PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE: Since 1997 © Copyright (PHNO) http://newsflash.org


PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

FIRST PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE KICKS OFF IN MINDANAO


FEBRUARY 21 -The first presidential debate for Mindanao initiated by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) has started at Cagayan de Oro’s Capitol University on Sunday afternoon (February 21, 2016), set to engage the five presidential aspirants in a debate about their takes on the issues of governance at hand. Vice President Jejomar Binay, Senator Grace Poe, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, former DILG secretary Mar Roxas, and Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago will be addressing the questions within the next two hours. This is the first debate held outside the Metro and the first organized by the Comelec after 24 years. The PiliPinas Debate 2016 kicked off with a 60-second opening remark from each candidate. Vice Presidet Binay addressed the public by saying: “Mula noon, hanggang ngayon, kahirapan pa din ang problema ng ating bayan.” He mentioned the projects that he has done for Makati City and the good service he has given to make the city one of the richest in the country. Senator Santiago followed by emphasizing the rich resources of the country. “There are many things rich in this country. We are rich in natural resources, people resources and yet year after year, we hear… that we are one of the poorest countries in the Asian community,” she addressed as she mentioned that it is because “everybody wants to have the money of the country in their pockets. “What our country needs is a sense of shared destiny,” Santiago ended. Duterte started his statement by commending Santiago, saying she is one of the most competent candidates. He continued by reassuring: “If I am president, I will get rid of criminality, drugs and corruption in just six months.” Poe, on the other hand, focused on the riches of Mindanao and its products. She gave the question: “Bakit patuloy ang paghihirap sa Mindanao?” and addressed the concern by saying that the country needs governance with “tunay na malasakit, mabilis kumilos, at agarang makapagbibigay ng solusyon.” She also mentioned that 30% of the budget will go to Mindanao for development under her governance. Lastly, Roxas compared choosing a president with choosing someone to bring their own children to school: “Kung ihahambing natin ang pagpili ng pangulo tulad ng kung sino ang magmamaneho para sa ating mga anak sa araw- araw?” After mentioning examples of someone who is “mainitin ang ulo, magnanakaw, at di marunong magmaneho”, he ended his statement by saying: “Buo ang loob ko sa inyong pagpasya.” FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Binay’s ‘decisive leadership’ scores


FEBRUARY 22 -PHOTO COURTESY OF PHILSTAR
LP’s Roxas takes potshots at rivals in 1st debate It was Vice President Jejomar Binay’s stress on decisive leadership that rang loud and clear in the first-ever 2016 presidential debate held at the Capitol University in Cagayan de Oro City yesterday even as all five presidential aspirants received personal blows from their rivals as each tried to outdo each other. They all came locked and loaded, only some came with dud ammunition. Presidential hopefuls United Nationalist Alliance’s (UNA) Binay, PDP-Laban’s Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, People’s Reform Party’s (PRP) Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago, independent Sen. Grace Poe and Liberal Party’s (LP) Mar Roxas all showed up for the first presidential debate held in this city yesterday, all trying to impress on the voters why they will make a better president than their rivals. The administration’s presidential bet Roxas at one time managed to corner Poe by raising the issue on her credentials and apparent inexperience in government. Roxas during the debate appeared focused on picking at Binay and Poe who are the survey leaders more than stressing on the “Daang Matuwid” platform. Poe is currently under fire from critics who have questioned her eligibility in seeking the presidency which is an issue now pending before the Supreme Court for resolution. The senator admitted her having a short stint insofar as government service is concerned but has gained enough experience including management requirement when he assumed an executive position during the early years of the Aquino administration. While still considered a neophyte in the upper chamber, the senator said she has managed to fulfill her duties through conduct of investigations on some of the pressing issues confronting the country and steered the passage of the Senate’s version of the controversial Freedom on Information (FOI) bill. READ MORE...

ALSO: Five rivals cross swords
[QUESTIONS FOCUSED ON CANDIDATES’ VULNERABILITIES]


FEBRUARY 22 -FACE-OFF The five presidential aspirants square off in the first of three debates held at Capitol University in Cagayan de Oro City: Vice President Jejomar Binay (left), Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas. The event was sponsored by the Inquirer and GMA News. LYN RILLON CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY—They came to pitch their message and slug it out with each other—they did well there—but their answers to questions about their vulnerabilities would be remembered most after the debate.
Sunday night’s opening presidential debate at Capitol University in Cagayan de Oro City was the first national debate organized by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) in 24 years, in cooperation with GMA 7 and the Philippine Daily Inquirer, to shift attention to policy talk in a country where many have been fascinated by personalities and show biz-like campaigns. To be sure, Vice President Jejomar Binay, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas were ready for the criticisms, though some of them grappled with the knocks on their candidacies. Binay faced the question about how he amassed wealth while in public office, squarely saying some of his wealth were passed on to him by his parents. Santiago snapped back at debate host Jessica Soho when she read the question about her health. “That’s my right,” Santiago replied, explaining that illnesses fluctuate and that it is her right to choose to run for President. Asked about her absences in the Senate, Santiago shot back that she was suffering from stage 4 cancer. “I waited to die, but my guardian angel did not let me die,” she said. Instead of arguing with Santiago, Duterte came to her support. “I will not go into a debate with Ma’am Miriam. I do not see Senator Santiago passing away in the next 20 years so there is no problem,” he said. An amused Santiago replied: “I do not want to spend the next six years lying in bed feeling sorry for myself … I felt sorry for my country. Because graft and corruption is endemic. Nobody did much except Mayor Rody Duterte.”  Duterte beamed and raised his right hand as the audience applauded him and Santiago.  Asked about his foul mouth, reputation as a womanizer and human rights record, Duterte said he would continue to kill criminals.  He denied allegations of extrajudicial killings, but said that if elected President, he would use the law to go after illegal drugs and criminals. READ MORE...

