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PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

COMELEC: 7 CANDIDATES MIGHT MAKE IT TO CERTIFIED LIST TO BE FINALIZED ON WEDNESDAY


JANUARY 29 -(Top row L-R) Binay, Duterte, Mendoza, Poe, (bottom row L-R) Roxas, Santiago, Señeres
With barely six days left before it finalizes the voter’s lists, the Commission on Elections (Comelec) said yesterday that voters might see seven people racing for the presidency on May 9.
Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista noted that the seven might make it to the Certified List of Candidates to be finalized on Wednesday. “There will be seven. Most likely it will be the ‘magnificent seven’,” Bautista said in an interview. He identified them as: Vice President Jejomar Binay (United Nationalist Alliance); Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago (People’s Reform Party); Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte (Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan); Mel Mendoza (Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino); Sen. Grace Poe (Independent); Mar Roxas (Liberal Party), and Rep. Roy Señeres (Partido ng Manggagawa at Magsasaka Workers and Peasants Party). Earlier, he announced the six qualified candidates for the vice presidency as Senators Alan Peter Cayetano, Francis Escudero, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., and Antonio Trillanes, all independent; Sen. Gregorio Honasan of UNA and Camarines Sur Rep. Leni Robredo of LP. Comelec decided yesterday to uphold an earlier ruling of the First Division, which declared independent Dante Valencia as a nuisance candidate because of his failure to prove that he could mount a nationwide campaign. READ MORE...

ALSO: IN CEBU AT IEC - 5,000 street kids, disabled children receive 1st communion


JANUARY 30 -CEBU CITY—Some 5,000 children from across the Philippines received their first communion on Saturday afternoon as part of the 51st International Eucharistic Congress (IEC) here. Retired Archbishop Emeritus of Cebu Ricardo Cardinal Vidal administered the first communion to the children—some were street kids, deaf and mute. LIVESTREAM: Day 7 International Eucharistic Congress in Cebu
“I know the feeling because I was once like them,” Cardinal Vidal said in his homily. Cardinal Vidal took his first holy communion during the first IEC in Manila in 1937. In an ambush interview on Friday, Cardinal Vidal hopes that one of the first communicants could be a priest.
The prelate eventually became a priest and a cardinal. He was also a former president of the Catholics Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP). The mass was held at the Cebu City Sports Center attended by thousands of Catholic faithful.
IDL FULL REPORT, RELATED  -
International Eucharistic Congress started ‘people power’... and POPE PAUL VI, the first Pope who visited the Philippines...

ALSO: Drilon to Noy - No more time to approve BBL
[Isabela Rep. Rodolfo Albano III also said it was the Mamasapano carnage that doomed the BBL and not the President, who “really pushed hard for its approval.” “The process of considering and approving the proposed Bangsamoro law was smooth sailing until the Mamasapano incident,” he said, as he reminded critics that Congress was not to blame either. He stressed that the incident “made the political environment not conducive for passing the BBL bill.”]


JANUARY 31 -With hardly any time left before the adjournment of Congress on Friday, it’s definitely a no go for the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), Senate President Franklin Drilon yesterday reported having told President Aquino.
“I sent word to the President that this is going to be very difficult. This is a local bill that must originate from the House of Representatives. Now it appears that it won’t be approved in the House of Representatives because they are having difficulties with getting a quorum,” Drilon said over radio dwIZ. If there was any hope in Malacañang that the BBL could still be approved between now and June 30, Drilon said his counterpart Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. had all but extinguished it with his own pronouncements that the BBL is dead in the 16th Congress. Session resumes on May 23. At Malacañang, Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. has called on stakeholders to “keep the wheels of the peace process running” should the BBL fail to make it in Congress. Drilon emphasized that the Senate, even if it wants to, cannot act on the BBL until it is approved by the House and transmitted to the upper chamber. “The BBL cannot be transmitted to the Senate before we adjourn. So there is no more time,” he said. But he stressed the BBL would continue to be on the top of the agenda of the Senate in its last three session days next week. This has been the case in the past few months but it has not pushed legislators to deliberate on the matter during session. For weeks, Senate Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile has been interpellating the sponsor of the BBL, Senator Ferdinand Marcos Jr. in the plenary. He is not even half way through his interpellation and there are still other senators who wish to say their piece about the bill. Drilon said the reality is “the election campaign is already here” and so many of the candidates are already busy going around the country. READ MORE...

