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INQUIRER EDITORIAL: STARTLING BIGOTRY
[Because of who he is and what he wants to be, Pacquiao’s reprehensible words, and the world view behind them, carry grave consequences. He deserves to be thus reminded. His dismal performance in the House of Representatives should indicate the man’s capacity for the legislative grind: He reported for work only four times in 2014—the worst absentee record in the House for that year. Number of laws he passed: zero.]


FEBRUARY 20 -As bouts went, the knockout came pretty quick. Barely a week since he uttered his now-infamous remark on TV that gay people are “worse than animals” when they engage in same-sex relations (“mas masahol pa sa hayop” in more lacerating Filipino), the world as he knew it had come tumbling down on the world-famous boxer-congressman-preacher. The blowback came swift and hard, with the country’s most prominent gay personalities, men and women alike, taking the lead to condemn Manny Pacquiao’s startling bigotry, joined by innumerable others, gay and straight, here and abroad, who found his comments appalling and a step too far. In the immediate aftermath, Pacquiao lost more than a million followers on Twitter and was dumped by global sportswear giant Nike, which called his remarks “abhorrent.” And the man was forced to apologize—awkwardly and obviously still missing the point—first on his Instagram account, then on radio.
The point, which many of his followers also fail to discern, or steadfastly refuse to, is not Pacquiao’s opposition per se to the idea of same-sex marriage. He has broached his disagreement with that prospect more than once, and he is not the first high-profile Filipino to do so. Politicians such as Lito Atienza and Tito Sotto, along with sundry bishops of the Catholic Church, have long railed against the possibility of such unions becoming a reality in the Philippines, especially in light of the bold strides made in the campaign for equality waged by gay people in other countries. READ MORE...RELATED,

ALSO: TV5 Network - Pacquiao video ‘minimally edited in good faith’; denies splicing  video

 
FEBRUARY 21 -SCREEN GRAB FROM "KUPAL LORD" FACEBOOK PAGE
Television network TV5 on Sunday denied splicing the 30-second video of United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) senatorial aspirant Manny Pacquiao where he expressed his view on same-sex marriage and said that it was “minimally edited in good faith.” It also said that it gave the raw interview to Pacquiao’s camp the same day the video was released. “The video that was posted online was not spliced but minimally edited in good faith and with reasonable care. There was no intention to change the context or misrepresent the essence of Mr. Paqcuiao’s statements. On the same day the video was posted, News5 gave the full raw video to Mr. Pacquiao’s camp, after which he issued his apology in social media,” TV5 said in a statement. “Moreover, the video of Mr. Pacquiao’s interview was likewise broadcast in its entirety on TV5, on the primetime newscast of Aksyon on February 16, 2016,” it added. The accusation was hurled against TV5 after the full version of the video went viral on Saturday. The video, which was posted on the Facebook page of a certain “Kupal Lord,” has since been viewed more than 5.2 million times. In the one minute video posted on the “Kupal Lord” page, Pacquiao explained that as a Christian, same sex marriage is prohibited. He then uttered his now controversial statement relegating members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community as “worse than animals.”  However, he explained that he is not condemning them. “I am not condemning them ah. Yung marriage lang, committing sin against God,” the boxer-legislator said. READ MORE...

ALSO: UNA - Pacquiao brought pride to PH, respect his views


FEBRUARY -21 -Manny Pacquiao made the Philippines and Filipinos proud, said Mon Ilagan, UNA spokesperson. Ilagan added that detractors should also remember the good that Pacquiao did and not only his comments about same-sex marriage. AP FILE
The United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) said it was about time that the uproar over the views of senatorial candidate Manny Pacquiao about same-sex marriage to die down. In a press briefing on Saturday night, UNA spokesperson Mon Ilagan said the public should look instead at the pride Pacquiao had brought the country as a boxing champion. “Manny has said everything. The issue will naturally die down. Kailangang respetuhin din natin ang pananaw ng bawat isa sa atin,” Ilagan said. “Tandaan din natin ang nagawa ni Manny Pacquiao sa buong Pilipinas. Pinasikat niya ang Pilipino. We should not forget that. Siguro naman, with that, i-rest na natin ang issue. Patayin na natin ang issue,” he added. Sen. Nancy Binay, the daughter of UNA standard bearer Vice President Jejomar Binay, said Pacquiao already sincerely apologized for his comments. She said it had also been difficult for Pacquiao to humble himself to make the apology. Asked about her reaction to Pacquiao’s citing Biblical passages which say gay people are condemned to hell, the senator said the public should respect Pacquiao’s position in the same way he respects his critics’ stance. “We just have to respect each other’s belief and opinion. Nag-apologize naman na si Cong. Manny. Dapat respetuhin din natin ang posisyon niya pagdating sa isyu ng (same-sex marriage),” she said. READ MORE...RELATED, UNA backs Pacquiao amid controversies...

ALSO: Facebook group slammed Media after Pacquiao’s same-sex marriage comment turns viral


FEBRUARY 20 -Screen grab from YouTube shows boxing icon and senatorial candidate Manny Pacquiao explaining his stand on same-sex marriage during an interview for Bilang Pilipino, the election coverage of TV5 and The STAR.
The media was slammed after an uncut version of senatorial candidate Sarangani Rep. Emmanuel “Manny” Pacquiao’s interview on same-sex marriage surfaced over the social media and went viral.
Facebook page "Kupal Lord" uploaded the uncut version of the interview and slammed the media for posting an off-cut video. "Eto ang tunay na clip! (Expletive) din ang media eh!!! Panoorin nyu bago nyu ibash si Manny Pacquiao," the caption for the video post said. READ: Pacquiao apologizes for comments against LGBT communityThe video also sparked debate among netizens, saying Pacquiao’s statement as taken out of context. "Sino ba tong media na nag edit ng interview? Ang linaw ng sinabi ni Manny. Mas masahol pa ang hayop sa tao. Hindi nya sinabi mas masahol pa ang hayop kaysa sa bakla or tomboy or lesbiana. Manny actually made a generalization as an example. Parang sinabi nya ang tao ay makasalanan. Which is true. Salute to Manny for his brave comments and i stand by him," Facebook user Darwin Orendain commented. "Obviously Manny was taken out of context," Facebook user Gerry Barganza said. The video circulated after Pacquiao drew flak on social media and was hit for commenting that people in same-sex relations are "worse than animals” when asked for his views about same-sex marriage in the interview by TV5 group for its Bilang Pilipino election coverage. He has since apologized for his comment but maintained he still stands by his belief. The original 26 second video, which also went viral on Tuesday, only mentioned his comparison between animals and humans. READ MORE...RELATED, In the Philippines - LGBT rights in the Philippines...