ALSO: Opening salvo: Bets slug it out


Presidential candidates Vice President Jejomar Binay, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and former interior secretary Manuel Roxas II raise each others’ hands at the end of yesterday’s presidential debate, the first in more than a decade. The photo is a screen grab from GMA 7. JOEY MENDOZA MANILA, Philippines – All the five presidential candidates showed up and kept to their allotted times as they expounded on their platforms and traded punches yesterday in the first of a series of debates. organized by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) held at Cagayan de Oro City yesterday.
The five candidates – Vice President Jejomar Binay, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and administration bet Manuel Roxas II – spelled out their platforms of government if elected president on May 9. They repeated their spiels on the first day of the official campaign period. Binay harped on leadership and his performance particularly as mayor of Makati. Duterte vowed to stamp out criminality within six months of becoming president. Santiago urged the electorate to vote for competence and look at her credentials. Poe promised a compassionate presidency, while Roxas promised to sustain the reforms of the Aquino administration’s tuwid na daan or straight path. Despite limited time, they also addressed issues raised against them during the two-hour debate in Cagayan de Oro organized by the Commission on Elections (Comelec). Binay faced corruption issues and explained his position on dynasties. Duterte was unapologetic about his human rights record. Santiago, a cancer survivor, said she has recovered and has a right to seek the presidency. Poe defended herself from criticisms that she lacked experience, while Roxas fended off criticisms of incompetence and indecision. The issues also popped up as the candidates faced off. READ MORE...

ALSO: Sparks fly as presidential bets spar at historic Pilipinas Debates 2016


Presidentiables share the stage Vice President Jejomar Binay, Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Senator Grace Poe, and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas share the stage at the end of the Pilipinas Debates 2016. Danny PataAudience at Capitol University, Cagayan de Oro Photo by Jab Jimenez
The five people vying for the country's highest post faced off for the first time on Sunday — and it didn't take long before sparks began to fly. The first leg of the PiliPinas Debates 2016, organized by the Commission on Elections in cooperation with GMA Network and the Philippine Daily Inquirer, saw Vice President Jejomar Binay, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Senator Grace Poe, former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas, and Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago tackle issues while taking shots at each other during the two-hour event at Capitol University in Cagayan De Oro. It was the first presidential debate ever held in Mindanao, and the first time in 24 years that the Comelec held a presidential debate. The candidates were grilled about their respective track records, as well as issues involving poverty and development and Mindanao. Roxas, the administration bet, set the tone by taking broadsides at his rivals during his opening statement. "Kung ihahambing natin ang pagpili ng pangulo tulad ng pagpili natin sa magmamaneho sa ating mga anak sa araw-araw, sino ang pipiliin natin? Kanino natin ipagkakatiwala ang kaligtasan ng ating mga anak? Sa isang tao na may mga kaso ng pagnanakaw, sa isang mainitin ang ulo na maaaring maaksidente [o] sa isang ngayon pa lang natututong magmaneho?" Roxas said. "O ipagkakaloob po natin ito sa isang taong matagal niyo nang kilala, matagal nang nanilbihan at ni minsan hindi kayo pinahamak o pinagsamantalahan?" he added. The other candidates used their opening statements to talk about their respective advocacies. Binay once again spoke about poverty as the biggest problem for the country. "Kahirapan pa rin problema ng bayan," he said, adding that his track record in Makati made him best suited to become president. He said poverty was the issue he addressed when he served as longtime mayor of Makati City, the country's center of business and finance. Binay cited jobs creation as the reason for the rise of Makati as the country's richest city. He also hit mentioned unnamed critics who are taking shots at his campaign with allegations of corruption. READ MORE...

ALSO: MALAYA COLUMN OF THE DAY -NO SCRUPLES


BY DODY LACUNA NOTHING much is mentioned about developing or pursuing morality in any of the candidates’ campaign platforms including those of the presidentiables. The strange thing is it seems the public does not really care a bit about the moral or psychological fitness of any of the leading five. No one among the presidential candidates has professed any interest in talking about moral issues. Sen. Grace Poe is almost sure criminal minds are active in the campaign trail up, especially those rendered financially disabled by the abolition of the pork barrel. A leading broadsheet has listed 10 national concerns to which presidential candidates have been asked to respond but does not include promotion of morality and character in government. Corruption is not a major concern as evidenced by the staying power of one of the three leading presidential candidates in the surveys. The voting public does not really mind that senators who earn about P90,000 a month or less than P2 million a year are running nationwide campaigns that will go to almost a half a billion pesos. Their tenures have been marked with either grand thievery from government coffers through the hidden pork barrel or unholy and common partnerships with businessmen rewarded with huge government contracts. Their rhetoric will never change until the earth under their feet splits and swallows them up - that they are committed to protect the national interest and to bring a brighter future for the poor and the sick of this country! How Malacañang and the Comelec shepherd the nation through the upcoming democratic exercise will define the kind of legacy or morality that would resonate through the coming generations already in danger of inheriting political partisanship, corruption, abuse of power and violence. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

1st presidential debate kicks off #PiliPinasDebates2016

MANILA, FEBRUARY 22, 2016 (MANILA BULLETIN) by Ces Dimalanta February 21, 2016 - The first presidential debate for Mindanao initiated by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) has started at Cagayan de Oro’s Capitol University on Sunday afternoon (February 21, 2016), set to engage the five presidential aspirants in a debate about their takes on the issues of governance at hand.

Vice President Jejomar Binay, Senator Grace Poe, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, former DILG secretary Mar Roxas, and Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago will be addressing the questions within the next two hours.

This is the first debate held outside the Metro and the first organized by the Comelec after 24 years.

The PiliPinas Debate 2016 kicked off with a 60-second opening remark from each candidate.

Vice Presidet Binay addressed the public by saying: “Mula noon, hanggang ngayon, kahirapan pa din ang problema ng ating bayan.” He mentioned the projects that he has done for Makati City and the good service he has given to make the city one of the richest in the country.

Senator Santiago followed by emphasizing the rich resources of the country.

“There are many things rich in this country. We are rich in natural resources, people resources and yet year after year, we hear… that we are one of the poorest countries in the Asian community,” she addressed as she mentioned that it is because “everybody wants to have the money of the country in their pockets.

“What our country needs is a sense of shared destiny,” Santiago ended.