ALSO: Palace accepts BBL’s doom


FEBRUARY 1 -President Aquino has ordered that special efforts be exerted to ensure the implementation of a peace agreement with Muslim rebels even after his term ends this year. File photo/Ernie Peñaredondo
MANILA, Philippines – With Malacañang accepting that the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) is doomed in Congress, President Aquino has directed Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Teresita Deles to consult with concerned parties on sustaining the peace initiative beyond his term. Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr., in his regular weekend interview over state-run radio dzRB, yesterday said Deles was told to come up with an action plan for the next administration to consider. The directive was to “firm up in consultation with stakeholders an action plan for promoting the peace process in the transition period during the remainder of the current administration’s term and up to the assumption of the next administration.” President Aquino has ordered that special efforts be exerted to ensure the implementation of a peace agreement with Muslim rebels even after his term ends this year, Coloma said. Congressional leaders have said they are unlikely to pass the BBL before the President’s term ends in June. Aquino had hoped to sign the BBL to seal a peace accord with the largest Muslim rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). But opposition from some legislators had delayed its passage despite his lobbying. Senate President Franklin Drilon himself has conceded that there is no more time to pass the measure, considering that there will only be three session days left starting today, for Congress to approve the BBL. For her part, Deles said the peace panel headed by Miriam Coronel-Ferrer might still conduct consultations with the MILF, which they have dealt with for the past five years of the Aquino administration. “Measures will include strengthening existing peace bodies and mechanisms to include the Bangsamoro Transition Commission, ceasefire and other joint security mechanisms, joint bodies for socioeconomic interventions,” she said. READ MORE...

ALSO: PH 2nd-most dangerous country for journalists in past 25 years—IFJ


JANUARY 31 -The massacre in Maguindanao where over 30 journalists were also killed in 2009 is testament to the danger media men and women face in the Philippines. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO BRUSSELS — The Philippines is the second most dangerous country for journalists in the past 25 years with 146 killings, the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) said. In the last quarter century, Iraq has topped the list with 309 killings, the overwhelming majority of them since the 2003 US-led invasion and war. Mexico and its drugs-related violence is third with 120. Philippines and Mexico also underscore the IFJ’s “recurring finding of our reports that there are many more killed in peacetime situations than in war-stricken countries.” READ: PH among countries of special concern in campaign vs impunity Over the past 25 years, at least 2,297 journalists and media staff have been killed for doing nothing more than trying to inform the world on war, revolution, crime and corruption. And killers continue to act with impunity, the IFJ announced in a new report. The annual total stood at 40 in the federation’s first year of counting, 1990, but has not dipped under the 100-mark since 2010. “The last ten years were the most dangerous,” said IFJ General Secretary Anthony Bellanger in an interview, with 2006 the worst year of all with 155 killed. And despite vows of protection from as high as the United Nations, the IFJ said it produced the report “25 years of contribution towards safer journalism” to underscore a worsening climate of impunity which has helped killers get away with murder and turn journalists into soft targets. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Comelec sees 7-way race


(Top row L-R) Binay, Duterte, Mendoza, Poe, (bottom row L-R) Roxas, Santiago, Señeres

MANILA, FEBRUARY 1, 2016 (MANILA STANDARD) By Sheila Crisostomo January 29, 2016 - With barely six days left before it finalizes the voter’s lists, the Commission on Elections (Comelec) said yesterday that voters might see seven people racing for the presidency on May 9.

Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista noted that the seven might make it to the Certified List of Candidates to be finalized on Wednesday.

“There will be seven. Most likely it will be the ‘magnificent seven’,” Bautista said in an interview.

He identified them as: Vice President Jejomar Binay (United Nationalist Alliance); Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago (People’s Reform Party); Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte (Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan); Mel Mendoza (Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino); Sen. Grace Poe (Independent); Mar Roxas (Liberal Party), and Rep. Roy Señeres (Partido ng Manggagawa at Magsasaka Workers and Peasants Party).

Earlier, he announced the six qualified candidates for the vice presidency as Senators Alan Peter Cayetano, Francis Escudero, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., and Antonio Trillanes, all independent; Sen. Gregorio Honasan of UNA and Camarines Sur Rep. Leni Robredo of LP.

Comelec decided yesterday to uphold an earlier ruling of the First Division, which declared independent Dante Valencia as a nuisance candidate because of his failure to prove that he could mount a nationwide campaign.

READ MORE...

“The en banc had reached a final decision to declare him a nuisance candidate. But, he can still go to the Supreme Court to seek a temporary restraining order if he wants to question our decision,” Bautista said.

The poll chief admitted the commission also debated on whether or not to retain Mendoza on the list.