ALSO: Manny Pacquiao in new 'death' to gays controversy


FEBRUARY 19 -Reuters FILE  Manny Paquiao
Christian boxer Manny Pacquiao has posted then deleted a Bible verse on his Instagram account saying men who have sex with other men should be "put to death".
The latest controversy comes after his sponsor Nike dropped him for "abhorrent" comments on people in same-sex marriage being "worse" than animals. ABS CBN reported that in his latest social media outing on the subject, Pacquiao quoted Leviticus 20:13: "Do not have sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman; that is detestable... If a man has sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They are to be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads." More than 18,000 users on Instagram "liked" the post in the two hours it was online before it was deleted. Manny Pacquiao's wife says the Lord is not pleased when couples break the covenant of marriage The post repeated Bible quotes on putting homosexuals to death the boxer had cited as long ago as 2012. At the time, Pacquiao said: "Hindi ako nagsabi niyan, kasinungalingan iyan. Hindi ko alam iyang verse ng Leviticus kasi hindi pa ako nakabasa ng Leviticus." This translates as him claiming he never said it: "I do not know this verse of Leviticus because I never read Leviticus." In the latest post, the boxer also quoted from St Luke's gospel: "Blessed are you when people hate you, when they exclude you and insult you and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man. Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their ancestors treated the prophets." In an interview on DZMM Teleradyo, he also said he is in favor of the death penalty which he described as "biblical". Pacquiao, who is running for Senate, has apologised for his comment about same-sex marriage and animals.THE FULL REPORT FROM CHRISTIAN TODAY ONLINE

ALSO: Pacquiao controversy Anti-gay remarks seen rattling advertisers more than voters


FEBRUARY 19 -Boxer Manny Pacquiao, who is running for senator in the Philippines, speaks to supporters in the city of Mandaluyong on Feb. 9. © Reuters
MANILA -- All it took was one television interview for boxer Manny Pacquiao, widely considered a national hero in the Philippines, to become a source of division. In expressing his opposition to same-sex relationships, Pacquiao, who claims to have renewed his Christian faith, said gay people are "worse than animals."  His remarks ricocheted worldwide, eliciting condemnation on social media. The boxer-turned-politician apologized on Tuesday, the day after the interview aired. Nike called Pacquiao's comments "abhorrent" and terminated its endorsement contract with him. The controversy erupted as the 37-year-old, who has won championships in eight different divisions, prepares for the last fight of his illustrious career. He is to face American Timothy Bradley on April 9. Pacquiao has said he wants to focus on his political ambitions. Pacquiao, an incumbent congressman, is running for senator as a member of the opposition United Nationalist Alliance. Uncertain odds So far, his political stature hardly matches his position in boxing's pantheon. In the latest Social Weather Stations survey, he ranked eighth to ninth among the 12 favored senatorial candidates -- a precarious spot that does not guarantee victory, according to political analyst Edmund Tayao. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Startling bigotry


Manny Pacquiao. AP FILE PHOTO

MANILA, FEBRUARY 22, 2016
(INQUIRER) @inquirerdotnet February 20th, 2016 - As bouts went, the knockout came pretty quick. Barely a week since he uttered his now-infamous remark on TV that gay people are “worse than animals” when they engage in same-sex relations (“mas masahol pa sa hayop” in more lacerating Filipino), the world as he knew it had come tumbling down on the world-famous boxer-congressman-preacher.

The blowback came swift and hard, with the country’s most prominent gay personalities, men and women alike, taking the lead to condemn Manny Pacquiao’s startling bigotry, joined by innumerable others, gay and straight, here and abroad, who found his comments appalling and a step too far.

In the immediate aftermath, Pacquiao lost more than a million followers on Twitter and was dumped by global sportswear giant Nike, which called his remarks “abhorrent.” And the man was forced to apologize—awkwardly and obviously still missing the point—first on his Instagram account, then on radio.

The point, which many of his followers also fail to discern, or steadfastly refuse to, is not Pacquiao’s opposition per se to the idea of same-sex marriage. He has broached his disagreement with that prospect more than once, and he is not the first high-profile Filipino to do so.

Politicians such as Lito Atienza and Tito Sotto, along with sundry bishops of the Catholic Church, have long railed against the possibility of such unions becoming a reality in the Philippines, especially in light of the bold strides made in the campaign for equality waged by gay people in other countries.

The United States was but the latest to recognize same-sex unions in 2015, following the progressive bent of other countries such as the Netherlands, Belgium, Canada, South Africa, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Portugal, Argentina, Uruguay, France, Brazil, England, and even staunchly Catholic bastions such as Spain, Mexico and Ireland.

The Philippines, meanwhile, has not even budged on its ban on divorce, making it the sole country in the world today without a legal recourse for couples to disengage from a marriage gone bad.

Obviously, legislating same-sex marriage is an even more long-shot prospect, and Pacquiao’s basic and well-known opposition to it wasn’t what got him in serious trouble.

The more insidious part of his remarks was the mentality that informed his world view. Here was a congressman aspiring to be a senator, with the eventual power, if he does win (he is eighth or ninth in the latest surveys), to shape public debate and craft laws and policies that would impact on the lives of millions of ordinary Filipinos.

His dismal performance in the House of Representatives should indicate the man’s capacity for the legislative grind: He reported for work only four times in 2014—the worst absentee record in the House for that year. Number of laws he passed: zero.


Pacquiao boldly shared what he has learned through the Bible and enumerated 10 reasons why it is important for everyone to read the Holy Book and the Truth that "we have to be BORN AGAIN.".

The only notable instance he took to the House floor was to oppose the reproductive health bill, and not with any coherent empirical or science-based argument, but with liberal quotations from the Bible.

Meanwhile, according to a 2015 World Food Programme report, his constituency of Sarangani is one of the 16 poorest provinces in the country, with more than half of its families—54 percent—saying that, on some months, they went hungry once a day.

Pacquiao as a politician is terrible enough; his newfound religiosity—credited for turning his life around from rakish excess to the prayerful, Bible-based countenance he now wears—appears to have further confused him on the basic need for those in government like himself to separate their private religious beliefs from the requirements of the law and secular polity.

While apologizing for his words, he defended the core of his argument by repeatedly invoking the Bible, as though ignorant of the fact that not all Filipinos are believers of it, let alone the fundamental, literalist interpretation to which he subscribes.

But if Pacquiao is to be senator, all Filipinos are to be his constituents, including the millions of gay people who stand at increased risk of further prejudice, discrimination, even violence from other people on account of a mindset that views them as less than human, as less deserving of the rights that those who are straight and who have never been in the minority take for granted—the right to love whomever they choose, for instance, and the right to build a life with that person under the equal protection of the law.

Because of who he is and what he wants to be, Pacquiao’s reprehensible words, and the world view behind them, carry grave consequences. He deserves to be thus reminded.

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

EDITORIAL Pacquiao knocked out by his own punch SHARES: 2382 VIEW COMMENTS @inquirerdotnet The Nation/Asia News Network 02:35 PM February 21st, 2016


INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

For a man who too often wriggles himself out of tight corners in a boxing ring, not to mention that he can take just about anything that’s thrown at him, legendary boxer Manny Pacquiao has finally met his match.

The opponent, it turns out, is not even a fellow boxer. His worst enemy, it seems, was his own mouth. The most frustrating thing for folks in his training and business camp is that no one knows how to wriggle out of this punch. Pacquiao found himself in a very hot water when he made a comment, comparing gays to animals.

“It’s common sense. Do you see animals mating with the same sex?” Pacquiao said in an interview. “Animals are better because they can distinguish male from female. If men mate with men and women mate with women, they are worse than animals.”

It didn’t take long for him to realize that he had crossed the line of propriety with the statement. He quickly apologized. This time around, the boxer whose rags-to-riches story has inspired so many – not to mention that he often uses this part of his life story in promoting his bouts and political career – tried to clarify himself.

While he didn’t go down the familiar route of saying he had been misquoted, the born-again Christian and a second-term Congressman in the Philippines said he condemned the “act”, but not the gays or lesbians themselves.

He also tried to play that “I love you all” card. But apparently it didn’t work as Nike, one of his major sponsors, dropped him like Iron Mike used to do to his opponents throughout much of his boxing career.

The decision by Nike, the world’s largest sports apparel brand, came one day after he made the public apology.
“We find Manny Pacquiao’s comments abhorrent,” Nike said in a statement.