Duterte started his statement by commending Santiago, saying she is one of the most competent candidates. He continued by reassuring: “If I am president, I will get rid of criminality, drugs and corruption in just six months.”

Poe, on the other hand, focused on the riches of Mindanao and its products. She gave the question: “Bakit patuloy ang paghihirap sa Mindanao?” and addressed the concern by saying that the country needs governance with “tunay na malasakit, mabilis kumilos, at agarang makapagbibigay ng solusyon.”

She also mentioned that 30% of the budget will go to Mindanao for development under her governance.

Lastly, Roxas compared choosing a president with choosing someone to bring their own children to school: “Kung ihahambing natin ang pagpili ng pangulo tulad ng kung sino ang magmamaneho para sa ating mga anak sa araw- araw?”

After mentioning examples of someone who is “mainitin ang ulo, magnanakaw, at di marunong magmaneho”, he ended his statement by saying: “Buo ang loob ko sa inyong pagpasya.”


TRIBUNE

Binay’s ‘decisive leadership’ scores Written by Angie M. Rosales and Charlie V. Manalo Monday, 22 February 2016 00:00


PHOTO COURTESY OF PHILSTAR

LP’s Roxas takes potshots at rivals in 1st debate
It was Vice President Jejomar Binay’s stress on decisive leadership that rang loud and clear in the first-ever 2016 presidential debate held at the Capitol University in Cagayan de Oro City yesterday even as all five presidential aspirants received personal blows from their rivals as each tried to outdo each other.

They all came locked and loaded, only some came with dud ammunition.

Presidential hopefuls United Nationalist Alliance’s (UNA) Binay, PDP-Laban’s Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, People’s Reform Party’s (PRP) Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago, independent Sen. Grace Poe and Liberal Party’s (LP) Mar Roxas all showed up for the first presidential debate held in this city yesterday, all trying to impress on the voters why they will make a better president than their rivals.

The administration’s presidential bet Roxas at one time managed to corner Poe by raising the issue on her credentials and apparent inexperience in government.

Roxas during the debate appeared focused on picking at Binay and Poe who are the survey leaders more than stressing on the “Daang Matuwid” platform.

Poe is currently under fire from critics who have questioned her eligibility in seeking the presidency which is an issue now pending before the Supreme Court for resolution.

The senator admitted her having a short stint insofar as government service is concerned but has gained enough experience including management requirement when he assumed an executive position during the early years of the Aquino administration.

While still considered a neophyte in the upper chamber, the senator said she has managed to fulfill her duties through conduct of investigations on some of the pressing issues confronting the country and steered the passage of the Senate’s version of the controversial Freedom on Information (FOI) bill.

READ MORE...

Binay pounded on the need for a decisive and effective leadership after the term of President Aquino whose administration he referred to as “callous and incompetent.”



“In smuggling, it is important to find the heads. You need decisive and effective leaders,” Binay said.

He said the current administration knows the problem of the nation but failed to apply solutions. “Those in the administration do not know how to lead. I am a decisive leader,” he said.

Binay’s communications director Joey Salgado said the VP knows where to take this country. “He showed a grasp of policy issues”, he said.

“In contrast, instead of talking about issues, Roxas opted to talk about himself and spent his time hitting his opponents by plucking data from thin air,” Salgado added.

PDP-Laban candidate Rodrigo Duterte chose most of the time not to debate and instead agreed on most of what his opponents had said.

Roxas takes potshots



While his four political rivals focused on their competence and credentials in delivering their opening remarks, Roxas immediately took a confrontational stance as he took a swipe against his opponents.

In his opening speech, Roxas likened electing the country’s leader to that of a father choosing a person who can drive for his children safely.

“Whom would you trust the safety of your child? On a person who has been accused of stealing?” Roxas said in an apparent reference to Binay who had been the subject of almost two years of inquisition before the Senate over allegations of anomaly during his stint as mayor of Makati City.

“Or on a hot-headed person who could be prone to accident?” said Roxas in reference to Duterte.

“Or on someone who is just starting to learn how to drive?” he added obviously referring to Poe.

However, of all the candidates, it was only Binay who emerged with the most solid platform in dealing with the country’s problem.

Binay stressed decisiveness and effective leadership are the keys in solving the country’s problem including poverty and criminality.

“The problem boils down to leadership. The leader is incompetent, ineffective. Whenever there’s a problem, he fails to present a solution,” Binay said when asked to rebut on the issue of solving criminality particularly smuggling which has been plaguing the country’s rice industry.

To help solve the worsening incident of poverty, Binny said the agriculture industry should be modernized with ample assistance from the government for support infrastructure including assistance for fertilizers and post-harvest requirements.
Binay even proposed to abolish the irrigation fees being charged to the farmers.

Poe failed to rebut Binay as she used her rebuttal time to promote her own program.



Poe’s obvious inexperience showed up during the debate as she presented programs mostly copied from Binay including the issuance of an executive order regarding the Freedom of Information (FOI) and proposed subsidies for the agricultural sector.

When asked if she would pursue the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), Poe groped for answer as even though she stressed she was for transparent and inclusive peace negotiation, her answered centered on her proposed projects for Mindanao which were outside of the autonomy being asked for by the MILF in the BBL.

Santiago lashed at the administration for bragging on economic growth which failed to trickle down to the masses.
“The economy grew by 6.3 percent but the percentage of the poor also increased,” said Santiago.

Duterte’s program, as expected centered on his fight against criminality and corruption which he vowed to lick in three to six months.

Roxas, apparently taking cue from his friend, President Aquino, bragged about the success of the administration’s “Daang Matuwid” which he vowed to continue, citing the 2 million families whose lives they were able to uplift, through state doles called the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps).

He however failed to cite that the beneficiaries of the government’s conditional cash transfer have now exceeded the numbers of the families living below poverty line which stood at 4.5 million families, to 5.4 million families this year.

Roxas also took credit for the construction of the Laguindingan Airport in Misamis Oriental which was started during the time of former Presdient Gloria Macapagal – Arroyo but which was finished during Aquino’s term.

Roxas also defended his performance as Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) and Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) secretary as if he had completely forgotten the mess the MRT system is in presently.