“Some of us believe that (having a) political party should not be used as sole ground but (we also have to look into) the candidate’s personal qualifications. But that is the en banc’s decision – that he is a nominee of a known political party,” Bautista explained.

Mendoza, 40, is a resident of Barangay Minuyan, San Jose del Monte in Bulacan and works as an assistant project officer.

Based on the Comelec timeline, it would have to finalize the lists of candidates by Feb. 3 because the printing of official ballots at the National Printing Office will start five days later.

Comelec also decided that candidates who have a pending disqualification case shall still be included in the ballots and their votes considered “stray” in the event they lose their cases.

Both Duterte and Poe have pending disqualification cases before the Comelec and the Supreme Court (SC).

All four disqualification cases against Duterte are yet to be resolved as the commission waits on its First Division to decide on a motion to inhibit Comelec Commissioner Rowena Guanzon from the proceedings.

Poe also waits on the SC to rule on the appeal she filed against the Comelec resolutions, which disqualified her from the presidential race.


INQUIRER

5,000 street kids, disabled children receive 1st communion at IEC By: Nestor Corrales
@NCorralesINQ INQUIRER.net 05:36 PM January 30th, 2016

CEBU CITY—Some 5,000 children from across the Philippines received their first communion on Saturday afternoon as part of the 51st International Eucharistic Congress (IEC) here.

Retired Archbishop Emeritus of Cebu Ricardo Cardinal Vidal administered the first communion to the children—some were street kids, deaf and mute.

LIVESTREAM: Day 7 International Eucharistic Congress in Cebu

“I know the feeling because I was once like them,” Cardinal Vidal said in his homily.

Cardinal Vidal took his first holy communion during the first IEC in Manila in 1937.

In an ambush interview on Friday, Cardinal Vidal hopes that one of the first communicants could be a priest.

The prelate eventually became a priest and a cardinal. He was also a former president of the Catholics Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP).

The mass was held at the Cebu City Sports Center attended by thousands of Catholic faithful.
IDL

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

International Eucharistic Congress started ‘people power’ By: Lito B. Zulueta
@inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 05:09 PM January 23rd, 2016


Archbishop Jose Palma carry Monstrance Blessed Sacrament as he celebrate mass at IEC Pavillon as to celebrate the Christ the King.(CDN PHOTO/LITO TECSON)

CEBU CITY – Philippine “people power” did not start with the millions who welcomed the papal visits of Saint John Paul II in 1981 and 1995 and of Pope Francis last year.

It started in 1937 when for the first time in history, the International Eucharistic Festival (IEC), the spiritual festival centered on the Holy Mass that started at the turn of the 20th century, was held in Asia—in solidly Catholic Philippines.


The 33rd International Eucharistic Congress was the Philippines’ first and held in Manila, Philippines, from 3 to 7 February 1937 during the pontificate of Pope Pius XI. It was the first congress to be held in Asia. CBCP FILE

When Manila hosted the 33rd IEC in 1937, some 1.5 million people from all over the world attended the festival. Six-hundred thousand took part in one religious procession while tens of thousands attended the pontifical Masses at Luneta.

Among Filipino children receiving their first Communion at that time was eight-year-old Ricardo Vidal, now cardinal-archbishop emeritus of Cebu.

Vidal, 84, was president of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) in 1986 when following the call of Cardinal Jaime Sin of Manila, the CBCP urged the dictator Ferdinand Marcos to step down and triggered the Edsa People Power revolution.

Also going to the Luneta with his parent to witness the festival was a child “provinciano” from Batangas, Gaudencio Rosales.
Now also a retired cardinal, Rosales, 83, succeeded Cardinal Sin as Manila archbishop in 2003.

Both prelates have encouraged Filipinos from all over the world to join the 51st IEC in Cebu and will co-celebrate pontifical Masses for pilgrims along with Archbishop Piero Marino, president of the Pontifical Commission on Eucharistic Congresses based in the Vatican.

‘Olympics for the Soul’

The 5st IEC, the “Olympics for the Soul” or spiritual festival held by the Catholic Church every year and later at fairly regular intervals since 1888, opens in Cebu Sunday, returning to the country almost 79 years after it was first held in Manila in 1937.

READ: IEC: A once-in-a-lifetime blessing


Pontifical Mass of 1937 Int’l Eucharistic congress. Commonwealth Photo by F. Sato. The 1937 congress was attended by approximately one and a half million people from all over the world, and included a religious procession of 600,000 people. Pontifical masses were held at the Rizal Park with hundreds of thousands of people attending. NEWSFEED FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN JAN. 24, 2016

Back then, the 33rd IEC was historic since it was the first time that it was being held in Asia, where the Christian majority only obtained in the Philippines.