“Nike strongly opposes discrimination of any kind and has a long history of supporting and standing up for the rights of the LGBT community.”

Condemnation came quickly from various communities- gay rights activists, fellow politicians, sports figures and celebrities – and rightly so.

The unfortunate comment may not have any impact on his political career in largely Christian Philippines.

But it will definitely damage his legacy as a sportsman and his standing among his supporters in the international arena, like Nike, who did not wait to terminate its relationship with boxing legend.

One can see Nike’s decision as a good business move. And one can argue for Pacquiao’s right to speak his mind and express his personal and religious values. But he must also understand that such a controversial statement comes with a price.

According to religious historians, Jesus Christ himself paid with his life for his conviction. Jesus’s selfless love and forgiveness and Christians’ theology is centred on the crucifixion.

But the words that came out of this much-celebrated boxer were not about love and compassion, although he did try to spin it differently to control the damage. Unfortunately, it was too little, too late. The damage has been done.

Perhaps, the adulating masses are at fault for expecting too much from a sportsperson. We see a poor boy become rich and famous because of his athletic skill and we cheer him on. The world loves an underdog.

But when one becomes a public figure – in this case, the Pacman is bidding to become the country’s senator and some say he may want to be the country’s president some day – it shouldn’t be too much to ask for some degree of sense and sensibility.

Being a popular sportsman and a public figure is not easy. One can only hope that Pacquiao does not mistake the cheers from the ringside as an endorsement of his political career.

And it is never too late for Pacquiao to look into himself and wonder if he is cut out to become a policy-maker, to lead the people and perhaps the entire nation should he wish to take that route.

The recent insensitive statement, which he continues to defend with a different spin, suggests he does not have what it takes to be a credible public figure.

In the ring, it’s him against his opponent. Making a wrong move will cost him and him alone.

But in life, especially as a policy-maker and national leader, his decision will have an impact on the citizens of his country.


INQUIRER

TV5: Pacquiao video ‘minimally edited in good faith’

SHARES: 891 VIEW COMMENTS @inquirerdotnet INQUIRER.net 03:54 PM February 21st, 2016


SCREEN GRAB FROM "KUPAL LORD" FACEBOOK PAGE

Television network TV5 on Sunday denied splicing the 30-second video of United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) senatorial aspirant Manny Pacquiao where he expressed his view on same-sex marriage and said that it was “minimally edited in good faith.”

It also said that it gave the raw interview to Pacquiao’s camp the same day the video was released.

“The video that was posted online was not spliced but minimally edited in good faith and with reasonable care. There was no intention to change the context or misrepresent the essence of Mr. Paqcuiao’s statements. On the same day the video was posted, News5 gave the full raw video to Mr. Pacquiao’s camp, after which he issued his apology in social media,” TV5 said in a statement.

“Moreover, the video of Mr. Pacquiao’s interview was likewise broadcast in its entirety on TV5, on the primetime newscast of Aksyon on February 16, 2016,” it added.

The accusation was hurled against TV5 after the full version of the video went viral on Saturday.

The video, which was posted on the Facebook page of a certain “Kupal Lord,” has since been viewed more than 5.2 million times.

In the one minute video posted on the “Kupal Lord” page, Pacquiao explained that as a Christian, same sex marriage is prohibited. He then uttered his now controversial statement relegating members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community as “worse than animals.”

However, he explained that he is not condemning them.

“I am not condemning them ah. Yung marriage lang, committing sin against God,” the boxer-legislator said.

READ MORE...

In the comment section of the Facebook post, netizens slammed TV5 and the media for releasing its 30-second teaser of the Pacquiao interview released last Feb. 15 which supposedly took the boxer out of context.

READ: UNA: Pacquiao brought pride to PH, respect his views

Facebook user Aby Buegas said: “Seriously, media is controlling the people! Nakakahiya naman tong sila boy abunda at vice, di man lang pinanood yung complete video, mas pinairal pa yung pagiging impulsive nila na magcomment rather than getting the complete detail!”

Raphael Mangali said: “Ang gagaling kasi mag pa hype ng media!! May mapagusapan lang at may maibalita na dudumugin ng masa. Nakakalungkot man isipin kung sino pa yung mga mas nakakaimpluwensya sila pa yung nagbibigay at nagpapala ng issue. Imbis na ipaliwanag or wag ipamis interpret eh.

Backlash against Pacquiao was immediate, with netizens and LGBT personalities condemning him for his gay slur. He was subsequently dropped by Nike as one of its endorsers.

Pacquiao has since apologized for his statements. AJH/JE


INQUIRER

UNA: Pacquiao brought pride to PH, respect his views SHARES: 1711 VIEW COMMENTS By: Marc Jayson Cayabyab @MJcayabyabINQ INQUIRER.net 11:44 AM February 21st, 2016


Manny Pacquiao made the Philippines and Filipinos proud, said Mon Ilagan, UNA spokesperson. Ilagan added that detractors should also remember the good that Pacquiao did and not only his comments about same-sex marriage. AP FILE

The United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) said it was about time that the uproar over the views of senatorial candidate Manny Pacquiao about same-sex marriage to die down.

In a press briefing on Saturday night, UNA spokesperson Mon Ilagan said the public should look instead at the pride Pacquiao had brought the country as a boxing champion.

“Manny has said everything. The issue will naturally die down. Kailangang respetuhin din natin ang pananaw ng bawat isa sa atin,” Ilagan said.

“Tandaan din natin ang nagawa ni Manny Pacquiao sa buong Pilipinas. Pinasikat niya ang Pilipino. We should not forget that. Siguro naman, with that, i-rest na natin ang issue. Patayin na natin ang issue,” he added.

Sen. Nancy Binay, the daughter of UNA standard bearer Vice President Jejomar Binay, said Pacquiao already sincerely apologized for his comments.

She said it had also been difficult for Pacquiao to humble himself to make the apology.

Asked about her reaction to Pacquiao’s citing Biblical passages which say gay people are condemned to hell, the senator said the public should respect Pacquiao’s position in the same way he respects his critics’ stance.

“We just have to respect each other’s belief and opinion. Nag-apologize naman na si Cong. Manny. Dapat respetuhin din natin ang posisyon niya pagdating sa isyu ng (same-sex marriage),” she said.

READ MORE...

Pacquiao was criticized by LGBT personalities, among them Vice Ganda who called him a false prophet and Ladlad founder Danton Remoto who said Pacquiao is a “numbskull” for not thinking that even animals exhibit homosexual behavior.

READ: Journalist Ira Panganiban to Pacquiao critics: Now, who’s the bigot?

Hollywood celebrity blogger Perez Hilton in his blog called Pacquiao’s statement “barbaric.”

“Common sense lang. Makakakita ka ba ng any animals na lalaki sa lalaki, babae sa babae? Mas mabuti pa yung hayop. Marunong kumilala kung lalaki, lalaki, o babae, babae,” Pacquiao said.

READ: Pacquiao stands firm after firestorm, apology

“Kung lalaki sa lalaki, babae sa babae, eh mas masahol pa sa hayop ang tao,” the boxer added.

Pacquiao has apologized for his mistake of comparing gays to animals, but he maintained his stance opposing same sex marriage.

In a dzMM interview on Wednesday, Pacquiao said it was the sexual act between the same gender, not the persons of the LGBT, which he condemned.

READ: Pacquiao says gay acts ‘detestable,’ ‘insult’ to God

US sports equipment giant Nike has sacked Pacquiao as its endorser for his gay slurs.