The LP bet also denied politicizing the Yolanda relief and rehabilitation effort of the government, as he forgot to mention how he tried to bully Tacloban Mayor Alfred Romualdez when he told him, “Remember you’re a Romualdez and the president is an Aquino.”

Roxas also tried to pick up a heated argument with Binay as he accused him of failing to arrest poverty and drug problem in Makati.

“Makati has the highest incident of drug problem. And it has two faces, the rich Makati of the Ayalas and the poor Makati of Binay,” said Roxas.

Binay however retorted saying Roxas’ figures are distorted.

“I don’t know where Mr. Roxas is getting his figures,” said Binay.

“With regards to the areas mentioned by Mr. Roxas, Pembo, Comembo, the people there are content and happy as we have awarded them the lots on whicn their house stand,” Binay said.

Santiago also downplayed the promises being bandied by both Poe and Roxas.

“It’s easy to make promises to high heavens. But in the end, the question is where will you get the money,” said Santiago.
In his closing statement, Binay said his program can be achieved even by the present administration if it hadn’t resorted to underpsending.

“Underspending leads to under performance, which leads to under delivery of services. It could lead to deaths as medicines and other needs are not delivered on time. Thus, we should put a stop to under spending,” the vice president said.

“For Mr. Roxas’ erudition, the number of poor residents in makati have declined dramatically during the binay administration. In 2000, there were over 17,000 poor families in Makati. In 2012, that number has dropped dramatically to only 2,000. Now contrast that with poverty in Roxas City. And again, for Mr. Roxas’ erudition. Makati has been consistently recognized by PDEA for its anti-drug campaign,” said Salgado.

“We should be true to ourselves, Mr. Roxas,” Salgado added.

Roxas, Poe trade blows
The problems of the country has been there for a long time. There is, however, no proof that if you are in the government longer, you can do better,” Poe said.

Roxas, in rebutting her claims, said he once tried to lure Poe to be his running mate, noting her inexperience as far as leadership is concerned.

Roxas told Poe that being President can’t be an OJT (on-the job-training). Lives and the future of the 100 million Filipinos are at stake and there is a time for everything, Roxas said.

“For me, experience is one of the most important attributes of a president. How would you know if somebody is putting one over you? or how would you decide on two separate recommendations on the same issue. A clean experience is needed for the next president,” he said.

But Poe countered Roxas’ statement saying that Roxas has been in government for so long but has not showed his experience in solving the problems on transportation and provision basic assistance to the public.

Poe, who led investigations on the sorry state of the Metro Rail Transit-3 and the tragic Mamasapano incident tried to highlight the fact that in both issues, Roxas was once involved in the concerned agencies, the DoTC and the DILG.



A former teacher, Poe said that while she did not have as many years in government as her opponents, she knows what the Filipinos needed.

Poe served as chairman of the MTRCB from 2010 to 2012, where she instituted a new ratings system.

Poe’s camp also immediately went on the defensive with her spokesman, Valenzuela Mayor Rex Gatchalian coming to her aid, saying that Roxas’ insinuation on the senator’s possible stint as president will be like OJT is with without basis.

“Sen. Poe gave us a glimpse of what her administration will do to eradicate poverty and to further develop our sectors like the agri sector. She also placed on the table her plans for Mindanao and the West Philippine Sea. She clearly showed her understanding of the pressing issues facing our country. She substantiated her statements with data and figures.

“In this debate, Sen. Poe showed that she understands our people, she understands our people’s problems and she showed them how she plans to deliver results. Fresh perspectives to decade-old problems. Platforms of governance that takes into account every individual. Time and time again, Sen. Poe’s critics attacked her for being inexperienced but during the debate she showed her detailed know-how of governance and what it takes to bring results for our people. Her stints in MTRCB, the Senate and the private sector disapproves the insinuations of Sec. Mar (Roxas),” he said.


Organizers of the debate allowed only 300 political leaders and supporters inside the venue. It said those without Comelec accreditation would not be allowed in the venue.

Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista said the venue of the next presidential debate would be in Cebu City on March 20, 2016 while the third presidential debate would be in Luzon on April 24, 2016.

Bautista said the holding of the debates intends to give the voters a chance to know the candidates better, especially on their plans once elected president.

“We hope the debates would provide the voters an informed decision in selecting the next president. We are also encouraging the candidates to focus on substantive issues,” Bautista said.

He said that agriculture development, poverty reduction, peace and order, and Charter change are the main topics of the Mindanao debate.


INQUIRER

QUESTIONS FOCUSED ON CANDIDATES’ VULNERABILITIES - Five rivals cross swords SHARES: 150 VIEW COMMENTS By: Gil C. Cabacungan, Kristine Angeli Sabillo, Marlon Ramos @inquirerdotnet
INQUIRER.net 12:00 AM February 22nd, 2016

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY—They came to pitch their message and slug it out with each other—they did well there—but their answers to questions about their vulnerabilities would be remembered most after the debate.

Sunday night’s opening presidential debate at Capitol University in Cagayan de Oro City was the first national debate organized by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) in 24 years, in cooperation with GMA 7 and the Philippine Daily Inquirer, to shift attention to policy talk in a country where many have been fascinated by personalities and show biz-like campaigns.

To be sure, Vice President Jejomar Binay, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas were ready for the criticisms, though some of them grappled with the knocks on their candidacies.

Binay faced the question about how he amassed wealth while in public office, squarely saying some of his wealth were passed on to him by his parents.

Santiago snapped back at debate host Jessica Soho when she read the question about her health.

“That’s my right,” Santiago replied, explaining that illnesses fluctuate and that it is her right to choose to run for President.

Asked about her absences in the Senate, Santiago shot back that she was suffering from stage 4 cancer.

“I waited to die, but my guardian angel did not let me die,” she said.

Instead of arguing with Santiago, Duterte came to her support.

“I will not go into a debate with Ma’am Miriam. I do not see Senator Santiago passing away in the next 20 years so there is no problem,” he said.