But evincing the growth of Christianity in the “pagan” Far East, the IEC has since been held in Bombay in predominantly Hindu India in 1964 (38th IEC) , and in Seoul in predominantly Buddhist Korea in 1989 (44th).

Commonwealth to republic

Since then, too, much has happened to the Philippines as a nation. It was a Commonwealth under the United States of America; but now it is a full-fledged republic.

Back in 1937, the pope was Pius XI, who sat at Saint Peter’s chair from 1922 to 1939.

He was the first pope to sit as a sovereign of Vatican City when it was created a state by virtue of the Lateran treaty in 1929.


Crowds of faithful at Lingayen Cathedral during the episcopal consecration of Msgr. Cesar Guerrero on May 24, 1929. From a private collection.

The concordat ended the papacy’s tumultuous relations with the Italian state after Garibaldi’s unification of Italy in the late 19th century.

Today, Pope Francis continues to sit as a Vatican sovereign like Pius XI. But he has largely shed the very pronounced monarchical, imperial trappings of the papacy that ruled the Papal States before Italian unification.

Perhaps recognizing the status of the Philippines as a US Commonwealth, Pope Pius XI sent as his papal legate to the Manila IEC an American prelate, Cardinal Denis Dougherty, Irish-American archbishop of Philadelphia.

The archbishop of Manila himself was Irish, Michael O’Doherty.


Myanmar Cardinal Charles Maung Bo, Papal Legate to the 51st International Eucharistic Congress, is flanked by Cebu Archbishop Jose Palma and Papal nuncio Archbishop Giuseppe Pinto upon his arrival at 51st IEC in Cebu. But showing the movement of the Church from North to South, from West to East, Pope Francis is sending to the Cebu IEC as papal legate Cardinal Charles Maung Bo of Yangon, Myanmar. CBCP PHOTO FILE

Christian bastion in Asia

Christianity has grown in Asia since 1937, with Catholic majorities in East Timor and perhaps Macau, and increasing Catholic presence and influence in Singapore and South Korea (the latter was visited by Pope Francis even ahead of the Philippines in 2014), but the Philippines now as then, remains the bastion of Christianity in Asia.

Back in 1937, there were 15 dioceses or church provinces in the country—Manila (founded in 1578), Nueva Segovia, covering the Ilocos (1595), Nueva Caceres, covering Bicol (1595), Lipa, covering Southern Tagalog (1910), Tuguegarao, covering Cagayan Valley (1910), Lingayen (1928), Mountain Province (1932), and Mindoro (1936); as well as Cebu (1595), Jaro (1865), Calbayog (1910), Zamboanga (1910), Palawan (1910), Bacolod (1932), and Cagayan de Oro (1933).

Now the Philippine Church has 85 dioceses and one military ordinariate (chaplaincy for the armed forces).

Although Manila remains the premiere see in the country, the formation of new dioceses (Caloocan, Novaliches, Cubao, Pasig and Paranaque) from its old territory in the last decade means that the Archdiocese of Cebu is now the largest diocese in Asia, with more than 150 parishes ministering to more than 3 million Catholics over a territory of more than 5,000 square kilometers.

Although Cebu may be divided into newer dioceses like Manila in the future, its numerical superiority as a result of the Balkanization of Manila has restored its preeminence as “the cradle of Christianity in the Philippines, considering that the first Christians in the country were the Cebuanos baptized during the Magellan expedition in 1521.

READ: Cebu a ‘miracle venue’ for eucharistic confab

Church-state clashes

The 1937 IEC likewise provided a prelude to contentious relations between church and state in the Philippines.

Commonwealth President Manuel L. Quezon welcomed delegates to the Manila IEC, but he tangled with Archbishop O’Doherty over legalizing divorce and removing religion from public instruction.

Quezon was from Tayabas in Luzon, mainly under the ancient ecclesiastical province of the Archdiocese of Manila and studied under the Dominicans in Letran and the University of Santo Tomas. But he was a Mason and very ambitious.

In contrast, Commonwealth Vice-President Sergio Osmeña, Quezon’s classmate at UST, refused clashes with the Church.
Osmeña hailed from Cebu.

Then as now, clashes over sexual morality bedevil state-church relations.

When the Aquino administration and its allies in Congress passed the reproductive health bill in 2012, the opposition came from the CBCP led by Archbishop Jose S. Palma.

Palma later thanked Cebu congressmen for staunchly opposing the law.