READ: Nike axes Pacquiao over gay slurs – official

#VotePH2016: The Inquirer multimedia coverage of the 2016 national and local elections in the Philippines provides to voters the latest news, photos, videos and infographics on the candidates and their platforms, as well as real-time election results come May 9, 2016. Visit our special Elections 2016 site here: http://www.inquirer.net/elections2016.

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

UNA backs Pacquiao amid controversies By Rosette Adel (philstar.com) | Updated February 20, 2016 - 6:00pm 1 20 googleplus0 0


Vice-president and now opposition presidential candidate Jejomar Binay, sixth from left, raises the hands of senatorial candidate Filipino boxer and Congressman Manny Pacquiao, right, at the start of the official campaign period for the May 9, 2016 presidential elections in Mandaluyong City Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. AP/Bullit Marquez

MANILA, Philippines – The oppositional party, United Nationalist Alliance (UNA), maintained its support for senatorial candidate and Sarangani Rep. Emmanuel “Manny” Pacquiao amid the controversies he is currently facing.

UNA President and Navotas Rep. Tobias “Toby” Tiangco said the world boxing champion Pacquiao all the more needs the party’s support

“Hindi porket may mali ho siyang nasabi e iiwanan naming siya. Hindi ba ho dapat lalo naming siyang samahan para mapaliwanagan tungkol dun sa isyu?” Tiangco said.

Tiangco was reacting to the public’s appeal to UNA to have Pacquiao removed from their senatorial slate after he drew flak for comparing homosexuals to animals while describing his views on same-sex marriage.

READ: Media hit after Pacquiao’s complete same-sex marriage comment turns viral | Pacquiao apologizes for comments against LGBT community

The solon also responded to the calls to postpone the April 9 boxing match of Pacquiao against American boxer Timothy Bradly to be held in Las Vegas as it is unfair to the other candidates.

Tiangco said that while he is not aware of the contents of Pacquiao’s contract, those who call for the cancelation of his match, including the Commission on Elections, should address their sentiments to the bout promoter, Bob Arum.

READ MORE...

“Alam ninyo ho, hindi ko alam yung nilalaman ng kontrata niya, but I will assume he has a contract to fight. May kontrata siya para lumaban under his contract agreement with Bob Arum. This is my assumption, so ang kontrata niya ay lumaban. Ang magpapalabas naman ay hindi siya,” Tiangco said in an interview with DZMM.

“Kung sino ho ang may hawak ng promotion, sila ho ang magpapalabas niyan o hindi. So sa tingin ko, kung may issue ho ang Comelec tungkol sa bagay na yan, they must address it to the promoter,” he added.

On Thursday, senatorial candidate and former Rep. Walden Bello asked Pacquiao to defer his fight until after elections citing an exposure advantage over other candidates as a possible ground for disqualification. The Comelec said it is already studying the match is a possible poll violation.

On Friday, election lawyer Romulo Macalintal said “there is no provision in election laws that would justify any complaint to disqualify Pacquiao just because of the April 9 boxing event.”


 

RELATED: Comelec: Pacquiao fight possibly a poll violation | Pacman fight won’t violate election rules, says lawyer

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

US Supreme Court extends same-sex marriage nationwide SHARES: 612 VIEW COMMENTS
@inquirerdotnet Associated Press 10:08 PM June 26th, 2015 Open publication - Free publishing

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court declared Friday that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States.

Gay and lesbian couples already can marry in 36 states and the District of Columbia. The court’s 5-4 ruling means the remaining 14 states, in the South and Midwest, will have to stop enforcing their bans on same-sex marriage.

The outcome is the culmination of two decades of Supreme Court litigation over marriage, and gay rights generally.

“No union is more profound than marriage,” wrote Justice Anthony Kennedy, joined by the court’s four more liberal justices.

The ruling will not take effect immediately because the court gives the losing side roughly three weeks to ask for reconsideration. But some state officials and county clerks might decide there is little risk in issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

The cases before the court involved laws from several states that define marriage as the union of a man and a woman. Those states have not allowed same-sex couples to marry within their borders and they also have refused to recognize valid marriages from elsewhere.

Just two years ago, the Supreme Court struck down part of the federal anti-gay marriage law that denied a range of government benefits to legally married same-sex couples.

The decision in United States v. Windsor did not address the validity of state marriage bans, but courts across the country, with few exceptions, said its logic compelled them to invalidate state laws that prohibited gay and lesbian couples from marrying.

The number of states allowing same-sex marriage has grown rapidly. As recently as October, just over one-third of the states permitted same-sex marriage.

There are an estimated 390,000 married same-sex couples in the United States, according to Williams Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles, which tracks the demographics of gay and lesbian Americans. Another 70,000 couples living in states that do not currently permit them to wed would get married in the next three years, the institute says. Roughly 1 million same-sex couples, married and unmarried, live together in the United States, the institute says.

The Obama administration backed the right of same-sex couples to marry. The Justice Department’s decision to stop defending the federal anti-marriage law in 2011 was an important moment for gay rights and President Barack Obama declared his support for same-sex marriage in 2012.

RELATED STORIES

Q&A: What US Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling means

Celebrities react to Supreme Court gay marriage ruling


PHILSTAR

Facebook group slammed Media after Pacquiao’s complete same-sex marriage comment turns viral By Rosette Adel (philstar.com) | Updated February 20, 2016 - 12:30pm 29 2229 googleplus1 1


Screen grab from YouTube shows boxing icon and senatorial candidate Manny Pacquiao explaining his stand on same-sex marriage during an interview for Bilang Pilipino, the election coverage of TV5 and The STAR.

 MANILA, Philippines – The media was slammed after an uncut version of senatorial candidate Sarangani Rep. Emmanuel “Manny” Pacquiao’s interview on same-sex marriage surfaced over the social media and went viral.

Facebook page "Kupal Lord" uploaded the uncut version of the interview and slammed the media for posting an off-cut video.

"Eto ang tunay na clip! (Expletive) din ang media eh!!! Panoorin nyu bago nyu ibash si Manny Pacquiao," the caption for the video post said.

READ: Pacquiao apologizes for comments against LGBT community

The video also sparked debate among netizens, saying Pacquiao’s statement as taken out of context.

"Sino ba tong media na nag edit ng interview? Ang linaw ng sinabi ni Manny. Mas masahol pa ang hayop sa tao. Hindi nya sinabi mas masahol pa ang hayop kaysa sa bakla or tomboy or lesbiana. Manny actually made a generalization as an example. Parang sinabi nya ang tao ay makasalanan. Which is true. Salute to Manny for his brave comments and i stand by him," Facebook user Darwin Orendain commented.

"Obviously Manny was taken out of context," Facebook user Gerry Barganza said.

The video circulated after Pacquiao drew flak on social media and was hit for commenting that people in same-sex relations are "worse than animals” when asked for his views about same-sex marriage in the interview by TV5 group for its Bilang Pilipino election coverage.

He has since apologized for his comment but maintained he still stands by his belief.

The original 26 second video, which also went viral on Tuesday, only mentioned his comparison between animals and humans.

READ MORE...

“Common sense lang. Makakakita ka ba ng any animals na lalaki sa lalaki o babae sa babae? Mas mabuti pa yung hayop. Marunong kumilala kung lalaki, lalaki, o babae, babae. O diba? Ngayon kung lalaki sa lalaki o babae sa babae, eh mas masahol pa sa hayop ang tao,” Pacquiao said.