An amused Santiago replied: “I do not want to spend the next six years lying in bed feeling sorry for myself … I felt sorry for my country. Because graft and corruption is endemic. Nobody did much except Mayor Rody Duterte.”

Duterte beamed and raised his right hand as the audience applauded him and Santiago.

Asked about his foul mouth, reputation as a womanizer and human rights record, Duterte said he would continue to kill criminals.

He denied allegations of extrajudicial killings, but said that if elected President, he would use the law to go after illegal drugs and criminals.

READ MORE...

“We will order the killing of all criminals,” he said.

Not OJT

Asked about the thinness of her resumé, Poe, a freshman senator, replied, “There is no proof that you will do better because you have been in office longer.”

Roxas said the presidency was not “OJT,” or on-the-job-training.

Roxas, who had wooed Poe to become his running mate, said there was a “right time for everything, especially since a President is responsible for the lives of 100 million Filipinos.

Roxas, who vowed to continue President Aquino’s reform program, defended his work at the Department of Transportation and Communication and the Department of the Interior and Local Government.

He also defended himself against criticism about his absence during Supertyphoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan), insisting he was there before, during and after the world’s worst storm.

Poe said that while Roxas had experience with three administrations, she herself had investigated numerous irregularities involving her rival’s former agencies.

“I don’t need extensive experience to understand our transportation problems,” she said.

Sharing suffering

Binay opened the debate by declaring that poverty was the main problem of the country, that he shared the suffering of the poor because he used to be one of them, and that he was successful in reducing poverty in Makati City when he took over as mayor 30 years ago.

Binay said his and his family’s reputations were tarnished by his political enemies.

Santiago also zeroed in on poverty as the biggest problem of the country, blaming it on “people who want the money of the government.”

Duterte started by coming out in the open about his admiration for Santiago, describing her as “one of only two persons qualified to run this country.”

He cited criminality and corruption as the main issues in these elections. “If I am President, I will get rid of criminality, drugs and corruption in three to six months,” he said.

Poe went micro in her opening spiel as she cited the importance of Mindanao in the production of pineapple, banana, coconut and corn for both the domestic and export markets.

She promised to allocate a third of the national budget to Mindanao if elected President.

It was Roxas, however, who threw the first punch right out of the starting gate.

Track record

“I have simple question with a simple answer. Who will you choose as your daily driver to entrust your child: Is it someone with a case of corruption, a hot-head who is prone to accidents, or someone who is just learning to drive? Or will you choose someone you have known for a long time, someone who has never taken advantage of you, and someone who comes with a good recommendation from a former employer,” Roxas said in a bid to set an antagonistic tone to the face-off.

The five candidates were confronted head on with the burning issues against them.

Binay was asked about his assets, liabilities and net worth, specifically how much of his properties were obtained through inheritance or through their income and whether these were obtained before or after he became mayor.

“[Three decades] is a long time. Some assets I inherited [from both my father and mother] before I got my position in 1986. Some I bought, It doesn’t mean that if you’re in government, you don’t have the means to buy. I practiced law and my wife practiced medicine. And it’s not true that we have a lot of land,” Binay said.

Political dynasty

Santiago, who was surprisingly tame for the good part of the debate, nearly went ballistic when Binay turned the tables on her when the question about political dynasties came up.

“Miriam has a son who was also elected,” Binay said in his rebuttal to the question thrown at him about members of his family holding public offices.

Santiago immediately turned to Binay and looked daggers at him.

Asked by debate host and GMA 7 Mike Enriquez if she wanted to respond, Santiago said: “What he said was wrong. My son ran for a party-list but did not run for another post after one term.”

Binay, whose wife and three children were elected to different offices, defended his position on the issue, saying while the Constitution barred it, no law had passed defining political dynasty.

He said it was wrong to prevent qualified people to run for public office just because they have relatives in the government.

But Santiago, a former judge who was also elected to the International Criminal Court, said the constitutional provision on political dynasty was enough.

“It’s a basic principle of constitutional law that anything written in the Constitution … should be literally applied if possible,” she said. “The Constitution is always and always supreme.”

On peace in Mindanao, Poe said she would push for a transparent, inclusive and sustainable discussions in forming a new agreement.

“We should follow this up with projects in Mindanao to sustain its development,” she said, adding that powers should be devolved to give Moro leaders more autonomy.

Closing remarks

Duterte said he would push for federalism as an alternative, especially for the people in the western side of Mindanao led by Moro National Liberation Front founder Nur Misuari.

Binay’s closing remarks hammered on the Aquino administration’s underspending and its adverse impact on infrastructure and social services without answering directly the main question: Why should he be elected President.

Santiago said the voters themselves had the responsibility to choose the next leader based on three criteria: He or she should have academic excellence, professional excellence and moral excellence or no record of corruption.

Duterte said he was running for President because he was tired of complaints about rising corruption, criminality and illegal drugs, all of which he promised to wipe out in three to six months.

Poe pressed her spiel about giving Mindanao a bigger share of the budget and said her first act as President was to push for the enactment of the freedom of information bill.

She sought to ease worries about her lack of experience, saying there were more experienced leaders who continued to employ worn-out solutions to the country’s persistent problems.

Roxas ended the debate with a swipe at his rivals. “Why do I want to be President? Because I want your life to be like mine, free from hunger, free from poverty, and free to dream,” he said. With a report from AP


PHILSTAR

Opening salvo: Bets slug it out (The Philippine Star) | Updated February 22, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0


Presidential candidates Vice President Jejomar Binay, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and former interior secretary Manuel Roxas II raise each others’ hands at the end of yesterday’s presidential debate, the first in more than a decade. The photo is a screen grab from GMA 7. JOEY MENDOZA

MANILA, Philippines – All the five presidential candidates showed up and kept to their allotted times as they expounded on their platforms and traded punches yesterday in the first of a series of debates. organized by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) held at Cagayan de Oro City yesterday.

The five candidates – Vice President Jejomar Binay, Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Sen. Grace Poe and administration bet Manuel Roxas II – spelled out their platforms of government if elected president on May 9.