Pius XI himself dealt with contentious church-state issues around the time when the IEC was being held in Manila in 1937.


Pope Pius XI --
Pope Pius XI died at 5:31 A.M. (Rome Time) of a third heart attack on 10 February 1939, at the age of 81. His last words to those near him at the time of his death were spoken with clarity and firmness: "My soul parts from you all in peace." Following a funeral he was buried in the crypt of St. Peter's Basilica on 14 February 1939, in the main chapel, close to the tomb of St. Peter. Pius XI will be remembered as the pope who reigned between the two great wars of the 20th century. WIKIPEDIA

Around that time, the Spanish civil war was raging. The war had broken out after the Republicans started killing Catholic clergy and religious in the early 1930’s. The nationalist Generalissimo Franco capitalized on the Christian persecutions, which killed thousands of nuns and clergy, to attack and defeat the Republicans.

Christians killed by the Republicans are considered martyrs and have since been beatified. Some of them had worked in the Philippines before, such as Blessed Buenaventura Garcia Paredes and Companion Martyrs, beatified by Pope Benedict XVI. They used to be students and teachers at UST and Letran.

Christian persecutions

Meanwhile, Pius XI also had to deal with the torching of churches in Mexico and the Christian persecutions in the Soviet Union.

Pius XI likewise signaled the Church’s growing involvement in social justice issues and her increasingly militant stand against liberal capitalism and Marxist socialism.

Pius XI issued the encyclical, Quadregesimo Anno, on the 40th anniversary of Pope Leo XIII’s milestone encyclical, Rerum Novarum, attacking capitalism and international finance and the abuse of workers’ rights.

He also condemned racism and Hitler.

Pius XI also issued the encyclical Studiorum Ducem in 1923 on the occasion of the sixth centenary of the canonization of Thomas Aquinas and upheld the teachings of the Dominican thinker as the official philosophy of the Church and the Angelicum in Rome as foremost promoter of the philosophy.

But as the Cebu congress gets underway, much has changed.

Instead of Thomism, there’s theological pluralism in the Church, as shown by discussions in the IEC Theological Symposium this week on “inculturation” or cultural adaptation of the Roman Rite of the Holy Mass, and more lenient, “more compassionate” treatment of remarried Catholics.

But it was also Pius XI who beatified popular saints such as Don Bosco and Therese of Lisieux, encouraged the Catholic Action movement and instituted the feast of Christ the King to promote more lay participation and democratization in the Church.

His legacy lives on as tens of thousands of Catholics are expected to join prelates, priests and religious in the 51st IEC in Cebu.

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RELATED FROM

POPE PAUL VI, the first Pope who visited the Philippines Published January 13, 2015 6:22pm By MARISSE PANALIGAN and JESSICA BARTOLOME, GMA News


Blessed Pope Paul VI shown with Rufino J. Cardinal Santos. Cardinal Santos was the 29th Archbishop of Manila and was the first Filipino to be elevated to the Cardinalate. November 27, 1970. (Photo from Filipinas Heritage Library)

GMA NEWS TV - Prior to Pope Francis' upcoming visit to the country on Thursday, only two pontiffs have ever set foot on Philippine soil — Pope Paul VI and Pope John Paul II.

As the first ever leader of the Roman Catholic Church to come to the Philippines, Pope Paul VI made history when he arrived in 1970 as part of a journey to the Far East and the Pacific.

Pope John Paul II, meanwhile, left his mark in the hearts of Filipinos after making two trips to the country: one in 1981 for the beatification of St. Lorenzo Ruiz and another in 1995 for World Youth Day.


Pope Paul VI with President Ferdinand E. Marcos on the balcony of the north wing of Malacañan Palace. Pope Paul VI was in the Philippines from November 27 to December 3, 1970 for a state visit, and was welcomed by President Ferdinand Marcos. In this photo from “Malacañan Palace: The Official Illustrated History,” the Pope is seen at the balcony of the north wing of Malacañang with the President. ABS-CBN FILE

Pope Paul VI had a busy itinerary during his brief stay in the capital — attending a reception at Malacañang Palace, celebrating mass at Quezon City Memorial Circle, ordaining priests at Rizal Park, speaking on air through Radio Veritas, meeting students of University of Santo Tomas, and visiting residents of Tondo.


Prior to Pope Francis' upcoming visit to the country in 2015, only two pontiffs have ever set foot on Philippine soil — Pope Paul VI and Pope John Paul II.

The Pope's trip was one of the top newsmakers in the country that year, occupying a significant amount of space on national dailies.