FROM YOU TUBE:

MANNY PACQUIAO AGAINST SAME SEX MARRIAGE BUT DENIES SAYING GAYS MUST BE PUT TO DEATH PINASWATCHER6 PINASWATCHER6 Subscribe3,186 Add to Share More 90,251 155 51 Published on May 16, 2012 MANNY PACQUIAO, GAY MARRIAGE AND SLOPPY JOURNALISM Eviscerating a boxer over a non-existent quote By Patrick Winn May 16, 2012 07:31

According to a slew of established American media outlets -- including USA Today, L.A. Weekly and Daily Kos-- boxing megastar and Philippine congressman Manny Pacquiao believes gay people should be executed.

How do they know?

Because that's what Pacquiao said in this interview, titled "Pacquiao Rejects Obama's New Twist on the Scriptures", which is cited as appearing in the National Conservative Examiner. The L.A. Weekly has squeezed the most from this interview with giddy reports on Pacquiao's subsequent ban from an L.A. mall and a post titled "Ten Gays Who Could Beat The Crap Out Of Manny Pacquiao."

But there are several reasons why journalists should reconsider echoing that this Nike-endorsed athlete wants all gays dead.

Here's the best one: the "National Conservative Examiner" doesn't exist.

The interview was posted to Examiner.com, a repository for "self-motivated, independent contributors" to post musings on cat care, cookie recipes, politics and other fare.

The "freelance writer" who scored the interview with Pacquiao, among the world's top celebrities, is listed as Granville Ambong, an "accredited deadline/lead writer for Maharlikan Times and the famous Philboxing.com." The latter is up and running. The former, like the "National Conservative Examiner," does not appear to exist.

It gets worse.

Pacquiao's explicit death-to-gays quote is bogus.

According to USA Today, Pacquiao recites a Leviticus passage declaring that gays "must be put to death." But even the post's author claims Pacquiao never personally recited this quote in a follow-up column. Yes, it's quoted in the article. But Ambong was quoting the Bible, not Pacquiao.

Pacquiao, like many Filipinos, claims devoutly Catholic beliefs. His conservative politics appear to fall somewhere to the right of Rick Santorum's; he proclaimed last year that condoms are sinful.

Given that Pacquiao is an elected Philippine official, as well as a lieutenant colonel in the US-allied Philippine Army, his convictions merit more scrutiny than most wayward statements spilling out of athletes' mouths.

Also deserving of scrutiny? Overeager journalists and online echo chambers.

The first campaign to strip Pacquiao of his sponsorships is already up and running.

Only a handful of media outlets have come to his defense, including Salon, which noted the mob-like mentality about what Pacquiao didn't say has reached epic proportions. The site said, "Before you could say gross perversion of the facts, Change.org was running a petition asking Nike to drop 'homophobic boxer Manny Pacquiao,' declaring, 'In an interview published Tuesday, March 15th with the conservative Examiner newspaper, the world-famous boxer and Los Angeles resident quoted Leviticus...' And except for the fact that Pacquiao didn't quote Leviticus, Examiner.com is not a conservative newspaper, and the interview didn't run on Tuesday, sure."

In a statement Pacquiao attempted to defend his reputation. He said, "I didn't say that, that's a lie... I didn't know that quote from Leviticus because I haven't read the Book of Leviticus yet. I'm not against gay people... I have a relative who is also gay. We can't help it if they were born that way. What I'm critical off are actions that violate the word of God. I only gave out my opinion that same sex marriage is against the law of God."

Following the incorrect news of Pacquiao's views, Twitter lit up with responses, even calling for Nike to pull their endorsement of Pacquiao. http://www.globalpost.com/globalpost -...

PHILSTAR NEWS REPORT CONTINUES...
The one minute and one second uncut video version posted by Facebook page "Kupal Lord," on the other hand, began with Pacquiao saying that, as a Christian, he believes same-sex marriage is a sin when asked by the interviewer if he is for or anti same-sex marriage.

Pacquiao added that he is not condemning the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community but only the act of same-sex marriage, reiterating that it is a sin against God.

READ: Manny Pacquiao on same sex marriage comment: I'm telling the truth

“As Christian, bawal naman yung same-sex marriage. Ginawa ang babae para sa lalaki, ginawa ang lalaki para sa babae. Kasi para sakin ito lang, common sense lang, makakita ka ba ng any animals na lalaki sa lalaki o babae sa babae? Mas mabuti pa yung hayop, marunong kumikilala kung lalaki o lalaki, [kung] babae, babae. Oh diba? Ngayon kung lalaki sa lalaki o babae sa babae eh mas masahol pa sa hayop ang tao. Ang hayop lang, hindi talaga puwedeng magsama ang lalake sa lalake,” Pacquiao said.

"Pero I'm not condemning, I'm not condemning them -- yung [same-sex] marriage lang. Yung committing sin against God,” he added.

The video on the "Kupal Lord" page has amassed over four million views.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/KupalLordz/videos/1570212729965756/

-----------------------------------

RELATED FROM WIKIPEDIA

LGBT rights in the Philippines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia See also: LGBT in the Philippines


Major Philippines city bans discrimination against LGBT individuals FROM GAYASIANEWS.COM

History
Precolonial Period

The babaylan, also called katalonan, bayoguin, bayok, agi-ngin, asog, bido and binabae depending on the ethnic group of the region, held important positions in the community.

They were the spiritual leaders of Filipino communities tasked with responsibilities pertaining to rituals, agriculture, science, medicine, literature, and other forms of knowledge that the community needed. In the absence of a datu, the babaylan could take charge of the whole community.

The role of the babaylan was mostly associated with females, but male babaylans also existed. Early historical accounts record the existence of male babaylans that wore female clothes and took the demeanor of a woman.

Anatomy was not the only basis for gender. Being male or female was based primarily on occupation, appearance, actions, and sexuality. A male babaylan could partake in romantic and sexual relations with other men without being judged by society.

Precolonial society accepted gender-crossing and transvestism as part of their culture. Rituals and trances performed by the babaylan mirrored the reunification of the opposites, the male and female.They believed that by doing this they would be able to exhibit spiritual potency, which would be used for healing spiritual brokenness. Outside this task, male babaylans sometimes indulged in homosexual relations.

Spanish-Colonial Period

The Spanish conquistadors introduced a predominantly patriarchal culture to precolonial Philippines. Males were expected to demonstrate masculinity in their society, alluding to the Spanish machismo or a strong sense of being a man.

Confession manuals made by the Spanish friars during this period suspected that the natives were guilty of sodomy and homosexual acts. During the 17th-18th century, Spanish administrators burned sodomites to enforce the decree made by Pedro Hurtado Desquibel, President of the Audiencia.

Datus were appointed as the district officers of the Spaniards while the babaylans were reduced to relieving the worries of the natives. The removal of the datu system of localized governance affected babaylanship.[6] The babaylans eventually disappeared with the colonization of the Spaniards. Issues about sexual orientation and gender identity were not widely discussed after the Spanish colonization.

American Colonial Period

Four decades of American occupation saw the promulgation and regulation of sexuality through a modernized mass media and a standardized academic learning. Furthered by the growing influence of Western biomedicine, it conceived a specific sexological consciousness in which the "homosexual" was perceived and discriminated as a pathological or sick identity.

Filipino homosexuals eventually identified to this oppressive identity and began engaging in projects of inversion, as the disparity of homo and hetero entrenched and became increasingly salient in the people's psychosexual logic.

Though American colonialism brought the Western notion of "gay" and all its discontents, it also simultaneously refunctioned to serve liberationist ends. While it stigmatized the local homosexual identity, the same colonialism made available a discussion and thus a discursive position which enabled the homosexualized bakla to speak.