They repeated their spiels on the first day of the official campaign period. Binay harped on leadership and his performance particularly as mayor of Makati. Duterte vowed to stamp out criminality within six months of becoming president. Santiago urged the electorate to vote for competence and look at her credentials. Poe promised a compassionate presidency, while Roxas promised to sustain the reforms of the Aquino administration’s tuwid na daan or straight path.

Despite limited time, they also addressed issues raised against them during the two-hour debate in Cagayan de Oro organized by the Commission on Elections (Comelec).

Binay faced corruption issues and explained his position on dynasties. Duterte was unapologetic about his human rights record. Santiago, a cancer survivor, said she has recovered and has a right to seek the presidency. Poe defended herself from criticisms that she lacked experience, while Roxas fended off criticisms of incompetence and indecision.

The issues also popped up as the candidates faced off.

READ MORE...

DUTERTE-SANTIAGO

Duterte and Santiago appeared to agree on several issues. The Davao mayor described Santiago as “one of the two” candidates qualified to run as president.

Duterte also refused to rebut Defensor’s remarks on her health status.

“I will not go into an argument or debate with Ma’am Miriam, she is telling you the truth and truth is very important. I do not see Senator Santiago passing away within the next 20 years. So, what is the problem?” Duterte said.

“It is my right. In our Constitution, there is no provision that if you’re sick of something, you’re disqualified,” Santiago replied, referring to her late-stage lung cancer.

“I was at the height of cancer. Stage 4. Stage 4 is the last stage. I was just waiting to die but my guardian angel did not allow that,” she said.

Santiago defended Duterte, saying the Davao mayor was able to stop the endemic graft and corruption in the local government that everybody has spoken.

“I felt sorry for my country because graft and corruption is endemic and everybody speaks out, but nobody has done very much except Mayor Rody Duterte,” Santiago said.

Duterte slammed Roxas for parroting the “Matuwid na Daan” policy of the Aquino administration, describing it in Filipino as “puro kulubot iyan (crooked),” thus eliciting laughter from the audience.

On the issue of infrastructure development in Mindanao, Duterte said it was lacking because of the neglect of the Aquino administration.

All the five candidates spelled out their platforms of government during the two-hour debate hosted by GMA-7 and Philippine Daily Inquirer.

Poe said she will allocate 30 percent of the national budget for the improvement of Mindanao if she is elected president.

She also said she will allow freedom of information as her first executive order.

Binay, who had served in the Cabinet of President Aquino, reiterated his earlier criticisms against the administration and promised to correct the mistakes of the government.

He said the current underspending of the administration, which he described as “analysis paralysis” has delayed the implementation of vital projects of the government.

BINAY FOCUSED ON ROXAS

Binay focused on Roxas in saying the former interior secretary mishandled the relief and rescue operations of the victims of Typhoon Yolanda in Leyte in 2013.

“If your were referring to me as the one who rode in a helicopter, I’ve witnessed a lot, but where were you then? The people of Leyte are so mad at you,” he told Roxas.

Binay also slugged it out with Roxas during the discussion on how to fight and eradicate the problem of illegal drugs.

Binay boasted about the anti-illegal drug campaign he waged in Makati City when he served as mayor of the country’s financial capital.

Roxas, however, countered by saying Makati City has the highest illegal drug rate in the country and there are many poor people as well.

Roxas made the opening statement that he is qualified to run the country based on his competence and trustworthiness, comparing himself to a driver steering the vehicle to a safe destination.

“Who are you going to entrust the safety of your children? Is it to somebody with many corruption cases?” Roxas said in apparent reference to Binay facing allegations of corruption.

Roxas also took a swipe at Poe, whom he scored for her lack of experience

“My apologies for Senator Poe, being a president is not an OJT (on the job training,” he said.

Poe, for her part, countered by pointing out the problems of the government agencies that Roxas had handled.

During the debates, Binay maintained during the debates that he had nothing to hide.

He also traded barbs with Santiago on the issue of political dynasty.

Binay said there should be no prohibition against anyone who wants to run for office as long as they are elected in honest and clean elections.

Santiago, however, said Binay’s position is wrong and should not be accepted, pointing out the anti-dynasty provision in the Constitution.

Santiago also noted the promises made by her rivals, saying they are “promises in the sky.”

Regarding the issues in Mindanao, only two candidates – Duterte and Santiago – fared well in answering the questions based on the reaction of the viewers of GMA-7 during the debates.

Binay was the least liked, based on the “emoticons” posted by readers of GMA-7 news online website. – Edith Regalado, Robertzon Ramirez, Helen Flores, Rainier Allan Ronda, Gerry Lee Gorit, Paolo Romero, Jose Rodel Clapano


GMA NEWS TV

Sparks fly as presidential bets spar at historic Pilipinas Debates 2016 Published February 21, 2016 7:50pm Updated February 21, 2016 9:25pm


Presidentiables share the stage Vice President Jejomar Binay, Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Senator Grace Poe, and former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas share the stage at the end of the Pilipinas Debates 2016. Danny PataAudience at Capitol University, Cagayan de Oro Photo by Jab Jimenez

The five people vying for the country's highest post faced off for the first time on Sunday — and it didn't take long before sparks began to fly.

The first leg of the PiliPinas Debates 2016, organized by the Commission on Elections in cooperation with GMA Network and the Philippine Daily Inquirer, saw Vice President Jejomar Binay, Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, Senator Grace Poe, former Interior Secretary Mar Roxas, and Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago tackle issues while taking shots at each other during the two-hour event at Capitol University in Cagayan De Oro.

It was the first presidential debate ever held in Mindanao, and the first time in 24 years that the Comelec held a presidential debate.

The candidates were grilled about their respective track records, as well as issues involving poverty and development and Mindanao.

Roxas, the administration bet, set the tone by taking broadsides at his rivals during his opening statement.

"Kung ihahambing natin ang pagpili ng pangulo tulad ng pagpili natin sa magmamaneho sa ating mga anak sa araw-araw, sino ang pipiliin natin? Kanino natin ipagkakatiwala ang kaligtasan ng ating mga anak? Sa isang tao na may mga kaso ng pagnanakaw, sa isang mainitin ang ulo na maaaring maaksidente [o] sa isang ngayon pa lang natututong magmaneho?" Roxas said.