Aside from making headlines, his arrival inspired the publication of numerous editorials, columns, letters to the editor, advertisements, and paid welcome messages from the private sector on the pages of newspapers.

Some 11 years later, another Pope visited the country — Pope John Paul II, who was now canonized as a saint last April by Pope Francis.

Pope John Paul II was able to go to places outside the capital, including Baguio City, Legazpi City, Bacolod City, Iloilo, Bataan, Cebu, and Davao.

The pontiff's first order of business was the celebration of mass at Manila Cathedral, before a jam-packed schedule of activities in addition to visiting UST and the people of Tondo.

ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT ON POPE PAUL VI

On November 27, 1970, Pope Paul VI, the 'PILGRIM POPE' arrived in Manila as part of an Asian tour.


Pope Paul VI in Manila, 180 Bishops had convened for the first ever Pan-Aseatic Bishop’s Conference. They were shown at the Manila International Airport waiting for the arrival of Giovanni Battista Montini, Pope Paul VI. And, despite the Philippines 400 years of Spanish Catholic colonization, Montini was the first Pontiff ever to set foot on Philippine soil. INQUIRER FILE.

INQUIRER, MANILA -Pope Paul VI was being welcomed at the airport by Philippine officials, led by then President Ferdinand Marcos, when a man dressed in a black priest’s garb lunged at him with a knife.

Death to superstition!” he yelled, according to a UPI report of the incident. The attacker, a 35-year-old Bolivian expat painter named Benjamin Mendoza, was quickly subdued by other people who were with the Pope.

According to press reports, it was the Pope’s personal secretary Pasquale Macchi who pushed the assassin to the ground. An Italian video clip now posted on YouTube shows the attack at the airport, and the assailant being dragged away.


Giovanni Battista Montini (“Pope” Paul VI) was the single one figure in Church history most responsible for creating/shaping the apostate Vatican II Sect in Rome. Vatican II was his council. (he’s the only “Pope” who signed its documents) Pope Francis called this Pope 'BLESSED'. He was beatified on 19 October 2014, at Saint Peter's Square, Vatican City by Pope Francis after the recognition of a miracle had been attributed to his intercession. The next step would be the recognition of another miracle, which would result in his canonization. The second miracle required for his canonization was reported to have occurred in January 2015. It was also reported that investigation into the alleged miracle is underway in northern Italy where the healing was said to have occurred. According to the vice-postulator Antonio Lanzoni the canonization could be approved in the near future and allowing for canonization sometime in the spring of 2016.


PHOTO OF Pope Francis Beatification of an Earlier Reformer, Paul VI.  Bishops gathered at the Vatican for Sunday’s beatification of Pope Paul VI, who led the church through an era of change. VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis on Sunday beatified Pope Paul VI, who died in 1978 after shepherding the church through a period of internal reform amid an era of social and political change and growing challenges to the church’s traditional teachings. Pope Paul VI concluded the work of the historic Second Vatican Council that introduced significant reforms and changed how the church communicated with other faiths — as well as nonbelievers, the faithful and the modern world. Credit Andrew Medichini/Associated Press. FROM NY TIMES By ELISABETTA POVOLEDO, OCT. 19, 2014.

PHNO NOTES:
Three popes thus far have made pastoral visits to the Philippines. Pope Paul VI visited the Philippines in 1970 and made a speech in front of students at the University of Santo Tomas (UST) in Manila.

In 1981, Pope John Paul II also gave a speech at UST, and beatified the 17th century Manila native Lorenzo Ruiz a saint at Luneta Park, the first beatification made outside the Vatican. The pontiff later returned the Philippines in 1995 for the X World Youth Day.

In 2015, Pope Francis gave a speech at UST and visited Tacloban, the city that was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

The Philippines has hosted the 1937 International Eucharistic Congress in Manila and will do so again from 25 to 31 January 2016, which was moved from the original May date per request of the Vatican.

Archbishop of Cebu José S. Palma of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines suggested that the Vatican to make Pope Francis' visit a priority so they comply with the Vatican's request.

Pope Francis' schedule for May 2016 is full so he is unlikely to visit the Philippines if the original schedule for the Congress had pushed through. WIKIPEDIA.


PHILSTAR

Drilon to Noy: No more time to approve BBL By Marvin Sy (The Philippine Star) | Updated January 31, 2016 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


“I sent word to the President that this is going to be very difficult. This is a local bill that must originate from the House of Representatives. Now it appears that it won’t be approved in the House of Representatives because they are having difficulties with getting a quorum,” Drilon said over radio dwIZ. Philstar.com/File

MANILA, Philippines – With hardly any time left before the adjournment of Congress on Friday, it’s definitely a no go for the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL), Senate President Franklin Drilon yesterday reported having told President Aquino.

“I sent word to the President that this is going to be very difficult. This is a local bill that must originate from the House of Representatives. Now it appears that it won’t be approved in the House of Representatives because they are having difficulties with getting a quorum,” Drilon said over radio dwIZ.

If there was any hope in Malacañang that the BBL could still be approved between now and June 30, Drilon said his counterpart Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. had all but extinguished it with his own pronouncements that the BBL is dead in the 16th Congress. Session resumes on May 23.

At Malacañang, Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. has called on stakeholders to “keep the wheels of the peace process running” should the BBL fail to make it in Congress.

Drilon emphasized that the Senate, even if it wants to, cannot act on the BBL until it is approved by the House and transmitted to the upper chamber.

“The BBL cannot be transmitted to the Senate before we adjourn. So there is no more time,” he said.

But he stressed the BBL would continue to be on the top of the agenda of the Senate in its last three session days next week. This has been the case in the past few months but it has not pushed legislators to deliberate on the matter during session.

For weeks, Senate Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile has been interpellating the sponsor of the BBL, Senator Ferdinand Marcos Jr. in the plenary.

He is not even half way through his interpellation and there are still other senators who wish to say their piece about the bill.

Drilon said the reality is “the election campaign is already here” and so many of the candidates are already busy going around the country.

READ MORE...

For instance, Marcos and Majority Leader Alan Peter Cayetano are now busy campaigning and may not be in the position to finish the debates on the BBL.

“The President strived to get this passed but under the circumstances, the stars did not align themselves, as they say,” Drilon said.

“This is why I have been saying that the BBL was the 45th victim of the Mamasapano (clash) because if our attention was not diverted by the Mamasapano hearings, then we probably would have finished this earlier,” he added.


BBL

Mamasapano to blame

Isabela Rep. Rodolfo Albano III also said it was the Mamasapano carnage that doomed the BBL and not the President, who “really pushed hard for its approval.”

“The process of considering and approving the proposed Bangsamoro law was smooth sailing until the Mamasapano incident,” he said, as he reminded critics that Congress was not to blame either.

He stressed that the incident “made the political environment not conducive for passing the BBL bill.”

Albano added he was for approving the measure “because I wanted to give the envisioned new autonomous Bangsamoro regional government a chance to work for the benefit and welfare of the people of Mindanao.”

The proposed law was the product of peace negotiations between the government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF).

Investigations by the Philippine National Police fact-finding board and the Senate have blamed the MILF for the death of 44 elite police commandos in Mamasapano, Maguindanao on Jan. 25 last year. – Aurea Calica, Jess Diaz


PHILSTAR

Palace accepts BBL’s doom By Delon Porcalla (The Philippine Star) | Updated February 1, 2016 - 12:00am 1 1 googleplus0 0


President Aquino has ordered that special efforts be exerted to ensure the implementation of a peace agreement with Muslim rebels even after his term ends this year. File photo/Ernie Peñaredondo

MANILA, Philippines – With Malacañang accepting that the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) is doomed in Congress, President Aquino has directed Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Teresita Deles to consult with concerned parties on sustaining the peace initiative beyond his term.

Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr., in his regular weekend interview over state-run radio dzRB, yesterday said Deles was told to come up with an action plan for the next administration to consider.

The directive was to “firm up in consultation with stakeholders an action plan for promoting the peace process in the transition period during the remainder of the current administration’s term and up to the assumption of the next administration.”

President Aquino has ordered that special efforts be exerted to ensure the implementation of a peace agreement with Muslim rebels even after his term ends this year, Coloma said.

Congressional leaders have said they are unlikely to pass the BBL before the President’s term ends in June.

Aquino had hoped to sign the BBL to seal a peace accord with the largest Muslim rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF).

But opposition from some legislators had delayed its passage despite his lobbying.

Senate President Franklin Drilon himself has conceded that there is no more time to pass the measure, considering that there will only be three session days left starting today, for Congress to approve the BBL.


DELES

For her part, Deles said the peace panel headed by Miriam Coronel-Ferrer might still conduct consultations with the MILF, which they have dealt with for the past five years of the Aquino administration.

“Measures will include strengthening existing peace bodies and mechanisms to include the Bangsamoro Transition Commission, ceasefire and other joint security mechanisms, joint bodies for socioeconomic interventions,” she said.

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“We would want to operationalize the recommendations of the transitional justice and reconciliation commission regarding the healing of the wounds of war, and moving towards sharpened interfaith and multicultural dialogue and cooperation,” Deles added.

And more importantly, there has to be an “undertaking of necessary groundwork to ensure the success of the legal, political track in the next administration.”

“We need to do all that is possible to ensure the full implementation of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro beyond this administration,” Coloma explained, quoting from the text message of Deles.

Last week, Malacañang acknowledged the imminent doom of the BBL following the remaining three session days of Congress, saying the path to peace is not limited to the passage of the peace measure.

Coloma issued the statement after Drilon and Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. conceded that time is running out for Congress to pass the priority measure.

“We have three days left. Let’s see. I cannot be certain about that,” Drilon admitted.

The BBL needs to be ratified by Congress in order to be implemented as the governing law for the Bangsamoro region by replacing the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao that was created during the term of Aquino’s mother, the late Cory in the late ’80s and early ’90s.

The House of Representatives, for its part, has ended the period of debates and started the period of amendments.

But the long speeches of lawmakers against the measure have taken much time that the prospects of its passage in the chamber next week – where Congress will adjourn for the election campaign – are near impossible.

Even if it breezes through the House, it still has to hurdle the Senate, which has prepared a different, more constitutional version renamed the Basic Law for the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region.


INQUIRER

H 2nd-most dangerous country for journalists in past 25 years—IFJ @inquirerdotnet
Associated Press 05:24 PM January 31st, 2016


The massacre in Maguindanao where over 30 journalists were also killed in 2009 is testament to the danger media men and women face in the Philippines. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

BRUSSELS — The Philippines is the second most dangerous country for journalists in the past 25 years with 146 killings, the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) said.

In the last quarter century, Iraq has topped the list with 309 killings, the overwhelming majority of them since the 2003 US-led invasion and war. Mexico and its drugs-related violence is third with 120.

Philippines and Mexico also underscore the IFJ’s “recurring finding of our reports that there are many more killed in peacetime situations than in war-stricken countries.”

READ: PH among countries of special concern in campaign vs impunity

Over the past 25 years, at least 2,297 journalists and media staff have been killed for doing nothing more than trying to inform the world on war, revolution, crime and corruption. And killers continue to act with impunity, the IFJ announced in a new report.

The annual total stood at 40 in the federation’s first year of counting, 1990, but has not dipped under the 100-mark since 2010.

“The last ten years were the most dangerous,” said IFJ General Secretary Anthony Bellanger in an interview, with 2006 the worst year of all with 155 killed.

And despite vows of protection from as high as the United Nations, the IFJ said it produced the report “25 years of contribution towards safer journalism” to underscore a worsening climate of impunity which has helped killers get away with murder and turn journalists into soft targets.

READ MORE...

READ: PH under fire for unsolved killing of journalists

“The IFJ estimates that only one of ten killings is investigated,” the report said, with actual convictions lower still.

“That is the diplomatic issue. Let’s stop the impunity that protects the killers,” Bellanger said.

The 79-page report will be made public next week, but The Associated Press obtained a copy ahead of a debate Monday at the British Parliament on “deaths of professional and citizen journalists in conflict zones.” The IFJ will also take the report to a major Unesco meeting in Paris next Thursday devoted to the same issue.


FUNERAL PROTEST Journalists carry the coffin of slain tabloid reporter Ruby Garcia in this photo taken in April 2014. ILIGAN CITY — The Philippines is among the four countries throughout the world that is the focus of this year’s global campaign by freedom of expression advocates against impunity on the killing of journalists. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO AND NEWSBIT.

“We bring this report to show to all that it really is time to do something about it,” said Bellanger.

Last year stood out for the attacks on the Paris office of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, where two Islamic extremists killed 12 people at the satirical newspaper’s office. The IFJ’s total tally of the year stood at 112.

The IFJ says it bases its information on a variety of sources, including national affiliates in about 140 nations, police sources and political reports. It has published annual reports since 1990, focusing on the killings of journalists and media staff in work-related incidents. The totals center on deaths of media professionals in targeted assassinations, cross fire incidents and bomb attacks.

Beyond the sustained high totals, Bellanger said that there is also a disturbing trend in which kidnappers who seize journalists kill them, all too often without even seeking ransom.

The targeting of journalists has continued unabated this year too. Earlier this month, a suicide car bomb attack in the Afghan capital, Kabul, targeted a bus owned by Afghanistan’s biggest media organization, Moby Group and a Taliban spokesman claimed responsibility saying Moby’s Tolo TV was the target. Seven media workers were killed.

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