It was during the neocolonial period in the 1960s that a conceptual history of Philippine gay culture began to take form, wherein a "‘subcultural lingo’ of urban gay men that uses elements from Tagalog, English, Spanish and Japanese, as well as celebrities’ names and trademark brands" developed, often referred as swardspeak, gayspeak or baklese.

Gay literature that were Philippine-centric also began to emerge during this period. Further developments in gay literature and academic learning saw the first demonstrations by LGBT political activists, particularly LGBT-specific pride marches.

Martial Law

During the implementation of the Martial Law, citizens were silenced by the government through the military. People, including the LGBT community, did not have a voice during this period, and many were harassed and tortured. At the behest of Imelda Marcos, an anti-gay book was published that clarified the agonistic situation of gay culture at the same time that all other progressive movements in the country was being militaristically silenced.

There were some homosexuals that were exiled by Marcos in America where they joined movements advocating the rights of the LGBT people. The community responded to this through the use of several mediums, such as the 1980s film, Manila by Night, which introduces an LGBT character in its plotline. When the regime ended, those exiled returned to the Philippines, introducing new ideas of gay and lesbian conceptions.

1970s-1980s

During the 1970s and 1980s, Filipino concepts of gay were greatly influenced by Western notions.

According to Being LGBT in Asia: The Philippines Country Report, LGBT people who are exposed to the Western notion of being "gay" starting to have relationships with other LGBT, instead of with heterosexual-identifying people.

Towards the end of the 1980s, an increase in awareness of LGBT Filipinos occurred. In the year 1984, a number of gay plays were produced and staged. The plays that were released during the said time tackled the process of "coming out" by gay people.

1990s

Based on the report made by USAID, in partnership with UNDP entitled "Being LGBT in Asia: The Philippines Country Report", the LGBT community during the early 90s, made books that help Filipinos become aware of the prevalence of LGBT communities like Ladlad, an anthology of Philippine gay writing edited by Danton Remoto and J. Neil Garcia and Margarita Go-Singco Holmes’s A Different Love: Being Gay in the Philippines in 1994 and 1993, respectively.

This decade also marks the first demonstration of attendance by an organized sector of the country’s LGBT community in the participation of a lesbian group called Lesbian Collective, as they join the International Women’s Day march of 1992.

Another demonstration of attendance was made by ProGay Philippines, led by Oscar Atadero, when they organized a Pride march on 26 June 1994, that marked the first Pride-related parade hosted by a country in Asia and the Pacific. And throughout the decade, various LGBT groups were formed such as Metropolitan Community Church (MCC) in and University of the Philippines (UP) Babaylan in 1992 and ProGay Philippines in 1993, and according to the report, the 1990s are the "probable maker of the emergence of the LGBT movement in the Philippines".

In 1998, the Akbayan Citizens’ Action Party became the first political party to consult the LGBT community and helped in the creation of the first LGBT lobby group, Lesbian and Gay Legislative Advocacy Network, otherwise known as LAGABLAB, in 1999.

LAGABLAB was the group who proposed revisions in the Lesbian and Gay Rights of 1999 and the filing of the Anti-Discriminations Bill (ADB) of 2000.

Contemporary (2000s-Present)

The LGBT movement has been very active in the new millennium. In the advent of the 2000s, more LGBT organizations were formed to serve specific needs, including sexual health (particularly HIV), psychosocial support, representation in sports events, religious and spiritual needs, and political representation. For example, the political party Ang Ladlad was founded by Danton Remoto, a renowned LGBT advocate, last 2003.

The community has also shown their advocacies through the 21st LGBT Pride March held in Luneta Park last June 27, 2015, with the theme, "Fight For Love: Iba-Iba. Sama-Sama".

This movement aims to remind the nation that the fight for LGBT rights is a fight for human rights. Advocates are calling on the Philippines to recognize the voices of people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.[24] In present time, there remains no umbrella LGBT organization in the Philippines.

Therefore, organizations tend to work independently of each other.[5] Due to these divisions, there remains no prioritization of efforts, with organizations focusing on what they consider as important for them.

Laws Affecting the LGBT Community

Non-commercial, homosexual relations between consenting adults in private are not a crime, although sexual conduct or affection that occurs in public may be subject to the "grave scandal" prohibition in Article 200 of the Revised Penal Code which states that:

"ARTICLE 200. Grave Scandal. — The penalties of arresto mayor and public censure shall be imposed upon any person who shall offend against decency or good customs by any highly scandalous conduct not expressly falling within any other article of this Code."

While on the Family Code of the Philippines, stated on Article 1, Article 2, and Article 147 respectively:
"Marriage is a special contract of permanent union between a man and a woman entered into in accordance with law for the establishment of conjugal and family life. It is the foundation of the family and an inviolable social institution whose nature, consequences, and incidents are governed by law and not subject to stipulation, except that marriage settlements may fix the property relations during the marriage within the limits provided by this Code."

"No marriage shall be valid, unless these essential requisites are present:
(1) Legal Capacity of contracting parties who must be a male and a female; and
(2) Consent freely given in the presence of the solemnizing officer."

The Magna Carta for Public Social Workers also address the concern regarding the discrimination of public social workers because of their sexual orientation:

"Section 17. Rights of a Public Social Worker. - Public social workers shall have the following rights:
1.) Protection from discrimination by reason of sex, sexual orientation, age, political or religious beliefs, civil status, physical characteristics/disability, or ethnicity;

2.) Protection from any form of interference, intimidation, harassment, or punishment, to include, but not limited to, arbitrary reassignment or termination of service, in the performance of his/her duties and responsibilities";

The Magna Carta for Women also provides an insight regarding the state's duties towards maintaining the rights of women, regardless of their sexual orientations:

"The State affirms women's rights as human rights and shall intensify its efforts to fulfill its duties under international and domestic law to recognize, respect, protect, fulfill, and promote all human rights and fundamental freedoms of women, especially marginalized women, in the economic, social, political, cultural, and other fields without distinction or discrimination on account of class, age, sex, gender, language, ethnicity, religion, ideology, disability, education, and status."


Rep. Arlene “Kaka” Bag-ao, a 2013 newsphoto from Global Balita online

The only bill directly concerning the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community in the Philippines is the Anti-Discrimination Act.

This bill seeks that all persons regardless of sex or sexual orientation must be treated the same as everyone else, wherein conditions do not differ in the privileges granted and the liabilities enforced.

The bill was introduced by Hon. Kaka J. Bag-ao the District Representative of Dinagat Islands on July 1, 2013 and is yet to be passed.

Religion

Several religious beliefs exists within the country, some of them including Roman Catholicism, the Iglesia ni Cristo, and Islam, among many others. These different faiths have their own views and opinions towards the topic of homosexuality.
Roman Catholicism

The Philippines is a predominantly Catholic country with approximately 82.9 percent of the population claiming to be Roman Catholics. The Roman Catholic Church has been one of the most active religious organizations in the country in opposition to the LGBT community. The Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines firmly states that marriage should only exist between a man and a woman. Also, they have called on individuals and politicians to actively oppose same-sex marriage.

They said that individuals should refuse to take part in ceremonies celebrating same-sex relationships and politicians should resist legalizing marriages of homosexual couples.They also stated that "A homosexual union is not and can never be a marriage as properly understood and so-called." However, they also said that "being a homosexual is not a sin. It is a state of a person." The Catholic Church welcomes members of the LGBT community, yet, as stated, gay people should be "welcomed with respect and sensitivity."

Iglesia ni Cristo

The Iglesia ni Cristo adheres to the teachings of the Bible and they denounce those who practice homosexual acts, as they are seen as immoral and wicked. These acts include having sexual affairs and relations with partners of the same sex, cross-dressing, and same-sex marriage. Also, in the Iglesia ni Cristo, men are not allowed to have long hair, for it is seen as a symbol of femininity and should be exclusive to women only.

Due to the fact that the INC's faith is founded upon the Bible, when a member of the INC is found out to be LGBT, he/she will be asked to leave the congregation as being a homosexual is not in line with their beliefs.

Islam

Muslim communities, like all other religious groups, face the challenge of confronting diversity. However, for many Muslims, dealing with homosexuality or transgender issues is a matter of sin and heresy, not difference and diversity. The Islamic community in the Philippines views homosexuality in a negative manner. It is considered to be a great sin to have a relationship with someone of the same sex. Muslims see homosexuals as persons who suffer from a moral disorder.

 For the Islam community, homosexuality is a sin and should be severely punished for it is not in Allah’s plan.

As cited in the Qur’an:
"O people, we created you all from a male and female
And made you into different communities and different tribes
So that you should come to know one another
Acknowledging that the most noble among you Is the one most aware of God"

Media

Recognized as an important venue for the promotion of issues related to the LGBT by participants in a national dialogue facilitated by the UNDP, the participants also acknowledged the negative impact of religion with regard to the treatment of such issues, whereat it provides a blanket context that society views homosexuality as negative.

In May 2004, producers of several television programs received a memorandum from the chair of the Movie and Television Review and Classification Board (MTRCB), which warned against positive depictions of lesbian relationships; it was stated in the memo that "lesbian and homosexual relationships are an abnormality/aberration on prime-time TV programs gives the impression that the network is encouraging homosexual relationships."


MIMI has no problem being declared Best Actor at the Cinemalaya Awards. ARNOLD ALMACEN,  INQUIRER FILE

The lack of sexual orientation and gender identity awareness is emphasized in other circumstances; transphobia is ubiquitous with media practitioners who do not address transgender people in accordance with how they self-identify.

At the 2013 Cinemalaya indie awards, transgender actress Mimi Juareza won under the Best Actor category, and in reports, she was referred to repeatedly using the male pronoun.


Slain transgender Jennifer Laude and boyfriend

In 2014, the death of Jennifer Laude and the investigation into it was highly publicized, with practitioners referring to her as Jeffrey "Jennifer" Laude.

Participants in the UNDP-facilitated national dialogue stated that content emphasized a general lack of understanding for sexual orientation and gender identity, such that LGBT stereotypes dominate; there are many gay men hosting programs at radio stations and television networks, but they are limited to covering entertainment shows.

There is an apparent lack of representation for lesbians and transgender people. Given their platform, some media personalities have publicly shared their anti-LGBT sentiments; in 2009 newspaper columnist Ramon Tulfo wrote that LGBT people "should not also go around town proclaiming their preferences as if it was a badge of honor."

Beyond mainstream media, which already has a niche for the sector, the Internet has provided LGBT people ways to tell their stories outside the realm of film, television, print, and radio. There are blogs kept, opportunities to connect with others, publications with LGBT sections, and a web-based magazine, Outrage, catering to the community.

Views Towards the LGBT Community

Ryan Thoreson in his article "Capably Queer: Exploring the Intersections of Queerness and Poverty in the Urban Philippines" did a research on the Queer community in the Philippines and how it copes with living here in the country. He interviewed a total of 80 queer informants in order to gather the data.

Based on his survey about employment, and from what he gathered, he claimed that under a half of the respondents were employed and weekly income mean was only 1514.28 PhP per week.

The survey also stated that "less than one-third have stable income, and very few enjoyed any kind of benefits" and 75% of its respondents said that they would like to do more wage-earning work.

As for its empowerment section, the survey stated that when the respondents were asked to tell their primary contribution to the household, 45% of them named household chores as their primary contribution, 30% stated giving money or paying the bills, 17.5% provided labor and money, and 7.5% said that they were not expected to contribute anything.

As for their privacy, 75% of the respondents said that they had enough privacy and personal space.

In terms of safety and security, Thoreson’s journal also provides statistical data in terms of the queer community’s involvement in crimes as victims. According to the survey he made, 55% of his respondents were harassed on the street, 31.2% were robbed, 25% had been physically assaulted, 6.25% had been sexually assaulted, 5% had survived a murder attempt, and 5% had been blackmailed by the police.

Economy

The LGBT community, although a minority in the economic sphere, still plays an integral role in the growth and maintenance of the economy. LGBT individuals face challenges in employment both on an individual level and as members of a community that is subject to discrimination and abuse. This can be compounded by the weak social status and position of the individuals involved.

A USAID study conducted in 2014, entitled "The Relationship between LGBT Inclusion and Economic Development: An Analysis of Emerging Economies", has shown that countries which have adopted anti-LGBT economic laws have lower GDPs compared to those who do not discriminate employers/employees based on their sexual orientation. The link between discrimination and the economy is direct, since the discrimination experienced by members of the LGBT community turn them into disadvantaged workers, which can be bad for business. Disadvantaged workers usually practice absenteeism, low productivity, inadequate training and high turnover, which make for higher labor costs and lower profits. According to the USAID study, LGBT people in their sample countries are limited in their freedoms in ways that also create economic harms.

On the other hand, studies have shown that the integration of the LGBT into the economic system yields a higher income for the country. In a recent USAID study, it is said that a wide range of scholarly theories from economics, political science, sociology, psychology, public health, and other social sciences support the idea that full rights and inclusion of LGBT people are associated with higher levels of economic development and well-being for the country. Also, the acceptance of LGBT people within the office environment can lead to higher income for the company since the people do not feel as disadvantaged and as discriminated as before.

Another thing is that a better environment for LGBT individuals can be an attractive bargaining chip for countries seeking multinational investments and even tourists, since a conservative climate that keeps LGBT people in the closet and policymakers from recognizing the human rights of LGBT people will hold their economy back from its full potential.

Naturally, passing a non-discrimination law will not immediately lead to a sudden boost in the country's economy, although less discrimination should eventually lead to more output.

Military

Sexual orientation or religion does not exempt citizens from Citizen Army Training (CAT), although some reports do suggest that people who are openly gay in this high school curriculum are harassed.

On 3 March 2009, the Philippines announced that it was lifting its ban on allowing openly gay and bisexual men and women from enlisting and serving in the Philippine Armed Services.

Politics

Marginalized sectors in society recognised in the national electoral law include categories such as elderly, peasants, labour, youth etc. Under the Philippine constitution some 20% of seats in the House of Representatives are reserved. In 1995 and 1997, unsuccessful efforts were made to reform the law so as to include LGBT people. A proponent of this reform was Senate President Pro Tempore Blas Ople who said (in 1997), "In view of the obvious dislike of the ... administration for gay people, it is obvious that the president will not lift a finger to help them gain a sectoral seat."

The Communist Party of the Philippines integrated LGBT rights into its party platform in 1992, becoming the first Philippine political party to do so.

The Akbayan Citizens' Action Party was another early party (although a minor one) to advocate for LGBT rights in 1998.

Philippine political parties are typically very cautious about supporting gay rights, as most fall along the social conservative political spectrum. A major political opponent of LGBT rights legislation has been Congressman Bienvenido Abante (6th district, Manila) of the ruling conservative Lakas-CMD party.


PRESIDENT ARROYO

The administration of former president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo was recently called "not just gender insensitive, but gender-dead" by Akbayan Party representative Risa Hontiveros. Rep. Hontiveros also said that the absence of any policy protecting the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender betrays the government’s homophobia: "this homophobic government treats LGBTs as second-class citizens,."

On June 17, 2011, the Philippines abstained from signing the United Nations declaration on sexual orientation and gender identity, which condemns violence, harassment, discrimination, exclusion, stigmatization, and prejudice based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

However, on September 26, 2014, the country gave a landmark yes vote on a follow-up resolution by the UN Human Rights Council to fight violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity(SOGI).

The Ang Ladlad is a new progressive political party, with a primary agenda of combating discrimination and harassment on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

On 11 November 2009, the Philippine Commission on Elections (COMELEC) denied the Filipino LGBT political party Ang Ladlad's petition to be allowed to run in the May 2010 elections, on the grounds of "immorality".

In the 2007 elections, Ang Ladlad was previously disqualified for failing to prove they had nationwide membership.

On 8 April 2010, the Supreme Court of the Philippines reversed the ruling of COMELEC and allowed Ang Ladlad to join the May 2010 elections.

Marriage and family

The Philippines does not offer any legal recognition to same-sex marriage, civil unions or domestic partnership benefits.

Since 2006, three anti-same sex marriage bills have been introduced and are pending before the Senate and Congress. In early 2011, Rep. Rene Relampagos of Bohol filed a bill to amend Article 26 of the Philippine Family Code, to prohibit "forbidden marriages." Specifically, this seeks to bar the Philippine state from recognizing same-sex marriages contracted overseas. The bill is in committee.

In December 2014 Herminio Coloma Jr, a spokesperson for the Presidential Palace, commented on same-sex marriage, saying; "We must respect the rights of individuals to enter into such partnerships as part of their human rights, but we just need to wait for the proposals in Congress"

Right after Ireland legalized same-sex marriage through a popular vote in May 2015, the Philippines has the possibility to legalize this law by a petition. [60] The Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines, however, is opposed to the idea despite stating that it supports 'equality for all'. To the extent of even stating that 'same-sex marriage' and 'falling for the same sex is wrong'.

Community

In LGBT community did not begin to organize on behalf of its human rights until the 1990s.

Poverty and the political situation in the Philippines, especially the dictatorship, may have made it difficult for the LGBT community to organize. One of the first openly gay people of significance was the filmmaker Lino Brocka.

The first gay lesbian bisexual and transgender pride parade in Asia and also the Philippines was led by ProGay Philippines on 26 June 1994 at the Quezon Memorial Circle.

It was organized just a few years after students organized the UP Babaylan group.

The pride event was attended by hundreds, and the march coincided with march against the government's VAT or the value added tax.

Since the 1990s LGBT people have become more organized and visible, both politically and socially. There are large annual LGBT pride festivals, and several LGBT organizations which focus on the concerns of University students, women and transgender people.

There is a vibrant gay scene in the Philippines with several bars, clubs and saunas in Manila as well as various gay rights organizations.

UP Babaylan founded in 1992, remains the oldest and largest LGBT student organization in the Philippines

Progay-Philippines, founded in 1993, which led the first Gay March in Asia in 1994

LAGABLAB, the Lesbian and Gay Legislative Advocacy Network established in 1999

STRAP (Society of Transsexual WOMEN of the Philippines), a Manila-based support group for trans women established in 2002.


CHRISTIAN TODAY ONLINE

Manny Pacquiao in new 'death' to gays controversy ruth-gledhill Ruth Gledhill CHRISTIAN TODAY CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 19 February 2016 Email Print Text Size Larger Smaller More Sharing Services Share


Reuters FILE  Manny Paquiao

Christian boxer Manny Pacquiao has posted then deleted a Bible verse on his Instagram account saying men who have sex with other men should be "put to death".

The latest controversy comes after his sponsor Nike dropped him for "abhorrent" comments on people in same-sex marriage being "worse" than animals.

ABS CBN reported that in his latest social media outing on the subject, Pacquiao quoted Leviticus 20:13: "Do not have sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman; that is detestable... If a man has sexual relations with a man as one does with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They are to be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads."

More than 18,000 users on Instagram "liked" the post in the two hours it was online before it was deleted.

Manny Pacquiao's wife says the Lord is not pleased when couples break the covenant of marriage

The post repeated Bible quotes on putting homosexuals to death the boxer had cited as long ago as 2012.

At the time, Pacquiao said: "Hindi ako nagsabi niyan, kasinungalingan iyan. Hindi ko alam iyang verse ng Leviticus kasi hindi pa ako nakabasa ng Leviticus."

This translates as him claiming he never said it: "I do not know this verse of Leviticus because I never read Leviticus."

In the latest post, the boxer also quoted from St Luke's gospel:
"Blessed are you when people hate you, when they exclude you and insult you and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man. Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their ancestors treated the prophets."

In an interview on DZMM Teleradyo, he also said he is in favor of the death penalty which he described as "biblical".

Pacquiao, who is running for Senate, has apologised for his comment about same-sex marriage and animals.


THE ASIAN NIKKEI ONLINE

Manny Pacquiao controversy Anti-gay remarks seen rattling advertisers more than votersFebruary 19, 2016 10:30 am JST  CLIFF VENZON, Nikkei staff writer


Boxer Manny Pacquiao, who is running for senator in the Philippines, speaks to supporters in the city of Mandaluyong on Feb. 9. © Reuters

MANILA -- All it took was one television interview for boxer Manny Pacquiao, widely considered a national hero in the Philippines, to become a source of division.

In expressing his opposition to same-sex relationships, Pacquiao, who claims to have renewed his Christian faith, said gay people are "worse than animals."

His remarks ricocheted worldwide, eliciting condemnation on social media. The boxer-turned-politician apologized on Tuesday, the day after the interview aired. Nike called Pacquiao's comments "abhorrent" and terminated its endorsement contract with him.

The controversy erupted as the 37-year-old, who has won championships in eight different divisions, prepares for the last fight of his illustrious career. He is to face American Timothy Bradley on April 9. Pacquiao has said he wants to focus on his political ambitions.

Pacquiao, an incumbent congressman, is running for senator as a member of the opposition United Nationalist Alliance.

Uncertain odds

So far, his political stature hardly matches his position in boxing's pantheon. In the latest Social Weather Stations survey, he ranked eighth to ninth among the 12 favored senatorial candidates -- a precarious spot that does not guarantee victory, according to political analyst Edmund Tayao.

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Tayao said his standing would surely slip if another survey were conducted now but added that a lot can happen before the May 9 elections. "Voters will eventually take into consideration that Manny is a national figure and he could regain the numbers, especially if he wins his fight with Bradley -- actually, even if he loses," Tayao said.

Pacquiao fights have a way of whipping up nationalistic fervor. Last May, he returned home to a hero's welcome despite failing in his attempt to deal U.S. fighter Floyd Mayweather Jr. his first loss.

Tales of Pacquiao's humble beginnings on the island of Mindanao are recounted time and again. The Philippine military, which is battling an insurgency, says there are "unofficial cease-fires" during his bouts. After all, the insurgents want to watch his fights, too.

Dennis Principe, a boxing analyst, said negative sentiment toward Pacquiao is expected to fade once public attention turns to other issues. There is also some support for Pacquiao's remarks. Some 80% of the Philippine population is Catholic. In an SWS survey in December 2013, more than 90% of Filipino adults said they were unlikely to engage in a same-sex relationship.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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