"O ipagkakaloob po natin ito sa isang taong matagal niyo nang kilala, matagal nang nanilbihan at ni minsan hindi kayo pinahamak o pinagsamantalahan?" he added.

The other candidates used their opening statements to talk about their respective advocacies.

Binay once again spoke about poverty as the biggest problem for the country. "Kahirapan pa rin problema ng bayan," he said, adding that his track record in Makati made him best suited to become president.

He said poverty was the issue he addressed when he served as longtime mayor of Makati City, the country's center of business and finance. Binay cited jobs creation as the reason for the rise of Makati as the country's richest city.

He also hit mentioned unnamed critics who are taking shots at his campaign with allegations of corruption.

READ MORE...

"Siniraan ako at ang aking pamilya ng mga bagay-bagay. Ako ay manumuno sa ating bansa na dala-dala ang ating malawak na pamamahala at malasakit sa bayan," he said.

Santiago, meanwhile, spoke about her anti-corruption advocacy.

"Everybody wants to have the money of the government in their pockets,” she said, saying that corruption is the reason with the country is one of the poorest in Southeast Asia.

Duterte, meanwhile, spoke about his platform of peace and order in his opening.

"I am here because there is so much criminality. Drugs are flooding the country and there is so much corruption in the government. If I am the president I promise in three to six months and I will deliver. Economic growth is impossible unless we start with government," he said.

Poe, for her part, boasted that her administration would have "tunay na malasakit."

Elected senator in 2013, Poe said promised that 30 percent of the country's budget would be devoted to Mindanao if she became president.

Heated battles

It didn't take long before the candidates got in on the action, with Roxas and Binay trading barbs on multiple instances.

After Roxas defended his track record as head of the Department of the Interior and Local Government and the Department of Transportation and Communication, Binay said that the administration bet remained unpopular in Eastern Visayas because of his poor performance in the aftermath of Super Typhoon Yolanda.

"Pagkatapos ng nangyari sa Leyte, grabe ang galit sa kanya ng mga taga-Leyte dahil sa kapalkpakan niya," Binay said, adding that Roxas is afflicted with "analysis-paralysis."

Roxas and Binay are known political rivals since the 2010 vice-presidential elections wherein Binay beat Roxas in a slim margin of 700,000 votes.

Roxas, for his part, took an apparent swipe at Binay, hinting that the vice president used calamities for political gain.

"Hindi ako bumitaw hangga't nag-stabilize ang sitwasyon; hindi katulad ng iba na dumating at nag-helicopter, nagturista, umalis at marami na ngayong sinasabi," Roxas said.

Later, Roxas and Binay traded barbs over the peace and order situation in Makati, where Binay had previously served as mayor.

"Makati has the highest drug rate! Lahat ng mga mayayaman, lahat ng mga clubs, bawa't Biyernes, Sabado, diyan laganap ang droga sa Makati," Roxas said.

Binay replied: "Ewan ko kung saan 'yung statistics ni Mr. Roxas."

Roxas also got into it with Senator Grace Poe, whom he scored for lack of experience.

"Ipagpaumanhin ng aking kaibigang si Senadora Grace Poe na ang pagiging pangulo ay hindi OJT," he said.

Poe, who has led the Senate investigation into the anomalies surrounding the Metro Rail Transit 3, for her part noted that Roxas has already served under three administrations. Despite this, however, she said problems remain in the agencies which Roxas handled.

"Pasensya na po, pero marami na rin akong naimbestigahan tulad ng DILG at DOTC sa MRT at sa tingin ko naman, hindi mo kailangan ng napakahabang karanasan para malaman na kulang ang tulong ng gobyerno ng transportasyon para sa bayan," she said.

Duterte, meanwhile, also took a shot at Roxas when discussing Mindanao issues, saying that the "Tuwid Na Daan" platform of the administration was not as straight as it claimed

"Wala naman akong nakitang Tuwid na Daan, puro kulubot man 'yan," said Duterte, referring to Roxas' platform of anti-corruption.

Feisty senator

Santiago, known for her fiery nature, also scored her fellow candidates for their promises to eradicate corruption without explaining how the government would pay for the programs.

"As I said, these are all promises way up in the sky. Promises in the sky is the program of government of many officials in the public office," Santiago said.

"Saan natin kukunin ang pera, yun ang tinatanong ko, saan?! Sino ang magbibigay, magdo-donate? Mga mayayaman ba? Dadagdagan ba natin [ang tax nila] dahil mayayaman sila?...Malaking problema yung where to source the funds. I can make an entire list from here to there of all my promises to you but that would each cost taxes," Santiago added.

Santiago also got into a tiff with Binay over a question about the anti-dynasty provision in the Constitution.

"Bakit naman ho magkakaroon ng batas para pagbawalan ang gustong magtrabaho, qualified naman at mahahalal naman sa isang malinis at marangal na halalan," said Binay.

Defensor replied that Congress still refuses to pass the Anti-Dynasty bill because its members are "self-interested" and themselves are members of dynasties.

Responding to Santiago's rebuttal, Binay reminded the public that even Santiago has a son who was elected.

Clarifying Binay's statement, Santiago said: "Mali ang sinabi. Ang anak ko, tumakbo na party-list representative. After one term, he did not run for another post." She said she currently has no other family member in government service.

Friendship goals

But it wasn't all sparring during the debates, as Duterte and Santiago expressed mutual admiration for each other during the debate.

In his opening statement, Duterte said Santiago was one of two candidates qualified to lead the country.

Later, when Santiago was asked about her health, Duterte expressed support for the senator.

"I do not want to engage into an argument with the good Senator Miriam Santiago. She is telling you the truth," Duterte said.

"I do not see Senator Santiago passing away within the next 20 years. So what's the problem?" Duterte added.

Closing statements

With their closing statements, the candidates once again had a chance to expound on their policy platforms.

Binay hit the administration's underspending, saying it won't happen in his administration.

"Underspending, nakaka-apekto ho yan, nakaka-delay ng performance. Yung mga infrastructure requirements natin na makakatulong para sa pagpapadami ng kabuhayan, hindi ho nagagawa, kaya ho kailangan tayong magdagdag at gastusin ang pera para mabago ang ating buhay," he said.

Santiago, for her part, touted her background and experience.

"We are here looking for a real leader of the Philippines who will implement all the valuable suggestions that were made here this evening. But this is not a personality contest. This is not a show for entertainment," she said.

Duterte, meanwhile, once again highlighted his advocacy against crime and corruption.

"There's so much corruption, there's so much crime, so much drugs flooding the country. And seems that nobody is minding these through. Matagal na, we have been raising that problem. Every time, before a forum, we talk about this, about that," said Duterte.

"Kung bigyan n'yo ako ng pagkakataon — only if God wills it also — I will stop it, I said. This is an imposed restriction on me. Hindi ako nagpapabilib sa inyo. I will get rid of drugs, supress crime, stop corruption in government in a matter of three to six months."

Poe, an advocate of the Freedom of Information bill in the Senate, promised to make it her first act if she becomes president.

"Kailangan magkaroon ng pakikipaglaban sa korupsyon. Kapag ako po ay naging pangulo, unang executive order, magkakaroon ng freedom of information na matagal na nating ginugusto," she said.

Roxas, meanwhile, spoke about his background, saying his being rich was not an obstacle to helping the poor.

"Hindi ko pinoproblema ang kakainin ko sa bukas. Bakit ko gustong maging pangulo? Dahil gusto kong maging ganito din ang buhay ninyo," he said.

Afterwards, Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista said that he was "very satisfied" with how the first presidential debate turned out.

"I thought it was a world class event both in terms of substance and form," Bautista said.

The chairman said he's looking forward to the next debate and he hopes that the other networks with their partner print media will either level with or exceed the turnout of the first one. —reports from Kathrina Charmaine Alvares, Rose-An Jessica Dioquino, Trisha Macas, Elizabeth Marcelo, Mark Merueñas, Veronica Pulumbarit/JST, GMA News


MALAYA COLUMN OF THE DAY

NO SCRUPLES By DODY LACUNA February 22, 2016


BY DODY LACUNA

NOTHING much is mentioned about developing or pursuing morality in any of the candidates’ campaign platforms including those of the presidentiables.

The strange thing is it seems the public does not really care a bit about the moral or psychological fitness of any of the leading five. No one among the presidential candidates has professed any interest in talking about moral issues.

Sen. Grace Poe is almost sure criminal minds are active in the campaign trail up, especially those rendered financially disabled by the abolition of the pork barrel.

A leading broadsheet has listed 10 national concerns to which presidential candidates have been asked to respond but does not include promotion of morality and character in government. Corruption is not a major concern as evidenced by the staying power of one of the three leading presidential candidates in the surveys.

The voting public does not really mind that senators who earn about P90,000 a month or less than P2 million a year are running nationwide campaigns that will go to almost a half a billion pesos.

Their tenures have been marked with either grand thievery from government coffers through the hidden pork barrel or unholy and common partnerships with businessmen rewarded with huge government contracts. Their rhetoric will never change until the earth under their feet splits and swallows them up - that they are committed to protect the national interest and to bring a brighter future for the poor and the sick of this country!

How Malacañang and the Comelec shepherd the nation through the upcoming democratic exercise will define the kind of legacy or morality that would resonate through the coming generations already in danger of inheriting political partisanship, corruption, abuse of power and violence.

READ MORE...

As in the United States, elected presidents here are sworn into office with one hand resting on a Bible which is practically discarded in Malacañang. Former General Dwight D. Eisenhower wanted a “religious note” of some sort for his campaign speeches as he barnstormed for the presidency. Eisenhower was the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe during World War II.

He had gone down on his knees with the Bible on his hand seeking divine guidance as the Normandy invasion got stalled due to bad weather. It is said that the stormy seas suddenly settled allowing the American and British forces to cross the channel - and under a cover of fog - with only a few hours to spare before the waters raged anew.

Evangelist Billy Graham met with Eisenhower in a hotel in Denver and Graham shared Bible verses appropriate to the needs of the United States. Pastor and author Robert Morgan writes that “five days before his inauguration as President of the United States, Eisenhower told Graham that he felt one of the reasons he was elected was to help set the moral and spiritual climate of America” “In the swift rush of great events” he scribbled in his final draft, “we find ourselves groping to know the full meaning of these times in which we live. In our quest for understanding, we beseech God’s guidance.”

Big-time businessmen masquerading as political advisers or consultants of senators and congressmen should learn a thing or two from Henry Crowell. At sixteen he contracted tuberculosis and appeared to be dying. He was able to regain his health but only after making up his mind that he would make money to support bigger and nobler causes. And after attending a D.L. Moody campaign in Ohio where he listened intently as the evangelist thundered: “The world has yet to see what God can do through a man fully dedicated to Him.” Morgan writes “Crowell grew stronger and began honing his business instincts, shrewdly investing his family’s wealth. He started companies, purchased properties, and introduced innovations to the marketplace. When a mill owned by nearby Quakers became available, Crowell purchased it and began dreaming of modern cereal products for American homes.”

Thus, Quaker Oats Company was born and has since grown into a multi-billion enterprise covering almost the entire planet. The money rolled in - and it rolled out. “Crowell gave 65 to 70 percent of his income to Christian causes. Millions of dollars flowed to churches, schools, and missions. Under his vision, the fledgling and prestigious Moody Bible Institute of Chicago escaped financial ruin and became a powerful training center. He helped start Moody Press, Moody Magazine and Moody radio ministries.”

While casinos, lotto outlets and gaming centers have practically taken this country by storm, there are not a few men who have made the street of U.N. Avenue in Manila their homes.

The pioneering Pagcor casino there has taken their savings, their inheritance, their families’ fortunes and left most of them with nothing except the shirt on their back.

They have failed to “visualize the penalties of failure,” as Rob Gilbert, editor of “Bits and Pieces” has put it, indeed prescribed by a government relishing billions of revenues while ignoring the vicious and abundant social costs to already tens of hundreds of families.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2016 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE