But like King Canute in the legend, Aquino will most likely get his feet wet.

What the legend says

In the legend and the chronicles, it is told that Canute, king of England and Denmark in the 12th century, went to the seashore joined by his courtiers.

As narrated by Henry of Huntingdon, Canute with great vigor commanded that his chair be set on the shore, when the tide began to rise.

And then he spoke to the rising sea, saying “You are part of my dominion, and the ground that I am seated upon is mine, nor has anyone disobeyed my orders with impunity. Therefore, I order you not to rise onto my land, nor to wet the clothes or body of your Lord.” But the sea carried on rising as usual without any reverence for his person, and soaked his feet and legs.


King Canute, by Luis Arcas Brauner FROM LOOKANDLEARN.COM

Moving away, Canute declared: “All the inhabitants of the world should know that the power of kings is vain and trivial, and that none is worthy of the name of king but He whose command the heaven, earth and sea obey by eternal laws.”

Afterwards, King Canute never again placed the crown on his head, but placed it instead above a picture of the Lord nailed to the cross.

Are we headed to the same denouement in BS Aquino’s frenzied effort to stop the election of Bongbong and his possible accession to the presidency?

READ MORE...

Before discussing how this plot will be resolved, let’s turn back to the instigator of Aquino’s tranfiguration, the New York Times.

Stop butting heads with Supreme Court

The NYT has the penchant of getting under Aquino’s skin.

On August 28, 2014, at a time when Aquino was crossing swords with the Supreme Court over the disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP), and was nursing hopes of running for a second term, the NY Times published a scathing editorial entitled “Political Mischief in the Philippines.”

It bluntly told Aquino that his actions “jeopardize Philippine democracy.”

It reported that the Supreme Court, by a 13-to-0 vote, struck down an Aquino spending program, saying “he had exceeded his authority in disbursing funds and that parts of the program consisted of irregular pork-barrel spending.”

The editorial concluded emphatically: “Mr. Aquino should uphold the Constitution of a fragile democracy if only out of respect for his father and for his mother. In practical terms, this means he should stop butting heads with the Supreme Court and gracefully step down when his term is up.”

Overnight, all talk of an Aquino second term stopped.

The following January, when Pope Francis came to visit the country, Aquino tried to grab the spotlight from him by lecturing the Holy Father and insulting the Church in Malacañang.

The Golden Age of Marcos

This time around, the wounding piece of journalism is a N NY Times report timed to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the EDSA revolt.

Written by Fred Whaley, it reported that “As Filipinos prepare for the 30th anniversary on of the ‘People Power’ revolution that toppled Ferdinand E. Marcos, the Marcos legacy is undergoing a political renaissance by those who claim it was a ‘golden age’ of peace and prosperity.”

It quoted Richard Negre, a Manila resident who was born two years after Marcos was overthrown. He said: “I think Marcos was our best president. That was when the Philippines was the leader of Asia. We were respected.”

The Times’ big revelation is that the family’s political resurgence is being led by Marcos’s son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., a popular senator who is tied for first place in the vice president’s race for the May 9 national election.

The report went on to quote other citizens who testified affirmatively for the Marcoses, and some who cast a skeptical eye on them.

It quoted Imelda Orduña, a 70-year-old retired schoolteacher, who said she remembers well the time of Marcos when there was no traffic, police officers did not extract bribes and criminals were on the run.

Another citizen, a customer service operator, said Bongbong Marcos was putting forward a proposal for the future that will bring back the best of the Marcos years.

She said, “That was a time when our economy was booming. Even Imelda did a lot of good things. She shared our culture with the world. I can forgive her for having so many shoes.”

It also gave space to one Aquino spokesman who said that the country is more successful now than it was under Mr. Marcos.

“We are now known as Asia’s rising star, an investment-grade economy and an example of good governance.”

But the final word was given to a young woman of 26, who spends hours each day battling traffic to get to work and is frustrated by the current government.

“During the time of martial law, the Philippines was disciplined,” she said as she gestured toward a group of jaywalkers dodging vehicles and blocking traffic. “People don’t even know how to cross the street now.”

Who will have the last word?

Who will have the last word? Noynoy Aquino or Bongbong Marcos?

Will the tide obey President Aquino and turn away from Bongbong?

Or will the tide keep surging forward, soak Aquino’s feet in water, and carry Bongbong to victory in May?

I’ve seen and covered too many of these political contests not to know where the wind is blowing, and when the writing is on the wall.

Come May 9, the Filipino King Canute (BS Aquino) will discover that his feet are wet.

And Bongbong Marcos will wake up to a morning, knowing that his time has indeed come.
yenmakabenta@yahoo.com 

22 Responses to The transfiguration of President Aquino into King Canute
RMA says:
February 27, 2016 at 2:48 pm
During Marcos time there was heavy traffic that’s why they started the LRT. There were no jobs. It was a bleak furture for fresh graduates. Today, you just have to hurdle the traffic to get to your job ! Fresh graduates look forward to a bright future ahead. This is the difference !!!
Reply
RMA says:
February 27, 2016 at 2:44 pm
During Marcos time there was traffic and no jobs. Today, you just have to hurdle traffic to get to your job. That’s the difference !
Reply
kaka says:
February 27, 2016 at 1:15 pm
Sabi ng Lola ko noong panahon ni Marcos kapag kumakain ang maraming mga Pilipino ay nagkakamay dahil sa kahirapan, ngayon naka kutsara na dahil LUGAW na lang ang kinakain. Saan ka pa diyan
Reply
wscalma says:
February 27, 2016 at 11:45 am
Problema sa Pinas,puro pulitika.Pondo,serbisyo,ekonomiya,industriya pati kasaysayan pinulitika.Kaya kahit walang kwentang komento ay pinupulitika.
Reply
Leodegardo Pruna says:
February 27, 2016 at 11:03 am
P-Noy cannot know where he stands. The people should asked Ateneo to release his psychological records so the people with understanding could at least bend a little to give way to such deficiency since anyway he is about to exit. Otherwise, the conditions now obtaining may lead to an unforgiving society where not only he but also to a president close to his heart (if ever) who led and left behind hate and vengeance which P-Noy himself continues to exercise. God save the Philippines.
Reply
Leonardo Llanto says:
February 27, 2016 at 10:21 am
The New York Times ain’t it used to be. Take the article with a grain of salt.
Reply
Kotimoy says:
February 27, 2016 at 9:24 am
You forgot one thing the atrocities committed by the Marcos regime!
Reply
Roger Sy says:
February 27, 2016 at 1:26 pm
And you also forget that the way the Aquino regimes treated us Filipinos in itself constitute atrocities being committed against our dignity as nation? Are you a proud member of the Yellowistas?
ren fuentes says:
February 27, 2016 at 2:42 pm
the atrocities you are thinking of are happening also at present. if you are talking about cronyism, they never left the scene. only faces change. cory had the kamaganak inc and the insulares group, erap had kumpales, fvr and arroyo had cronies and benito boy sisi has kkk. corruption by politicians is still present. murders, tortures and arbitrary arrests are still happening. the only thing different is the free press. during martial law, the manila times, tribune and standard will not be allowed to exist.
genesisbughaw says:
February 27, 2016 at 8:58 am
Sir,
Let me put it in the scale of justice.
Marcos Golden Age:
Infrastructure projects erected including nuclear plant mindful at time that we need energy security; the Masagana 99; A lot of pro people projects like the Heart Center , National Kidney now being privatized, etc;
-Human Rights abuses; Extrajudicial killings, etc.
-A kleptocratic kind of corruption;
-Lost our freedom and more
With Aquino going canute:
THRU PPP defeats the very core foundation of our Constiution ; “the general welfare of the people is the Supreme Law”;
-Extrajudicial killings including media practitioners and continuing debasement of our cultural minorities;
-Endemic corruption why his administration turned our Nation into pigsty Republic;
and,
-Ilegal drugs now became No.1 National Security threat.
Marcos golden age got lupus.
In our TIME, we regain our freedom but lost our golden opportunities after EDSa1
Kaya ako po ay Solid North
Reply
Orlando Tupas says:
February 27, 2016 at 8:29 am
Hindi lang paa ang mababasa kay Pnoy kungdi malulunod rin siya sa pagkapanalo ni Bongbong sa 2016 election.
Reply
DAKILA says:
February 27, 2016 at 7:31 am
Magnificent analysis! New York Times is one of the very influential members of the Mainstream Media in US. It is the voice of people controlling White House and the Capitol. This article coming from New York Times which is timed on the day before the 30th anniversary of EDSA is a clear warning to Pnoy and his administration that they are already out of grace from the Entity who gave them the power. In short, Washington is done with them. No matter how he explain to the people the hazards of Martial Law under Pres. Marcos, Washington has already decided and its very clear that they are endorsing Bongbong to take over. Pnoy should take this very seriously and he better not make funny this election. This power can make and unmake presidency as sampled when his mother Cory was placed into power.
Reply
Mariano Patalinjug says:
February 27, 2016 at 7:10 am
Yonkers, New York
26 Feb. 2016
The people of the Ilocos provinces obviously cannot get over their high regard for a beloved son, FERDINAND E. MARCOS, who ruled over the country as a Dictator from 1972 to 1986–and, by extension also for his wife IMELDA [the “imeldefic” known worldwide as that First Lady with 3,000 pairs of shows], and for his children, IMEE, BONGBONG, AND IRENE.
Imee is now the Governor of Ilocos Norte; Imelda a Representative from Ilocos Norte; and Bongbong a Senator who is now a candidate for Vice President. It is only Irene who is not a politician, but is married to the son of one of the wealthiest families of the Philippines.
It is a tragedy of major dimensions that the present generation of Filipinos may have only a vague idea of what the “Conjugal Dictatorship” of Ferdinand and Imelda did to the country–and that could explain why Bongbong Marcos is confident that he has a very good chance of getting elected Vice President now and, in 2022, will very likely decide to be a candidate for President and win!
But that’s just what Philippine “democracy” is all about. It is actually not Lincoln’s utopian democracy “of the people, by the people and for the people.” It is IN FACT, one that is of the plutocrats, by the plutocrats and for the plutocrats.
MARIANO PATALINJUG
patalinjugmar@gmail.com
Reply
alex says:
February 27, 2016 at 6:26 am
Gago lang si NOYTARD kaya ayaw niyang tanggapin na totoo ang pahayag ng NYT.S ira ulo kasi kaya ang pinaggagawa niya sa loob ng anim na taon kundi maghiganti ,manuhol,magpabaya at manigarilyo ang gago.Palibhasa’y lahi ng traydor(lolo niya ay makapili noong panahon ng mga hapon) at lahi din ng mga balasubas(ninuno niya ay niloko ang bayan sa pagkahuiha ng Luisita noon)ang gago kaya wala kang maasahan na katinuhan sa ABNOY na yan.
Reply
Emilio Calaguas says:
February 27, 2016 at 3:27 am
Mr. Makabenta your writing has no sense. Traffic during the Marcos years was not bad because vwry few cab afford cars. Filipinos were very poor because all the monies of the people were taken by Ferdinand and Imelda. Yhey made th e Central Bank as their own piggy bank. Proof is that we are auctioning the jewelries of Imelda which was bought by peoples mopney. . Mr. Makabenta tumigil ka nga niloloko mo ang mga tao.
Reply
Roberto cruz says:
February 27, 2016 at 1:11 pm
I saw, i witnessed, i conclude that FM was the best.
abraham says:
February 27, 2016 at 2:38 am
Best written article ever.this time pilipinos are for bongbong Marcos.
Reply
Filemarc says:
February 27, 2016 at 2:24 am
Your article is one sided, taking the opinion of people who were pro-Marcos. What about the opinion of people who suffered during Martial Law? Were you already born during the dictator’s time? I guess not or even if you were, have you not thought of the several people who disappeared, murdered, kidnapped because they voiced their opinion against the great dictator? You mentioned about the opinion you quoted that there was no traffic during those days, it’s because there were not too many vehicles around compared to the present times. Police accepting bribes is an old story not even during Marcos time it was eradicated. I knew because we had trucking business that was always a victim of these police asking for bribes. Being a newsman should get true facts and not just write to destroy the credibility of the present President who is voicing the true situation during Martial Law. Another Marcos will bring back the nightmares during his father’s regime. I also would like to add, if Bong-bong is sincere, return the ill-gotten wealth of his family to help the poor people of the Philippines!
Reply
Cori says:
February 27, 2016 at 10:57 am
Pakibasa ho ulit…,para lang ho naishare ni Mr Makabenta ang storya na nangaling sa New York Times ng America,hindi ho sya nagsulat nyan,,just like sharing,,paki intindi ho muna yung buong article
Carvelo says:
February 27, 2016 at 12:45 am
Unlike King Canute, Aquino is so stupid and clueless that he will not give up whatever “crown” he thinks is on his head and will continue his irresponsible remarks and incompetence to his last day in office.
Reply
rodrigonase says:
February 27, 2016 at 12:11 am
Our King Canute and his yellow horde are in extreme panic mood. The floodgates of yellow propaganda have been unleashed with impunity if only to thwart Bongbong’s making it as the vice president in May and ensure that his chosen clone makes it to Malacanang. That’s like stopping the sea from rising to seek its own level.
Reply
Pilipino says:
February 26, 2016 at 11:36 pm
“a young woman of 26,” said: “During the time of martial law, the Philippines was disciplined,” and EDSA is already on its 30th. This young woman was born 4 years after EDSA and martial law was even way before EDSA, how could she even conceived what the Philippines was like then?
Reply


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2016 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE